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Look up bed in Wiktionary, the free dictionary.
A bed with a chamber pot under it.
A bed with a chamber pot under it.

A bed (listen) is a piece of furniture or location primarily used as a place to sleep, though it is also regularly used to serve other functions as well, such as providing the primary place for sexual intercourse, and is often used for simple relaxation. A bed is a piece of furniture with a soft horizontal surface used primarily for sleeping. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Wiktionary (a portmanteau of wiki and dictionary) is a multilingual, Web-based project to create a free content dictionary, available in over 151 languages. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2048 × 1536 pixel, file size: 816 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2048 × 1536 pixel, file size: 816 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Stacked chamber pots A chamber pot (also a john, a chamberpot, a jordan, a po (from French pot de chambre) or simply a potty) consists of a bowl-shaped container with a handle kept in the bedroom under a bed or in the cabinet of a nightstand and used as... For the UK band, see Furniture (band). ... For other uses, see Sleep (disambiguation). ... It has been suggested that Duration of sexual intercourse be merged into this article or section. ... Look up relaxation in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


To make beds more comfortable, the top layer is frequently a mattress. Originally these were bags of straw for most people and filled with feathers for the wealthy.[citation needed] Eventually new fillings such as cotton and artificial fillers became common. In modern times most mattresses use springs, solid foam, latex, water, or air. As time passes more and more people are looking for a better sleep, spending a large percentage of our life in a bed it has become a more recent realisation for many to attribute health deteriorations to what they lay on. Water resiliant fibres (natural and synthetic), latex, synthetic foams and a combination of a huge range of different spring technologies all have their different benefits. A pillow top queen-size mattress. ... For other uses, see Feather (disambiguation). ... For the business meaning, see Wealth (economics). ... For other uses, see Cotton (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Spring. ... Sea foam on the beach Foam on a cappuccino Fire-retardant, foamed plastic being used as a temporary dam for firestop mortar in a cable penetration in a pulp and paper mill on Vancouver Island, British Columbia, Canada. ...


The second layer is the box spring Inner-sprung Base. The box spring or "divan" is a large mattress-sized box containing wood and springs that provide additional support and suspension for the mattress. Adding this feature to the mattress it has been calculated that it improves the overall life of the unit by 68%. A box-spring is a hard sturdy wooden frame, covered in cloth, containing springs or some other form of torsion. ...


The third layer is the bed frame. The bed frame lifts the mattress/mattress-box spring off the ground. A bed frame or bedstead is the part of a bed used to position a mattress or box spring set off from the ground. ...


A dust ruffle, bed skirt, or valance sheet may be used to make the bed frame match the rest of the bedding.


For greater head support, most people use a pillow, placed at the top of a mattress. Also used is some form of covering blanket to provide warmth to the sleeper, often bed sheets, a quilt, or a duvet. This article is about the cushion. ... For other uses, see Blanket (disambiguation). ... A bed sheet is a large piece of cotton or linen cloth used to cover a mattress. ... A quilt is a type of puppy with long fluffy ears. ... A double duvet. ...


Also, some people prefer to dispense with the box spring and bed frame, and replace it with a platform bed style. This is more common in the European region.

Contents

History

The Ancient World

Early beds were little more than piles of straw or some other natural materials. An important change was raising them off the ground, to avoid drafts, dirt, and pests. Bales of straw bundles of rice straw Pile of straw bales, sheltered under a tarpaulin Straw is an agricultural byproduct, the dry stalk of a cereal plant, after the nutrient grain or seed has been removed. ...


The Egyptians had high bedsteads which were ascended by steps, with bolsters or pillows, and curtains to hang round. Often there was a head-rest as well, semi-cylindrical and made of stone, wood or metal. Assyrians, Medes and Persians had beds of a similar kind, and frequently decorated their furniture with inlays or appliqués of metal, mother-of-pearl and ivory. Pillows redirects here; for information on the Japanese band, see the pillows. ... A curtain is a piece of cloth intended to block or obscure light. ... Look up stone in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... For other uses, see Wood (disambiguation). ... This article is about metallic materials. ... It has been suggested that Assyrian people be merged into this article or section. ... Median Empire, ca. ... The Persians of Iran (officially named Persia by West until 1935 while still referred to as Persia by some) are an Iranian people who speak Persian (locally named Fârsi by native speakers) and often refer to themselves as ethnic Iranians as well. ... A piece of nacre Nacre, also known as mother of pearl, is an organic mixture of calcium carbonate (CaCO3) in the form of platy crystals of aragonite and conchiolin (a scleroprotein). ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


The oldest account of a bed is probably that of Odysseus: a charpoy[1] woven of rope, plays a role in the Odyssey. A similar bed can be seen at the St Fagans National History Museum in Wales. Homer also mentions the inlaying of the woodwork of beds with gold, silver and ivory. For other uses, see Odysseus (disambiguation). ... This article is about Homers epic poem. ... The Manor House of St Fagans castle. ... This article is about the country. ... This article is about the Greek poet Homer and the works attributed to him. ... GOLD refers to one of the following: GOLD (IEEE) is an IEEE program designed to garner more student members at the university level (Graduates of the Last Decade). ... This article is about the chemical element. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


