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British Broadcasting Corporation
Type Broadcast radio, television and online
Country Flag of the United Kingdom United Kingdom
Availability National
International 
Founded by John Reith
Motto "Nation Shall Speak Peace Unto Nation"
Key people Sir Michael Lyons, Chairman, BBC Trust
Mark Thompson, Director-General (Chairman of the Executive Board).
Launch date 1922 (radio)
1927 (incorporation)
1932 (television)
Former names British Broadcasting Company Ltd. (1922-1927)
Website
www.bbc.co.uk

The British Broadcasting Corporation, which is usually known simply as the BBC, is the world's largest broadcasting corporation. The BBC (British Broadcasting Corporation) is the national publicly funded broadcaster of the United Kingdom. ... Image File history File links BBC.svg Summary BBC logo http://www. ... Terrestrial television (also known as over-the-air, OTA or broadcast television) was the traditional method of television broadcast signal delivery prior to the advent of cable and satellite television. ... A website (alternatively, web site or Web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos or other digital assets that is hosted on one or more web servers, usually accessible via the Internet. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_United_Kingdom. ... Sir John Charles Walsham Reith, 1st Baron Reith KT GCVO GBE CB TD PC (20 July 1889–16 June 1971) was a Scottish broadcasting executive who established the tradition of independent public service broadcasting in the United Kingdom. ... The BBC Trust logo The BBC Trust is a body that oversees the BBC, being independent of BBC management and external bodies. ... This article is about the Director-General of the BBC. For other individuals with the same name, see Mark Thompson (disambiguation) Mark Thompson (born July 31, 1957) is Director-General of the BBC, a post he has held since 2004, and a former chief executive of Channel 4. ... The Director-General is chief executive and editor-in-chief of the BBC. The position is appointed by Board of Governors of the BBC. Sir John Reith (1927-1938) Sir Frederick Ogilvie (1938-1942) Sir Cecil Graves and Robert W. Foot (joint Director-Generals, 1942-1943) Robert W. Foot (1942... The British Broadcasting Company Ltd was a British commercial company formed on October 18, 1922 by British and American electrical companies doing business in the United Kingdom. ... Broadcasting is the distribution of audio and/or video signals which transmit programs to an audience. ...


It has 28,500 employees in the United Kingdom alone and an annual budget of more than £4 billion.[1][2] GBP redirects here. ...


Founded on 18 October 1922 as the British Broadcasting Company Ltd, it was subsequently granted a Royal Charter and made a state-owned corporation in 1927. The corporation produces programmes and information services, broadcasting globally on television, radio, and the Internet. The stated mission of the BBC is "to inform, educate and entertain" (as laid down by Parliament in the BBC Charter);[3] its motto is "Nation Shall Speak Peace Unto Nation". is the 291st day of the year (292nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1922 (MCMXXII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The British Broadcasting Company Ltd was a British commercial company formed on October 18, 1922 by British and American electrical companies doing business in the United Kingdom. ... For the ship of the same name, see Royal Charter (ship). ... Nationalization, also spelled nationalisation, is the act by which a nation takes possession of assets without requiring the owners consent, with or without payment of compensation. ... Type Bicameral Houses House of Commons House of Lords Speaker of the House of Commons Michael Martin MP Speaker of the House of Lords Hélène Hayman, PC Members 1377 (646 Commons, 731 Peers) Political groups Labour Party Conservative Party Liberal Democrats Scottish National Party Plaid Cymru Democratic Unionist... The coat of arms. ...


The BBC is a quasi-autonomous public corporation as a public service broadcaster. The Corporation is run by the BBC Trust; and is, per its charter, "free from both political and commercial influence and answers only to its viewers and listeners".[4] For other uses, see Autonomy (disambiguation). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... In the United Kingdom the term public service broadcasting (PSB) refers to broadcasting intended for the public benefit rather than for purely commercial concerns. ... The BBC Trust logo The BBC Trust is a body that oversees the BBC, being independent of BBC management and external bodies. ...


The BBC's domestic programming and broadcasts are primarily funded by levying television licence fees (under the Wireless Telegraphy Act 1949), although money is also raised through commercial activities such as sale of merchandise and programming. The BBC World Service, however, is funded through a grant-in-aid by the Foreign and Commonwealth Office. As part of the BBC Charter, the Corporation cannot show commercial advertising on any services in the United Kingdom (television, radio, or internet). Outside the United Kingdom the BBC broadcasts commercially funded channels such as BBC America, BBC Canada, and BBC World. In order to justify the licence fee, the BBC is expected to produce a number of high-rating shows[citation needed] in addition to programmes that commercial broadcasters would not normally broadcast.[4] This article is about a licence that is required to own or operate a television or radio. ... The Wireless Telegraphy Act is the name given to the foundation of all communication laws in the United Kingdom. ... The BBC World Service is one of the most widely recognised international broadcasters, transmitting in 33 languages to many parts of the world through multiple technologies. ... A grant-in-aid is funding granted by government, the use of which is subject to parliamentary oversight, to finance all or some part of the costs of another organization. ... The Foreign and Commonwealth Office, Whitehall, seen from St. ... BBC America is an American television network, owned and operated by BBC Worldwide, which was launched on March 29, 1998, available on both cable and satellite. ... BBC Canada is a general entertainment Canadian category 2 digital cable television channel. ... World News bulletins form the main part of the channels daily schedule. ... A television licence is an official licence required in some countries for all owners of a television receiver. ...


Domestic UK audiences often refer to the BBC as "the Beeb", a nickname popularised by Kenny Everett.[5] Another nickname, now less commonly used, is "Auntie", said to originate from the old-fashioned "Auntie knows best" attitude, (but possibly a sly reference to the 'aunties' and 'uncles' who were presenters of children's programmes in early days)[6] in the days when John Reith, the BBC's founder, was in charge. The two nicknames have also been used together as "Auntie Beeb",[7] and Auntie has been used in outtakes programmes such as Auntie's Bloomers.[8] Kenny Everett (born Maurice Cole in Crosby, Merseyside, 25 December 1944, died 4 April 1995), was a popular English radio DJ and television entertainer. ... Sir John Charles Walsham Reith, 1st Baron Reith KT GCVO GBE CB TD PC (20 July 1889–16 June 1971) was a Scottish broadcasting executive who established the tradition of independent public service broadcasting in the United Kingdom. ... An outtake can be a take or scene, as of a movie, or a television program, that is filmed but not used in the final cut, usually for pacing reasons. ...


It is also the largest news gathering system by means of its newsgathering operation, BBC Newsgathering, which includes various regional offices, foreign correspondents and agreements with other news services.[9] It reaches more than 200 countries and is available to more than 274 million households, to CNN's (its nearest competitor) estimated 200 million, which also gives it the largest News channel in the world. Its radio service is in the short wavelength, which makes it available to many regions of the world. It also broadcasts news - by radio or over the Internet - in some 30 languages.

Contents

History

The BBC coat of arms
The BBC coat of arms
Main article: Timeline of the BBC

The original British Broadcasting Company was founded in 1922 by a group of telecommunications companies — Marconi, Radio Communication Company, Metropolitan-Vickers, General Electric, Western Electric, and British Thomson-Houston[10] — to broadcast experimental radio services. The first transmission was on 14 November of that year, from station 2LO, located at Marconi House, London.[11] Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... This is a timeline of the history of the British Broadcasting Corporation. ... The British Broadcasting Company Ltd was a British commercial company formed on October 18, 1922 by British and American electrical companies doing business in the United Kingdom. ... The British Broadcasting Company Ltd was a British commercial company formed on October 18, 1922 by British and American electrical companies doing business in the United Kingdom. ... Telecommunication involves the transmission of signals over a distance for the purpose of communication. ... Guglielmo Marconi Guglielmo Marconi, GCVO (25 April 1874 – 20 July 1937) was an Italian electrical engineer and Nobel laureate, known for the development of a practical wireless telegraphy system commonly known as the radio. Marconi was President of the Accademia dItalia and a member of the Fascist Grand Council... Metropolitan-Vickers, or Metrovick, was a British heavy industrial firm of the early-to-mid 20th century formerly known as British Westinghouse. ... “GEC” redirects here. ... Company Masthead Logo Logo until circa 1969, also current logo on company web site Logo 1969–1983 Hi Dan! Western Electric (sometimes abbreviated WE and WECo) was an American electrical engineering company, the manufacturing arm of AT&T from 1881 to 1995. ... British Thomson-Houston (BTH) was a British engineering and heavy industrial company, known primarily for their electrical systems and steam turbines. ... is the 318th day of the year (319th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


The Company, with John Reith as general manager, became the British Broadcasting Corporation in 1927 when it was granted a Royal Charter of incorporation and ceased to be privately owned. It started experimental television broadcasting in 1932 using an electromechanical 30 line system developed by John Logie Baird. It became a regular service (known as the BBC Television Service) in 1936 alternating between a Baird mechanical 240 line system and the all electronic 405 line Marconi-EMI system. The superiority of the electronic system saw the mechanical system dropped later that year. Television broadcasting was suspended from 1 September 1939 to 7 June 1946 during the Second World War. A widely reported urban myth is that, upon resumption of service, announcer Leslie Mitchell started by saying, "As I was saying before we were so rudely interrupted..." In fact, the first person to appear when transmission resumed was Jasmine Bligh and the words said were "Good afternoon, everybody. How are you? Do you remember me, Jasmine Bligh...?"[12] For the ship of the same name, see Royal Charter (ship). ... For other persons named John Baird, see John Baird (disambiguation). ... BBC One (or BBC1 as it was formally styled) is the oldest television station in the United Kingdom, and indeed, the world. ... 405 line is the name of a monochrome analogue television broadcasting system in operation in the UK between 1936 and 1985, and also used for some time in Ireland and Hong Kong. ... is the 244th day of the year (245th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1939 (MCMXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 158th day of the year (159th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1946 (MCMXLVI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full 1946 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... Urban Legend is also the name of a 1998 movie. ... Leslie Mitchell (born October 4, 1905 in Edinburgh, died November 23, 1985 in London) was famous in the United Kingdom as the first voice heard on BBC Television at its inception on November 2, 1936, and also for making the first announcement on Associated-Rediffusion, the first ITV company, on... Jasmine Bligh was one of the first three BBC Television service presenters. ...


