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Encyclopedia > BBC One
BBC One
Launched 1 October 1936
Owned by BBC
Picture format 576i (PAL) 16:9
Audience share 22.6%
(September 2007, [1])
Country Flag of the United Kingdom United Kingdom
Formerly called BBC Television Service
1936 → 1960

BBC tv
until April 1964
Sister channel(s) BBC Two,
BBC Three,
BBC Four
Website www.bbc.co.uk/bbcone
Availability
Terrestrial
Analogue Normally tuned to 1
Freeview Channel 1
Satellite
Sky Digital Channel 101 and BBC UK regional TV on satellite
Sky Digital (ROI) Channel 141
Cable
Virgin Media Channel 101
Tiscali TV Channel 1
UPC Ireland Channel 108

BBC One is the primary television channel of the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC), and was the first television station to be launched in the United Kingdom (as the BBC Television Service until 1960, and then renamed BBC tv until 1964). The channel has an annual budget of £840 million.[1] It is funded entirely by the television licence fee, and therefore shows uninterrupted programming with no commercial advertising. BBC Radio 1 (commonly referred to as just Radio 1) is a British national radio station operated by the BBC, specialising in popular music and speech and is aimed primarily at the 14-29[1] age group. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 566 pixels Full resolution (3516 × 2486 pixel, file size: 34 KB, MIME type: image/png)This image is an official version provided by the BBC Media Bank. ... is the 274th day of the year (275th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1936 (MCMXXXVI) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ... For other uses, see BBC (disambiguation). ... 576i is the shorthand name for a video mode. ... For other uses, see PAL (disambiguation). ... The 16:9 aspect ratio (also known as widescreen) is an aspect ratio that is 16/9 or 1. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_United_Kingdom. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... BBC Three, the successor to the similar BBC Choice, is a British television channel from the BBC broadcasting only on digital cable, terrestrial and satellite. ... For the BBC radio station, see BBC Radio 4. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Analogue television in the United Kingdom. ... This article is about the United Kingdom digital terrestrial television service. ... Sky Digital is the brand name for British Sky Broadcastings digital satellite television service, transmitted from SES Astra satellites located at 28. ... The BBC has provided on the UK digital satellite service all of the BBC One and BBC Two regional variations, which provides local news inserts and (outside England) regional presentation. ... Sky Digital is the brand name for British Sky Broadcastings digital satellite television service, transmitted from SES Astra satellites located at 28. ... Anthem The Soldiers Song Republic of Ireland() – on the European continent() – in the European Union() Capital (and largest city) Dublin Official languages Irish, English Demonym Irish Government Republic and Parliamentary Democracy  -  President Mary McAleese  -  Taoiseach Bertie Ahern, TD Independence from the United Kingdom   -  Declared 24 April 1916   -  Ratified 21... Virgin Media Inc. ... Tiscali TV is a UK-based consumer Video on Demand service, operated by the European telephony company, Tiscali SpA. The service, originally known as Homechoice, was provided by Video Networks Limited (VNL), based in Shepherds Bush in West London, until it was purchased by Tiscali UK in August 2006... UPC Ireland N.V. is Liberty Global Europes operation in Ireland. ... This article is an overview article about the Crown chartered British Broadcasting Corporation formed in 1927. ... This article is about a television transmitting location or company. ... “GBP” redirects here. ... A television licence is an official licence required in some countries for all owners of a television receiver. ...


On 2 November 1936 the BBC launched the world's first regular, public television service with a high level of image resolution[2]. is the 306th day of the year (307th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1936 (MCMXXXVI) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ... Image resolution describes the detail an image holds. ...

Contents

History

The early years

The transmission mast above the BBC wing of Alexandra Palace, home of BBC One from 1936 until the early 1950s, photographed in 2001.
The transmission mast above the BBC wing of Alexandra Palace, home of BBC One from 1936 until the early 1950s, photographed in 2001.
An Emitron camera used to make the earliest 405-line programmes broadcast on the channel.
An Emitron camera used to make the earliest 405-line programmes broadcast on the channel.

Baird Television made Britain's first television broadcast on 30 September 1929 from its studio in Long Acre, London via the BBC's London transmitter, using the electromechanical system pioneered by John Logie Baird. This system used a vertically-scanned image of 30 lines — just enough resolution for a close-up of one person, and with a bandwidth low enough to use existing radio transmitters. Simultaneous transmission of sound and picture was achieved on 30 March 1930, by using the BBC's new twin transmitter at Brookmans Park. By late 1930, thirty minutes of morning programmes were broadcast Monday to Friday, and thirty minutes of evening programmes were broadcast at midnight on Tuesdays and Fridays after BBC radio went off the air. Baird broadcasts via the BBC continued until June 1932. Download high resolution version (472x690, 43 KB)Uploaded to illustrate BBC One. ... Download high resolution version (472x690, 43 KB)Uploaded to illustrate BBC One. ... For other uses, see BBC (disambiguation). ... Alexandra Palace from the south Alexandra Palace was built in an area spanning Wood Green and Muswell Hill, North London, England in 1873 as a public entertainment centre and North London counterpart of The Crystal Palace. ... Download high resolution version (472x1035, 42 KB)Uploaded to illustrate BBC One. ... Download high resolution version (472x1035, 42 KB)Uploaded to illustrate BBC One. ... John Logie Baird John Logie Baird (August 13, 1888 – June 14, 1946) was a Scottish engineer, who is best known for being the first person to demonstrate a working television. ... is the 273rd day of the year (274th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1929 (MCMXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Long Acre as it passes Covent Garden tube station Long Acre is a street in central London, England. ... Antenna tower of Crystal Palace transmitter, London A transmitter (sometimes abbreviated XMTR) is an electronic device which with the aid of an antenna propagates an electromagnetic signal such as radio, television, or other telecommunications. ... This schematic shows the circular paths traced by the holes in a Nipkow disk. ... Bust of John Logie Baird in Helensburgh. ... Bandwidth is the difference between the upper and lower cutoff frequencies of, for example, a filter, a communication channel, or a signal spectrum, and is typically measured in hertz. ... is the 89th day of the year (90th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1930 (MCMXXX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display 1930 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Brookmans Park transmitter is a facility for medium wave broadcasting north of London (national grid reference: TL259050). ...