The Greek bed had a wooden frame, with a board at the head and bands of hide laced across, upon which skins were placed. At a later period the bedstead was often veneered with expensive woods; sometimes it was of solid ivory veneered with tortoise-shell and with silver feet; often it was of bronze. The pillows and coverings also became more costly and beautiful; the most celebrated places for their manufacture were Miletus, Corinth and Carthage. Folding beds, too, appear in the vase paintings. A veneer is a thin covering over something. ... Tortoiseshell can refer to: a Tortoiseshell cat a pattern used in clothing and jewellery the Small Tortoiseshell, a butterfly the Hawksbill turtle Tortoiseshell, a song by The Boo Radleys which appeared on their EP Every Heaven This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists pages that might otherwise... This article is about the chemical element. ... This article is about the metal alloy. ... The lower half of the benches and the remnants of the scene building of the theater of Miletus (August 2005) Miletus (Carian: Anactoria Hittite: Milawata or Millawanda, Greek: Μίλητος transliterated Miletos, Turkish: Milet) was an ancient city on the western coast of Anatolia (in what is now Aydin Province, Turkey), near... Corinth, or Korinth (Greek: Κόρινθος, Kórinthos; see also List of traditional Greek place names) is a Greek city-state, on the Isthmus of Corinth, the narrow stretch of land that joins the Peloponnesus to the mainland of Greece. ... For other uses, see Carthage (disambiguation). ...


The Roman mattresses were stuffed with reeds, hay, wool or feathers; the last was used towards the end of the Republic, when custom demanded luxury. Small cushions were placed at the head and sometimes at the back. The bedsteads were high and could only be ascended by the help of steps. They were often arranged for two persons, and had a board or railing at the back as well as the raised portion at the head. The counterpanes were sometimes very costly, generally purple embroidered with figures in gold; and rich hangings fell to the ground masking the front. The bedsteads themselves were often of bronze inlaid with silver, and Elagabalus had one of solid silver. In the walls of some of the houses at Pompeii bed niches are found which were probably closed by curtains or sliding partitions. Ancient Romans had various kinds of beds for repose. These included: Ancient Rome was a civilization that grew from a small agricultural community founded on the Italian Peninsula circa the 9th century BC to a massive empire straddling the Mediterranean Sea. ... A mattress is a piece of bedding on which to sleep or lie. ... Reed can refer to: People Alfred Reed, American composer Andre Reed, American football player for the Buffalo Bills Carol Reed, British film director David P. Reed, telecommunications expert, creator of Reeds law Davin Reed, American botanist Donna Reed, American actress Edward James Reed, Victorian era naval architect Evelyn Reed... For other uses, see Hay (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Wool (disambiguation). ... Closeup on a single white feather A feather is one of the epidermal growths that forms the distinctive outer covering, or plumage, on a bird. ... This article is about the state which existed from the 6th century BC to the 1st century BC. For the state which existed in the 18th century, see Roman Republic (18th century). ... Murex brandaris, also known as the Spiny dye-murex The chemical structure of 6,6′-dibromoindigo, the main component of Tyrian Purple A space-filling model of 6,6′-dibromoindigo Tyrian purple (Greek: , porphyra, Latin: purpura), also known as royal purple or imperial purple, is a purple-red dye used... GOLD refers to one of the following: GOLD (IEEE) is an IEEE program designed to garner more student members at the university level (Graduates of the Last Decade). ... Elagabalus Elagabalus (c. ... For other uses, see Pompeii (disambiguation). ... History - Ancient history - Ancient Rome This is a List of Ancient Rome-related topics, that aims to include aspects of both the Ancient Roman Republic and Roman Empire. ...

  • lectus cubicularis, or chamber bed, for normal sleeping;
  • lectus genialis, the marriage bed, it was much decorated, and was placed in the atrium opposite the door.
  • lectus discubitorius, or table bed, on which they ate—for they ate while lying on their left side—there being usually three people to one bed, with the middle place accounted the most honorable position;
  • lectus lucubratorius, for studying;
  • and a lectus funebris, or emortualis, on which the dead were carried to the pyre.[2]

In Anatomy, atrium refers to a structure of the heart. ... This article is about the architectural feature. ... An Ubud cremation ceremony in 2005. ...