The European Broadcasting Union was formed on 12 February 1950, in Torquay with the BBC among the 23 founding broadcasting organisations. EBU redirects here. ... is the 43rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1950 (MCML) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Competition to the BBC was introduced in 1955 with the commercially and independently operated television network ITV, however, the BBC monopoly on radio services would persist into the 1970s. As a result of the Pilkington Committee report of 1962, in which the BBC was lauded and ITV was very heavily criticised for not providing enough quality programming,[13] the BBC was awarded a second TV channel, BBC2, in 1964, renaming the existing channel BBC1. BBC2 used the higher resolution 625 line standard which had been standardised across Europe. BBC2 was broadcast in colour from 1 July 1967, and was joined by BBC 1 and ITV on 15 November 1969. The 405 line VHF transmissions of BBC 1 (and ITV) were continued for compatibility with older television receivers until 1985. For other uses, see ITV (disambiguation). ... The Pilkington Committee was set up on July 13, 1960 under the chairmanship of British industrialist Sir Harry Pilkington to consider the future of broadcasting, cable and the possibility of television for public showing. The report, published in 1962, criticised the populism of ITV, and recommended that Britains third... For the BBC radio station, see BBC Radio 2. ... BBC One (or BBC1 as it was formerly styled) is the oldest United Kingdom, and indeed, the world. ... is the 182nd day of the year (183rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1967 (MCMLXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the 1967 Gregorian calendar. ... is the 319th day of the year (320th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also: 1969 (number) 1969 (movie) 1969 (Stargate SG-1) episode. ... Very high frequency (VHF) is the radio frequency range from 30 MHz to 300 MHz. ...


Starting in 1964 a series of pirate radio stations (starting with Radio Caroline) came on the air, and forced the British government finally to regulate radio services to permit nationally-based advertising-financed services. In response the BBC reorganized and renamed their radio channels. The Light Programme was split into Radio 1 offering continuous rock music and Radio 2 more "Easy Listening".[14] The "Third" programme became Radio 3 offering classical music and cultural programming. The Home Service became Radio 4 offering news, and non-musical content such as quiz shows, readings, dramas and plays. As well as the four national channels, a series of local BBC radio stations was established.[15] The term Pirate Radio usually refers to illegal or unregulated radio transmission. ... Radio Caroline is a European radio station that started transmissions on Easter Sunday 1964 from a ship anchored in international waters off the coast of Felixstowe, Suffolk England. ...


In 1974, the BBC's teletext service, Ceefax, was introduced, developed initially to provide subtitling, but developed into a news and information service. In 1978 the BBC went on strike just before the Christmas of that year, thus blocking out the transmission of both channels and amalgamating all four radio stations into one.[16][17] A BBC Ceefax page from 10 September 1999 Ceefax (phonetic for See Facts) is the BBCs teletext information service. ...


Since the deregulation of the UK television and radio market in the 1980s, the BBC has faced increased competition from the commercial sector (and from the advertiser-funded public service broadcaster Channel 4), especially on satellite television, cable television, and digital television services.[citation needed] Deregulation is the process by which governments remove, reduce, or simplify restrictions on business and individuals in order to (in theory) encourage the efficient operation of markets. ... This article is about the British television station. ... Satellite television is television delivered by way of communications satellites, as compared to conventional terrestrial television and cable television. ... Cable TV redirects here. ... Digital television (DTV) refers to the sending and receiving of moving images and sound by means of discrete (digital) signals, in contrast to the analog signals used by analog TV. Introduced in the late 1990s, this technology appealed to the television broadcasting business and consumer electronics industries as offering new...


The BBC Research Department has played a major part in the development of broadcasting and recording techniques. In the early days it carried out essential research into acoustics and programme level and noise measurement.[citation needed] The BBC Research Department made major contributions to broadcast technology, carrying out original research in many areas, and developing items like the Peak programme meter (PPM) which became the basis for many world standards. ...


The 2004 Hutton Inquiry and the subsequent Report raised questions about the BBC's journalistic standards and its impartiality. This led to resignations of senior management members at the time including the then Director General, Greg Dyke. In January 2007, the BBC released minutes of the Board meeting which led to Greg Dyke's resignation. Many commentators have considered the discussions documented in the minutes to have made Dyke's ability to remain in position untenable and tantamount to a dismissal.[citation needed] The Hutton Inquiry was a British judicial inquiry chaired by Lord Hutton, appointed by the British government to investigate the death of a government weapons expert, Dr. David Kelly. ... Gregory Dyke (born 20 May 1947) is a journalist and broadcaster. ...


Unlike the other departments of the BBC, BBC World Service is funded by the Foreign and Commonwealth Office. The Foreign and Commonwealth Office, more commonly known as the Foreign Office or the FCO, is the British government department responsible for promoting the interests of the United Kingdom abroad. The Foreign and Commonwealth Office, Whitehall, seen from St. ...


On 18 October 2007, BBC Director General Mark Thompson announced a controversial plan to make major cuts and reduce the size of the BBC as an organisation. The plans include a reduction in posts of 2,500; including 1,800 redundancies, consolidating news operations, reducing programming output by 10% and selling off the flagship Television Centre building in London.[18] These plans have been fiercely opposed by unions, who have threatened a series of strikes, however the BBC have stated that the cuts are essential to move the organisation forward and concentrate on increasing the quality of programming. is the 291st day of the year (292nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... BBC Television Centre (sometimes abbreviated TVC or TC) in London is home to much of the BBCs television output and, since 1998, almost all of the corporations national TV and radio news output by BBC News. ...


Corporation

Royal Charter

The BBC is a quasi-autonomous Public Corporation operating as a public service broadcaster incorporated under a Royal Charter that is reviewed every 10 years. Until 2007, the Corporation was run by a board of governors appointed by The Queen or King on the advice of the government for a term of four years, but on 1 January 2007 the Board of Governors was replaced with the BBC Trust. The BBC is required by its charter to be free from both political and commercial influence and to answer only to its viewers and listeners.[4] This article does not cite any references or sources. ... In the United Kingdom the term public service broadcasting (PSB) refers to broadcasting intended for the public benefit rather than for purely commercial concerns. ... The agencies responsible for the government of the United Kingdom consist of a number of ministerial departments (usually headed by a Secretary of State) and non-ministerial departments headed by senior civil servants. ... is the 1st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... The BBC Trust logo The BBC Trust is a body that oversees the BBC, being independent of BBC management and external bodies. ...


The most recent Charter came into effect on 1 January 2007.[4] It has created a number of important changes to the Corporation's management and purpose: is the 1st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ...

  • Abolition of the Board of Governors, and their replacement by the BBC Trust.
  • A redefinition of the BBC's "public services" (which are considered its prime function):
    • Sustaining citizenship and civil society;
    • Promoting education and learning;
    • Stimulating creativity and cultural excellence;
    • Representing the UK, its nations, regions and communities;
    • Bringing the UK to the world and the world to the UK;
    • Helping to deliver to the public the benefit of emerging communications technologies and services, and taking a leading role in the switchover to digital television.
  • The BBC must display at least one of the following characteristics in all content: high quality, originality, innovation, to be challenging and to be engaging.
  • The BBC must demonstrate that it provides public value in all its major activities.

The BBC Trust logo The BBC Trust is a body that oversees the BBC, being independent of BBC management and external bodies. ...

Corporate structure

  • Governance Unit
  • Content Groups
    • Journalism (incorporates News, Sport, Global News and Nations and Regions)
    • Vision (incorporates all TV production)
    • Audio and Music (incorporates all radio production, music commissioning and BBC Radio Resources)
    • Future Media and Technology (Incorporates New Media, R&D, Information and Archives)
  • Professional Services
    • Strategy (formerly Strategy and Distribution and merged with Policy and Legal)
    • Marketing, Communications and Audiences
    • Finance
    • BBC Workplace (Property)
    • BBC People (to 2004, Human Resources & Internal Communications)
    • BBC Training & Development
  • Commercial Groups

BBC Resources provides BBC Studios and Outside Broadcast facilities based in London UK, along with network network Post Production facilities in England (ie excluding the other UK Nations of Scotland, Northern Ireland and Wales). ... BBC Worldwide Limited is the wholly-owned commercial subsidiary of the British Broadcasting Corporation, formed out of a restructuring of its predecessor BBC Enterprises in 1995. ...

Management

The BBC is a nominally autonomous corporation, independent from direct government intervention, with its activities being overseen by the BBC Trust, formerly the Board of Governors. General management of the organisation is in the hands of a Director-General, who is appointed by the Trust. The BBC Trust logo The BBC Trust is a body that oversees the BBC, being independent of BBC management and external bodies. ... The Board of Governors of the BBC is a group of twelve people who together regulate the BBC and represent the interests of the public, in particular those of viewers and listeners. ... The Director-General is chief executive and editor-in-chief of the BBC. The position is appointed by Board of Governors of the BBC. Sir John Reith (1927-1938) Sir Frederick Ogilvie (1938-1942) Sir Cecil Graves and Robert W. Foot (joint Director-Generals, 1942-1943) Robert W. Foot (1942...


BBC Trust

Main article: BBC Trust

The BBC Trust came into effect on 1 January 2007, replacing the Board of Governors. The BBC Trust logo The BBC Trust is a body that oversees the BBC, being independent of BBC management and external bodies. ... is the 1st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ...