The BBC began its own regular television programming from the basement of Broadcasting House, London on 22 August 1932. The studio moved to expanded quarters at 16 Portland Place, London, in February 1934, and continued broadcasting the 30-line images, carried by telephone line to the medium wave transmitter at Brookmans Park, until 11 September 1935, by which time advances in all-electronic television systems made the electromechanical broadcasts obsolete. For other uses, see Broadcasting House (disambiguation). ... is the 234th day of the year (235th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1932 (MCMXXXII) was a leap year starting on Friday (the link will display full 1932 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Portland Place is a street in the Marylebone district of central London. ... Mediumwave radio transmissions (sometimes called Medium frequency or MF) are those between the frequencies of 300 kHz and 3000 kHz. ... , Bradmore Green, Brookmans Park. ... is the 254th day of the year (255th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1935 (MCMXXXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar). ...


After a series of test transmissions and special broadcasts that began in August, regular BBC television broadcasts officially resumed on 1 October 1936, from a converted wing of Alexandra Palace in London, housing two studios, various scenery stores, make-up areas, dressing rooms, offices, and even the transmitter itself, now broadcasting on the VHF band. BBC television initially used two systems, on alternate weeks: the 240-line Baird intermediate film system, and the 405-line Marconi-EMI system, each making the BBC the world's first regular high-definition television service, alternating on a weekly basis and broadcasting Monday to Saturday from 3.00pm to 4.00pm and 9.00pm to 10.00pm.[3] The two systems were to run on a trial basis for six months. However, the Baird system, which used a mechanical camera for filmed programming and Farnsworth image dissector cameras for live programming, proved too cumbersome and visually inferior, and was dropped in February 1937. is the 274th day of the year (275th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1936 (MCMXXXVI) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ... Alexandra Palace from the south Alexandra Palace was built in an area spanning Wood Green and Muswell Hill, North London, England in 1873 as a public entertainment centre and North London counterpart of The Crystal Palace. ... Very high frequency (VHF) is the radio frequency range from 30 MHz to 300 MHz. ... The intermediate film system was a television process used in 1932-1937 in which motion picture film was processed almost immediately after it was exposed in a camera, then scanned by a scanner, and transmitted over the air. ... The 405-line monochrome analogue television broadcasting system was the first electronic television system to be used in regular broadcasting. ... This article needs cleanup. ...


Initially, the station's range was officially only within a twenty-five mile (40 km) radius of the Alexandra Palace transmitter—in practice, however, transmissions could be picked up a good deal further away, and on one occasion in 1938 were picked up by engineers at RCA in New York, who were experimenting with a British television set.[4] RCA, formerly an acronym for the Radio Corporation of America, is now a trademark owned by Thomson SA through RCA Trademark Management S.A., a company owned by Thomson. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ...


Wartime closure

On 1 September 1939, two days before Britain declared war on Germany, the station was unceremoniously taken off air with little warning[5]. It was feared that the VHF transmissions would act as a beacon to enemy aircraft homing in on London. Also, many of the television service's technical staff and engineers would be needed for the war effort, in particular on the RADAR programme. The last programme aired was a Mickey Mouse cartoon, Mickey's Gala Premiere. According to figures from England's Radio Manufacturers Association, 18,999 television sets had been manufactured from 1936 to September 1939, when production was halted by the war. is the 244th day of the year (245th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1939 (MCMXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... For other uses, see Radar (disambiguation). ... Mickey Mouse is an Academy Award-winning comic animal cartoon character who has become an icon for The Walt Disney Company. ... Cartoons, 1933 Mickeys film is having a premiere, and all the stars turn out at the Chinese Theatre: Laurel and Hardy Marx Brothers Jimmy Durante Clark Gable Sid Grauman Mae West Jean Harlow Joan Crawford Bette Davis Harold Lloyd Joe E. Brown Charlie Chaplin Edward G. Robinson George Arliss...


Postwar

BBC television returned on 7 June 1946 at 3 p.m. Jasmine Bligh, one of the original announcers, made the first announcement saying, 'Good afternoon everybody. How are you? Do you remember me, Jasmine Bligh?' The Mickey Mouse cartoon of 1939 was repeated twenty minutes later.[6] is the 158th day of the year (159th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1946 (MCMXLVI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full 1946 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Jasmine Bligh was one of the first three BBC Television service presenters. ... Rerun van Pelt is the name of Linus and Lucys younger brother in the comic strip Peanuts. ...


Postwar broadcast coverage extended to Birmingham in 1949 with the opening of the Sutton Coldfield television transmitter, and by the early 1950s the entire country was covered. This article is about the British city. ... The Sutton Coldfield television transmitter is a broadcasting transmitter based at Sutton Coldfield, in Birmingham, England (Grid reference SK113003). ...


Alexandra Palace was the home base of the channel until the early 1950s when the majority of production moved to the Lime Grove Studios, and then in 1960 the headquarters moved to the purpose-built BBC Television Centre at White City, also in London, where the channel is based to this day. Lime Grove Studios was a film studio complex built by the Gaumont Film Company in 1915 situated in a street named Lime Grove, near Hammersmith, west London and described by Gaumont as the finest studio in Great Britain and the first building ever put up in this country solely for... BBC Television Centre (sometimes abbreviated TVC or TC) in London is home to much of the BBCs television output and, since 1998, almost all of the corporations national TV and radio news output by BBC News. ... White City may be: In the United Kingdom: White City, London In Canada: White City, Saskatchewan In the United States: White City, Florida White City, Kansas White City, Illinois White City, Oregon White City, Utah And also; Tel Aviv; The White City is a nickname for this city in Israel... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ...


