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Encyclopedia > Aztec mythology
The Aztec world
Aztec society

Nahuatl language
Aztec calendar
Aztec religion
Aztec mythology
Human sacrifice in Aztec culture Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Aztec is a term used to refer to certain ethnic groups of central Mexico, particularly those groups who spoke the Nahuatl language and who achieved political and military dominance over large parts of Mesoamerica in the 14th, 15th and 16th centuries, a period referred to as the Late post-Classic... // Aztec society traditionally was divided into two classes; the macehualli (people) or peasantry and the pilli or nobility. ... Nahuatl ( [1] is a term applied to a group of related languages and dialects of the Aztecan [2] branch of the Uto-Aztecan language family, indigenous to central Mexico. ... The Aztec calendar was the calendar of the Aztec people of Pre-Columbian Mexico. ... Aztec religion was a Mesoamerican religion combining elements of polytheism, shamanism and animism within a framework of astronomy and calendrics. ... Human sacrifice was an aspect of historical Aztec culture/religion, although the extent of the practice is debated by scholars. ...

Aztec history

Aztlán
Aztec codices
Aztec warfare
Aztec Triple Alliance
Spanish conquest of Mexico
Siege of Tenochtitlan
La Noche Triste
Hernán Cortés The Aztecs were a Pre-Columbian Mesoamerican people of central Mexico in the 14th, 15th and 16th centuries. ... For other uses, see Aztlán (disambiguation). ... Detail of first page from the Boturini Codex, depicting the departure from Aztlán. ... Note: This page or section contains IPA phonetic symbols in Unicode. ... The Aztec Triple Alliance, also known as The Aztec Empire, was an alliance of three Aztec city-states: Tenochtitlán; Texcoco; and Tlacopán. ... Aztec empire The Spanish conquest of the Aztec Empire was one of the most important campaigns in the Spanish colonization of America. ... Combatants Spain Tlaxcallān Aztec Empire Commanders Hernán Cortés Pedro de Alvarado Cuitláhuac Cuauhtémoc Strength 86 cavalry 900 infantry 80,000 natives 100,000- 300,000 warriors[1] Casualties 20,000 natives dead 100,000 dead 100,000 civilian dead The Siege of Tenochtitlan ended in... Hernán Cortés Hernán Cortés, marqués del Valle de Oaxaca (1485–December 2, 1547) was the conquistador who conquered Mexico for Spain. ... Hernán(do) Cortés Pizarro, 1st Marqués del Valle de Oaxaca (1485–December 2, 1547) was the conquistador who became famous for leading the military expedition that initiated the Spanish Conquest of Mexico. ...

Hueyi Tlatoani

Acamapichtli (13761395)
Huitzilíhuitl (13951417)
Chimalpopoca (14171427)
Itzcóatl (14271440)
Moctezuma I (14401469)
Axayacatl (14691481)
Tízoc (14811486)
Ahuitzotl (14861502)
Moctezuma II (15021520)
Cuitláhuac (1520)
Cuauhtémoc (15201521) Huey Tlatoani (Nahuatl great speaker, also spelt Uei Tlatoani or Hueyi Tlahtoani; plural Huey Tlatoque) was the Nahuatl title used for the emperor of the Mexica (Aztec). ... Acamapichtli was the first tlatoani (king) of the Aztecs of Tenochtitlan. ... // Events March – The treaty between England and France is extended until April of 1377. ... Events End of reign of Hungary by Capet-Anjou family. ... Huitzilíhuitl (died circa 1417) was the second Tlatoani, or Aztec ruler of Tenochtitlan. ... Events End of reign of Hungary by Capet-Anjou family. ... Events Antipope Benedict XIII is deposed, and Pope Martin V is elected. ... Chimalpopoca (died circa 1427) was the third Tlatoani, or Aztec ruler of Tenochtitlán. ... Events Antipope Benedict XIII is deposed, and Pope Martin V is elected. ... Events Lincoln College, a constituent college of the University of Oxford, is founded. ... Itzcoatl (Obsidian Serpent in Nahuatl) was the fourth tlatoani (emperor) of the Aztecs, ruling from 1427 (or 1428) to 1440, the period when the Mexica (as the Aztecs called themselves) threw off the domination of the Tepanecs and laid the foundations for the eventual Aztec Empire. ... Events Lincoln College, a constituent college of the University of Oxford, is founded. ... For alternative meanings, see number 1440. ... Moctezuma Ilhuicamina, or Moctezuma I (also known as Montezuma I) (the surname meaning solitary one who shoots an arrow into the sky) was born to Huitzilihuitl, the second Aztec Emperor. ... For alternative meanings, see number 1440. ... Events July 26 - Battle of Edgecote Moor October 17 - Prince Ferdinand of Aragon wed princess Isabella of Castile. ... Axayacatl (pron. ... Events July 26 - Battle of Edgecote Moor October 17 - Prince Ferdinand of Aragon wed princess Isabella of Castile. ... Year 1481 was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar). ... Tízoc was the Aztec ruler (Tlatoani) of the city of Tenochtitlán. ... Year 1481 was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar). ... Events Tízoc, Aztec ruler of Tenochtitlan dies. ... Auítzotl (sometimes rendered as Ahuitzotl) was the Aztec ruler of the city of Tenochtitlán. ... Events Tízoc, Aztec ruler of Tenochtitlan dies. ... 1502 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Moctezuma or Montezuma II, also known as Motecuhzoma Xocoyotzin (c. ... 1502 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1520 (MDXX) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar. ... Cuitláhuac was the Aztec ruler (Tlatoani) of the city of Tenochtitlán from June to October 1520. ... Year 1520 (MDXX) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar. ... For other uses, see Cuauhtémoc (disambiguation). ... Year 1520 (MDXX) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar. ... Events January 3 - Pope Leo X excommunicates Martin Luther in the papal bull Decet Romanum Pontificem. ...