"The BBC Trust works on behalf of licence fee payers: it ensures the BBC provides high quality output and good value for all UK citizens and it protects the independence of the BBC." — BBC Trust[19]

The Trust sets the overall strategic direction for the corporation and assesses the performance of the BBC Executive Board. The Trust has twelve trustees, currently:[20]

The original trustees, three former governors and eight new members, were announced by Tessa Jowell, Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, in October 2006.[21] Michael Grade, then Chairman of the Governors, was to become Chairman of the Trust at the time of the announcement, but due to his move to ITV, Chitra Bharucha became the Acting Chair.[22] Sir Michael Lyons took over as Chairman from 1 May 2007.[23] Dr Chitra Bharucha MB BS, FRCPath, FRSA, is a former Consultant Haematologist and the current Acting Chair of the BBC Trust. ... Dr Diane Coyle (born in Lancashire[1]), is a freelance economist, and a former advisor to the UK Treasury. ... Dermot Gleeson is a barrister, former Irish government advisor and businessman born in Cork, Ireland in 1949. ... Dame Patricia Hodgson, DBE has been the Principal of Newnham College, Cambridge, since August 2006. ... Jeremy Peat (born 1945) is a banker and a Governor of the BBC. He was appointed to the Board of Governors of the BBC for four years from 1 January 2005 and is the National Governor for Scotland. ... Richard Tait is a BBC Governor appointed for a four year term on 1 August 2004. ... Tessa Jowell (born 17 September 1947 in London) is a British politician. ... The Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport is a UK cabinet position with responsibility for the Department for Culture, Media and Sport. ... For other uses, see ITV (disambiguation). ... is the 121st day of the year (122nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ...


Executive Board

The Executive Board oversees the effective delivery of the corporation's objectives and obligations within a framework set by the BBC Trust, and is headed by the Director-General, Mark Thompson. In December 2006, Thompson announced the final appointments to the new Executive Board, consisting of ten directors from the different operations of the group, and five non-executive directors, appointed to provide independent and professional advice to the Executive Board. The members are:[24] This article is about the Director-General of the BBC. For other individuals with the same name, see Mark Thompson (disambiguation) Mark Thompson (born July 31, 1957) is Director-General of the BBC, a post he has held since 2004, and a former chief executive of Channel 4. ...

  • Mark Thompson (Board Chairman and Director-General)
  • Mark Byford (Deputy Chairman and Deputy Director-General; Director, Journalism Group)
  • Caroline Thomson (Chief Operating Officer)
  • Jana Bennett OBE (Director, BBC Vision)
  • Jenny Abramsky (Director, BBC Audio and Music)
  • Ashley Highfield (Director, Future Media and Technology; resignation announced)
  • John Smith (Chief Executive, BBC Worldwide)
  • Zarin Patel (Group Finance Director)
  • Steve Kelly (Director, BBC People)
  • Tim Davie (Director, Marketing, Communications and Audiences)

Non-executive directors: This article is about the Director-General of the BBC. For other individuals with the same name, see Mark Thompson (disambiguation) Mark Thompson (born July 31, 1957) is Director-General of the BBC, a post he has held since 2004, and a former chief executive of Channel 4. ... Mark Byford (born June 13, 1958) is Deputy Director General of the BBC and head of all its journalism. ... Jana Bennett joined the BBC as Director of Television in April 2002 having previously been Executive Vice President and General Manager at Discovery Communications in the USA. External link BBC Website Categories: Substubs | People stubs ... Jenny Abramsky (born 7 October 1946) is Director of BBC Audio and Music. ... Ashley Highfield (born October 3rd 1965) joined the BBC in October 2000 as Director of New Media & Technology. ... John Smith joined the BBC in 1989. ... Zarin Patel is the BBCs Chief Financial Officer. ... Tim Davie is the BBCs Director of Marketing, Communications & Audiences. ...

Marcus Ambrose Paul Agius (born 22 July 1946) is a British financier and businessman, currently Chairman of Barclays. ... Barclays Bank is the fourth largest bank in the United Kingdom. ... Michael Richard Lynch was born in Carrick-on-Suir, County Tipperary, Republic of Ireland in 1965. ... Autonomy Corporation plc (LSE: AU.) is an enterprise software company based in Cambridge, United Kingdom, and San Francisco, USA. It is generally considered to be the technology leader in Enterprise Search as well as being the leader in revenue, customer numbers, and for public companies in revenue growth. ... Rexam PLC is a PLC listed on the LSE with headquarters in the UK. Their main businesses are the provision of packaging solutions and the manufacturing of beverage cans. ... Chief Executive may refer to: Chief Executive of Hong Kong Chief Executive of Macau Chief Executive Officer This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... A General Counsel is the chief lawyer of a legal department, usually in a corporation or government department. ... For the 1930s airline of similar name, see British Airways Ltd. ...

Governors

The Board of Governors regulated the group from incorporation in 1927 until 31 December 2006, when the Board was replaced by the BBC Trust. The governors as of the dissolution of the Board were: The Board of Governors of the BBC is a group of twelve people who together regulate the BBC and represent the interests of the public, in particular those of viewers and listeners. ...

Anthony Salz, a prominent solicitor, is the current Vice Chairman of the BBC. Salz assumed the position on August 1, 2004 after the resignation of the former Vice Chairman, Lord Ryder. ... Professor Ranjit Sondhi is a BBC Governor with responsibility for the English regions. ... Professor Fabian Monds is a BBC Governor with resposibility for Northern Ireland. ... Professor Merfyn Jones is a historian, broadcaster, governor of the BBC and vice-chancellor of the University of Wales, Bangor. ... Jeremy Peat (born 1945) is a banker and a Governor of the BBC. He was appointed to the Board of Governors of the BBC for four years from 1 January 2005 and is the National Governor for Scotland. ... Deborah Bull CBE (born March 22, 1963) is an English dancer, writer, and broadcaster. ... The Right Honourable Ruth Lynn Deech, Baroness Deech, DBE (born 1943 in Clapham, London) is an academic and a Governor of the BBC. Deech studied Law at St Annes College, Oxford, graduating with a first in 1965. ... Dermot Gleeson (born 5 September 1949) is a current BBC Governor and will join the board of the new BBC Trust. ... Angela Sarkis is a BBC Governor appointed for a four year term in October 2002. ... Richard Tait is a BBC Governor appointed for a four year term on 1 August 2004. ...

Finance

The BBC has the largest budget of any UK broadcaster with an operating expenditure of £4 billion in 2005[25] compared to £3.2 billion for British Sky Broadcasting,[26] £1.7 billion for ITV[27] and £79 million (in 2006) for GCap Media (the largest commercial radio broadcaster).[28] British Sky Broadcasting (BSkyB — formerly two companies, Sky Television and BSB) is a company that operates Sky Digital, a subscription television service in the UK and the Republic of Ireland. ... For other uses, see ITV (disambiguation). ... GCap Media plc is a British commercial radio company formed from the merger of the Capital Radio Group and GWR Group. ...


Revenue

See also: Television licence and Television licensing in the United Kingdom

The principal means of funding the BBC is through the television licence, costing £11.37 a month if paid by direct debit (as of February 2007). Such a licence is required to operate a broadcast television receiver within the UK. The cost of a television licence is set by the government and enforced by the criminal law. The revenue is collected privately and is paid into the central government Consolidated Fund, a process defined in the Communications Act 2003. This collection is carried out by an outside Agency called Capita. Funds are then allocated by the DCMS and Treasury and approved by Parliament via the Appropriation Act(s). Additional revenues are paid by the Department for Work and Pensions to compensate for subsidised licences for over-75s. This article is about a licence that is required to own or operate a television or radio. ... In the United Kingdom and the Crown dependencies, a television licence is required to receive any publically broadcast television service, from any source. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1556x620, 34 KB) Summary BBC income 2004, from the BBC Annual Report as quoted in Licensing File links The following pages link to this file: BBC ... Direct debit is a payment method that allows an organisation to instruct their bank to collect varying amounts directly from customers accounts. ... The Consolidated Fund is the British governments central bank account, held at the Bank of England. ... See also the Communications Act 2003 (Nigeria). ...


Income from commercial enterprises and from overseas sales of its catalogue of programmes has substantially increased over recent years,[29] with BBC Worldwide contributing some £145 million to the BBC's core public service business. BBC Worldwide Limited is the wholly-owned commercial subsidiary of the British Broadcasting Corporation, formed out of a restructuring of its predecessor BBC Enterprises in 1995. ...


According to the BBC's 2005-2006 Annual Report,[30] its income can be broken down as follows:

  • £3,100.6 m licence fees collected from householders.
  • £620.0 m from BBC Commercial Businesses.
  • £260.2 m from the World Service, of which £239.1 m is from grants (primarily funded by the Foreign and Commonwealth Office), £15.8 m from subscriptions, and £5.3 m from other sources.
  • £24.2 m from other income, such as providing content to overseas broadcasters and concert ticket sales.

Expenditure

The BBC gives two forms of expenditure statement for the financial year 2005-2006.


The amount of each licence fee spent monthly[31] breaks down as follows:

Department Monthly cost (GBP)
BBC ONE £3.52
BBC TWO £1.52
Transmission and collection costs £1.08
Nations and English Regions television £1.04
BBC Radio 1, 2, 3, 4 and Five Live £1.02
Digital television channels £1.00
Nations' and local radio 68p
bbc.co.uk 36p
BBC jam 14p
Digital radio stations 10p
Interactive TV (BBCi) 8p
Total £10.54

The total broadcasting spend for 2005-2006[32] is given as: Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (804x602, 52 KB) Summary Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): BBC ... GBP redirects here. ... For the BBC radio station, see BBC Radio 1. ... For the BBC radio station, see BBC Radio 2. ... BBC Radio is a service of the British Broadcasting Corporation which has operated in the United Kingdom under the terms of a Royal Charter since 1927. ... The domain name bbc. ... BBC jam (formerly known as BBC Digital Curriculum) is an online educational service launched by the BBC in January 2006. ... Digital Audio Broadcasting (DAB), also known as Eureka 147, is a technology for broadcasting of audio using digital radio transmission. ... BBCi is the brand name for the BBCs interactive television services. ...