Medieval Europe

The ancient Germans lay on the floor on beds of leaves covered with skins, or in a kind of shallow chest filled with leaves and moss. In the early middle ages they laid carpets on the floor or on a bench against the wall, placed upon them mattresses stuffed with feathers, wool or hair, and used skins as a covering. They appear to have generally lain naked in bed, wrapping themselves in the large linen sheets which were stretched over the cushions. In the 13th century luxury increased, and bedsteads were made of wood much decorated with inlaid, carved and painted ornament. They also used folding beds, which served as couches by day and had cushions covered with silk laid upon leather. At night a linen sheet was spread and pillows placed, while silk-covered skins served as coverlets. Curtains were hung from the ceiling or from an iron arm projecting from the wall. The Carolingian manuscripts show metal bedsteads much higher at the head than at the feet, and this shape continued in use until the 13th century in France, many cushions being added to raise the body to a sloping position. In the 12th-century manuscripts the bedsteads appear much richer, with inlays, carving and painting, and with embroidered coverlets and mattresses in harmony. Curtains were hung above the bed, and a small hanging lamp is often shown. In the 14th century the woodwork became of less importance, being generally entirely covered by hangings of rich materials. Silk, velvet and even cloth of gold were much used. Inventories from the beginning of the 14th century give details of these hangings lined with fur and richly embroidered. Then it was that the tester bed made its first appearance, the tester being slung from the ceiling or fastened to the walls, a form which developed later into a room within a room, shut in by double curtains, sometimes even so as to exclude all drafts. The space between bed and wall was called the ruelle, and very intimate friends were received there. Look up foliage in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... This article is about the organ. ... A chest is one of the oldest forms of furniture. ... For other uses, see Moss (disambiguation). ... The Middle Ages formed the middle period in a traditional schematic division of European history into three ages: the classical civilization of Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and modern times, beginning with the Renaissance. ... Carpet is a general term given to any loom-woven or felted textile and to grass floor coverings. ... Look up bench in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Closeup on a single white feather A feather is one of the epidermal growths that forms the distinctive outer covering, or plumage, on a bird. ... For other uses, see Wool (disambiguation). ... This article is about the body feature. ... Look up Naked in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Torn linen cloth, recovered from the Dead Sea Linen is a material made from the fibers of the flax plant. ... (12th century - 13th century - 14th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 13th century was that century which lasted from 1201 to 1300. ... For other uses, see Leather (disambiguation). ... General Name, symbol, number iron, Fe, 26 Chemical series transition metals Group, period, block 8, 4, d Appearance lustrous metallic with a grayish tinge Standard atomic weight 55. ... Also see: France in the Middle Ages. ... A manuscript (Latin manu scriptus written by hand), strictly speaking, is any written document that is put down by hand, in contrast to being printed or reproduced some other way. ... (12th century - 13th century - 14th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 13th century was that century which lasted from 1201 to 1300. ... link title Media:Example. ... Antique bronze oil lamp with Christian symbol (replica) A terra-cotta oil lamp, Antique oil lamp (replica) An oil lamp is a simple vessel used to produce light continuously for a period of time from a fuel source. ... This 14th-century statue from south India depicts the gods Shiva (on the left) and Uma (on the right). ... For other uses of this word, see Silk (disambiguation). ... Swatch of black cotton velvet decorator fabric used for drapery Velvet is a type of tufted fabric in which the cut threads are very evenly distributed, with a short dense pile, giving it its distinct feel. ... GOLD refers to one of the following: GOLD (IEEE) is an IEEE program designed to garner more student members at the university level (Graduates of the Last Decade). ... For other uses, see Fur (disambiguation). ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ...


In the 15th century beds became very large, reaching to 7 or 8 feet by 6 or 7 feet. The mattresses were often filled with pea-shucks, straw or feathers. At this time great personages were in the habit of carrying most of their property about with them, including beds and bed-hangings, and for this reason the bedsteads were for the most part mere frameworks to be covered up; but about the beginning of the 16th century bedsteads were made lighter and more decorative, since the lords remained in the same place for longer periods. (14th century - 15th century - 16th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 15th century was that century which lasted from 1401 to 1500. ... A foot (plural: feet or foot;[1] symbol or abbreviation: ft or, sometimes, ′ – a prime) is a unit of length, in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... (15th century - 16th century - 17th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 16th century was that century which lasted from 1501 to 1600. ...


Renaissance and Modern Europe

In the 17th century, which has been called "the century of magnificent beds," the style a la duchesse, with tester and curtains only at the head, replaced the more enclosed beds in France, though they lasted much longer in England. Louis XIV had an enormous number of sumptuous beds, as many as 413 being described in the inventories of his palaces. Some of them had embroideries enriched with pearls, and figures on a silver or golden ground. The great bed at Versailles had crimson velvet curtains on which "The Triumph of Venus" was embroidered. So much gold was used that the velvet scarcely showed. (16th century - 17th century - 18th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 17th century was that century which lasted from 1601-1700. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... Louis XIV King of France and Navarre By Hyacinthe Rigaud (1701) Louis XIV (Louis-Dieudonné) (September 5, 1638–September 1, 1715) reigned as King of France and King of Navarre from May 14, 1643 until his death. ... For other things called pearl, see pearl (disambiguation). ... This article is about the city of Versailles. ... Swatch of black cotton velvet decorator fabric used for drapery Velvet is a type of tufted fabric in which the cut threads are very evenly distributed, with a short dense pile, giving it its distinct feel. ...


