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Encyclopedia > Axum
Aksuma
UNESCO World Heritage Site
The Northern Stelae Park in Axum with the King Ezana's Stele at the centre and the Great Stele lies broken.
State Party Flag of Ethiopia Ethiopia
Type Cultural
Criteria i, iv
Identification #15
Regionb Africa

Inscription History UNESCO (United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization) is a specialized agency of the United Nations established in 1945. ... A UNESCO World Heritage Site is a specific site (such as a forest, mountain, lake, desert, monument, building, complex, or city) that has been nominated and confirmed for inclusion on the list maintained by the international World Heritage Programme administered by the UNESCO World Heritage Committee, composed of 21 State... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (900x495, 186 KB) Summary The Northern Stele Park at the town of Axum, Ethiopia. ... As of 2006, there are a total of 830 World Heritage Sites located in 138 State Parties. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Ethiopia. ... A UNESCO World Heritage Site is a specific site (such as a forest, mountain, lake, desert, monument, building, complex, or city) that has been nominated and confirmed for inclusion on the list maintained by the international World Heritage Programme administered by the UNESCO World Heritage Committee, composed of 21 State... This is a list of the UNESCO World Heritage Sites in Africa. ...

Formal Inscription: 1980
4th Session

a Name as officially inscribed on the WH List
b As classified officially by UNESCO
A UNESCO World Heritage Site is a specific site (such as a forest, mountain, lake, desert, monument, building, complex, or city) that has been nominated and confirmed for inclusion on the list maintained by the international World Heritage Programme administered by the UNESCO World Heritage Committee, composed of 21 State...

Axum, properly Aksum, is a city in northern Ethiopia. Located in the Mehakelegnaw Zone of the Tigray Region near the base of the Adwa mountains, this town has a latitude and longitude of 14°07′N, 38°44′E. It was the centre of the Axumite Kingdom, which emerged around the time of the birth of Jesus and declined after the 7th century due to unknown reasons, but contributed to the shift of the power centre of the Ethiopian Empire further inland.[1] The city of Chicago, as seen from the sky A city is an urban area that is differentiated from a town, village, or hamlet by size, population density, importance, or legal status. ... Mehakelegnaw (or The central [Zone]) is a Zone in the Ethiopian Region of Tigray. ... Map of Ethiopia highlighting the Tigray region. ... The landscape of Adwa Adwa (also spelled Adowa, Aduwa, or Adua) is a market town in northern Ethiopia, and best known as the community closest to the decisive Battle of Adowa fought in 1896. ... The Kingdom of Aksum (or Axum), was an important trading nation in northeastern Africa, growing from ca. ... This article is about Jesus of Nazareth. ... The 7th century is the period from 601 - 700 in accordance with the Julian calendar in the Christian Era. ...


Based on figures from the Central Statistical Agency in 2005, Axum has an estimated total population of 47,320 of whom 20,774 were males and 21,898 were females.[2] Seventy-five percent of the people in the city are members of the Ethiopian Orthodox Church. The remainder of the population is Sunni Muslim and P'ent'ay (Protestant and other non-Orthodox Christians). The Central Statistical Agency (CSA) is an agency of the government of Ethiopia designated to provide all surveys and censuses for that country used to monitor economic and social growth, as well as to act as an official training center in that field. ... The Ethiopian Orthodox Tewahido Church is an Oriental Orthodox church in Ethiopia that was part of the Coptic Church until it was granted its own Patriarch by Cyril VI, the Coptic Pope, in 1959. ... Sunni Islam (Arabic سنّة) is the largest denomination of Islam. ... A Muslim (Arabic: مسلم, Turkish: Müslüman, Persian and Urdu: مسلمان, Bosnian: Musliman) is an adherent of Islam. ... Pentay or Pentay(Amharic- ፔንጤ) is a slang term widely used in modern Ethiopia, and among Ethiopians living abroad, to describe Ethiopian Christians who are not members of the Ethiopian Orthodox Tewahedo, Ethiopian Orthodox Tehadeso, Roman Catholic or Ethiopian Catholic churches. ...


Aksum is served by an airport (ICAO code HAAX, IATA AXU). The International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO), an agency of the United Nations, develops the principles and techniques of international air navigation and fosters the planning and development of international air transport to ensure safe and orderly growth. ... The International Air Transport Association is an international trade organization of airlines headquarted in Montreal, Quebec, Canada. ...