The Aztec civilization recognized a polytheistic mythology, which contained the many gods (over 100) and supernatural creatures from their religious beliefs. Aztec is a term used to refer to certain ethnic groups of central Mexico, particularly those groups who spoke the Nahuatl language and who achieved political and military dominance over large parts of Mesoamerica in the 14th, 15th and 16th centuries, a period referred to as the Late post-Classic...

Contents

History

Aztec culture is generally grouped with the cultural complex known as the Nahua because of the common language they shared. According to legend, the various groups who were to become the Aztecs arrived from the north into the Anahuac valley around Lake Texcoco. The location of this valley and lake of destination is clear – it is the heart of modern Mexico City – but little can be known with certainty about the origin of the Aztec. The Nahua are a group of indigenous peoples of Mexico. ... For the city in Mexico, see Anáhuac, Nuevo León. ... Lake Texcoco is a lake in Mexico. ... Mexico City (in Spanish: Ciudad de México, México, D.F. or simply México) is the capital city of Mexico. ...


There are different accounts of their origin. In the myth the ancestors of the Mexica/Aztec came from a place in the north called Aztlán, the last of seven nahuatlacas (Nahuatl-speaking tribes, from tlaca, "man") to make the journey southward, hence their name "Azteca". Other accounts cite their origin in Chicomostoc, "the place of the seven caves", or at Tamoanchan (the legendary origin of all civilizations). For other uses, see Aztlán (disambiguation). ...


The Mexica/Aztec were said to be guided by their god Huitzilopochtli, meaning "Left-handed Hummingbird" or "Hummingbird from the South". When they arrived at an island in the lake, they saw an eagle which was perched on a nopal cactus full of its fruits (nochtli). (Due to a mistranslation of an account by Tesozomoc, it became popular to say the eagle was devouring a snake, but in the original Aztec accounts, the snake is not mentioned. One states that it was eating a bird, another indicates that it was only perched in the cactus, and a third just says it was eating something.) This vision fulfilled a prophecy telling them that they should found their new home on that spot. The Aztecs built their city of Tenochtitlan on that site, building a great artificial island, which today is in the center of Mexico City. This legendary vision is pictured on the Coat of Arms of Mexico. // Huitzilopochtli, as depicted in the Codex Telleriano-Remensis. ... For other uses, see Hummingbird (disambiguation). ... Genera Several, see below. ... A nopales merchant at his stand in the Merced market of Mexico City Nopals are a vegetable made from the young stem segments of prickly pear, carefully peeled to remove the spines. ... Tenochtitlan, looking east. ... Before Mexico City, Tenochtitlan was an artificial island of 250,000 (Dr Atl) Dejima, not allowed direct contact with nearby Nagasaki Formoza (Gdynia) The World in Dubai An artificial island is an island that has been formed by human, rather than natural means. ... Mexico City (in Spanish: Ciudad de México, México, D.F. or simply México) is the capital city of Mexico. ... The Coat of Arms of Mexico has been an important symbol of Mexican politics and culture for centuries. ...

Mask of Xiuhtecuhtli, c. c. 1500, of Mixtec-Aztec provenance.
Mask of Xiuhtecuhtli, c. c. 1500, of Mixtec-Aztec provenance.

According to legend, when the Mexicas arrived in the Anahuac valley around Lake Texcoco, they were considered by the other groups as the least civilized of all, but the Mexica/Aztec decided to learn, and they took all they could from other peoples, especially from the ancient Toltec (whom they seem to have partially confused with the more ancient civilization of Teotihuacan). To the Aztec, the Toltecs were the originators of all culture; "Toltecayotl" was a synonym for culture. Aztec legends identify the Toltecs and the cult of Quetzalcoatl with the legendary city of Tollan, which they also identified with the more ancient Teotihuacan. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2472x3176, 847 KB) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2472x3176, 847 KB) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Lake Texcoco is a lake in Mexico. ... The Atlantes – columns in the form of Toltec warriors in Tula. ... Teotihuacan was the largest Pre-Columbian known city in the Americas, and the name Teotihuacan is used to refer to the civilization this city dominated, which at its greatest extent included most of Mesoamerica. ... It has been suggested that this article be split into multiple articles. ... Tollan or Tolan or Tolán is the name used for the capital city of two empires of Pre-Columbian Mesoamerica; first for Teotihuacan, and later for the Toltec capital of Tula. ...