In the 18th century feather pillows were first used as coverings in Germany, which in the fashions of the bed and the curious etiquette connected with the bedchamber followed France for the most part. The beds were a la duchesse, but in France itself there was great variety both of name and shape. The custom of the "bed of justice" upon which the king of France reclined when he was present in parliament, the princes being seated, the great officials standing, and the lesser officials kneeling, was held to denote the royal power even more than the throne. Louis XI is credited with its first use, and the custom lasted till the end of the monarchy. In the chambre de parade, where the ceremonial bed was placed, certain persons, such as ambassadors or great lords, whom it was desired to honour, were received in a more intimate fashion than the crowd of courtiers. At Versailles women received their friends in their beds, both before and after childbirth, during periods of mourning, and even directly after marriage - in fact in any circumstances which were thought deserving of congratulation or condolence. During the 17th century this curious custom became general, perhaps to avoid the tiresome details of etiquette. Portable beds were used in high society in France till the end of the ancien regime. The earliest of which mention has been found belonged to Charles the Bold. They had curtains over a light framework, and were in their way as fine as the stationary beds. (17th century - 18th century - 19th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 18th century refers to the century that lasted from 1701 through 1800. ... Kings ruled in France from the Middle Ages to 1848. ... The House of Representatives Chamber of the Parliament of Australia in Canberra. ... For other meanings, see Prince (disambiguation). ... The thrones for The Queen of Canada, and the Duke of Edinburgh (back) in the Canadian Senate, Ottawa are usually occupied by the Governor General and his/her spouse at the annual State Opening of Parliament. ... Louis XI Louis XI the Prudent (French: Louis XI le Prudent) (July 3, 1423 - August 30, 1483), also informally nicknamed luniverselle aragne (old French for universal spider), was a King of France (1461 - 1483). ... Kings ruled in France from the Middle Ages to 1848. ... For other uses, see Ambassador (disambiguation). ... The Media Centre at Lords Cricket Ground Lords Cricket Ground is a cricket ground in St Johns Wood in London. ... Courtiers follow an ancient profession. ... The Palace of Versailles, or simply Versailles, is a royal château in Versailles, France. ... Parturition redirects here. ... Margaret of Spain, Empress of Austria, in Mourning, 1666; note the children and servants in mourning dress behind her. ... Matrimony redirects here. ... (16th century - 17th century - 18th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 17th century was that century which lasted from 1601-1700. ... Ancien R gime means Old Regime or Old Order in French; in English, the term refers primarily to the social and political system established in France under the Valois and Bourbon dynasties, and secondarily to any regime which shares the formers defining features: a feudal system under the control... Charles the Bold Charles, called the Bold (French: Charles le Téméraire) (November 10, 1433 – 1477) was Duke of Burgundy from 1467 to 1477. ...


Iron beds appear in the 18th century; the advertisements recommend them as free from the insects which sometimes infested wooden bedsteads. Elsewhere, there was also the closed bed with sliding or folding shutters, and in England - where beds were commonly quite simple in form - the four poster was the usual citizen's bed until the middle of the 19th century. (17th century - 18th century - 19th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 18th century refers to the century that lasted from 1701 through 1800. ... Generally speaking, advertising is the paid promotion of goods, services, companies and ideas by an identified sponsor. ... Orders Subclass Apterygota Symphypleona - globular springtails Subclass Archaeognatha (jumping bristletails) Subclass Dicondylia Monura - extinct Thysanura (common bristletails) Subclass Pterygota Diaphanopteroidea - extinct Palaeodictyoptera - extinct Megasecoptera - extinct Archodonata - extinct Ephemeroptera (mayflies) Odonata (dragonflies and damselflies) Infraclass Neoptera Blattodea (cockroaches) Mantodea (mantids) Isoptera (termites) Zoraptera Grylloblattodea Dermaptera (earwigs) Plecoptera (stoneflies) Orthoptera (grasshoppers, crickets... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... A four poster bed is a bed with four posts which support a tester. ... Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Uses of Beds

People generally use beds as sleep areas, though they can also be used to store things and for sexual intercourse. For other uses, see Sleep (disambiguation). ... It has been suggested that Duration of sexual intercourse be merged into this article or section. ...


Bed sizes

Beds come in a wide array of shapes and sizes. Most countries have a standard set of four sizes of mattresses. While the Double size appears to be standard among English speaking countries, based on the imperial measurement of 4 ftin by 6 ft 3 in, the sizes for other bed types tend to vary. The European sizes differ; they are based on the metric system. The Imperial units are an irregularly standardized system of units that have been used in the United Kingdom and its former colonies, including the Commonwealth countries. ... For other uses, see Foot (disambiguation). ... An inch (plural: inches; symbol or abbreviation: in or, sometimes, ″ - a double prime) is the name of a unit of length in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... The International System of Units (symbol: SI) (for the French phrase Syst me International dUnit s) is the most widely used system of units. ...


A king-sized bed differs from the other sizes in implementation, as it is not common to have a king-sized box spring; rather, two smaller box-springs are used under a king-sized mattress. On a U.S. Standard or "Eastern" King, the box springs are identical in size to a Twin Extra-Long.


Standard sizes

Modern manufacturing conventions have resulted in a limited number of standard sizes of commercial bedding for mattresses and box springs. They vary by country of origin.

Mattress size (width × length)
U.S.[3] Australia[4] UK[5] Europe
Twin / Single 39 × 75 in
97 × 191 cm
36 × 75 in
91 × 191 cm
35 × 79 in
90 × 200 cm
Double / Full 54 × 75 in
137 × 191 cm
55 × 79 in
140 × 200 cm
Queen
(UK King)
60 × 80 in
152 × 203 cm
60 × 78 in
152 × 198 cm
63 × 79 in
160 × 200 cm
King
(UK Super King)
76 × 80 in
193 × 203 cm
72 × 80 in
183 × 203 cm
72 × 78 in
183 × 198 cm
71 × 79 in
180 × 200 cm

The sizes in the UK, other than the Double, vary compared to the U.S. sizes, being generally smaller. The U.S. Queen corresponds to UK King and King to Super King. The European or continental basic sizes are similar to the UK but have a set length of 2 metres. The denominations Queen, King and Super King are not used in continental Europe, and Double refers to 140cm or any higher width. Instead of these US/UK denominations, the bed width is given in centimeters. An inch (plural: inches; symbol or abbreviation: in or, sometimes, ″ - a double prime) is the name of a unit of length in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... A centimetre (American spelling centimeter, symbol cm) is a unit of length that is equal to one hundredth of a metre, the current SI base unit of length. ...


These dimensions are for the mattress—the actual bed frame will be a little bigger in order to fully encompass and support the mattress. The thickness of the mattress may vary considerably.