Due to its historical value, in 1980 UNESCO added its archeological sites to its list of World Heritage Sites. History studies the past in human terms. ... 1980 (MCMLXXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday. ... UNESCO (United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization) is a specialized agency of the United Nations established in 1945. ... A UNESCO World Heritage Site is a specific site (such as a forest, mountain, lake, desert, monument, building, complex, or city) that has been nominated and confirmed for inclusion on the list maintained by the international World Heritage Programme administered by the UNESCO World Heritage Committee, composed of 21 State...

Contents

The Aksumite kingdom and the Ethiopian Church

Image:Ark of the Covenant church in Aksum Ethiopia.jpg
The Chapel of the Tablet

The kingdom of Axum had its own written language called Ge'ez, and also developed a distinctive architecture exemplified by giant obelisks, the oldest of which (though much smaller) date from 5,000-2,000 BC.[3] This kingdom was at its height under king Ezana, baptized as Abreha, in the 300s (which was also when it officially embraced Christianity).[4] The Axumite Kingdom, also known as the Aksum Kingdom, was an important trading nation in northeastern Africa, growing from circa the 5th century BC to become an important trading nation by the 1st century AD. It converted to Christianity in 325 or 328 (various sources). ... Geez (also transliterated Giiz, , and pronounced IPA: ; ISO 639-2 gez) is an ancient South Semitic language that had developed in the current region of Eritrea and northern Ethiopia in the Horn of Africa, as the language of the peasantry. ... Ezana of Axum was ruler of the Axumite Kingdom from about 320 to 350 AD. Ezana succeeded his father Ella Amida while still a youth and his mother, Sofya served as regent. ... (3rd century - 4th century - 5th century _ other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 4th century was that century which lasted from 301 to 400. ... Christians believe that Jesus is the mediator of the New Covenant (see Hebrews 8:6). ...


The Ethiopian Orthodox Church claims that the Church of Our Lady Mary of Zion in Axum houses the Biblical Ark of the Covenant in which lies the Tablets of Law upon which the Ten Commandments are inscribed.[5] This same church was the site Ethiopian emperors were crowned for centuries until the reign of Fasilides, then again beginning with Yohannes IV until the end of the empire. Axum is considered to be the holiest city in Ethiopia and is an important destination of pilgrimages.[5] Significant religious festivals are the T'imk'et Festival (known as the Epiphany in western Christianity) on 7 January and the Festival of Maryam Zion in late November. Tewahedo Church may refer to any of the following: The Ethiopian Orthodox Tewahedo Church The Eritrean Orthodox Tewahdo Church This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... This Gutenberg Bible is displayed by the United States Library of Congress. ... A late 19th-century artists conception of the Ark of the Covenant, employing a Renaissance cassone for the Ark and cherubim as latter-day Christian angels The Ark of the Covenant (ארון הברית in Hebrew: aron habrit) is described in the Hebrew Bible as a sacred container, wherein rested the stone... The Tablets of Law are the two pieces of stone onto which God inscribed the Ten Commandments with His finger, according to the Biblical passages in Exodus. ... This 1768 parchment (612x502 mm) by Jekuthiel Sofer emulated the 1675 Decalogue at Amsterdam Esnoga synagogue. ... Fasilides or Basilides (throne name `Alam Sagad), b at Magazaz, Shewa, in 1603 before 10 November, was (1632 - October 18, 1667) of Ethiopia, and a member of the Solomonid dynasty. ... Emperor Yohannes IV (c. ... This article is about the Christian feast. ... January 7 is the seventh day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ...


In 1937, a 24-meter tall, 1700-year-old obelisk standing in Axum was cut into three parts by Italian soldiers and shipped to Rome to be re-erected. The obelisk is widely regarded as one of the finest examples of engineering from the height of the Axumite empire. Despite a 1947 United Nations agreement that the obelisk would be shipped back, Italy balked, resulting in a long-standing diplomatic dispute with the Ethiopian government, which views the obelisk as a symbol of national identity. In April 2005, Italy finally returned the obelisk pieces to Axum amidst much official and public rejoicing. It is due to be re-erected in late 2006.[6] [1] UNESCO has assumed responsibility for the re-installation of this stele in Axum. Year 1937 (MCMXXXVII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... The Northern Stelae Park in Axum, with the King Ezanas Stele at the centre and the Great Stele lies broken. ... Nickname: The Eternal City Motto: SPQR: Senatus PopulusQue Romanus Location of the city of Rome (yellow) within the Province of Rome (red) and region of Lazio (grey) Coordinates: Region Lazio Province Province of Rome Founded 21 April 753 BC  - Mayor Walter Veltroni Area    - City 1285 km²  (580 sq mi)  - Urban... 1947 (MCMXLVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1947 calendar). ... The foundation of the U.N. The United Nations (UN) is an international organization whose stated aims are to facilitate co-operation in international law, international security, economic development, social progress and human rights issues. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ...