Competition

The station held a monopoly on television broadcasting in the United Kingdom until the first ITV station was launched in 1955. The competition quickly forced the channel to change its identity and priorities following a large drop in audience figures. By the 1980s, the channel had launched the first breakfast television programmes and returned to its previous form under the controller of the channel at the time, Michael Grade. This article is about the economics of markets dominated by a single seller. ... Independent Television (generally known as ITV, but also as ITV Network) is a public service network of British commercial television broadcasters, set up under the Independent Television Authority (ITA) to provide competition to the BBC. ITV is the oldest commercial television network in the UK. Since 1990 and the Broadcasting... This article is about the Canadian television show. ... Michael Ian Grade CBE (born March 8, 1943) is a British businessman and a distinguished figure in the field of broadcasting. ...


Since the launch of multichannel television, BBC One's share of the viewing has declined, although not as fast as ITV's leading the channel to once again become the most watched in the last decade. Independent Television (generally known as ITV, but also as ITV Network) is a public service network of British commercial television broadcasters, set up under the Independent Television Authority (ITA) to provide competition to the BBC. ITV is the oldest commercial television network in the UK. Since 1990 and the Broadcasting...


The station was renamed BBC1 when BBC2 was launched in April 1964. On 15 November 1969, simultaneous with ITV and two years after BBC2, the channel began 625-line PAL colour programming. Stereo audio transmissions began in 1988 (NICAM), and wide-screen programming was introduced on digital platforms in 1998. However, many of these developments took some years to become available on all transmitters. This article does not cite any references or sources. ... is the 319th day of the year (320th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also: 1969 (Stargate SG-1) episode. ... Independent Television (generally known as ITV, but also as ITV Network) is a public service network of British commercial television broadcasters, set up under the Independent Television Authority (ITA) to provide competition to the BBC. ITV is the oldest commercial television network in the UK. Since 1990 and the Broadcasting... For other uses, see PAL (disambiguation). ... NICAM (known also as NICAM 728, after the 728 kbit/s bitstream it is sent over), Near Instantaneous Companded Audio Multiplex, is a format for digital sound on analogue television transmissions. ...


The channel has had a diverse range of identities and priorities over the years and was named Channel Of The Year at the 2007 Broadcast Awards.


The channel was praised by judges who said: "At a time when all major terrestrial broadcasters are facing questions about how fast and far their share of viewing will fall, BBC One has shown it can deliver mass entertainment.."


Peter Fincham, Controller of BBC One said: "I am really delighted that BBC One did so well at the Broadcast Awards. I'd like to thank the many many people who contributed to a successful year on the channel and these awards reflect the variety and strength of the programming."[7] Peter Fincham (born 1957) is a British television producer and executive, who was the Controller of BBC One, the primary television channel of the British Broadcasting Corporation,[1] until his resignation on October 5, 2007, following criticism over the handling of the A Year With The Queen scandal. ...


Programming

BBC One aims to be the UK’s most valued television channel, with the broadest range of quality programmes of any UK mainstream network. The channel is committed to widening the appeal of all genres by making a range of subjects accessible to a broad audience. BBC One is committed to covering national and international sports events and issues, showcasing landmark programmes and exploring new ways of presenting specialist subjects.

BBC One remit

Channel Controllers

* had not previously worked for the BBC before appointment Gerald Cock (born 1887; died November 10, 1973) was a British broadcasting executive, who initially worked for BBC Radio, before being made the Corporation’s very first Director of Television, in effect the very first Controller of the television channel initially known as the BBC Television Service but later... Maurice Gorham (born 1902; died August 9, 1975) was an Irish journalist and broadcasting executive. ... Norman Collins was a British radio and television executive, and one of the major figures behind the establishment of the Independent Television (ITV) network in the UK, which was the first organisation to break the BBC’s broadcasting monopoly when it began transmitting in 1955. ... Cecil McGivern was a British broadcasting executive, who initially worked for BBC Radio before transferring to BBC Television in the late 1940s. ... Kenneth Adam (born on March 1, 1908 in Nottingham, England, United Kingdom; died October 18, 1978) was a British journalist and broadcasting executive, who from 1957 until 1961 served as the Controller of the BBC Television Service. ... Stuart Hood (born 1915 in Angus, Scotland) is a former British television producer and executive, who from 1961 until 1963 was the Controller of the BBC Television Service. ... Donald Baverstock (January 18, 1924 – March 17, 1995) was a British television producer and executive. ... Michael Peacock (born 1929) was a British television executive, who from 1963 until the spring of 1965 was the first ever Controller of BBC Two, the Corporations second television channel. ... Paul Fox is a British television executive, who spent much of his broadcasting career working for BBC Television, most prominently as the Controller of BBC One between 1967 and 1973. ... Bryan Cowgill is a British television executive, who initially worked in the sports department of BBC Television. ... Sir Bill Cotton (born April 23, 1928) CBE, is a British television producer and executive, the son of big-band leader Billy Cotton. ... Alan Hart was a British television executive, who from 1981 to 1984 was the Controller of BBC One. ... Michael Ian Grade CBE (born March 8, 1943) is a British businessman and a distinguished figure in the field of broadcasting. ... Jonathan Powell (born 1947) is a British television producer and executive. ... Alan Yentob (born March 11, 1947) is a British television executive. ... Michael Jackson (born 1958) is a British television executive. ... Peter Salmon (born 1956 in Burnley, Lancashire, UK) is a British television producer and executive. ... Lorraine Heggessey (born November 16, 1956) is the Controller of BBC One, the UKs oldest and frequently most-watched television channel. ... Peter Fincham (born 1957) is a British television producer and executive, who was the Controller of BBC One, the primary television channel of the British Broadcasting Corporation,[1] until his resignation on October 5, 2007, following criticism over the handling of the A Year With The Queen scandal. ... Roly Keating is the current controller of British television channel BBC Two as of 2004. ...