Because the Aztec adopted and combined several traditions with their own earlier traditions, they had several creation myths; one of these describes four great ages preceding the present world, each of which ended in a catastrophe. Our age – Nahui-Ollin, the fifth age, or fifth creation – escaped destruction due to the sacrifice of a god (Nanahuatl, "full of sores", the smallest and humblest of the gods) who was transformed into the Sun. This myth is associated with the ancient city of Teotihuacan, which was already abandoned and destroyed when the Aztec arrived. Another myth describes the earth as a creation of the twin gods Tezcatlipoca and Quetzalcoatl. Tezcatlipoca lost his foot in the process of creating the world and all representations of these gods show him without a foot and with a bone exposed. Quetzalcoatl is also called "White Tezcatlipoca". Creation beliefs and stories describe how the universe, the Earth, life, and/or humanity came into being. ... In Aztec mythology, the god Nanauatl (or Nanauatzin, the suffix tzin implies respect or familiarity) sacrificed himself in fire so that it would continue to shine on Earth as the sun, thus becoming the sun god. ... Tezcatlipoca as depicted in the Codex Borgia. ... It has been suggested that this article be split into multiple articles. ...


Gods

  • Acolnahuacatl, or Acolmiztli - a god of the underworld, Mictlan
  • Acuecucyoticihuati (see Chalchiuhtlicue)
  • Amimitl - god of lakes and fishermen
  • Atl - god of water
Chalchiutlicue from Codex Ríos.
Chalchiutlicue from Codex Ríos.
  • Chalchiuhtlicue (also Chalciuhtlicue, or Chalchihuitlicue) (She of the Jade Skirt). (Sometimes Acuecucyoticihuati) - the goddess of lakes and streams, and also of birth; consort of Tlaloc.
  • Chalchiuhtotoliq (Precious Night Turkey) - god of pestilence and mystery
  • Chalmecatecuchtlz - a god of the underworld, Mictlan and sacrifices
  • Chalmecatl the underworld, Mictlan and the north
  • Chantico - the goddess of hearth fires, personal treasure, and volcanoes
  • Chicomecoatl (also Chalchiuhcihuatl, Chiccomeccatl, or Xilonen) - goddess of new maize and produce, wife of Cinteotl.
  • Ehecatl (also Ehecatl-Quetzalcoatl) - the god of the Wind and creator of the earth, heavens, and the present race of men. As god of the west, one of the skybearers
  • Huehuecoyotl (also Ueuecoyotl) - a trickster god of indulgence and pranks. A shapeshifter, associated with drums and the coyote
  • Huehueteotl (also Ueueteotl, Xiuhtecuhtli, Xiutechuhtli) - an ancient god of the hearth, the fire of life. Associated with the pole star and the north, and serves as a skybearer
  • Huitzilopochtli (also Mextli, Mexitl, Uitzilopochtli) - the supreme god of Tenochtitlan, patron of war, fire and the sun
  • Huixtocihuatl (also Uixtochihuatl) - a goddess of salt and saltwater
  • Ilamatecuhtli (also Cihuacoatl or Quilaztli) - aged goddess of the earth, death, and the milky way. Her roar signalled war
  • Itztlacoliuhqui-Ixquimilli - god of stone, obsidian, coldness hardness, and castigation. Aspect of Tlahuizcalpantecuhtli
  • Itzli - god of sacrifice and stone knives.
  • Itzpapalotl - Queen of Tomoanchan and one of the Cihuateteo (night demons) and tzitzimime (star demons)
  • Ixtlilton - the god of healing, dancing, festivals and games. Brother of Xochipilli.
  • Macuilcozcacuauhtli (five vulture) - one of the Ahuiateteo (gods of excess)
  • Macuilcuetzpalin (five lizard) - one of the Ahuiateteo (gods of excess)
  • Macuilmalinalli (five grass) - one of the Ahuiateteo (gods of excess)
  • Macuiltochtli (five rabbit) - one of the Ahuiateteo (gods of excess)
  • Macuilxochitl (five flower) - the god of games and gambling, and chief of the Ahuiateteo (gods of excess)
  • Malinalxochitl - sorceress and goddess of snakes, scorpions and insects of the desert
  • Matlalceuitl (also Matlalcueje) - goddess of rainfall and singing. Identified with Chalchiuhtlicue.
  • Mayahuel (also Mayahual, or Mayouel) - the goddess of maguey, and by extension, alcohol
  • Metztli (also Metztli, Tecuciztecatl, Tecciztecatl)- lowly god of worms who failed to sacrifice himself to become the sun, and became the moon instead, his face darkened by a rabbit.
  • Mextli - a god of war and storms
  • Nanahuatzin (also Nana, Nanautzin, or Nanauatzin) - lowly god who sacrificed himself to become sun god Tonatiuh
  • Omacatl (see Tezcatlipoca)
  • Omecihuatl (see Ometeotl)
  • Ometecuhtli (see Ometeotl)
  • Ometeotl (also Citlatonac or Ometecuhtli (male) and Omecihuatl (female)) - the god(s) of duality, pregenator(s) of souls and lord/lady of heaven
  • Ometotchtli (two rabbit) - drunken rabbit god, leader of the Centzon Totochtin
  • Opochtli - left-handed god of trapping, hunting and fishing
  • Oxomoco - goddess of astrology and the calendar
Quetzalcoatl in human form, using the symbols of Ehecatl, from the Codex Borgia.
Quetzalcoatl in human form, using the symbols of Ehecatl, from the Codex Borgia.
  • Quetzalcoatl (also Tlahuizcalpantecuhtli) (quetzal-feathered serpent) - creator god and patron of rulership, priests and merchants. Associated with Ehecatl as the divine wind
  • Quilaztli (see Ilamatecuhtli)
  • Tecciztecatl (see Mextli)
  • Temazcalteci (also Temaxcaltechi) - goddess of bathing and sweatbaths
  • Teoyaomicqui (also Teoyaomiqui)- the god of dead warriors
  • Tepeyollotl - (The jaguar form of Tezcatlipoca) god of the heart of the mountain, associated with jaguars, echoes, and earthquakes
  • Tepoztecatl (also Tezcatzontecatl) - god of pulque and rabbits
  • Teteoinnan - mother of the gods
  • Tezcatlipoca (also Omacatl, Titlacauan) - omnipotent god of rulers, sorcerers and warriors; night, death, discord, conflict, temptation and change. A sinister rival to Quetzalcoatl. Can appear as as a jaguar.
  • Tlahuizcalpantecuhtli - destructive god of the morning star (venus), dawn, and of the east. One of the skybearers
  • Tlaloc (also Nuhualpilli) - the great and ancient provider and god of rain, fertility and lightning
  • Tlaltecuhtli - goddess of earth, associated with difficult births
  • Tlazolteotl (also Tlaelquani, Tlazolteotli)- the goddess of purification from filth, disease or excess
  • Tloquenahuaque - a creator god or ruler
  • Toci (also Temazcalteci) - grandmother goddess, heart of the earth and mother of the gods. Associated with midwives and war
  • Tonacatecuhtli - the aged creator and provider of food and patron of conceptions
  • Tonacacihuatl - consort of Tonacatecuhtli
  • Tonantzin - a mother goddess
  • Tonatiuh - a sun god and heavenly warrior, associated with eagles and with the Maya
  • Tzitzmitl - aged grandmother goddess
  • Xochipilli - the young god of feasting, painting, dancing, games, and writing. Associated with Macuilxochitl and Cinteotl
  • Xochiquetzal - goddess of love, beauty, female sexuality, prostitutes, flowers, pleasure, craft, weaving, and young mothers
  • Xocotl - star god associated with fire
  • Xolotl - canine companion of Quetzalcoatl and god of twins, sickness and deformity. Accompanies the dead to Mictlan
  • Yacatecuhtli (also Yactecuhtli) - the god of merchants and travelers