Axum and Islam

Although Axumite Muslims have attempted to build a mosque in this most holy of Ethiopian towns, Orthodox residents, and the emperors of the past have replied that they must be allowed to build an Ethiopian Orthodox church in Mecca (officially Makkah) if the Muslims are to be allowed to build a mosque in Axum.[citation needed] This article is about the city in Saudi Arabia. ...


The connection of Axum with Islam is very old. According to ibn Hisham, when Muhammad faced oppression from the Quraish clan, he sent a small group that included his daughter Ruqayya and her husband Uthman ibn Affan, whom Ashama ibn Abjar, the king of Axum, gave refuge to, and protection to, and refused the requests of the Quraish clan to send these refugees back to Arabia. These refugees did not return until the sixth year of the Hijra (628), and even then many remained in Ethiopia, eventually settling at Negash in eastern Tigray. Ibn Hisham, Abu Muhammad Abd al-Malik (d. ... For other persons named Muhammad, see Muhammad (name). ... Quraish (Arabic: ‎ translit: ) is the Meccan tribe that the Islamic prophet Muhammad belonged to before he received the revelations of Islam. ... Leave this page if youre under 18!! - Page contains huge lies and hardly has any facts > it will surely misguide you! Uthman ibn Affan (Arabic: عثمان بن عفان) (c. ... According to Arabic sources, Ashama ibn Abjar was Emperor of Aksum at the time of Muhammad when several Muslims sought refuge in the Aksumite kingdom. ... For other uses see Hijra. ... Events Khusro II of Persia overthrown Pippin of Landen becomes Mayor of the Palace Brahmagupta writes the Brahmasphutasiddhanta Births Deaths Empress Suiko of Japan Theodelinda, queen of the Lombards Categories: 628 ... Negash is a town in the Tigray region (or kilil) of Ethiopia, located north of Mekele. ...


There are different traditions concerning the effect these early Muslims had on the ruler of Axum. The Muslim tradition is that the ruler of Axum was so impressed by these refugees that he became a secret convert.[citation needed] On the other hand, one Ethiopian tradition states that the Muslim refugees who lived in Ethiopia during this time converted to Orthodox Christianity, thus becoming the first known convert from Islam to Christianity. Worth mentioning is a second Ethiopian tradition, that on the death of Ashama ibn Abjar, Muhammed is reported to have prayed for the king's soul, and told his followers, "Leave the Ethiopians in peace, as long as they do not take the offensive."[7] blahh


Sites of interest

The major Aksumite monuments in the town are stelae; the largest number lie in the Northern Stelae Park, ranging up to the 33 metre-high Great Stele (believed to have fallen during construction) and the tallest standing 24m high King Ezana's Stele. Another stele looted by the Italian army was only returned to Ethiopia in 2005 and is due for reinstallation. They are believed to mark graves and would have had cast metal discs affixed to their sides, which are also carved with architectural designs. The Gudit Stelae, unlike the northern area, are interspersed with mostly fourth century tombs. The Taj Mahal, commissioned by the Muslim Mughal Emperor Shah Jahan, as a mausoleum for his wife, Arjumand Banu Begum. ... Ancient Egyptian funerary stela A stela (or stele) is a stone or wooden slab, generally taller than it is wide, erected for funerary or commemorative purposes, most usually decorated with the names and titles of the deceased inscribed, carved in relief or painted onto the slab. ... King Ezanas Stele is the central main obelisk of Axum. ... The Northern Stelae Park in Axum, with the King Ezanas Stele at the centre and the Great Stele lies broken. ... Look up Grave in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... (3rd century - 4th century - 5th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 4th century was that century which lasted from 301 to 400. ... A tomb is a small building (or vault) for the remains of the dead, with walls, a roof, and (if it is to be used for more than one corpse) a door. ...