Only 8.9%[1] of the peak programming is repeats (30.8% is repeats overall) with a peak target of 5% in 2008/2009. Programming on this channel costs an average of £162,900 per hour.


With a mission to provide big programmes for all licence-fee payers, it has the main sport, news, current affairs and documentaries. It has historically broadcast children's programmes (now taken from CBBC and CBeebies). The channel remains one of the principal television channels in the United Kingdom and provides 2,508 annual hours of news and weather, 1,880 hours of factual and learning, 1,036 hours of drama, 672 hours of children's, 670 hours of sport, 654 hours of film, 433 hours of entertainment, 159 hours of current affairs, 92 hours of religion and 82 hours of music and arts.[8] Current CBBC Logo CBBC - short for Childrens BBC - is the brand-name for the BBCs childrens television programmes aimed at children aged between 6 and 12 years old. ... CBeebies is a British television channel produced by the BBC and aimed at children six years and under. ...


News and current affairs

Main article: BBC News

2,508 annual hours of news and weather (293 in peak, 1,049 of BBC News 24 simulcasts) are provided by regular news programmes are BBC Breakfast, the One O'Clock News, Six O'Clock News and the Ten O'Clock News (the most-watched UK news programme), each including BBC regional news programmes. The station has broadcast continuously since 1997, simulcasting BBC News 24 from the early hours in the morning until 6:00am. All of the three main news bulletins have a lead over their rival programmes on ITV. BBC News is the department within the BBC responsible for the corporations news-gathering and production of news programmes on BBC television, radio and online. ... BBC News 24 is the BBCs 24 hour rolling news television channel in the United Kingdom. ... BBC Breakfast is the morning television news programme simulcast on BBC One and BBC News 24. ... The BBC One OClock News is the early afternoon news bulletin from the BBC. Produced by BBC News, the programme is broadcast on BBC One and BBC News 24 every weekday. ... The BBC Six OClock News is the evening news programme which is broadcast daily on British television channel BBC One and BBC News 24 from 6:00pm until 6:30pm and is currently presented by George Alagiah and Sian Williams, who is standing in until the bulletin reverts to... The BBC Ten OClock News is the flagship evening news programme for British television channel BBC One and BBC News 24. ... BBC News 24 is the BBCs 24 hour rolling news television channel in the United Kingdom. ...


Each year 159 hours of current affairs programmes are broadcast on BBC One, including Panorama and Watchdog. Politics is also covered, with programmes such as Question Time and This Week. Crimewatch UK, a special programme appealing for help in unsolved crimes, is also frequently broadcast. Panorama is a long-running current affairs documentary series on BBC television, launched on 11 November 1953 and focusing on investigative journalism. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Question Time is a topical debate television programme in the United Kingdom, based on Any Questions?. It is currently shown on BBC One at 22:35 on Thursdays, and typically features politicians from the three major political parties and other public figures who answer questions put to them by the... This Week is a current affairs and politics TV programme in the United Kingdom on the BBC, screened on Thursday evenings, hosted by former The Sunday Times editor Andrew Neil alongside former Conservative Member of Parliament (MP) and Minister Michael Portillo, and Labour MP for Hackney, Diane Abbott. ... Crimewatch UK is a long-running and high-profile British television programme, produced by the BBC, that reconstructs unsolved crimes with a view to gaining information from the members of the public, in order to help solve major crimes. ...


Factual and learning

Whilst nature documentaries such as Planet Earth are the most familiar part of the 1,880 annual BBC One hours of factual and learning, this also includes lifestyle-format daytime programmes and a number of reality TV formats and the One Life strand. Planet Earth is a BBC nature documentary series narrated by David Attenborough and produced by Alastair Fothergill. ...


Drama

Main article: BBC television drama

BBC One is the BBC's home of drama, with 1,036 hours each year. There are several half-hour episodes of EastEnders each week, plus hospital dramas Casualty and Holby City. In recent years the BBC's innovative dramas such as Spooks, Judge John Deed, Hustle and time-travel police drama Life on Mars have defeated ITV in the ratings. Also included in the twenty weekly hours of new drama is its highly successful programme Doctor Who. Cathy Come Home, a 1966 entry into The Wednesday Play anthology series, voted the best drama and second highest programme overall in the British Film Institutes 2000 survey of the 100 Greatest British Television Programmes of the 20th century. ... EastEnders is a popular BBC television soap opera, first broadcast in the United Kingdom on BBC1 on 19 February 1985[4] and continuing to date. ... Casualty is the longest running emergency medical drama series in the world[1], first broadcast in 1986 and transmitted in the UK on BBC One (with repeats on UKTV Gold). ... Holby City is a medical drama television serial, formerly a drama series, broadcast on BBC One in the United Kingdom. ... For the music band, see The Spooks. ... Judge John Deed is a BBC television drama series about a high court judge, created, written and produced by G. F. Newman. ... Hustle is a British television comedy-drama series made by Kudos Film & Television for BBC One in the United Kingdom. ... Life on Mars is a BAFTA and International Emmy award-winning British television drama series, which was first shown on BBC One in January and February 2006. ... Independent Television (generally known as ITV, but also as ITV Network) is a public service network of British commercial television broadcasters, set up under the Independent Television Authority (ITA) to provide competition to the BBC. ITV is the oldest commercial television network in the UK. Since 1990 and the Broadcasting... For other uses, see Doctor Who (disambiguation). ...