Department Total cost (£million)
Television 1443
Radio 218
bbc.co.uk 72
BBC jam 36
Interactive TV (BBCi) 18
Local radio and regional television 370
Programme related spend 338
Overheads and Digital UK 315
Restructuring 107
Transmission and collection costs 320
Total 3237

Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (804x602, 40 KB) Summary Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): BBC ... GBP redirects here. ...

Headquarters and regional offices

Main BBC headquarters, Broadcasting House, Portland Place, Central London.
Main BBC headquarters, Broadcasting House, Portland Place, Central London.
BBC Northern Ireland headquarters on Ormeau Avenue, Belfast.
BBC Northern Ireland headquarters on Ormeau Avenue, Belfast.
Main article: Broadcasting House

Broadcasting House in Portland Place, London, England, UK is the official headquarters of the BBC. It is home to three of the ten BBC national radio networks. They are BBC Radio 3, BBC Radio 4, and BBC 7. On the front of the building are statues of Prospero and Ariel (from Shakespeare's The Tempest) sculpted by Eric Gill. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 431 × 599 pixels Full resolution (774 × 1076 pixel, file size: 134 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) BBC Broadcasting House, Portland Place at the head of Regent Street, London I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 431 × 599 pixels Full resolution (774 × 1076 pixel, file size: 134 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) BBC Broadcasting House, Portland Place at the head of Regent Street, London I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Portland Place is a street in the Marylebone district of central London. ... Central London is a much-used but unofficial and vaguely defined term for the most inner part of London, the capital of England. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1600x1200, 1393 KB) Summary Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Belfast BBC Northern Ireland Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1600x1200, 1393 KB) Summary Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Belfast BBC Northern Ireland Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera... BBC Northern Ireland is the main public service broadcaster in Northern Ireland. ... This article is about the city in Northern Ireland. ... For other uses, see Broadcasting House (disambiguation). ... Portland Place is a street in the Marylebone district of central London. ... Central London is a much-used but unofficial and vaguely defined term for the most inner part of London, the capital of England. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... BBC Radio 3 is a radio station operated by the BBC within the United Kingdom. ... old Radio 4 logo BBC Radio 4 is a UK domestic radio station which broadcasts a wide variety of spoken-word programmes including news, drama, comedy, science and history. ... BBC Radio 7 is a digital radio station broadcasting comedy, drama, and childrens programming 24 hours a day. ... Prospero and Miranda by William Maw Egley Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Prospero Prospero is the protagonist in The Tempest, a play by William Shakespeare. ... Ariel taking on an illusionary form, at Prosperos command Ariel (IPA: [ɛəriəl]) is a fictional sprite who appears in William Shakespeares play The Tempest. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Arthur Eric Rowton Gill (February 22, 1882–November 17, 1940) was a British sculptor, typographer and engraver. ...


Renovation of Broadcasting House began in 2002 and is scheduled for completion in 2010. As part of a major reorganisation of BBC property, Broadcasting House is to become home to BBC News (both television and radio), national radio, and the BBC World Service. The major part of this plan involves the demolition of the two post-war extensions to the building and construction of a new building[33] beside the existing structure. During the rebuilding process many of the BBC Radio networks have been relocated to other buildings in the vicinity of Portland Place. This article refers to the news department of the British Broadcasting Corporation, for the BBC News Channel see BBC News (TV channel). ... The BBC World Service is one of the most widely recognised international broadcasters, transmitting in 33 languages to many parts of the world through multiple technologies. ...


In 2010, the entire BBC News operation is expected to relocate from the News Centre at BBC Television Centre to the refurbished Broadcasting House in what is being described as "one of the world's largest live broadcast centres".[34] BBC Television Centre (sometimes abbreviated TVC or TC) in London is home to much of the BBCs television output and, since 1998, almost all of the corporations national TV and radio news output by BBC News. ...


By far the largest concentration of BBC staff in the UK exists in White City. Well-known buildings in this area include the BBC Television Centre, White City, Media Centre, Broadcast Centre and Centre House. For other uses, see White City. ... BBC Television Centre (sometimes abbreviated TVC or TC) in London is home to much of the BBCs television output and, since 1998, almost all of the corporations national TV and radio news output by BBC News. ...


As well as the various BBC buildings in London, there are major BBC production centres located in Cardiff, Belfast, Glasgow, Birmingham, Manchester, Bristol, Southampton and Newcastle upon Tyne. Some of these local centres (for example Belfast) are also known as "Broadcasting House" (see Broadcasting House (disambiguation)). There are also many smaller local and regional studios scattered throughout the UK. This article is about the capital city of Wales. ... This article is about the city in Northern Ireland. ... For other uses, see Glasgow (disambiguation). ... This article is about the British city. ... This article is about the City of Manchester in England. ... This article is about the English city. ... For other uses, see Southampton (disambiguation). ... This article is about a city in the United Kingdom. ... Broadcasting House is the name of the BBC headquarters in London, United Kingdom. ...


In 2011, the BBC is planning to move several departments including BBC Sport and BBC Children's north to newly built premises in Salford Quays, Greater Manchester.[35] This will mark a major decentralisation of the corporation's operations from London. BBC Sport is the sports division of the BBC. It became a fully dedicated division of the BBC in 2000. ... BBC Childrens is the name of the department within the BBC responsible for creating programming for children up to the age of 16. ... , Salford Quays is an area of Salford, in Greater Manchester, England, near the end of the Manchester Ship Canal. ... Greater Manchester is a metropolitan county in North West England which has a population of 2. ...


News

Main article: BBC News

BBC News is the largest broadcast news gathering operation in the world,[36] providing services to BBC domestic radio as well as television networks such as the BBC News Channel, BBC Parliament and BBC World News, as well as BBCi, Ceefax and BBC News Online. New BBC News services that are also proving popular are mobile services to mobile phones and PDAs. Desktop news alerts, e-mail alerts, and digital TV alerts are also available. This article refers to the news department of the British Broadcasting Corporation, for the BBC News Channel see BBC News (TV channel). ... BBC Parliament is a British television channel from the BBC. It broadcasts live and recorded coverage of the British House of Commons and House of Lords, Select Committees, the Northern Ireland Assembly, the Scottish Parliament and the Welsh Assembly, and occasionally from the General Synod of the Church of England. ... BBC World News (previously BBC World) is the BBCs international news and current affairs television channel. ... BBCi is the brand name for the BBCs interactive television services. ... A BBC Ceefax page from 10 September 1999 Ceefax (phonetic for See Facts) is the BBCs teletext information service. ... BBC News website in June 2007. ...

Weekly reach of all the BBC's services in the UK
Weekly reach of all the BBC's services in the UK[37]
Weekly reach of the BBC's five national analogue radio stations
Weekly reach of the BBC's five national analogue radio stations[37]
Weekly reach of the BBC's domestic television services
Weekly reach of the BBC's domestic television services[37]

Ratings figures suggest that during major crises such as the 7 July 2005 London bombings or a royal funeral, the UK audience overwhelmingly turns to the BBC's coverage as opposed to its commercial rivals.[38] On 7 July 2005, the day that there were a series of coordinated bomb blasts on London's public transport system, the bbc.co.uk website recorded an all time bandwidth peak of 11 Gb/s at 12:00 on 7 July. BBC News received some 1 billion total hits on the day of the event (including all images, text and HTML), serving some 5.5 terabytes of data. At peak times during the day there were 40,000 page requests per second for the BBC News website. The previous day's announcement of the 2012 Olympics being awarded to London caused a peak of around 5 Gbit/s. The previous all time high at bbc.co.uk was caused by the announcement of the Michael Jackson verdict, which used 7.2 Gbit/s.[39] Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (900x612, 14 KB) Summary Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): BBC User:Daduzi/BBCcharts ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (900x612, 14 KB) Summary Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): BBC User:Daduzi/BBCcharts ... In the application of statistics to advertising and media analysis, reach is defined as the size of the audience who listen to, read, view or otherwise access a particular work in a given time period. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (958x654, 11 KB) Summary Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): BBC User:Daduzi/BBCcharts ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (958x654, 11 KB) Summary Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): BBC User:Daduzi/BBCcharts ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (896x610, 21 KB) Summary Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): BBC User:Daduzi/BBCcharts ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (896x610, 21 KB) Summary Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): BBC User:Daduzi/BBCcharts ... Image File history File links BBC_Television_Centre. ... Image File history File links BBC_Television_Centre. ... BBC Television Centre (sometimes abbreviated TVC or TC) in London is home to much of the BBCs television output and, since 1998, almost all of the corporations national TV and radio news output by BBC News. ... For other uses, see White City. ... Satellite image of the inner part of West London Ayad Dibis is the best in West London. ... The 7 July 2005 London bombings (also called the 7/7 bombings) were a series of coordinated terrorist bomb blasts that hit Londons public transport system during the morning rush hour. ... is the 188th day of the year (189th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The domain name bbc. ... A gigabit is a unit of information or computer storage, abbreviated Gbit or sometimes Gb. ... HTML, an initialism of HyperText Markup Language, is the predominant markup language for web pages. ... This article is about a measurement term for data storage capacity. ... (Redirected from 2012 Olympics) Nine cities submitted bids for the 2012 Summer Olympics, and five have made it to the shortlist for hosting the Games of the XXX Olympiad. ... The domain name bbc. ... Michael Joseph Jackson (August 29, 1958), commonly known as MJ as well as the King of Pop, is an American musician, entertainer, and pop icon whose successful career and controversial personal life have been a part of pop culture for the last three decades. ...