Historically[who?], Single referred to a bed size that was half the width of a Double, that is, approximately the width of one pillow. In Western nations, such beds have become quite rare, with a Twin bed becoming the standard for one-person sleeping.[citation needed] Without another common use for the term Single and with the term Double being widely used, Single has come to be another term for a twin bed in these places. This article is about the cushion. ...


Portable camp beds are generally the size of original single beds.[citation needed] A camp bed, or cot, is a small portable, lightweight bed used in times where larger permanent beds cannot be used. ...


Other U.S. sizes

Twin Extra Long 
38 × 80 in (0.99 × 2.03 m)
This size is fairly popular in college dormitories.
Three Quarter 
48 × 75 in (1.22 × 1.90 m) often (47-48) X 72 in. sizing varies.
This size is considered obsolete by the major manufacturers.
Super Single 
48 × 84 in (1.22 × 2.13 m)
Full Extra Long 
54 x 80 in
Olympic Queen 
66 × 80 in (1.68 × 2.03 m) a novelty size by Simmons
California Queen 
60 × 84 in (1.52 × 2.13 m)
Eastern King 
76 x 80 in (1.93 x 2.03 m)
An alternate name for a U.S. King.
California King 
72 × 84 in (1.83 × 2.13 m)
A common size on the West Coast of the United States, also called a Western King, West Coast King, Cal King, or WC King.
Long King 
72 x 104 in (1.83 m × 2.64m)[citation needed]

An inch (plural: inches; symbol or abbreviation: in or, sometimes, ″ - a double prime) is the name of a unit of length in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... This article is about the unit of length. ... A typical American college dorm room A dormitory or dorm is a place to sleep. ... Regional definitions vary from source to source. ...

Other UK sizes

Small Single 
30 × 75 in (0.76 × 1.91 m)
Super Single 
42 × 75 in (1.07 × 1.91 m)
Small Double / Three Quarter 
48 × 75 in (1.22 × 1.91 m)

Other European sizes

Modern continental Europe practice is to refer to a bed by explicit width or size ("80 cm bed" or "80x200 cm bed").[citation needed] Other sizes found include:

Extra Small Single 
0.75 × 2 m (30 × 79 in)
Small Single 
0.8 × 2 m (31 × 79 in)
Large Single 
1 × 2 m (39 × 79 in)

In France, the length of older beds is sometimes 1.9 m instead of 2 m.[citation needed]


Most mattress sizes in the Netherlands are also available in extra long. Meaning 2.2 m instead of 2.0 m.


Other Australian sizes

Single Extra Long 
0.92 x 2.03 m (36 in by 80 in)
King Single 
1.06 × 2.03 m (41 × 80 in)

Other New Zealand sizes

The following bed sizes are available in New Zealand:[6]

Long Single 
0.90 × 2.03 m (35 × 80 in)
King Single 
1.05 × 2.03 m (41 × 80 in)
Long Double 
1.35 × 2.03 m (53 × 80 in)
King 
1.65 × 2.03 m (65 × 80 in)
Super King 
1.80 × 2.03 m (71 × 80 in)
Californian King 
2.00 × 2.03 m (79 × 80 in)

Types of beds

See also: :Category:Beds

There are many varieties of beds:

  • An adjustable bed is a bed that can be adjusted to a number of different positions
  • An air bed uses an air-inflated mattress, sometimes connected to an electric air pump and having firmness controls.
  • A bassinet is a bed specifically for newborn infants.
  • A box-bed is a bed having the form of a large box with wooden roof, sides, and ends, opening in front with two sliding panels or shutters; often used in cottages in Scotland: sometimes also applied to a bed arranged so as to fold up into a box.
  • A brass bed, constructed from brass or brass-plated metal.
  • A bunk is a bed used in a confined space.
  • A bunk bed is two or more beds one atop the other. (See also: loft bed.)
  • A captain's bed (also known as a chest bed or cabin bed) is a platform bed with drawers and storage compartments built in underneath.
  • An infant's bed (also crib or cot) is a small bed specifically for babies and infants.
  • A camp bed (also cot) is a simple, temporary, portable bed used by armies and large organizations in times of crisis.
  • A canopy bed is similar to a four poster bed, but the posts usually extend higher and are adorned or draped with cloth, sometimes completely enclosing the bed.
  • A daybed is a couch that is used as a seat by day and as a bed by night.
  • A futon is a traditional style of Japanese bed that is also available in a larger Western style.
  • A four poster bed is a bed with four posts, one in each corner, that support a tester.
  • A hammock is a piece of suspended fabric.
  • A hideaway bed, invented by Sarah E. Goode in response to the needs of apartment-dwellers, folds up into another piece of furniture, such as a shelf or desk, when not in use.
  • A hospital bed is specifically designed to facilitate convalescence, traditionally in a hospital or nursing facility, but increasingly in other settings, such as a private residence. Modern hospital beds commonly have wheels to assist in moderate relocation, but they are larger and generally more permanently placed than a gurney. The hospital bed is also a common unit of measurement for the capacity of any type of inpatient medical facility, though it is just as common to shorten the term to bed in that usage.
  • An iron bed, developed in the 1850s, is constructed of iron and steel.
  • A Manjaa is a traditional Punjabi bed made of tied ropes bordered by a wooden frame.
  • A Murphy bed or wallbed is a bed that can hinge into a wall or cabinet to save space.
  • A pallet is a thin, lightweight mattress.
  • A platform bed is a mattress resting on a solid, flat raised surface, either free-standing or part of the structure of the room.
  • A roll-away bed (or cot) is a bed whose frame folds in half and rolls in order to be more easily stored and moved.
  • A rope bed is a pre-modern bed whose wooden frame includes crossing rope to support the typically down-filled single mattress.
  • A sofabed is a bed that is stored inside a sofa.
  • A state bed developed in Early Modern Europe from a hieratic canopy of state.
  • A trundle bed or truckle bed is a bed usually stored beneath a twin bed.
  • A vibrating bed is typically a coin-operated novelty found in a vintage motel. For a fee, the mattress vibrates for a duration of time.
  • A waterbed is a bed/mattress combination where the mattress is filled with water.