In Aztec mythology, Acolnahuacatl (also referred to as Acolmiztli) was a god of Mictlan, the Underworld. ... In Aztec mythology, Mictlan was the lowest (ninth) level of the underworld, located far to the north. ... Chalciuhtlicue from the Codex Ríos In Aztec mythology, Chalchiuhtlicue (also Chalciuhtlicue, or Chalcihuitlicue) (She of the Jade Skirt) was the goddess of lakes and streams. ... In Aztec mythology, Amimitl was a god of lakes and fishermen. ... In Aztec mythology, Atl was a god of water. ... In Aztec mythology, Atlacamani was the goddess of oceanic storms such as hurricanes. ... In Aztec mythology, Atlacoya was the goddess of drought. ... In Aztec mythology, Atlatonin was a mother goddess and a goddess of the coast. ... In Aztec mythology, Atlaua (lord of the waters) was a water god, patron of fishermen and archers. ... In Aztec mythology, Ayauhteotl was the goddess of crepuscular fog, vanity and fame. ... In Aztec and Maya mythology, Camaxtli was a god of hunting, war, fate and fire (which he invented). ... In Aztec mythology, Centeotl (also Centeocihuatl or Cinteotl) was a god of maize (originally a goddess), and a son of Tlazolteotl and husband of Xochiquetzal. ... In Aztec mythology, Chalchiuhtlatonal was a god of water. ... Drawing of Chalchiutlicue from Codex Ríos This drawing of Chalciutlicue accompanies page 17 (verso) which depicts the fourth trecena. ... Drawing of Chalchiutlicue from Codex Ríos This drawing of Chalciutlicue accompanies page 17 (verso) which depicts the fourth trecena. ... A painting of Tláloc, as shown in on page 20R of Codex Rios. ... Chalciuhtlicue from the Codex Ríos In Aztec mythology, Chalchiuhtlicue (also Chalciuhtlicue, or Chalcihuitlicue) (She of the Jade Skirt) was the goddess of lakes and streams. ... Tlaloc, as shown in the late 16th century Codex Rios. ... In Aztec mythology, Mictlan was the lowest (ninth) level of the underworld, located far to the north. ... Statuette of Mictlantecuhtli See also: Mictlantecuhtli (disambiguation) In Aztec mythology, Mictlantecuhtli (lord of Mictlan) is the god of the dead and King of Mictlan (Chicunauhmictlan), the lowest section of the underworld. ... In Aztec mythology, Mictlan was the lowest (ninth) level of the underworld, located far to the north. ... In Aztec mythology, Chantico (she who dwells in the house) was the goddess of fires in the family hearth and volcanoes. ... Chicomecoatl in an illustration from Rig Veda Americanus, an 1890 book on American aboriginal literature In Aztec mythology, Chicomecoatl Seven snakes, was the Aztec goddess of maize during the Middle Culture period. ... This article is about the maize plant. ... In Aztec mythology, Centeotl (also Centeocihuatl or Cinteotl) was a god of maize (originally a goddess), and a son of Tlazolteotl and husband of Xochiquetzal. ... In Aztec mythology, Chicomexochtli was the patron god of painters and other artists. ... In Aztec mythology, Chiconahui was a domestic fertility goddess and protectress of families and homes. ... In Aztec mythology, the god Chiconahuiehecatl participated in the creation of the world. ... In Aztec mythology, Cihuacoatl (snake woman; also Chihucoatl, Ciucoatl) was a fertility goddess and patron of mothers, particularly women who died in childbirth. ... In Aztec mythology, Citlalicue (star garment; also Citlalinicue, Ilamatecuhtli) created the stars along with her husband, Citlalatonac. ... It has been suggested that this article be split into multiple articles. ... In Aztec mythology, Centeotl (also Centeocihuatl or Cinteotl) was a god of maize (originally a goddess), and a son of Tlazolteotl and husband of Xochiquetzal. ... This article is about the maize plant. ... In Aztec mythology, Tlazolteotl was an earth, sex, childbirth and a mother goddess. ... Ometeotl is the name of the dual god Ometecutli/Omecihuatl in Aztec mythology. ... In Aztec mythology, Citlalicue (star garment; also Citlalinicue, Ilamatecuhtli) was a goddess who created the stars along with her husband, Citlalatonac. ... Statue of Coatlicue displayed in National Museum of Anthropology and History in Mexico City Coatlicue, also known as Teteoinan (also transcribed Teteo Inan) (The Mother of Gods), is the Aztec goddess who gave birth to the moon, stars, and Huitzilopochtli, the god of the sun and war. ... In Aztec mythology, Coyolxauhqui (golden bells more correctly: She with the bells on her cheeks Consider the orbiting full moon and the stone carvings facial details. ... In Aztec mythology, the Centzonuitznaua (or Centzon Huitznahuas) were the gods of the southern stars. ... // Huitzilopochtli, as depicted in the Codex Telleriano-Remensis. ... In Aztec mythology, Cochimetl, or Cocochimetl was the god of commerce and merchants. ... In Aztec mythology, Coyolxauhqui (golden bells more correctly: She with the bells on her cheeks Consider the orbiting full moon and the stone carvings facial details. ... // Huitzilopochtli, as depicted in the Codex Telleriano-Remensis. ... For other uses, see Milky Way (disambiguation). ... Information in this article or section has not been verified against sources