Radio

Further information: BBC Radio, BBC Local Radio

The BBC has five major national stations: BBC Radio is a service of the British Broadcasting Corporation which has operated in the United Kingdom under the terms of a Royal Charter since 1927. ... BBC Local Radio is the BBCs regional radio service for England and the Channel Islands, consisting of 40 stations. ...

  • Radio 1 ("the best new music and entertainment")
  • Radio 2 (the UK's most listened to radio station, with 12.9 million weekly listeners[40])
  • Radio 3 (specialist-interest music such as classical, world, arts, drama and jazz)
  • Radio 4 (current affairs, drama and comedy)
  • Radio 5 Live (24 hour news, sports and talk)

In recent years some further national stations have been introduced on digital radio platforms including Five Live Sports Extra (a companion to Five Live for additional events coverage), 1Xtra (for black, urban and gospel music), 6 Music (less mainstream genres of music), BBC 7 (comedy, drama & children's programming) and BBC Asian Network (British South Asian talk, music and news in English and in many South Asian languages), a station which had evolved from BBC Local Radio origins in the 1970s and still is broadcast on Medium Wave frequencies in some parts of England. In addition the BBC World Service is now also broadcast nationally in the UK on DAB. BBC Radio Five Live is the radio service providing live BBC News, phone-ins, and sports commentaries. ... A typical DAB digital radio receiver with the Digital Radio Development Bureau DAB digital radio marketing logo In the United Kingdom, the roll-out of digital radio is proceeding since test transmissions were started by the BBC in 1990. ... BBC Five Live Sports Extra is an additional radio service provided by the British Broadcasting Corporation via digital radio and the digital satellite and digital terrestrial television services in the UK. It is not available via normal analogue radio. ... BBC 1Xtra is a UK radio station from the BBC specialising in urban music. ... BBC 6 Music is one of the BBCs newest radio stations, launched on March 11, 2002 and originally codenamed Network Y. It is only available via digital media - DAB radio, the Internet and the various forms of digital television. ... For other uses, see Mainstream. ... Asian Network logo BBC Asian Network studio at The Mailbox shopping centre, Birmingham. ... The term British Asian is used to denote a person of Southern Asian ancestry or origin, or sometimes Western Asian origin, who was born in or was an immigrant to the United Kingdom. ...


There is also a network of local stations with a mixture of talk, news and music in England and the Channel Islands as well as national stations (Nations' radio) of BBC Radio Wales, BBC Radio Cymru (in Welsh), BBC Radio Scotland, BBC Radio nan Gaidheal (in Scots Gaelic), BBC Radio Ulster, and BBC Radio Foyle. BBC Local Radio is the BBCs regional radio service for England and the Channel Islands, consisting of 40 stations. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... This article is about the British dependencies. ... BBC Radio Wales is the BBCs national radio station broadcasting to Wales in the English language. ... BBC Radio Cymru is BBC Wales Welsh language radio station, broadcasting throughout Wales on FM since 1979. ... Welsh redirects here, and this article describes the Welsh language. ... BBC Radio Scotland is BBC Scotlands national radio network, broadcasting since 1976 on 92-95 FM and 810 medium wave. ... BBC Radio nan Gaidheal is the BBCs Gaelic language broadcaster for Scotland. ... // Scottish Gaelic (Gàidhlig) is a member of the Goidelic branch of Celtic languages. ... BBC Radio Ulster is a BBC Radio station based in Belfast and is part of BBC Northern Ireland. ... BBC Radio Foyle is a BBC Northern Ireland radio station which serves North West of Northern Ireland. ...


For a world-wide audience, the BBC produces the Foreign Office funded BBC World Service, which is broadcast worldwide on shortwave radio, and on DAB Digital Radio in the UK. The World Service is a major source of news and information programming and can be received in 150 capital cities worldwide, with a weekly audience estimate of 163 million listeners worldwide. The Service currently broadcasts in 33 languages and dialects (including English), though not all languages are broadcast in all areas.[41] The Foreign and Commonwealth Office, Whitehall, seen from St. ... The BBC World Service is one of the most widely recognised international broadcasters, transmitting in 33 languages to many parts of the world through multiple technologies. ... A solid-state, analog shortwave receiver Shortwave radio operates between the frequencies of 3 MHz (3,000 kHz) and 30 MHz (30,000 kHz) [1] and came to be referred to as such in the early days of radio because the wavelengths associated with this frequency range were shorter than...


In 2005, the BBC announced that it would substantially reduce its radio broadcasting in Eastern European languages and divert resources instead to a new Arabic language satellite TV broadcasting station (including radio and online content) in the Middle East to be launched in 2007.[42] Statistical regions of Europe as delineated by the United Nations (UN definition of Eastern Europe marked red):  Northern Europe  Western Europe  Eastern Europe  Southern Europe Pre-1989 division between the West (grey) and Eastern Bloc (orange) superimposed on current borders: Russia (dark orange), other countries formerly part of the USSR... Arabic redirects here. ... A map showing countries commonly considered to be part of the Middle East The Middle East is a region comprising the lands around the southern and eastern parts of the Mediterranean Sea, a territory that extends from the eastern Mediterranean Sea to the Persian Gulf. ...


Since 1943, the BBC has also provided radio programming to the British Forces Broadcasting Service, which broadcasts in countries where British troops are stationed. The British Forces Broadcasting Service was established by the British War Office (now Ministry of Defence) in 1943, and today provides radio and television programming for HM Forces, and their dependents worldwide, in Germany, Cyprus, Belize, Canada, Bosnia, Kosovo and the Middle East. ...


All of the national, local, and regional BBC radio stations, as well as the BBC World Service, are available over the Internet in the RealAudio streaming format. In April 2005, the BBC began trials offering a limited number of radio programmes as podcasts.[43] RealAudio is a proprietary audio format developed by RealNetworks. ... Streaming media is multimedia that is continuously received by, and normally displayed to, the end-user while it is being delivered by the provider. ... A podcast is a series of digital-media files which are distributed over the Internet using syndication feeds for playback on portable media players and computers. ...


Historically, the BBC was the only (legal) radio broadcaster based in the UK mainland until 1967, when University Radio York (URY), then under the name Radio York, was launched as the first (and now oldest) legal independent radio station in the country. However the BBC did not enjoy a complete monopoly prior to this as several Continental stations (such as Radio Luxembourg) broadcast programmes in English to Britain since the 1930s and the Isle of Man based Manx Radio began in 1964. University Radio York (commonly known as URY) is a student radio station covering the campus of the University of York. ... Radio Luxembourg is a commercial radio station that has broadcast in many languages in conjunction with a television service operated from the Grand Duchy of Luxembourg. ... Manx Radio - The Sound of your Life logo. ...


Television

Main article: BBC Television
The back of the BBC Birmingham headquarters in The Mailbox.
The back of the BBC Birmingham headquarters in The Mailbox.

BBC One and BBC Two are the BBC's flagship television channels. The BBC is also promoting the new channels BBC Three and BBC Four, which are only available via digital television equipment (now in widespread use in the UK, with analogue transmission being phased out by December 2012[44]). The BBC also runs the BBC News channel, BBC Parliament, and two children's channels, CBBC and CBeebies, on digital. BBC Television is a service of the British Broadcasting Corporation which began in 1932. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 571 pixelsFull resolution (2132 × 1523 pixel, file size: 404 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg)The front of BBC Birminghamin the Mailbox. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 571 pixelsFull resolution (2132 × 1523 pixel, file size: 404 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg)The front of BBC Birminghamin the Mailbox. ... This article is about the British city. ... Categories: Places of interest in Birmingham, England | Stub ... For the BBC radio station, see BBC Radio 1. ... For the BBC radio station, see BBC Radio 2. ... For the BBC radio station, see BBC Radio 3. ... For the BBC radio station, see BBC Radio 4. ... Digital television (DTV) refers to the sending and receiving of moving images and sound by means of discrete (digital) signals, in contrast to the analog signals used by analog TV. Introduced in the late 1990s, this technology appealed to the television broadcasting business and consumer electronics industries as offering new... BBC Parliament is a British television channel from the BBC. It broadcasts live and recorded coverage of the British House of Commons and House of Lords, Select Committees, the Northern Ireland Assembly, the Scottish Parliament and the Welsh Assembly, and occasionally from the General Synod of the Church of England. ... The CBBC Channel is a British television service aimed at 6 to 13 year olds produced by the BBC. It complements the CBBC programming that continues to air on BBC One and BBC Two. ... CBeebies is a British television channel produced by the BBC and aimed at children six years and under. ...


BBC One is a regionalised TV service which provides opt-outs throughout the day for local news and other local programming. These variations are more pronounced in the BBC 'Nations', i.e. Northern Ireland, Scotland and Wales, where the presentation is mostly carried out locally on BBC One and Two. BBC Two variations within England are currently rare, though most regions still have the ability to 'opt out' of the main feed, albeit on analogue only. BBC Two was also the first channel to be transmitted on 625 lines in 1964, then carry a small-scale regular colour service from 1967. BBC One would follow in December 1969. BBC Northern Ireland is the main public service broadcaster in Northern Ireland. ... BBC Scotland (BBC Alba in Gaelic) is a constituent part of the British Broadcasting Corporation, the publicly-funded broadcaster of the United Kingdom. ... BBC Wales (Welsh: ) is a division of the British Broadcasting Corporation for Wales. ...