An air mattress is an inflatable mattress, usually made of plastic or textile-reinforced plastic or rubber. ... Modern reproduction of a medieval cot and rattle, c. ... Brass beds are beds in which the headboard and footboard are made of brass; the frame rails are usually made of steel. ... Bunk in the ship Seawahanka A bunk is a bed or other place for sleeping, particularly a narrow bed built like a shelf into or against a wall, as in a ships cabin, or several like beds stacked over one another known as a bunkbed. ... A Bunkbed A bunk bed is a type of bed in which one bed is stacked on top of another. ... A loft bed is similar to a bunk bed in that it usually has one bed stacked on top of another, although this is not always the case. ... A baby lying on an elevated mattress in an infant bed An infant bed is a small bed (commonly referred to as a cot in British English and a crib in American English) specifically for infants. ... The term baby can refer to: an infant a very early computer—the Small-Scale Experimental Machine, nicknamed Baby a musician – Brian Williams – who performs under the name Baby. ... “Baby” redirects here. ... A camp bed, or cot, is a small portable, lightweight bed used in times where larger permanent beds cannot be used. ... A canopy bed is a decorative bed somewhat similar to a four poster bed. ... A four poster bed is a bed with four posts which support a tester. ... Daybeds are used as beds as well as seating areas. ... For other uses, see Couch (disambiguation). ... A futon in Japan A futon in the U.S. A futon )   is a type of mattress that makes up a Japanese bed. ... A four poster bed is a bed with four posts which support a tester. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... Garden hammock A couple in a hammock on the beach The hammock is a fabric sling used for sleeping or resting. ... Sarah E. Goode (b. ... Categories: Move to Wiktionary | Stub ... For the town in the Republic of Ireland, see Hospital, County Limerick. ... Rest home for seniors in ÄŒeský Těšín, Czech Republic SNF redirects here. ... Medical personnel using a stretcher-type gurney. ... Iron beds are beds in which the headboard and footboard are made of iron; the frame rails are usually made of steel. ... The Manjaa is a traditional Punjabi bed. ... This article is about the geographical region. ... A Murphy Bed or Wallbed is a bed that flips up at the head end for storage inside a closet. ... Platform beds are beds whose base consists of a raised, flat, hard, horizontal surface meant to support a mattress. ... Sofas come in a variety of colors, patterns, and materials (two-seater model) Ancient Greek sofa A couch, also known as a sofa, settee, lounge or chesterfield is an item of furniture for the comfortable seating of more than one person. ... Sofa may refer to: A piece of furniture also called a couch or Davenport. ... The Grand Master of the Knights Hospitaller at Rhodes under a canopy of estate, on a dais: there is a cushion under his feet Margaret Beaufort, Queen Mother, at prayer, by an anonymous artist, about 1500 Engraving of the Gnadenaltar in the Vierzehnheiligen Basilica, Bad Staffelstein, Bavaria. ... The Grand Master of the Knights Hospitaller at Rhodes under a canopy of estate, on a dais: there is a cushion under his feet Margaret Beaufort, Queen Mother, at prayer, by an anonymous artist, about 1500 Engraving of the Gnadenaltar in the Vierzehnheiligen Basilica, Bad Staffelstein, Bavaria. ... Trundle beds are usually considered a pair of beds, one slightly smaller than a twin bed that is on rollers or casters so that it may be put beneath the upper twin bed for storage. ... A waterbed or water mattress is a bed or mattress filled with water. ...

Bed frames

Bed frames, also called bed steads, are made of wood or metal. The frame is made up of head, foot, and side rails. For heavy duty or larger frames (such as for queen- and king-sized beds), the bed frame also includes a center support rail. These rails are assembled to create a box for the mattress or mattress/box spring to sit on.


Types of bed frames include:

  • platform - typically used without a box spring
  • captain - has drawers beneath the frame to make use of the space between the floor and the bed frame
  • waterbed - a heavy-duty frame built specifically to support the weight of the water in the mattress

Though not truly parts of a bed frame, many people[who?] include headboards, footboards, and bed rails in their definition of bed frames. Headboards and footboards can be wood or metal. They can be stained, painted, or covered in fabric or leather.


Bed rails are made of wood or metal and are attached to a headboard and footboard. Wooden slats are placed perpendicular to the bed rails to support the mattress/mattress box spring.