Children's

Main article: CBBC

Because there are many homes that do not yet have access to digital television channels CBeebies and CBBC, BBC One still broadcasts 672 hours of children's programmes each year - over two hours each day - mostly during the late afternoon. It is expected these programmes will migrate to the digital channels by 2013. Current CBBC Logo CBBC - short for Childrens BBC - is the brand-name for the BBCs childrens television programmes aimed at children aged between 6 and 12 years old. ... CBeebies is a British television channel produced by the BBC and aimed at children six years and under. ... The CBBC Channel is a British television service aimed at 6 to 13 year olds produced by the BBC. It complements the CBBC programming that continues to air on BBC One and BBC Two. ...


Sport

Main article: BBC Sport

The BBC holds rights to many sporting events, and BBC One broadcasts 670 hours of sport each year. This includes Premiership football highlights on Match of the Day, tennis from Wimbledon, horse racing such as the Grand National, the London Marathon, the Olympic Games, Rugby League, Rugby Union, Snooker tournaments, and international athletics. BBC Sport is the sports division of the BBC. It became a fully dedicated division of the BBC in 2000. ... For other sports leagues which may be referred to by this name, see List of professional sports leagues. ... For the Doctor Who novel, see Match of the Day (Doctor Who). ... The Championships, Wimbledon, commonly referred to as Wimbledon, is the oldest major championship in tennis and is widely considered to be the most prestigious. ... The Grand National is the most valuable National Hunt handicap horse race in the United Kingdom. ... Runners surge out of the Blackfriars Bridge underpass onto the Victoria Embankment; two miles to go The London Marathon is a road marathon that has been held each year in London since 1981, usually in April. ... The five Olympic rings were designed in 1913, adopted in 1914 and debuted at the Games at Antwerp, 1920. ... Wally Lewis passing the ball in Rugby League State of Origin. ... For other uses, see Rugby (disambiguation). ... Snooker is a cue sport that is played on a large baize-covered table with pockets in each of the four corners and in the middle of each of the long side cushions. ... A womens 400m hurdles race on a typical outdoor red rubber track. ...


Film

British, US and international films are broadcast for 654 hours each year on BBC One. This is mainly late-night fillers with some box office hits at Christmas and holiday periods.


Entertainment

433 hours of entertainment are broadcast by BBC One each year. This includes game shows like National Lottery, quiz shows like Have I Got News for You, several talent shows such as Dance X and chat shows such as Friday Night with Jonathan Ross. A play here! sign outside a newsagent, incorporating the National Lotterys logo of a stylised hand with crossed fingers which emulates a smiling face. ... Have I Got News for You is a British television panel show; produced by Hat Trick Productions for the BBC. It is based loosely on the BBC Radio 4 show The News Quiz, and has been running since 1990. ... DanceX is a reality television show produced in the UK for BBC One. ... Friday Night with Jonathan Ross is a chat show presented by Jonathan Ross. ...


Religion

The annual 92 hours of religion comprises mainly of weekly editions of recorded Songs of Praise Christian services and Sunday morning Christian Heaven and Earth with Gloria Hunniford, which ended its nine year run on BBC One on 2 September 2007[9]. It will be replaced by shows produced by two independent production companies. Mentorn Oxford will produce Heart and Soul, which is described as “a new multifaith programme featuring a panel and a studio audience”, followed by Life from the Loft which will take the same slot early next year, and will be made by the Leeds-based company True North.[10] In 2005 BBC One was criticised for reducing the amount of religious programming, which was previously at 101 hours per year.[11] Songs of Praise is a BBC television programme based around traditional Christian hymns. ... For other uses, see Christian (disambiguation). ... Heaven & Earth, now known as Heaven & Earth with Gloria Hunniford, is a BBC television programme, aired on Sunday mornings from 10am to 12am on BBC One. ... is the 245th day of the year (246th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ...


Comedy

BBC One broadcasts many comedy programmes, often screened on Friday nights. These shows include the long running My Family and highly successful Little Britain, no longer in production, which was transferred from BBC Three. One of the most popular BBC comedy shows was Only Fools and Horses, which until recently was still regularly repeated on the channel. My Family is a British sitcom starring Robert Lindsay and Zoë Wanamaker that first aired in 2000. ... This article is about the British TV show Little Britain. ... BBC Three, the successor to the similar BBC Choice, is a British television channel from the BBC broadcasting only on digital cable, terrestrial and satellite. ... Only Fools and Horses is a British television sitcom, created and written by John Sullivan, and made and broadcast by the BBC. Seven series were originally broadcast in the UK between 1981 and 1991, with sporadic Christmas specials until 2003. ...


Music and arts

As the weekly popular music chart programme Top of the Pops was axed, BBC One now broadcasts only 82 hours of music and arts each year. The majority of this is the Alan Yentob fronted Imagine and classical music concerts such as the BBC Proms. Top of the Pops, also known as TOTP, was a long-running British music chart television programme, made and broadcast by the BBC. It was originally shown each week, mostly on BBC One, from 1 January 1964 to 30 July 2006. ... Alan Yentob (born March 11, 1947) is a British television executive. ... Imagine is a wide ranging arts series first broadcast on BBC One in 2003. ... A Promenade concert in the Royal Albert Hall, 2004. ...


Daytime

Daytime programming (from 9:15 a.m.) is a mainly made up of lifestyle shows such as Bargain Hunt, but also includes soaps such as Neighbours and Doctors. From 3:25 p.m. until 5:35 p.m., normal broadcasting is suspended in order for a special CBBC broadcasting strand, with its own visual identity. BBC One's most popular daytime programme is Neighbours, with audience figures approaching five million. As of 2008, Channel Five will be broadcasting Neighbours instead of the BBC [2] . Bargain Hunt is a daytime television programme on BBC One, which started in the year 2000. ... This article is about an Australian soap opera. ... Five, launched in 1997, is the fifth and final national terrestrial analogue television channel to launch in the United Kingdom. ...


Quotas

28%[1] of "qualifying hours" are made by independent production companies (statutory target is 25%). 99% of peak hours programmes are original productions (target 90%), as are 82% of all hours (target 70%)[1].