BBC Scotland's and BBC Alba's HQ in Glasgow

In the Republic of Ireland, the BBC channels are available in a number of ways. All multichannel platforms carry them, although many viewers also receive BBC services via 'overspill' from transmitters in Northern Ireland or Wales, or via 'deflectors' - transmitters in the Republic which rebroadcast broadcasts from the UK, received off-air, or from Digital Satellite. BBC Scotland (BBC Alba in Gaelic) is a constituent part of the British Broadcasting Corporation, the publicly-funded broadcaster of the United Kingdom. ... BBC Alba is the Gaelic name for Scotlands national television broadcaster, BBC Scotland Television. ...


From June 9, 2006, the BBC began a 6-12 month trial of High-definition television broadcasts under the name BBC HD. The corporation has been producing programmes in the format for many years, and states that it hopes to produce 100% of new programmes in HDTV by 2010.[45] is the 160th day of the year (161st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... High-definition television (HDTV) is a digital television broadcasting system with greater resolution than traditional television systems (NTSC, SECAM, PAL). ... BBC HD is the high-definition television channel launched by the BBC on a trial basis from May 15, 2006, with the first HD originated programme, Planet Earth, shown on May 27. ...


Since 1975, the BBC has also provided its TV programmes to the British Forces Broadcasting Service (BFBS), allowing members of HM Forces serving all over the world to watch and listen to their favourite programmes from home on two dedicated TV channels. The British Forces Broadcasting Service was established by the British War Office (now Ministry of Defence) in 1943, and today provides radio and television programming for HM Forces, and their dependents worldwide, in Germany, Cyprus, Belize, Canada, Bosnia, Kosovo and the Middle East. ... The armed forces of the United Kingdom are known as the British Armed Forces or Her Majestys Armed Forces, officially the Armed Forces of the Crown. ...


Internet

Main article: bbc.co.uk
Main article: BBC iPlayer

The bbc.co.uk [3] website, formerly known as BBCi and before that BBC Online, includes a comprehensive news website and archive. The website uses GeoIP technology and carries advertisements when viewed outside of the UK.[4]BBC claims the site to be "Europe's most popular content-based site"[46] and states that 13.2 million people in the UK visit the site's more than two million pages.[47] According to Alexa's TrafficRank system, in May 2007 bbc.co.uk was the 20th most popular English Language website in the world,[48] and the 33rd most popular overall.[49] The domain name bbc. ... iPlayer redirects here. ... A website (alternatively, web site or Web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos or other digital assets that is hosted on one or more web servers, usually accessible via the Internet. ... BBC News website in June 2007. ... Geo targeting (in internet marketing) is the method of determining the physical location of a website visitor and deliver different content to that visitor based his location, such as country, region/state, city, metro code/zip code, organization, ISP or other criteria. ... Alexa Internet, Inc. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ...


A new version of the BBC website began in December 2007, with the new site enabling the user to customize the BBC's internet services to their own needs. This, on 28th February 2008, was made permanent.[50]


The website allows the BBC to produce sections which complement the various programmes on television and radio, and it is common for viewers and listeners to be told website addresses for the bbc.co.uk sections relating to that programme. The site also allows users to listen to most Radio output live and for seven days after broadcast using its RealPlayer-based "Radio Player"; some TV content is also distributed in RealVideo format. A new system known as iPlayer was launched on July 27, 2007, which uses peer-to-peer and DRM technology to deliver both radio and TV content of the last seven days for offline use for up to 30 days. Also, through participation in the Creative Archive Licence group, bbc.co.uk allowed legal downloads of selected archive material via the internet.[51] As of February 2008 the BBC has also offered television programmes for download on Apple iTunes under the studio title "BBC Worldwide". // Uniform Resource Locator (URL) formerly known as Universal Resource Locator, is a technical, Web-related term used in two distinct meanings: In popular usage and many technical documents, it is a synonym for Uniform Resource Identifier (URI); Strictly, the idea of a uniform syntax for global identifiers of network-retrievable... RealPlayer, briefly known also as RealOne Player, is a cross-platform media player by RealNetworks that plays a number of multimedia formats including MP3, MPEG-4, QuickTime, Windows Media and multiple versions of proprietary RealAudio and RealVideo formats. ... RealVideo is a proprietary video format developed by RealNetworks. ... iPlayer redirects here. ... is the 208th day of the year (209th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... A peer-to-peer (or P2P) computer network is a network that relies on the computing power and bandwidth of the participants in the network rather than concentrating it in a relatively few servers. ... Digital rights management (DRM) is an umbrella term that refers to access control technologies used by publishers and copyright holders to limit usage of digital media or devices. ... The Creative Archive Licence logo. ... Screenshot of Mac OS X version of iTunes The title given to this article is incorrect due to technical limitations. ...


BBC jam was a free online service, delivered through broadband and narrowband connections, providing high-quality interactive resources designed to stimulate learning at home and at school. Initial content was made available in January 2006 however BBC jam was suspended on 20th March 2007 due to allegations made to the European Commission that it was damaging the interests of the commercial sector of the industry.[52] BBC jam (formerly known as BBC Digital Curriculum) is an online educational service launched by the BBC in January 2006. ... Berlaymont, the Commissions seat The European Commission (formally the Commission of the European Communities) is the executive branch of the European Union. ...


In recent years some major on-line companies and politicians have complained that the bbc.co.uk website receives too much funding from the television licence, meaning that other websites are unable to compete with the vast amount of advertising-free on-line content available on bbc.co.uk.[53] Some have proposed that the amount of licence fee money spent on bbc.co.uk should be reduced — either being replaced with funding from advertisements or subscriptions, or a reduction in the amount of content available on the site.[54] In response to this the BBC carried out an investigation, and has now set in motion a plan to change the way it provides its online services. bbc.co.uk will now attempt to fill in gaps in the market, and will guide users to other websites for currently existing market provision. (For example, instead of providing local events information and timetables, users will be guided to outside websites already providing that information.) Part of this plan included the BBC closing some of its websites, and rediverting money to redevelop other parts.[55][56]


Interactive television

Main article: BBCi

BBCi is the brand name for the BBC's interactive digital television services, which are available through Freeview (digital terrestrial), as well as Sky Digital (satellite), and Virgin Media (cable). Unlike Ceefax, BBCi is able to display full-colour graphics, photographs, and video, as well as programmes. Recent examples include the interactive sports coverage for football and rugby football matches, BBC Soundbites which starred young actress Jennifer Lynn and an interactive national IQ test, Test the Nation. All of the BBC's digital television stations, (and radio stations on Freeview), allow access to the BBCi service. BBCi is the brand name for the BBCs interactive television services. ... Digital TV set-top box Interactive television describes a number of techniques which allow viewers to interact with television content as they view it. ... Digital television (DTV) refers to the sending and receiving of moving images and sound by means of discrete (digital) signals, in contrast to the analog signals used by analog TV. Introduced in the late 1990s, this technology appealed to the television broadcasting business and consumer electronics industries as offering new... For a wider corporate history and profile, see British Sky Broadcasting. ... Virgin Media Inc. ... A BBC Ceefax page from 10 September 1999 Ceefax (phonetic for See Facts) is the BBCs teletext information service. ... Soccer redirects here. ... For other uses, see Rugby (disambiguation). ... Jennifer Caroline Lynn (born on February 15, 1988) is a British actress who works in television, film and theatre. ... Test the Nation is a television programme, first broadcast by the BBC in the United Kingdom. ...


As well as the 24/7 service, BBCi provides viewers with over 100 interactive TV programmes every year, including news and weather.[57]


Commercial services

BBC Worldwide Limited is the wholly-owned commercial subsidiary of the BBC responsible for the commercial exploitation of BBC programmes and other properties, including a number of television stations throughout the world. The cable and satellite stations BBC Prime (in Europe, Africa the Middle East, and Asia), BBC America, BBC Canada (alongside BBC Kids), broadcast popular BBC programmes to people outside the UK, as does UK.TV (co-run with Foxtel and Fremantle Media) in Australasia. A similar service, BBC Japan, ceased broadcasts in April 2006 after its Japanese distributor folded.[58] BBC Worldwide also runs a 24-hour news channel, BBC World and co-runs, with Virgin Media, the UKTV network of stations in the UK, producers of amongst others UKTV Gold. In addition, BBC television news appears nightly on many Public Broadcasting Service stations in the United States, as do reruns of BBC programmes such as EastEnders, and in New Zealand on TV One. BBC Worldwide Limited is the wholly-owned commercial subsidiary of the British Broadcasting Corporation, formed out of a restructuring of its predecessor BBC Enterprises in 1995. ... The old BBC Prime logo used until 1997 BBC Prime is the BBCs general entertainment TV channel in Europe, Africa and the Middle East. ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... A world map showing the continent of Africa Africa is the worlds second-largest and second most-populous continent, after Asia. ... A map showing countries commonly considered to be part of the Middle East The Middle East is a region comprising the lands around the southern and eastern parts of the Mediterranean Sea, a territory that extends from the eastern Mediterranean Sea to the Persian Gulf. ... For other uses, see Asia (disambiguation). ... BBC Kids is a Canadian category 2 digital cable television channel owned by Alliance Atlantis and BBC Worldwide. ... UKTV is a subscription television channel in Australia and New Zealand, screening UK entertainment programming, sourced mainly from the archives of the BBC, TALKBACKThames and ITV Plc. ... Foxtel is a subscription television company in Australia, formed through a joint venture between Telstra and News Corporation. ... Australasia Australasia is a term variably used to describe a region of Oceania: Australia, New Zealand, and neighbouring islands in the Pacific Ocean. ... BBC Japan was a television channel from the BBC available via satellite in Japan. ... World News bulletins form the main part of the channels daily schedule. ... Virgin Media Inc. ... This article is about the UKTV network of channels in the UK and Ireland. ... UKTV Gold, (previously known as UK Gold until March 8, 2004), is a British television channel that shows mainly classic BBC entertainment programmes. ... PBS redirects here. ... Albert Square in the 1980s. ... TV One is a New Zealand national television network owned and operated by state-owned media company TVNZ. It is targeted at an older audience, compared to other major television channels in New Zealand. ...