Bed rails and frames are often attached to the bed post using knock-down fittings.[7] [8] A knock-down fitting enables the bed to be easily dismantled for removal. Primary knock-down fittings for bed rails are as follows:

  • Pin-and-hook fastener. A mortise or slot is cut vertically in the bedpost. Pins are inserted horizontally in the bed post so that the pins perpendicularly intersect the mortise. For example, if one looked in the mortise, one might see part of one horizontal pin at the bottom of the mortise and a part of a second pin toward the top of the mortise. Hooks are installed at the end of the rail. Usually these hooks are part of a plate that is attached to the rail. The hooks then are inserted into the bed post mortise and hook over the pins.
  • Plate-and-hook fastener. Instead of pins inserted horizontally into the bedpost, an eye plate (post plate) is installed on the bedpost. The hooks are installed on the rail, either as surface mount or recessed. Depending on the hardware, the bedpost may require a mortise in order to allow the hooks to fasten to the plate. This is also referred to as a keyhole fastener, especially if the connector is more of a "plug" than a "hook".
  • Bed bolts ("through-bolts") are a different means of knock-down connection. A hole is typically drilled through the bedpost. The bolt head is inset and covered with a plug. In the rail, a dowel nut or other type of nut receives the bolt.

Simple and strong, the mortise and tenon joint (also called the mortice and tenon) has been used for centuries by woodworkers around the world to join two pieces of wood, most often at an angle close to 90°. Although there are many variations on the theme, the basic idea is...

References

  1. ^ http://www.imagesofafghanistan.com/images/AsleeponaCharpoy.jpg
  2. ^ This article incorporates content from the 1728 Cyclopaedia, a publication in the public domain. http://digicoll.library.wisc.edu/cgi-bin/HistSciTech/HistSciTech-idx?type=turn&entity=HistSciTech000900240244&isize=L
  3. ^ Mattress Size :: USA & Canada
  4. ^ St. Albans Textiles - Mohair Blankets
  5. ^ Welcome to Myer's Beds
  6. ^ Better Beds Better Sleep - Sleepyhead New Zealand
  7. ^ "Historical Guide: Bed Hardware", Whitechapel, Ltd
  8. ^ "Bed Rail Fastener Options"

http://www.bed-adjustable.co.uk/build-a-bed.html Build a Bed Table of Trigonometry, 1728 Cyclopaedia Cyclopaedia, or, A Universal Dictionary of Arts and Sciences (folio, 2 vols. ... The public domain comprises the body of all creative works and other knowledge—writing, artwork, music, science, inventions, and others—in which no person or organization has any proprietary interest. ...


See also

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Beds
Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Mattresses

A pillow top queen-size mattress. ... A bed sheet is a large piece of cotton or linen cloth used to cover a mattress. ... For other uses, see Sleep (disambiguation). ... Co-sleeping, also called the family bed, is a practice in which babies and young children sleep with one or both parents. ... Look up relaxation in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...