and may not be reliable. ... It has been suggested that this article be split into multiple articles. ... In Aztec mythology, Huehuecoyotl (old, old coyote; sometimes alternately Ueuecoyotl) is the trickster god of music, dance, song. ... For other uses, see Shapeshifting (disambiguation). ... Statue of Huehueteotl in Tijuana, Mexico In Aztec mythology, Xiuhtecuhtli (also Huehueteotl, old god) was the personification of life after death, light in darkness and food during famine. ... // Huitzilopochtli, as depicted in the Codex Telleriano-Remensis. ... Tenochtitlan, looking east. ... In Aztec mythology, Huixtocihuatl (or Uixtochihuatl, Uixtociuatl) was a fertility goddess who presided over salt and salt water. ... In Aztec mythology, Citlalicue (star garment; also Citlalinicue, Ilamatecuhtli) created the stars along with her husband, Citlalatonac. ... For other uses, see Milky Way (disambiguation). ... In Aztec mythology, Tlahuizcalpantecuhtli (lord of the star of the dawn; also spelled Tlahuizcalpantecutli or Tlahuixcalpantecuhtli) was the personification of the morning star, which is the planet Venus as seen in the morning. ... In Aztec mythology, Itzli (or Itztli) was a god of stone, particularly in the shape of a sacrifical knife. ... In Aztec mythology, Itzpapalotl (Clawed Butterfly or Obsidian Butterfly) was a fearsome skeletal goddess, who ruled over the paradise world of Tomoanchan. ... In Aztec Mythology, Tomoanchan is a mythical paradise ruled over by Itzpapalotl. ... In Aztec mythology, the Cihuateteo (also Ciuteoteo or Ciuateoteo) were the spirits of human women who died in childbirth (). Childbirth was considered a form of battle, and its victims were honored as fallen warriors. ... In Aztec mythology, Tzitzimime, the monsters from above, were star gods or demons. ... In Aztec mythology, Ixtlilton (Little Black One) was a god of healing, maize, feasts and festivals. ... In Aztec mythology, Xochipilli was the god of love, games, beauty, dance, flowers, maize, and song. ... Macuiltochtli (Five Rabbit; from Nahuatl, macuilli, five, tochtli, rabbit) is one of the five deities from Aztec and other central Mexican pre-Columbian mythological traditions who, known collectively as the Ahuiateteo, symbolized excess, over-indulgence and the attendant punishments and consequences thereof. ... In Aztec mythology, Xochipilli (flower prince) was the god of love, games, beauty, dance, flowers, maize, and song. ... In Aztec mythology, Malinalxochi was a sorceress and goddess of snakes, scorpions and insects of the desert. ... Chalciuhtlicue from the Codex Ríos In Aztec mythology, Chalchiuhtlicue (also Chalciuhtlicue, or Chalcihuitlicue) (She of the Jade Skirt) was the goddess of lakes and streams. ... In Aztec mythology, Mayahuel was a human girl whom Ehecatl, the wind god, fell in love with. ... ... In Aztec mythology, Metztli (also Meztli) was a god of the moon, the night, and farmers. ... In Aztec mythology, Mextli (also Mexitl or Tecciztecatl) was a god of war and storms and was born fully armed as a warrior. ... In Aztec mythology, Mictecacihuatl was the Queen of Mictlan, the underworld, and wife of Mictlantecuhtli. ... In Aztec mythology, Mictlan was the lowest (ninth) level of the underworld, located far to the north. ... For other uses, see Underworld (disambiguation). ... Statuette of Mictlantecuhtli Mictlantecuhtli (lord of Mictlan), in Aztec mythology, was a god of the dead and King of Mictlan (Chicunauhmictlan), the lowest and northernmost section of the underworld. ... In Aztec mythology, Mictlan was the lowest (ninth) level of the underworld, located far to the north. ... In Aztec mythology, Mixcoatl (Cloud Serpent) was a god of the hunt, the north star and war. ... For other uses, see Milky Way (disambiguation). ... In Nahuatl mythology, Tezcatlipoca (smoking mirror) was the god of the night, the north and temptation. ... It has been suggested that this article be split into multiple articles. ... In Aztec mythology, the god Nanauatl (or Nanauatzin, the sufix tzin implies respect or familiarity) sacrificed himself in fire so that it would continue to shine on Earth as the sun, thus becoming the sun god. ... In Aztec mythology, Tonatiuh was the sun god. ... Tezcatlipoca as depicted in the Codex Borgia. ... Ometeotl is the name of the dual god Ometecutli/Omecihuatl in Aztec mythology. ... Ometeotl is the name of the dual god Ometecutli/Omecihuatl in Aztec mythology. ... Ometeotl is the name of the dual god Ometecutli/Omecihuatl in Aztec mythology. ... Ometotchtli (sometimes spelled Ometochtli), also known as Two Rabbits is a god of drunkenness in the Aztec pantheon. ... In Aztec mythology, the Centzon Totochtin (four-hundred rabbits; also Centzontotochtin) were a group of deities who met for frequent parties; they are divine rabbits, and the gods of drunkenness. ... In Aztec mythology, Opochtli was a god of hunting and fishing. ... In Aztec mythology, Patecatl was a god of healing and fertility, and the discoverer of peyote. ... In Aztec mythology, Mayahuel was a human girl whom Ehecatl, the wind god, fell in love with. ... In Aztec mythology, Paynal was the impersonator and messenger of Huitzilopochtli. ... // Huitzilopochtli, as depicted in the Codex Telleriano-Remensis. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Quetzalcoatl_Ehecatl. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Quetzalcoatl_Ehecatl. ... Information in this article or section has not been verified against sources and may not be reliable. ... Divine being Quetzalcoatl in human form, using the symbols of Ehecatl, from the Codex Borgia. ... It has been suggested that this article be split into multiple articles. ... Information in this article or section has not been verified against sources and may not be reliable. ... In Aztec mythology, Citlalicue (star garment; also Citlalinicue, Ilamatecuhtli) created the stars along with her husband, Citlalatonac. ... In Aztec mythology, Mextli (also Mexitl or Tecciztecatl) was a god of war and storms and was born fully armed as a warrior. ... In the Aztec mythology, Temazcalteci was the goddess of steam baths. ... In Aztec mythology, Teoyaomqui (or Teoyaoimquit, Huahuantli) was the god of dead warriors, particularly those who had died in battle. ... In Aztec mythology, Tepeyollotl (heart of the mountains; also Tepeyollotli) was the god of earthquakes, echoes and jaguars. ... Tezcatlipoca as depicted in the Codex Borgia. ... For other uses, see Jaguar (disambiguation). ... In Aztec mythology, Tepoztecatl (or Tezcatzontecatl) was the god of pulque, of drunkenness and fertility. ... Pulque, or octli, is an alcoholic beverage made from the fermented juice of the maguey, and is a traditional native beverage of Mesoamerica. ... In Aztec mythology, Teteoinnan (also known as Tozi and Toci) was the mother of the gods, the personification of the power of nature, and the goddess of healing and sweat baths. ... Tezcatlipoca as depicted in the Codex Borgia. ... It has been suggested that this article be split into multiple articles. ... For other uses, see Jaguar (disambiguation). ... In Aztec mythology, Tlahuizcalpantecuhtli (lord of the star of the dawn; also spelled Tlahuizcalpantecutli or Tlahuixcalpantecuhtli) was the personification of the morning star, which is the planet Venus as seen in the morning. ... Tlaloc, as shown in the late 16th century Codex Rios. ... In Aztec mythology, Tlaltecuhtli (or Tlaltecutli) was a chthonic sea monster who dwelled in the ocean after the fourth Great Flood. ... In Aztec mythology, Tlazolteotl was an earth, sex, childbirth and a mother goddess. ... In Aztec mythology, Tloquenahuaque (or Tloque Nuhaque) was a creator god or ruler, the creator of the first pair of humans, and the ruler of the first four ages of the world. ... In Aztec legend, Toci was the goddess of the earth (mother earth), and she looked after all the injured wildlife and people. ... In Aztec mythology, Tonacatecuhtli (lord of our sustenance) was a fertility god. ... In Aztec mythology, Tonacacihuatl was the wife of Tonacatecuhtli. ... In Aztec mythology, Tonacatecuhtli (lord of our sustenance) was a fertility god. ... In Aztec mythology, Tonantzin was a lunar mother goddess. ... In Aztec mythology, Tonatiuh was the sun god. ... This article is about the pre-Columbian Maya civilization. ... Depiction of a Tzitzimitl from the Codex Magliabechiano. ... In Aztec mythology, Chicomecoatl was the goddess of maize and fertility. ... This article is about the maize plant. ... Xipe Totec ias depicted in the Codex Borgia, notice the bloody weapon and the flayed human skin he wears as a suit with the hands hanging down. ... In Aztec mythology, Xiuhcoatl (the fire-snake, fire-serpent or Turquoise Serpent) was the personification of drought and scorched earth. ... The mask of Xiuhtecuhtli, from the British Museum, of Aztec/Mixtec provenance. ... The mask of Xiuhtecuhtli, from the British Museum, of Aztec/Mixtec provenance. ... Statue of Huehueteotl in Tijuana, Mexico In Aztec mythology, Xiuhtecuhtli (also Huehueteotl, old god) was the personification of life after death, light in darkness and food during famine. ... In Aztec mythology, Xochipilli was the god of love, games, beauty, dance, flowers, maize, and song. ... In Aztec mythology, Xochipilli (flower prince) was the god of love, games, beauty, dance, flowers, maize, and song. ... In Aztec mythology, Centeotl (also Centeocihuatl or Cinteotl) was a god of maize (originally a goddess), and a son of Tlazolteotl and husband of Xochiquetzal. ... In Aztec mythology, Xochiquetzal (flower feather) was a goddess of flowers, fertility, games, dancing and agriculture, as well as craftsmen, prostitutes and pregnant women. ... In Aztec mythology, Xocotl was a stellar god who presided over fire. ... In Aztec mythology, (and among the Toltecs), Xolotl was the god of lightning and the one who aided the dead on their journey to Mictlan. ... It has been suggested that this article be split into multiple articles. ... In Aztec mythology, Mictlan was the lowest (ninth) level of the underworld, located far to the north. ... In Aztec mythology, Yacatecuhtli was the patron god of travelers, especially merchant travelers. ...