Many BBC programmes (especially documentaries) are sold via BBC Worldwide to foreign television stations, and comedy, documentaries and historical drama productions are popular on the international DVD market.[59] Documentary film is a broad category of visual expression that is based on the attempt, in one fashion or another, to document reality. ... A comedy is a dramatic performance of a light and amusing character, usually with a happy conclusion to its plot. ... Documentary film is a broad category of visual expression that is based on the attempt, in one fashion or another, to document reality. ... A costume drama is a period piece in which elaborate costumes, sets and properties are featured in order to capture the ambience of a particular era. ...


BBC Worldwide also maintains the publishing arm of the BBC and it is the third-largest publisher of consumer magazines in the United Kingdom.[60] BBC Magazines, formerly known as BBC Publications, publishes the Radio Times (and published the now-defunct The Listener) as well as a number of magazines that support BBC programming such as BBC Top Gear, BBC Good Food, BBC Sky at Night, BBC History, BBC Wildlife and BBC Music. BBC Magazines is the magazine publishing division of BBC Worldwide, the commercial subsidiary of the British Broadcasting Corporation. ... Current Radio Times logo Radio Times is the BBCs weekly television and radio programme listings magazine. ... The Listener was a weekly magazine established by the BBC under Lord Reith in January 1929. ... Top Gear is a car magazine published by BBC Worldwide, and named after the BBCs Top Gear television show. ... The Sky at Night is a monthly television programme on astronomy produced by the BBC. The show has had the same permanent presenter, Sir Patrick Moore, from its first airing on 24 April 1957, making it one of the longest-running programmes[1] with the same presenter in television history. ... BBC Wildlife is a British glossy, all-colour, monthly magazine about wildlife, founded by BBC Worldwide and published on their behalf by their subsidiary, Origin Publishing. ... BBC Music is a team working in the department of Radio and Music Interactive at the BBC. Responsible for the BBC Music website - the portal site to music content across the BBC website. ...


BBC Worldwide also produces several branded channels available on satellite in Asia and India, including BBC Lifestyle, BBC Knowledge and BBC Entertainment. In December 2007, a polish version of BBC Entertainment launched.


The BBC has traditionally played a major role in producing book and music tie-ins with its broadcast material. BBC Records produced soundtrack albums, talking books and material from radio broadcasts of music.


Between 2004 and 2006, BBC Worldwide owned the independent magazine publisher Origin Publishing.[61]


BBC Worldwide also licences and directly sells DVD and audio recordings of popular programmes to the public, most notably Doctor Who (including books and merchandise), and archive classical music recordings, initially as BBC Radio Classics and then BBC Legends. DVD (also known as Digital Versatile Disc or Digital Video Disc - see Etymology) is a popular optical disc storage media format. ... This article is about the television series. ... This article is about Western art music from 1000 AD to the present. ...


Miscellaneous

The BBC and the Foreign and Commonwealth Office jointly run BBC Monitoring, which monitors radio, television, the press and the internet worldwide. The BBC Monitoring divisions logo BBC Monitoring is a division of the British Broadcasting Corporation that monitors the mass media worldwide and acts as the British Governments provider of open source intelligence (OSINT). ...


In the 1980s, the BBC developed several PCs, most notably the BBC Micro. The BBC Microcomputer System was a series of microcomputers and associated peripherals designed and built by Acorn Computers Ltd for the BBC Computer Literacy Project operated by the British Broadcasting Corporation. ...


Unions

Union membership is a private matter between staff and their chosen union: staff are not automatically covered by a union, but since the BBC is a large employer (in the media sector), membership numbers are considerable.[citation needed]


Staff at the BBC are normally represented by BECTU, along with journalistic staff by the NUJ and electrical staff by Amicus. Union membership is optional, and paid for by staff members and not by the BBC. The Broadcasting, Entertainment, Cinematograph and Theatre Union (BECTU) is a United Kingdom. ... The National Union of Journalists (NUJ) is a trade union for journalists in the United Kingdom and the Republic of Ireland. ... For other uses, see Amicus (disambiguation). ...


Cultural significance

The BBC was the only television broadcaster in the United Kingdom until 1955 and the only legal radio broadcaster until 1969 (when URY obtained their first licence[citation needed]). Its cultural impact was therefore significant since the country had no choice for its information and entertainment from these two powerful media. University Radio York (commonly known as URY) is a student radio station covering the campus of the University of York. ...


Even after the advent of commercial television and radio, the BBC has remained one of the main elements in British popular culture through its obligation to produce TV and radio programmes for the mass audiences. However the arrival of BBC2 allowed the BBC also to make programmes for minority interests in drama, documentaries, current affairs, entertainment and sport. Examples are cited such as I, Claudius, Civilisation, Tonight, Monty Python's Flying Circus, Doctor Who and Pot Black, but many other ground-breaking examples can be given in each of these fields as shown by the BBC's entries in the British Film Institute's 2000 list of the 100 Greatest British Television Programmes.[62] In radio the BBC has also maintained a high standard of news, drama, entertainment, documentaries, sport and music for all tastes, and still draws large audiences, while also serving minority tastes. I, Claudius, 1976 was a BBC Television adaptation of Robert Gravess I Claudius and Claudius the God. ... Front cover Civilisation (full title, Civilisation: A Personal View) was a popular TV series outlining the history of Western society produced by the BBC and aired in 1969 on BBC Two. ... Tonight was a BBC television current affairs programme presented by Cliff Michelmore and broadcast in Britain live on weekday evenings from 1957 to 1965. ... This article is about the television series. ... This article is about the television series. ... Pot Black was a UK television snooker tournament that played a large part in the popularisation of the modern game. ... The British Film Institute (BFI) is a charitable organisation established by Royal Charter to encourage the development of the arts of film, television and the moving image throughout the United Kingdom, to promote their use as a record of contemporary life and manners, to promote education about film, television and... 100 Greatest British Television Programmes was a list compiled in 2000 by the British Film Institute (BFI) chosen by a poll of industry professionals, to determine what were the greatest British television programmes of any genre ever to have been screened. ...


The BBC's objective of providing a service to the public, rather than just entertainment, has changed the public's perception in a wide range of subjects from health to natural history.[citation needed] By maintaining a high standard the BBC also defined a quality threshold that the commercial companies had to reach to retain their licences, but the advent of the multi-channel age is lessening this effect.[neutrality disputed] The export of BBC programmes, the BBC World Service and BBC World have meant that the cultural impact of the BBC has been also experienced world-wide. The BBC World Service is one of the most widely recognised international broadcasters, transmitting in 33 languages to many parts of the world through multiple technologies. ... World News bulletins form the main part of the channels daily schedule. ...


Although the BBC has changed society, the society has also changed the BBC. The term BBC English (Received Pronunciation) refers to the former use of Standard English with this accent. However the organisation now makes more use of regional accents in order to reflect the diversity of the UK, though clarity and fluency are still expected of presenters. From its 'starchy' beginnings, the BBC has also become more inclusive, and now accommodates the interests of all strata of society and all minorities, because they all pay the licence fee. The BBC therefore plays a major role in maintaining a cohesive society. Received Pronunciation (RP) is a form of pronunciation of the English language, usually defined as the educated spoken English of southeastern England. This is a prescriptivist point-of-view — it is quite possible for an intelligent, educated individual to use a non-standard dialect. ... Standard English is a nebulous term generally used to denote a form of the English language that is thought to be normative for educated users. ... Note: This page or section contains IPA phonetic symbols in Unicode. ...


Competition from Independent Television, Channel 4, Sky and other broadcast television stations, has slightly lessened the BBC's reach, but nevertheless it remains a major influence on British popular culture. Many popular everyday sayings are derived from BBC-produced television shows.[citation needed] For other uses, see ITV (disambiguation). ... This article is about the British television station. ... British Sky Broadcasting (BSkyB — formerly two companies, Sky Television and BSB) is a company that operates Sky Digital, a subscription television service in the UK and the Republic of Ireland. ...


Criticism

Main article: Criticism of the BBC

The BBC has long faced allegations of a left, right wing or liberal bias,[63] and such criticism has been repeated most recently by past and present employees such as Antony Jay, Jeff Randall, Justin Webb and Andrew Marr.[64] Left-wing figures, such as the journalist John Pilger, have frequently accused the BBC of a right-wing bias (a view supported by the left-wing website Media Lens); the anti-Iraq war MP George Galloway has referred to it as the "Bush and Blair Corporation".[65] Criticism of the BBC for alleged biases have come from the British government of the day,as well as from other political groups and various media outlets. ... Sir Antony Rupert Jay CVO (born 20 April 1930) was the co-author, with Jonathan Lynn of the successful British political comedies, Yes, Minister and Yes, Prime Minister (1980-88). ... Jeff William Randall (born October 3, 1954) is a business journalist, formerly the business editor of BBC News and, from 2005, editor-at-large of the Daily Telegraph. ... Justin Webb became BBCs chief radio and Washington correspondent in 2001. ... Andrew Marr (born 31 July 1959, Glasgow, Scotland) is a Scottish journalist and political commentator. ... John Pilger at the Humber Mouth Hull literature festival 2006 John Pilger (born October 9, 1939) is an Australian journalist and documentary filmmaker from Sydney, primarily based in London, England. ... MediaLens is a media analysis website based in the United Kingdom. ... A Member of Parliament, or MP, is a representative elected by the voters to a parliament. ... George Galloway (born 16 August 1954 in Dundee) is a Scottish politician, author and talkshow host noted for his left-wing views, confrontational style, and rhetorical skill. ...