Other features of the town include St Mary of Zion church, built in 1665 and said to contain the Ark of the Covenant (a prominent twentieth century church of the same name neighbours it), archaeological and ethnographic museums, the Ezana Stone written in Sabaean, Ge'ez and Ancient Greek in a similar manner to the Rosetta Stone, King Bazen's Tomb (a megalith considered to be one of the earliest structures), the so-called Queen of Sheba's Bath (actually a reservoir), the fourth century Ta'akha Maryam and sixth century Dungur palaces, the monasteries of Abba Pentalewon and Abba Liqanos and the Lioness of Gobedra rock art. The Chapel of the Tablet The Church of Our Lady Mary of Zion (“Igzi’itne Maryam S’iyon Yeityopiya Ortodoks Baytekristiyan” in the languages of Ethiopia) of the Ethiopian Orthodox Church is the most important and one of the oldest churches of Ethiopia. ... 1665 (MDCLXV) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 10-day slower Julian calendar). ... A late 19th-century artists conception of the Ark of the Covenant, employing a Renaissance cassone for the Ark and cherubim as latter-day Christian angels The Ark of the Covenant (ארון הברית in Hebrew: aron habrit) is described in the Hebrew Bible as a sacred container, wherein rested the stone... (19th century - 20th century - 21st century - more centuries) Decades: 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s The 20th century lasted from 1901 to 2000 in the Gregorian calendar (often from (1900 to 1999 in common usage). ... Archaeology or sometimes in American English archeology (from the Greek words αρχαίος = ancient and λόγος = word/speech) is the study of human cultures through the recovery, documentation and analysis of material remains, including architecture, artefacts, biofacts, human remains, and landscapes. ... Ethnography (from the Greek ethnos = nation and graphe = writing) refers to the qualitative description of human social phenomena, based on months or years of fieldwork. ... The Louvre Museum in Paris, one of the largest and most famous museums in the world. ... Greek inscription of Ezana recording his defeat of various neighboring peoples. ... The Sabaeans were a people who lived in what is today Yemen in the final millennium BCE. They may be the same nation as the biblical Sheba. ... The Geez language (or Giiz language) is an ancient language that developed in the Ethiopian Highlands of the Horn of Africa as the language of the peasantry. ... Note: This article contains special characters. ... The Rosetta Stone in the British Museum. ... Megalithic tomb, Mane Braz, Brittany Bronze age wedge tomb in the Burren area of Ireland For the record label, see Megalith Records. ... The Ashokan Reservoir, located in Ulster County, New York, USA. It is one of 19 that supplies New York City with drinking water. ... (3rd century - 4th century - 5th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 4th century was that century which lasted from 301 to 400. ... (5th century — 6th century — 7th century — other centuries) Events The first academy of the east the Academy of Gundeshapur founded in Persia by the Persian Shah Khosrau I. Irish colonists and invaders, the Scots, began migrating to Caledonia (later known as Scotland) Glendalough monastery, Wicklow Ireland founded... Dungur ruins Dungur is the name of a series of ruins located in the western part of Aksum, Ethiopia, the former capital of the Kingdom of Aksum. ... ÓÈÚÒÛ ä akdjf ie dkj nvxc jdfijek,dfcvn . ... Rock art is a term in archaeology for any man-made markings made on natural stone. ...


Local legend claims the Queen of Sheba lived in the town. // The Queen of Sheba, (Nigist Saba Amharic: ንግት ሳባ), referred to in the Bible books of 1 Kings and 2 Chronicles, the New Testament, the Quran, and Ethiopian history, was the ruler of Sheba, an ancient kingdom which modern archaeology speculates was located in present-day Eritrea, Ethiopia or Yemen. ...


Sister cities

Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Nickname: The Mile-High City Location of Denver in Colorado Coordinates: Country United States State Colorado City-County Denver (coextensive) Founded November 22, 1858 Incorporated November 7, 1861  - Mayor John Hickenlooper (D) Area    - City  154. ...

References

  1. ^ G. Mokhtar, UNESCO General History of Africa, Vol. II, Abridged Edition (Berkeley: University of California Press, 1990), pp. 215-35. ISBN 0-85255-092-8.
  2. ^ CSA 2005 National Statistics, Table B.4
  3. ^ Herausgegeben von Uhlig, Siegbert, Encyclopaedia Aethiopica: D-Ha (Wiesbaden: Harrassowitz Verlag, 2005), p. 871.
  4. ^ J. D. Fage, A History of Africa (London: Routledge, 2001)". pp. 53-54. ISBN 0-415-25248-2.
  5. ^ a b Hodd, Mike, Footprint East Africa Handbook (New York: Footprint Travel Guides, 2002), p. 859. ISBN 1-900949-65-2.
  6. ^ Hoffman, Barbara T., Art and Cultural Heritage (Cambridge: University Press, 2005), p. 5. ISBN 0-521-85764-3.
  7. ^ Paul B. Henze, Layers of Time: A History of Ethiopia (New York: Palgrave, 2000), pp. 42f