Some of the channels most popular programmes such as Match of the Day, Have I Got News for You, The Kumars at No. 42, The Apprentice and Little Britain originally started off on other BBC channels, but were moved to BBC One because of their popularity.[12] For the Doctor Who novel, see Match of the Day (Doctor Who). ... Have I Got News for You is a British television panel show; produced by Hat Trick Productions for the BBC. It is based loosely on the BBC Radio 4 show The News Quiz, and has been running since 1990. ... The Kumars at No. ... Series Three of The Apprentice is a television series currently airing in the UK on BBC One. ... This article is about the British TV show Little Britain. ...


Productions

For the first half-century of its existence, with the exception of films and imported programmes from countries such as the United States and Australia, almost all the channel's output was produced by the BBC's in-house production departments. This changed following the Broadcasting Act 1990, which required that 25% of the BBC's television output be out-sourced to independent production companies.[13] As of 2004 many popular BBC One shows are made for the channel by independents, but the in-house production departments continue to contribute heavily to the schedule. This article is about motion pictures. ... The Broadcasting Act 1990 is a law of the British parliament, often regarded by both its supporters and its critics as a quintessential example of Thatcherism. ...


Network variations

An example of the BBC One Scotland variation on the current national theme.
An example of the BBC One Scotland variation on the current national theme.

To reflect the countries within the United Kingdom that the channel is available in, BBC One has individual continuity and opt-outs for Scotland,[14] Wales[15] and Northern Ireland.[16] The channel's visual identity is largely the same as the version used in England, save for the inclusion of the country name below the main BBC One logo. Image File history File links Bbconescotlandidentnew. ... Image File history File links Bbconescotlandidentnew. ... This article is about the country. ... This article is about the country. ... Northern Ireland (Irish: , Ulster Scots: Norlin Airlann) is a constituent country of the United Kingdom lying in the northeast of the island of Ireland, covering 5,459 square miles (14,139 km², about a sixth of the islands total area). ...


In the English regions,[17] the BBC has regional news and current affairs programme opt-outs as well as a limited amount of continuity for the English regions. During such regional opt-outs, the region name is displayed as with the national variations, in smaller characters beneath the main channel logo. A generic news programme, UK Today, available mainly to digital viewers but also shown in the case of problems with regional news programmes was discontinued in 2002. This was replaced by transmission of BBC London News, since digital viewers are now able to receive regional programming. For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... The last main UK Today bulletin was broadcast on the 25th of January 2002. ... BBC London is the brand for the BBCs tri-media radio, television and online service for London and its immediate environs. ...


BBC One Scotland has undoubtedly the greatest level of variation from the generic network, owing to BBC Scotland scheduling Scottish programming on the main BBC Scotland channel, rather than on BBC Two. BBC One Scotland variations include the soap opera River City and the football programme Sportscene, the inclusion of which causes network programming to be displaced or replaced. BBC Scotland is home to Reporting Scotland, the daily news from Scotland, which shows on the BBC 1 network every day at 6. ... BBC Scotland (BBC Alba in Gaelic) is a constituent part of the British Broadcasting Corporation, the publicly-funded broadcaster of the United Kingdom. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Fiction River City (television series) is a soap opera produced by BBC Scotland River City is a fictional city set in Iowa in The Music Man. ... Sportscene is a Scottish sports television programme produced by BBC Scotland. ...


BBC One Wales was considered a separate channel by the BBC upon its launch in the mid-1960s, appearing as "BBC Wales" (without the "1")[18]


Presentation

Main article: History of BBC television idents

BBC One's identity has been symbolised by a globe shown on its idents for most of its existence[19]. Originally in 1962 this was represented as a map of the UK shown between programmes, but in 1963 the globe first appeared, changing in style and appearance over the next 39 years. The history of BBC television idents starts in the early 1950s, when idents were first used by the BBC to differentiate each of their channels and create separate identites for them. ... This article is about the Internet protocol. ...

  • From 15 November 1969 it became a 'mirror-globe' in several colours and sizes (a globe in front of a curved mirror which reflected a distorted view of the reverse).
  • On 18 February 1985 the COW (Computer Originated World) debuted. This was a computer-animated globe with the land coloured gold and the sea a transparent blue, giving the impression of a glass globe.
  • On 16 February 1991 on the same day that BBC2 rebranded, an ethereal crystal-ball-type globe appeared, which was played out on air from laserdisc.
  • On 4 October 1997 the revolving aspect disappeared as the globe became a red, orange and yellow hot-air balloon, coloured to resemble a globe, flying around various places in the UK.
  • On 29 March 2002 the globe disappeared from television screens, to be replaced by a series of idents consisting of people dancing in various styles (see BBC 'Rhythm & Movement' idents).
  • On 7 October 2006 at 10:00 BST, the new set of idents based on circles (see BBC One 'Circle' idents) were launched. According to the BBC, the circle symbol both represents togetherness and acts as a nod to the former globe idents.

is the 319th day of the year (320th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also: 1969 (Stargate SG-1) episode. ... is the 49th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... is the 47th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the 1991 Gregorian calendar). ... Not to be confused with disk laser, a type of solid-state laser in a flat configuration. ... is the 277th day of the year (278th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... is the 88th day of the year (89th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... BBC Rhythm & Movement idents were a set of on-screen channel identities used on BBC One from 29 March 2002 until 7 October 2006. ... is the 280th day of the year (281st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The BBC Circle idents are a set of on-screen channel identities that debuted on BBC One at 10am BST on 7 October 2006. ...