The BBC received its most serious criticism of recent times over its coverage of the events leading up to the war in Iraq.[66] The controversy over what it described as the "sexing up" of the case for war in Iraq by the government, led to the BBC being heavily criticised by the Hutton Inquiry,[67] although this finding was much disputed by the British press.[68] The Hutton Inquiry was a British judicial inquiry chaired by Lord Hutton, appointed by the British government to investigate the death of a government weapons expert, Dr. David Kelly. ...


In August 2007 Plaid Cymru MP Adam Price highlighted what he perceived as a lack of a Welsh focus on BBC news broadcasts.[69] Price threatened to withhold future television license fees in response to a lack of thorough news coverage of Wales, echoing a BBC Audience Council for Wales July report citing public frustration over how the Welsh Assembly is characterized in national media.[70] Plaid AM Bethan Jenkins agreed with Price and called for responsibility for broadcasting to be devolved to the Welsh Assembly, voicing similar calls from Scotland's First Minister Alex Salmond.[69] Criticism of the BBC's news coverage for Wales and Scotland since devolution prompted debate of possibly providing evening news broadcasts with specific focus for both countries.[69] Plaid Cymru (IPA:; English: ; often referred to simply as Plaid) is a political party in Wales. ... Adam Price (born September 23, 1968, Carmarthen) is a politician in Wales, and Plaid Cymru Member of Parliament for Carmarthen East and Dinefwr. ... Television news refers to the practice of disseminating current events via the medium of television. ... A television licence is an official licence required in some countries for all owners of a television receiver. ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... Alexander Elliot Anderson Salmond, known as Alex Salmond (born December 31, 1954, Linlithgow), is a Scottish politician, and the current First Minister of Scotland, heading a minority government. ...


Additionally many people object to the enforced payment of a TV licence in these days of multi stream multi content communications. This is further inflamed by the way the BBC tries to enforce payment of the licence fee, using an outside agency (Capita) to send aggressively worded letters to every premises in the UK not showing as licenced on their database. Many people have responded to this by joining one of the several pressure groups against the licence fee. [71] [72] [73] [74] [75]


See also

BBC Portal
Wikimedia Commons has media related to:


Image File history File links Portal. ... // United Kingdom BBC One BBC Two United Kingdom, digital only (Freeview, digital cable and digital satellite (Astra 2D)) BBC Three BBC Four (replaced BBC Knowledge) BBC Parliament (replaced the non-BBC Parliament Channel) BBC News (also online [1]) CBBC Channel (7-12 year-olds) CBeebies (1-6 year-olds) BBC... British television broadcasting has a range of different broadcasters, broadcasting multiple channels over a variety of distribution media. ... In the United Kingdom the term public service broadcasting (PSB) refers to broadcasting intended for the public benefit rather than for purely commercial concerns. ... // This is a list of early television stations of the 1920s and 1930s that were among the first in the world. ...


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2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 122nd day of the year (123rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 187th day of the year (188th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 3rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 130th day of the year (131st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 187th day of the year (188th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 43rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 127th day of the year (128th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 263rd day of the year (264th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 301st day of the year (302nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 223rd day of the year (224th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 273rd day of the year (274th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 270th day of the year (271st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 273rd day of the year (274th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 243rd day of the year (244th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 203rd day of the year (204th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 291st day of the year (292nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 291st day of the year (292nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 21st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 72nd day of the year (73rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 332nd day of the year (333rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 309th day of the year (310th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The BBC Trust logo The BBC Trust is a body that oversees the BBC, being independent of BBC management and external bodies. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 184th day of the year (185th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 70th day of the year (71st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 187th day of the year (188th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... British Sky Broadcasting (BSkyB — formerly two companies, Sky Television and BSB) is a company that operates Sky Digital, a subscription television service in the UK and the Republic of Ireland. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 188th day of the year (189th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... ITV plc (LSE: ITV) is the British media company that operates 11 of the 15 regional television broadcasters that make up the ITV Network, the oldest and largest commercial terrestrial television network in the United Kingdom. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 188th day of the year (189th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... GCap Media plc is a British commercial radio company formed from the merger of the Capital Radio Group and GWR Group. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 188th day of the year (189th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 187th day of the year (188th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 21st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 188th day of the year (189th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 188th day of the year (189th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 187th day of the year (188th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 187th day of the year (188th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... BBC News website in June 2007. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 151st day of the year (152nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 21st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 188th day of the year (189th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see Guardian. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 359th day of the year (360th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 317th day of the year (318th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... RAJAR (Radio Joint Audience Research Limited) was established in 1992 to operate a single audience measurement system for the radio industry in the United Kingdom. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 187th day of the year (188th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The BBC World Service is one of the most widely recognised international broadcasters, transmitting in 33 languages to many parts of the world through multiple technologies. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 21st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Middle East Times is a daily newspaper published in Cairo, Egypt. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 187th day of the year (188th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 194th day of the year (195th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 74th day of the year (75th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 188th day of the year (189th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 187th day of the year (188th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 187th day of the year (188th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Alexa Internet, Inc. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 71st day of the year (72nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Alexa Internet, Inc. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 71st day of the year (72nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 347th day of the year (348th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 36th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 276th day of the year (277th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The BBC Trust logo The BBC Trust is a body that oversees the BBC, being independent of BBC management and external bodies. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 73rd day of the year (74th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 36th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 187th day of the year (188th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 187th day of the year (188th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... BBC News website in June 2007. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 187th day of the year (188th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see The Independent (disambiguation). ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 226th day of the year (227th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 187th day of the year (188th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 187th day of the year (188th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... BBC Worldwide Limited is the wholly-owned commercial subsidiary of the British Broadcasting Corporation, formed out of a restructuring of its predecessor BBC Enterprises in 1995. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 187th day of the year (188th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... BBC Worldwide Limited is the wholly-owned commercial subsidiary of the British Broadcasting Corporation, formed out of a restructuring of its predecessor BBC Enterprises in 1995. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 195th day of the year (196th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 365th day of the year (366th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The British Film Institute (BFI) is a charitable organisation established by Royal Charter to encourage the development of the arts of film, television and the moving image throughout the United Kingdom, to promote their use as a record of contemporary life and manners, to promote education about film, television and... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 54th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... See also The New York Times, The Times of India, or The Irish Times. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 230th day of the year (231st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 296th day of the year (297th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 21st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Lord Hutton The Right Honourable James Brian Edward Hutton, Baron Hutton, PC (born 29 June 1932), is a former British Law Lord. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 315th day of the year (316th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Cable News Network, commonly known as CNN, is a major cable television network founded in 1980 by Ted Turner. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 315th day of the year (316th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 67th day of the year (68th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 67th day of the year (68th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 67th day of the year (68th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 67th day of the year (68th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 67th day of the year (68th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

Bibliography

  • Briggs, Asa. - The BBC - The First Fifty Years - Condensed version of the five-volume history by the same author. - Oxford University Press, 1985. ISBN 0-19-212971-6
  • Coulton, Barbara. - Louis MacNeice in the BBC - Writer and producer from 1941 to 1961 in the Features Department of BBC radio. - Faber & Faber, 1980. ISBN 0-571-11537-3
  • Gilder PhD., Eric. - Mass Media Moments in the United Kingdom, the USSR and the USA. - Historical background relating to the British Broadcasting Company, Ltd., its founding companies; their transatlantic connections; General Post Office licensing system; commercial competitors from Europe prior to World War II and offshore during the 1960s. - "Lucian Blaga" University of Sibiu Press, Romania. 2003. ISBN 973-651-596-6
  • Milne, Alasdair. - The memoirs of a British broadcaster - History of the Zircon spy satellite affair, written by a former Director General of the BBC. A series of BBC radio programmes called "The Secret Society" led to a raid by police in both England and Scotland to seize documents as part of a government censorship campaign. - Coronet, 1989. - ISBN 0-340-49750-5
  • Moran, Lord. - Churchill at War 1940 to 1945 - The Memoirs of Churchill's Doctor, with an introduction by Lord Moran's son, John, the present Lord Moran. - This diary paints an intimate portrait of Churchill by Sir Charles Watson, his personal physician (Lord Moran), who spent the war years with the Prime Minister. In his diary, Moran recorded insights into Churchill's character, and moments when he let his guard down, including his views about the BBC being riddled with communists. - Carroll & Graf, 2002. Reissue ISBN 0-7867-1041-1
  • Parker, Derek. - David & Charles - Radio: The Great Years - History of BBC radio programmes from the beginning until the date of publication. 1977. ISBN 0-7153-7430-3
  • Spangenberg, Jochen. - The BBC in Transition. Reasons, Results and Consequences - Encompassing account of the BBC and influencing external factors until 1996. - Deutscher Universitaetsverlag. 1997. ISBN 3-8244-4227-2
  • Wilson, H.H. - Pressure Group - History of the political fight to introduce commercial television into the United Kingdom. - Rutgers University Press, 1961.
  • West, W.J. - Truth Betrayed a critical assessment of the BBC, London, 1987, ISBN 0-7156-2182-3

Oxford University Press (OUP) is a highly-respected publishing house and a department of the University of Oxford in England. ... Faber and Faber is a celebrated publishing house in the UK, notable in particular for publishing the poetry of T. S. Eliot. ... David & Charles (also David and Charles) is a publisher specialising in illustrated non-fiction books. ...

External links

  • BBC Homepage at bbc.co.uk
  • About the BBC at bbc.co.uk
  • Editorial Guidelines at bbc.co.uk
  • BBC on YouTube
  • Motion Gallery
  • BBC Programme Catalogue - "Details of 949,181 BBC radio & TV programmes, dating back 75 years"
  • Find a BBC Building at bbc.co.uk
  • First article on the BBC role in Social Bookmarking on the Internet - The BBC added Social Bookmarking links in August 2007, to their News and Sport articles, raising the profile of them significantly.

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