External links

For other uses, see Sleep (disambiguation). ... Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep is the normal stage of sleep characterized by rapid movements of the eyes. ... The sleep stages 1 through 4 are collectively referred to as NREM (non-rapid eye movement) sleep. ... Polysomnogram demonstrating SWS. High amplitude EEG is highlighted in red. ... Beta waves Beta wave, or beta rhythm, is the term used to designate the frequency range of brain activity above 12 Hz (12 transitions or cycles per second). ... A delta wave is a large, slow brain wave associated with deep sleep. ... Gamma waves A gamma wave is a pattern of brain waves, associated with perception and consciousness. ... In humans, a theta wave is an electroencephalogram pattern normally produced while awake but relaxed or drowsy. ... Advanced sleep phase syndrome (ASPS) is a sleep disorder in which patients feel very sleepy early in the evening (e. ... Automatism, from the Greek automatismos or self action, is the spontaneous production of often purposeless verbal or motor behavior without conscious self-control, self-conceptualization or self-censorship. ... Circadian rhythm sleep disorders are a family of sleep disorders affecting the timing of sleep. ... Delayed sleep-phase syndrome (DSPS) is a chronic disorder of sleep timing. ... Dyssomnias are a broad classification of sleeping disorder that make it difficult to get to sleep, or to stay sleeping. ... Hypersomnia, also known as excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS), is excessive amount of sleepiness. ... Hypersomnia, also known as excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS), is excessive amount of sleepiness. ... This article is about the sleeping disorder. ... For other uses, see Narcolepsy (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Night Terror. ... Nocturia is the need to get up during the night in order to urinate, thus interrupting sleep. ... Periodic Limb Movement Disorder (PLMD), also called nocturnal myoclonus, is a sleep disorder where the patient moves involuntarily during sleep. ... Non 24-hour sleep phase syndrome, also termed non 24-hour circadian rhythm disorder or hypernychthemeral syndrome, is a sleep disorder in which a persons internal clock runs longer than 24 hours. ... Ondines Curse, also called congenital central hypoventilation syndrome (CCHS) or primary alveolar hypoventilation, is a respiratory disorder that is fatal if untreated. ... A parasomnia is any sleep disorder such as sleepwalking, sleep sex, teeth grinding, night terrors, rhythmic movement disorder, REM behaviour disorder, restless leg syndrome, and somniloquy (or sleep talking), characterized by partial arousals during sleep or during transitions between wakefulness and sleep. ... Sleep apnea is a sleep disorder characterized by pauses in breathing during sleep. ... Sleep deprivation is a general lack of the necessary amount of sleep. ... Sleepeating or Nocturnal Eating Syndrome is a parasomnia where people experience recurrent episodes of eating during their sleep, without being aware of it. ... Sleeping sickness or African trypanosomiasis is a parasitic disease in people and animals, caused by protozoa of genus Trypanosoma and transmitted by the tsetse fly. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Sleepwalking (also called somnambulism or noctambulism[1]), under the larger category of parasomnias or sleep disorders where the sufferer engages in activities that are normally associated with wakefulness while he or she is asleep or in a sleeplike state. ... For other uses, see Dream (disambiguation). ... The current usage of the term nightmare refers to a dream which causes the sleeper a strong unpleasant emotional response. ... Exploding head syndrome is a condition first reported by a British physician in 1988[1] that causes the sufferer to occasionally experience a tremendously loud noise as if from within his or her own head, usually described as an explosion, roar or a ringing noise. ... Hypnos and Thanatos,Sleep and His Half-Brother Death by John William Waterhouse Wikibooks has a book on the topic of Lucid Dreaming A lucid dream, also known as a conscious dream, is a dream in which the person is aware that he or she is dreaming while the dream... A false awakening is an event in which someone dreams they have awakened from sleep. ... The Nightmare, by Henry Fuseli (1781) is thought to be one of the classic depictions of sleep paralysis perceived as a demonic visitation. ... Hypnagogia (also spelled hypnogogia) describes vivid dream-like auditory, visual, or tactile sensations, which are often accompanied by sleep paralysis and experienced when falling asleep or waking up. ... A hypnic or hypnagogic jerk is an involuntary muscle twitch (more generally known as myoclonus or a myoclonic twitch) which often occurs during the transition from wakefulness to sleep (see hypnagogia). ... A nocturnal emission is an ejaculation of semen experienced by a male during sleep. ... Somnolence (or drowsiness) is a state of near-sleep, a strong desire for sleep, or sleeping for unusually long periods. ... Dream worlds are a commonly used plot device in fictional works, most notably in science fiction and fantasy fiction. ... Bedding refers to the materials laid above the mattress of a bed for warmth. ... This article is about the cushion. ... A bed sheet is a large piece of cotton or linen cloth used to cover a mattress. ... A double duvet. ... For other uses, see Blanket (disambiguation). ... A quilt is a type of puppy with long fluffy ears. ... A sleeping bag is a protective bag for a person to sleep in, essentially a blanket that can be closed with a zipper or similar means, and functions as a bed in situations where it is impractical to carry around a full bed. ... Nightwear, also called sleepwear, nightclothes, or nightdress, is clothing designed to be worn while sleeping. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... A child wearing a blanket sleeper. ... Fashionable young men in early 16th century Germany showed a lot of fine linen in a studied negligence. ... The negligee is a form of womenswear intended for wear at night and in the bedroom or in a airport parking lot. ... Pink chiffon nightie A nightgown (also called a nightdress) is a loosely hanging item of nightwear nowadays solely for women, Its length may vary from hip-length (babydoll) to floor-length (peignoir) but is typically knee-length. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... For other uses, see Nightcap (disambiguation). ... A peignoir is a long nightgown for women usually sheer and made of chiffon. ... Look up Pajamas in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Short pink chiffon nightgown Black slip nightgown A nightgown (also called a nightdress) is a loosely hanging item of nightwear nowadays mostly for women. ... A Bunkbed A bunk bed is a type of bed in which one bed is stacked on top of another. ... A four poster bed is a bed with four posts which support a tester. ... A futon in Japan A futon in the U.S. A futon )   is a type of mattress that makes up a Japanese bed. ... Garden hammock A couple in a hammock on the beach The hammock is a fabric sling used for sleeping or resting. ... A pillow top queen-size mattress. ... Genera & Species Genus Cimex Cimex lectularius Cimex hemipterus () Cimex pilosellus Cimex pipistrella Genus Leptocimex Leptocimex boueti Genus Haematosiphon Haematosiphon inodora Genus Oeciacus Oeciacus hirudinis Oeciacus vicarius Genus Afrocimex Afrocimex constrictus A bedbug (or bed bug) is a small nocturnal insect of the family Cimicidae that lives by hematophagy, that is... A bedroom is a room where people sleep. ... Bedtime is a popular parenting tradition that involves, to a greater or lesser extent, rituals made to help children feel more secure [1], and become accustomed to a comparatively more rigid schedule of sleep than they would sometimes prefer. ... Bedtime Stories track listing GHV2 track listing For the 1964 comedy film, see Bedtime Story (film). ... Chronotype is an attribute of human beings reflecting whether they are alert and prefer to be active early or late in the day. ... Jet lag (or jet-lag) is a physical condition caused by crossing multiple time zones during flight. ... For other uses, see Lullaby (disambiguation). ... Polyphasic sleep is a term used to describe several alternative sleep patterns intended to reduce sleep time to 2–6 hours daily in order to achieve a better quality of sleep. ... A power nap (sometimes called a catnap) is a short nap, usually 15-20 minutes, intended to revitalize the subject from drowsiness while working, coined by Cornell University social psychologist James Maas. ... A painting of a young woman taking a siesta. ... Many competing theories have been advanced to discover the possible connections between sleep and learning in humans. ... This does not cite its references or sources. ... Sleep inertia is a physiological state characterised by a decline in motor dexterity and a subjective feeling of grogginess, immediately following an abrupt awakening from deep sleep. ... For other uses, see Sleepover (film). ... Snoring is the act of breathing through the open mouth in such a way as to cause a vibration of the uvula and soft palate, thus giving rise to a sound which may vary from a soft noise to a loud unpleasant sound. ... It has been suggested that Duration of sexual intercourse be merged into this article or section. ...

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