Impact of Peter Fincham

Since first joining the channel as Controller in 2005 Peter Fincham oversaw the commissioning of several successful BBC One programmes including Robin Hood (2006–present), Jane Eyre (2006) and How Do You Solve A Problem Like Maria?, which was soon followed by related show Any Dream Will Do because of its success.[20] His first full year in charge of the channel saw a year-on-year growth in the audience share, with a rise from 22.2% in August 2005 up to a 23.6% share in August 2006.[21] Peter Fincham (born 1957) is a British television producer and executive, who was the Controller of BBC One, the primary television channel of the British Broadcasting Corporation,[1] until his resignation on October 5, 2007, following criticism over the handling of the A Year With The Queen scandal. ... Robin Hood is a British television programme, produced by independent production company Tiger Aspect Productions for BBC One, with co-funding from the BBC America cable television channel in the United States. ... Charlotte Brontës novel Jane Eyre (1847) has been the subject of numerous television and film adaptations. ... How Do You Solve A Problem Like Maria? was a British talent show, shown on Saturday evenings on BBC One, first broadcast on 29 July 2006 until the series finale on 16 September 2006. ... Any Dream Will Do, often known as Joseph, was a 2007 talent show-themed television series produced by the BBC in the United Kingdom. ...


Fincham also directly initiated the creation of both early evening current affairs and lifestyle programme The One Show (2006–present), now to run all but two weeks of the year, and the prime time chat show Davina (2006), the latter being designed as a vehicle for successful Big Brother presenter Davina McCall.[22] However, Davina was a critical and ratings disaster,[23] which Fincham subsequently admitted was personally his fault, although he defended the strategy of experimenting with the BBC One schedule. He then continued with this experimentation with another notable change to the schedule in January 2007, when he moved the current affairs series Panorama back from its Sunday night slot to a prime time Monday evening slot which it had been removed from in 2000, although this decision was most likely in response to a demand from the Board of Governors of the BBC for the channel to show more current affairs programming in prime time.[24] The One Show was a television show on BBC One, broadcast on weekdays at 6. ... A talk show (U.S.) or chat show (Brit. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... For the current series, see Big Brother 2007 (UK). ... Davina Lucy Pascale McCall[1] (born 16 October 1967) is an English television presenter and actress who works on British television. ... get lost Category: ... Panorama is a long-running current affairs documentary series on BBC television, launched on 11 November 1953 and focusing on investigative journalism. ... The Board of Governors of the BBC is a group of twelve people who together regulate the BBC and represent the interests of the public, in particular those of viewers and listeners. ...


Fincham's judgement was again called into question, this time by The Daily Telegraph newspaper, for his decision to spend £1.2 million replacing the BBC 'Rhythm & Movement' idents, which had been introduced by his predecessor Lorraine Heggessey several years earlier, with the BBC One 'Circle' idents, a set of eight ten-second films, some of which were shot abroad in locations such as Mexico and Croatia.[25] Fincham later found himself having to publicly defend the £18 million salary that the BBC paid presenter Jonathan Ross in 2006,[26] although Ross's BBC One work - primarily consisting of Friday Night with Jonathan Ross - formed only a small part of his overall BBC commitment. This article concerns the British newspaper. ... BBC Rhythm & Movement idents were a set of on-screen channel identities used on BBC One from 29 March 2002 until 7 October 2006. ... Lorraine Heggessey (born November 16, 1956) is the Controller of BBC One, the UKs oldest and frequently most-watched television channel. ... The BBC Circle idents are a set of on-screen channel identities that debuted on BBC One at 10am BST on 7 October 2006. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Friday Night with Jonathan Ross is a chat show presented by Jonathan Ross. ...


In May 2007, Fincham took the decision to drop the Australian soap opera Neighbours from BBC One after twenty-one years on the channel, when its producers significantly raised the price they wanted the BBC to pay for it in a bidding war.[27] Fincham commented that it was 'a big loss', but that BBC One would not pay 'the best part of £300m'.[28] Neighbours will leave the channel in Spring 2008 and is currently the most popular daytime show.[28] This article is about an Australian soap opera. ...


Fincham was involved in a further controversy in July 2007, when he was accused of misleading BBC One viewers. The incident involved a clip from forthcoming documentary A Year With the Queen which was shown to journalists during a press conference. It apparently showed the Queen storming out of a session with American photographer Annie Leibovitz over a disagreement about what she should wear, but the BBC subsequently admitted that the scenes used in the trailer had been edited out of their correct order, meaning that a false impression was given.[29] Fincham admitted the error, but rejected calls that he should resign from his position as a result.[30] His future was deemed uncertain following critical comments from BBC Trust Chairman Sir Michael Lyons [31] and he resigned on 5th October 2007. Elizabeth II (Elizabeth Alexandra Mary Windsor; born 21 April 1926) is Queen of sixteen sovereign states, holding each crown and title equally. ... This article is about the American photographer. ... The BBC Trust logo The BBC Trust is a body that oversees the BBC, being independent of BBC management and external bodies. ... Sir Michael Lyons (born 1950), is a former councillor and council chief executive, who has also been involved in some of the key central government commissions and reports into local government finance from 2000 to 2007. ...


Subtitles service

The BBC has stated that by April 2008 they aim to have subtitles for viewers with hearing difficulties present on 100% of BBC programming. Currently 95% of BBC One and BBC Two programmes are subtitled.[32] The BBC also offers audio description on some popular BBC One programmes[33] for visually impaired viewers. Currently 8% of the BBC's total television output, which includes BBC One, has audio descriptions. This will increase to 10% by 2008.[34] In printed material In printed material, a subtitle is an explanatory or alternate title. ... Audio description refers to an additional narration track for blind and visually impaired viewers of visual media, including television and movies, dance, opera, and visual art. ...