Further reading

  • Yuri M. Kobishchanov. Axum (Joseph W. Michels, editor; Lorraine T. Kapitanoff, translator). University Park, Pennsylvania: University of Pennsylvania, 1979. ISBN 0-271-00531-9
  • Stuart Munro-Hay. Aksum: An African Civilization of Late Antiquity. Edinburgh: University Press. 1991. ISBN 0-7486-0106-6 online edition
  • Stuart Munro-Hay. Excavations at Aksum: An account of research at the ancient Ethiopian capital directed in 1972-74 by the late Dr Nevill Chittick London: British Institute in Eastern Africa, 1989 ISBN 0-500-97008-4
  • Sergew Hable Sellassie. Ancient and Medieval Ethiopian History to 1270 Addis Ababa: United Printers, 1972.
  • African Zion, the Sacred Art of Ethiopia. New Haven: Yale University Press, 1993.

External links

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Cities of Ethiopia

Abomsa | Adama (Nazret) | Addis Ababa | Addis Zemen | Adet | Adigrat | Adwa | Agaro | Alaba Kulito | Alamata | Aleta Wendo | Ambo | Arba Minch | Areka | Asaita | Asebe Teferi | Asella | Asosa | Awbere | Awasa | Axum | Bati | Bedele | Bichena | Bodti | Bure | Butajira | Chagni | Debarq | Debre Berhan | Debre Marqos | Debre Tabor | Debre Zeyit | Degehabur | Dembidolo | Derwonaji | Dessie | Dila | Dire Dawa | Dodola | Dolo | Fiche | Finote Selam | Gambela | Gebre Guracha | Gimbi | Ginir | Goba | Gode | Gondar | Goro | Guduru | Hagere Miriam | Harar | Hart Sheik | Holeta Genet | Humera | Inda Selassie | Irgalem | Irgachefe | Jijiga | Jimma | Jinka | Kabri Dar | Kibre Mengest | Kobo | Kombolcha | Korem | Maychew | Mek'ele | Meki | Mendi | Metu | Mojo | Mota | Moyale | Negele Arsi | Negele Boran | Neji | Nekemte | Robe | Sawla | Sebeta | Shakiso | Shambu | Shashamane | Shewa Robit | Sodo | Softu | Waliso | Weldiya | Welenchiti | Welkite | Wenj Gefersa | Wereta | Wukro | Ziway This gari is crossing the Addis Ababa-Dire Dawa Road in Adama, Ethiopia. ... For the long-distance runner, see Addis Abebe. ... Adigrat is a town in the Tigray region (or kilil) of Ethiopia that As of 1994, it had a population of around 37,417 people. ... The landscape of Adwa Adwa (also spelled Adowa, Aduwa, or Adua) is a market town in northern Ethiopia, and best known as the community closest to the decisive Battle of Adowa fought in 1896. ... Ambo is a spa town in Ethiopia, lying west of Addis Ababa. ... Arba Minch (Amharic, forty springs) is a city in the of Ethiopia. ... Asaita is the current capital of the Afar Region of Ethiopia, located in the northeastern part of that country, and at the southern edge of the Danakil Desert. ... Asellais a city in the Oromia region of Ethiopia. ... Asosa is the capital of the Benishangul-Gumuz region (or killoch) of Ethiopia. ... Awasa is a town in Ethiopia, on the shores of Lake Awasa. ... Bati is a town in Ethiopia, lying east of Dessie. ... Debre Berhan is a town in the Amhara region of Ethiopia, about 120 kilometers north east of Addis Ababa, on the paved highway to Dessie. ... Debre Marqos (also called Mankorar) is a city in the Amhara Region of Ethiopia. ... Debre Tabor is a town in the Amhara Region of Ethiopia, about 100 kilometers southeast of Gondar, and 50 kilometers E of Lake Tana. ... Debre Zeyit (also known by its Oromofi name of Bishoftu) is a town in the Oromia Region of Ethiopia, lying south east of Addis Ababa, on the railway line to Djibouti. ... Dembidolo is a market town in western Ethiopia, lying north east of Gambela. ... Dessie or Dese is a city in the Amhara region of Ethiopia, with a population as of 1994 of 97,314 people. ... Dila is a market town in the Southern Nations, Nationalities, and Peoples Region of Ethiopia, lying on the main road from Addis Ababa to Nairobi. ... Map of Ethiopia showing Dire Dawa (in red). ... Fiche (also spelled Fichte) is a town in central Ethiopia. ... Gambela is a city in Ethiopia and the capital of the Gambela Region or kilil. ... Goba is a town in south-central Ethiopia. ... Gondar (less commonly spelled Gonder) was the old imperial capital of Ethiopia and the historic Begemder province, now part of the Amhara region. ... Guduru is a village and Mandal in Krishna District, Andhra Pradesh, India. ... Harar (sometimes spelled Harrar, Hārer, or Harer) is an eastern city in Ethiopia, and the capital of the modern Harari ethno-political division (or kilil) of Ethiopia. ... Humera (also Himera, Geez ሁመራ hūmerā) is a town in northern Ethiopia, near the borders of Sudan and Eritrea with a latitude and a longitude of . ... Shire, also known as Inda Selassie, is a town in the Tigray region of Ethiopia, lying west of Aksum. ... Irgalem (also spelled Yrgalam and Yrga Alem) is a town in southern Ethiopia. ... Jijiga is a city in eastern Ethiopia, located approximately 80 km east of Harar and 60 km west of the border with Somaliland. ... Jimma is the largest city in western Ethiopia; as of 1994 it had a population of 88,867 people. ... Jinka is a market town on the Tama Plains of south western Ethiopia, lying near the Mago National Park. ... Kombolcha is a town in the Amhara Region of Ethiopia, lying immediately south east of Dessie. ... Korem (alternative forms include Quoram Vecchia, Kworam) is a town in central Ethiopia. ... Maychew (Tigrinya ማይጭው Salty water, also transliterated Mai Ceu, Maichew, and Mai Cio) is a town in the Tigray Region of Ethiopia. ... Mekelē is capital of the Tigray region of Ethiopia and home to the headquarters of the UNMEE. It is located some 650 km north of the capital, Addis Ababa. ... Metu is a market town in western Ethiopia, lying on the Sor River. ... Moyale is a town on the border of Ethiopia and Kenya, with parts of it existing in both countries. ... Negele Boran (or Neghelle) is a town in southern Ethiopia. ... Nekemte (also called Lekemt) is a market town in the Oromia region (or kilil) of Ethiopia, and was the capital of the former province of Welega. ... Shashamane (or Shashemene) is a town in the Ethiopian province of Shoa, about 150 miles from the capital of Addis Ababa. ... SoDo is a neighborhood in Seattle, Washington, that makes up part of the citys Industrial District. ... Weldiya is a town located in the Amhara province of Ethiopia. ... Ziway or Zway is a town in the Southern Nations, Nationalities, and Peoples Region of Ethiopia, located on the road that connects Addis Ababa to Nairobi. ...