Serpent gods

Chicomecoatl in an illustration from Rig Veda Americanus, an 1890 book on American aboriginal literature In Aztec mythology, Chicomecoatl Seven snakes, was the Aztec goddess of maize during the Middle Culture period. ... In Aztec mythology, Cihuacoatl (snake woman; also Chihucoatl, Ciucoatl) was a fertility goddess and patron of mothers, particularly women who died in childbirth. ... Statue of Coatlicue displayed in National Museum of Anthropology and History in Mexico City Coatlicue, also known as Teteoinan (also transcribed Teteo Inan) (The Mother of Gods), is the Aztec goddess who gave birth to the moon, stars, and Huitzilopochtli, the god of the sun and war. ... In Aztec mythology, Mixcoatl (Cloud Serpent) was a god of the hunt, the north star and war. ... It has been suggested that this article be split into multiple articles. ... In Aztec mythology, Xiuhcoatl (the fire-snake, fire-serpent or Turquoise Serpent) was the personification of drought and scorched earth. ...

God groups

  • Ahuiateteo (also Macuiltonaleque) - five gods who personify excess
  • Cihuateteo (also Civatateo) - souls of women who died in childbirth who lead the setting sun in the western sky. Also night demons who steal children, and cause seizures, insanity and sexual transgression. They also accompany warriors to heaven.
  • Centzon huitznahua - southern stars, children of Coatlicue
  • Centzon Totochtin (400 rabbits) - gods of pulque
  • Skybearers - associated with the four directions, supported the vault of the sky.
  • Tzitzimime - star demons of darkness that attack the sun during eclipses and threaten the earth

In Aztec mythology, the Cihuateteo (also Ciuteoteo or Ciuateoteo) were the spirits of human women who died in childbirth (). Childbirth was considered a form of battle, and its victims were honored as fallen warriors. ... Statue of Coatlicue displayed in National Museum of Anthropology and History in Mexico City Coatlicue, also known as Teteoinan (also transcribed Teteo Inan) (The Mother of Gods), is the Aztec goddess who gave birth to the moon, stars, and Huitzilopochtli, the god of the sun and war. ... In Aztec mythology, the Centzon Totochtin (four-hundred rabbits; also Centzontotochtin) were a group of deities who met for frequent parties; they are divine rabbits, and the gods of drunkenness. ... Pulque, or octli, is an alcoholic beverage made from the fermented juice of the maguey, and is a traditional native beverage of Mesoamerica. ... In Aztec mythology, Tzitzimime, the monsters from above, were star gods or demons. ...

Supernatural creatures

  • Ahuitzotl - a man-eating water-dwelling dog-monkey with a hand on its tail
  • Cipactli - the caiman at the foundations of the earth
  • Cihuateteo-the spirits of human women who died in childbirth (mociuaquetzque.)
  • Nagual - a tutelary animal or vegetable spirit
  • Nahual - a shapeshifting sorcerer or witch
  • Tlaltecuhtli - a toad goddess

Ahuitzotal The Ahuizotl is a creature of Central American legends. ... In Aztec mythology, Cipactli was a vicious primeval sea monster, part crocodile and part fish. ... Genera Alligator Caiman Melanosuchus Paleosuchus Alligators and caimans are reptiles closely related to the crocodiles and forming the family Alligatoridae (sometimes regarded instead as the subfamily Alligatorinae). ... In Aztec mythology, the Cihuateteo (also Ciuteoteo or Ciuateoteo) were the spirits of human women who died in childbirth (). Childbirth was considered a form of battle, and its victims were honored as fallen warriors. ... Nagual or Nahual (both pronounced [nawal]) is a word used in the study of the religion, mythology, folklore and anthropology of Mesoamerican peoples and which is used with different definitions. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Nagual. ... In Aztec mythology, Tlaltecuhtli (or Tlaltecutli) was a chthonic sea monster who dwelled in the ocean after the fourth Great Flood. ...