Notes and references

  1. ^ a b c d BBC Annual Report and Accounts 2005/2006
  2. ^ A 240-line intermediate film system and the Marconi-EMI's 405-line all-electronic television service. Germany introduced all-electronic television with a medium level of image resolution (180 lines) in 1935.
  3. ^ Burns, R.W. (1998). Television: An International History of the Formative Years. London: The Institution of Electrical Engineers, ix. ISBN 0-85296-914-7. 
  4. ^ They filmed the static-ridden output they saw on their screen, and this poor-quality, mute film footage is the only surviving record of 1930s British television filmed directly from the screen. However, some images of programmes do survive in newsreels, which also contain some footage shot in studios while programmes were being made, giving a feel for what was being done, albeit without directly replicating what was being shown on screen.
  5. ^ The edit that rewrote history - Baird. Retrieved on 2007-05-28.
  6. ^ Rohrer, Finlo. "Back after the break", BBC News Magazine, bbc.co.uk, 2006-06-07. Retrieved on 2007-04-25. 
  7. ^ BBC One named Channel Of The Year at Broadcast Awards BBC Press Office; 25 January 2007
  8. ^ BBC Annual Report and Accounts 2005/2006 (PDF). BBC Trust p.144. bbc.co.uk. Retrieved on 2007-04-28.
  9. ^ Heaven and Earth ends
  10. ^ New shows to replace Heaven and Earth
  11. ^ BBC criticised for reducing amount of religious programmes
  12. ^ The Apprentice moves to BBC One BBC Press Office
  13. ^ About the Independent Production Quota
  14. ^ About BBC One Scotland BBC Website
  15. ^ About BBC One Wales BBC Website
  16. ^ About BBC One Northern Ireland BBC Website
  17. ^ BBC - England BBC Website
  18. ^ "...a separate service - BBC Wales - available to the greater part of the people in the Principality..." BBC Handbook 1967, p25; British Broadcasting Corporation, London: 1966
  19. ^ Oh, that Symbol... - Baird. Retrieved on 2007-05-28.
  20. ^ Snoddy, Raymond. "Back the BBC to hang on to its viewers in the multi-channel age", The Independent, 2006-10-23. Retrieved on 2007-01-19. 
  21. ^ Channel 4's Big Brother hangover (Requires free registration). Guardian Unlimited (2006-10-18). Retrieved on 2007-01-19.
  22. ^ Wells, Matt (2006-09-06). The One Show gets another go (Requires free registration). Guardian Unlimited. Retrieved on 2007-01-19.
  23. ^ Sutcliffe, Thomas. "Don't blame Davina for this disaster", The Independent, 2006-03-14. Retrieved on 2007-01-19. 
  24. ^ Sherwin, Adam. "Panorama to take on ITV soap", The Times, 2006-01-19. Retrieved on 2007-01-19. 
  25. ^ Alleyne, Richard. "BBC splashes out £1.2m on circle of life TV links", The Daily Telegraph, 2006-09-27. Retrieved on 2007-01-19. 
  26. ^ Sherwin, Adam. "BBC's £18 m deal makes Ross best-paid presenter", The Times, 2006-06-10. Retrieved on 2007-01-19. 
  27. ^ BBC pulls out of Neighbours fight. BBC News Online (2007-05-18). Retrieved on 2007-05-18.
  28. ^ a b Neighbours will move in Spring 2008 Media Guardian
  29. ^ BBC apologises over Queen clips. BBC News Online (2007-07-12). Retrieved on 2007-07-13.
  30. ^ I stay, says royal row BBC boss. BBC News Online (2007-07-13). Retrieved on 2007-07-13.
  31. ^ Fincham Criticised by Sir Michael Lyons Times Online
  32. ^ BBC policy on subtitles BBC Website
  33. ^ List of programmes with audio description
  34. ^ BBC Policy on Audio Descriptions BBC Website

The intermediate film system was a television process used in 1932-1937 in which motion picture film was processed almost immediately after it was exposed in a camera, then scanned by a scanner, and transmitted over the air. ... The 405-line monochrome analogue television broadcasting system was the first electronic television system to be used in regular broadcasting. ... A Newsreel is a documentary film that is regularly released in a public presentation place containing filmed news stories. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... May 28 is the 148th day of the year (149th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... BBC News is the department within the BBC responsible for the corporations news-gathering and production of news programmes on BBC television, radio and online. ... The domain name bbc. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 158th day of the year (159th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 115th day of the year (116th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... PDF is an abbreviation with several meanings: Portable Document Format Post-doctoral fellowship Probability density function There also is an electronic design automation company named PDF Solutions. ... The BBC Trust logo The BBC Trust is a body that oversees the BBC, being independent of BBC management and external bodies. ... The domain name bbc. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 118th day of the year (119th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... May 28 is the 148th day of the year (149th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see The Independent (disambiguation). ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 296th day of the year (297th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 19th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Guardian Unlimited is a British website owned by the Guardian Media Group. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 291st day of the year (292nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 19th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 249th day of the year (250th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Guardian Unlimited is a British website owned by the Guardian Media Group. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 19th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see The Independent (disambiguation). ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 73rd day of the year (74th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 19th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Times is a national newspaper published daily in the United Kingdom (and the Kingdom of Great Britain before the United Kingdom existed) since 1788 when it was known as The Daily Universal Register. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 19th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 19th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article concerns the British newspaper. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 270th day of the year (271st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 19th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Times is a national newspaper published daily in the United Kingdom (and the Kingdom of Great Britain before the United Kingdom existed) since 1788 when it was known as The Daily Universal Register. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 161st day of the year (162nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 19th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... BBC News website in June 2007. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 138th day of the year (139th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 138th day of the year (139th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... BBC News website in June 2007. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 193rd day of the year (194th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 194th day of the year (195th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... BBC News website in June 2007. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 194th day of the year (195th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 194th day of the year (195th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Times is a national newspaper published daily in the United Kingdom (and the Kingdom of Great Britain before the United Kingdom existed) since 1788 when it was known as The Daily Universal Register. ...

See also

// The title of Oldest Television Station is a controversial one, but can be assumed from several in Europe (particularly of England and Germany), and in the United States. ... An incomplete list of popular BBC produced shows and shows originally produced for BBC TV: Contents: Top - 0–9 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z 100 greatest Britons 199 Park...

External links

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