Coordinates: 14.124° N 38.721° E Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Axum (1179 words)
Modern Axum is the capital of the Abyssinian province of Tigré, and nestles in a kloof, or valley, beneath a lofty peak of the Adoua mountains, at 7,545 feet above the level of the sea.
The other principal ecclesiastics resident at Axum are the above mentioned Etchigeh (Etchagué), or principal bishop, always a native; the Nebrid, a kind of archdeacon or head of the priesthood and rector of the cathedral; the Lij Kaneat, or judge in ecclesiastical matters, together with monks and priests of various grades.
Axum claims to hold in the innermost recesses of its cathedral the original Tables of the Law and the tabout, or Ark of the Covenant that the Abyssinians say was brought from Jerusalem to their ancient fortress of Ava by Menelek, the son of Solomon, and the Queen of Sheba, and transferred later to Axum.
Britain.tv Wikipedia - Axum (990 words)
It was the centre of the Axumite Kingdom, which emerged around the time of the birth of Jesus and declined after the 7th century due to unknown reasons, but contributed to the shift of the power centre of the Ethiopian Empire further inland.
The kingdom of Axum had its own written language called Ge'ez, and also developed a distinctive architecture exemplified by giant obelisks, the oldest of which (though much smaller) date from 5,000-2,000 BC This kingdom was at its height under king Ezana, baptized as Abreha, in the 300s (which was also when it officially embraced Christianity).
Axum is considered to be the holiest city in Ethiopia and is an important destination of pilgrimages.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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