Legendary heroes

Popocatépetl (commonly referred to as Popo) is an active volcano and the second highest peak in Mexico after Pico de Orizaba (5,610m). ...

Places

For other uses, see Aztlán (disambiguation). ... Aztec is a term used to refer to certain ethnic groups of central Mexico, particularly those groups who spoke the Nahuatl language and who achieved political and military dominance over large parts of Mesoamerica in the 14th, 15th and 16th centuries, a period referred to as the Late post-Classic... Tenochtitlan, looking east. ... Iztaccíhuatl (alternative spellings include Ixtaccíhuatl or either variant spelled without the accent) is the third highest mountain in Mexico, after Pico de Orizaba (5,610m) and Popocatepetl (5,452m). ... In Aztec mythology, Mictlan was the lowest (ninth) level of the underworld, located far to the north. ... Popocatépetl (commonly referred to as Popo) is an active volcano and the second highest peak in Mexico after Pico de Orizaba (5,610m). ... In Aztec mythology, Tlalocan is the underworld, ruled by Tlaloc and his wife Chalchiuhtlicue. ... Tehuantepec is a town in the southeast of the Mexican state of Oaxaca. ... In Aztec mythology, Tlillan-Tlapallan was the middle realm of heaven, and was reserved for those who understood Quetzalcoatls wisdom. ... Tamoanchan is a mythical location of origin known to the Mesoamerican cultures of the central Mexican region in the Late Postclassic period. ...

References

  • Boone, Elizabeth H. (Ed.) (1982). The Art and Iconography of Late Post-Classic Central Mexico. Washington, D.C.: Dumbarton Oaks. ISBN 0-88402-110-6. 
  • Brinton, Daniel G. (Ed.) (1890). "Rig Veda Americanus". Library of Aboriginal American Literature No. VIII. Project Gutenberg reproduction. (English) (Nahuatl)
  • Leon-Portilla, Miguel [1963] (1990). Aztec Thought and Culture, Davis, J.E. (trans), Norman, Oklahoma: Oklahoma University Press. ISBN 0-8061-2295-1. 
  • Miller, Mary; and Karl Taube (1993). The Gods and Symbols of Ancient Mexico and the Maya. London: Thames and Hudson. ISBN 0-500-05068-6. 

Dumbarton Oaks is a nineteenth-century mansion located in the Georgetown section of Washington, DC. It houses the Dumbarton Oaks Research Library and Collection, a leading center for scholarship in Byzantine studies, Pre-Columbian studies and the history of landscape architecture. ... Daniel Garrison Brinton (May 13, 1837-July 31, 1899), was an American archaeologist and ethnologist. ... Project Gutenberg, abbreviated as PG, is a volunteer effort to digitize, archive and distribute cultural works. ... Miguel León-Portilla (born in Mexico City, 22 February 1926) is a Mexican anthropologist and historian, and the prime authority on Nahuatl thought and literature. ... Mary Miller is the master of Saybrook College at Yale University and the Vincent Scully Professor of the History of Art. ... Karl Andreas Taube is an American Mayanist, anthropologist, epigrapher and ethnohistorian, known for his publications and research into the pre-Columbian cultures of Mesoamerica and the American Southwest. ...

See also

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Aztec mythology

Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... Aztec philosophy was the school of philosophy developed by the Aztec Empire. ...

External links

  • Rig Veda Americanus, Daniel Brinton (Ed), available at Project Gutenberg.; late 19th C. compendium of some Aztec mythological texts and poems appearing in one MS. version of Sahagun's 16th C. codices.
  • Aztec history, culture and religion B. Diaz del Castillo, The Discovery and Conquest of Mexico (tr. by A. P. Maudsley, 1928, repr. 1965)
Daniel Garrison Brinton (May 13, 1837-July 31, 1899), was an American archaeologist and ethnologist. ... Project Gutenberg, abbreviated as PG, is a volunteer effort to digitize, archive and distribute cultural works. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Aztec Gods and Goddesses 2 (5272 words)
In Aztec mythology, Patecatl was a god of healing and fertility, and the discoverer of peyote.
In Aztec mythology, Tepoztecatl (or Tezcatzontecatl) was the god of pulque, of drunkenness and fertility.
In Aztec mythology, Tlahuizcalpantecuhtli ("lord of the star of the dawn"; also spelled "Tlahuizcalpantecutli" or "Tlahuixcalpantecuhtli") was the personification of the morning star, which is the planet Venus as seen in the morning.
Aztec and Mayan Gods (644 words)
In Aztec mythology, Chicomecoatl was the goddess of corn and fertility.
In Aztec mythology, Itzpapalotl is a goddess of agriculture.
In Aztec mythology, Paynal was the messenger to Huitzilopochtli.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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