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Encyclopedia > Avon, Connecticut
Avon, Connecticut
Coordinates: 41°47′40″N, 72°51′28″W
NECTA Hartford
Region Capitol Region
Incorporated 1830
Government
 - Type Council-manager
 - Town manager Philip K. Schenck, Jr.
 - Town council John F. Carlson, Chm.
Diane S. Hornaday
William J. Shea II
Joseph C. Woodford
Mark C. Zacchio
Area
 - City 60.9 km²  (23.5 sq mi)
Population (2005)
 - City 17,209UNIQ3ecd654,225,321,636-ref-00,000,001-QINU
 - Density 288/km² (745/sq mi)
Time zone Eastern (UTC-5)
 - Summer (DST) Eastern (UTC-4)
ZIP code 06001
Website: Avon

Avon is a town in Hartford County, Connecticut, United States. As of 2005, the town has an estimated total population of 17,209.[2] A New England City and Town Area or NECTA is a geographic entity in the New England region of the United States. ... The council-manager government is one of 2 main variations of representative municipal government (for contrast, also see Mayor-Council government). ... Council-manager government - Wikipedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... Area is a physical quantity expressing the size of a part of a surface. ... Square kilometre (US spelling: Square kilometer), symbol km², is an SI unit of surface area. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... Population density by country, 2006 Population density is a measurement of population per unit area or unit volume. ... A time zone is a region of the Earth that has adopted the same standard time, usually referred to as the local time. ... The Eastern Standard Time Zone is a geographic region that keeps time by subtracting five hours from Coordinated Universal Time (UTC). ... -12 | -11 | -10 | -9:30 | -9 | -8 | -7 | -6 | -5 | -4 | -3:30 | -3 | -2:30 | -2 | -1 | -0:25 | UTC (0) | +0:20 | +0:30 | +1 | +2 | +3 | +3:30 | +4 | +4:30 | +4:51 | +5 | +5:30 | +5:40 | +5:45 | +6 | +6:30 | +7 | +7:20 | +7... Daylight saving time around the world  DST used  DST no longer used  DST never used Daylight saving time (DST), also summer time in British English, is the convention of advancing clocks so that afternoons have more daylight and mornings have less. ... The Eastern Standard Time Zone is a geographic region that keeps time by subtracting five hours from Coordinated Universal Time (UTC). ... −12 | −11 | −10 | −9:30 | −9 | −8 | −7 | −6 | −5 | −4 | −3:30 | −3 | −2:30 | −2 | −1 | −0:25 | UTC (0) | +0:20 | +0:30 | +1 | +2 | +3 | +3:30 | +4 | +4:30 | +4:51 | +5 | +5:30 | +5:40 | +5:45 | +6 | +6:30 | +7 | +7:20 | +7... Mr. ... Hartford County is located in the north central part of the U.S. state of Connecticut. ... It has been suggested that this article be split into multiple articles. ... 2005 is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Avon was settled in 1645 and was originally a part of Farmington but sold to the Puritans in a land charter granted by the Duke of York in 1830. Avon was originally called Northington (the north parish) before it broke off from Farmington. According to the Avon Historical Society, Avon's independence was rooted in the need for a church that was more accessible to the growing town's population than the Congregational Church in Farmington. They eventually commissioned someone to come north from the Yale Divinity School to found the first church. It is generally considered a suburb of Hartford. Avon Old Farms School, a prestigious boarding school, is located there. In 2005, Avon was named the 3rd safest town in America by Money Magazine. It is home to the Pine Grove School House, built in 1865 and remains open today as a museum. Avon was listed as one of the "preppiest" places in the United States in the 1980s best-seller The Official Preppy Handbook. An episode of MTV's My Super Sweet 16 took place there. // Events January 10 - Archbishop Laud executed on Tower Hill, London. ... Coordinates: NECTA Hartford Region Capitol Region Incorporated 1645 Government Type Council-manager  - Town manager Kathleen Eagen  - Council chairman Michael Clark Area  - City 74. ... The Puritans were members of a group of radical Protestants which developed in England after the Reformation. ... The title Duke of York is a title of nobility in the British peerage. ... Yale Divinity School is the one of the constituent graduate schools of Yale University, in New Haven, Connecticut, USA. ... Housing subdivision near Union, Kentucky, a suburb of Cincinnati, Ohio. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Avon Old Farms School is a boys prep school in Avon, Connecticut. ... A boarding school is an educational institution where some or all pupils not only study, but also live, amongst their peers. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Motto: (Out Of Many, One) (traditional) In God We Trust (1956 to date) Anthem: The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington D.C. Largest city New York City None at federal level (English de facto) Government Federal constitutional republic  - President George Walker Bush (R)  - Vice President Dick Cheney (R) Independence from... Cover of Money magazine Money is a Time Warner financial magazine. ... The Pine Grove School House is an old schoolhouse in the town of Avon, Connecticut (USA). ... Cover of The Official Preppy Handbook The Official Preppy Handbook is a tongue-in-cheek reference guide written by Lisa Birnbach as a parody of an aspect of North American culture she styles as prepdom. ... MTV (Music Television) is an American cable television network headquartered in New York City. ... My Super Sweet 16 is a MTV reality series depicting the travails of wealthy teenagers planning extravagant parties and balls, including 16th birthday parties, Cotillion balls, and Quinceañeras. ...

Contents

Historical Populations

1830 1,025
1840 1,001
1850 995
1860 1,059
1870 987
1880 1,057
1890 1,182
1900 1,302
1910 1,337
1920 1,534
1930 1,738
1940 2,258
1950 3,171
1960 5,273
1970 8,352
1980 11,201
1990 13,937
2000 15,832
2005 17,209 (estimate)

Sources: Interactive Connecticut State Register & Manual and U.S. Census Bureau, Population Division Liberty Leading the People by Eugène Delacroix commemorates the July Revolution 1830 (MDCCCXXX) was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... 1840 is a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ... Year 1850 (MDCCCL) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... 1860 is the leap year starting on Sunday. ... 1870 (MDCCCLXX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1880 (MDCCCLXXX) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar). ... 1890 (MDCCCXC) was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar). ... Year 1900 (MCM) was an exceptional common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar, but a leap year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar. ... 1910 (MCMX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Sunday of the 13-day slower Julian calendar. ... Year 1920 (MCMXX) was a leap year starting on Thursday. ... Year 1930 (MCMXXX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link is to a full 1930 calendar). ... 1940 (MCMXL) was a leap year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1940 calendar). ... 1950 (MCML) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will take you to calendar). ... 1960 (MCMLX) was a leap year starting on Friday (the link is to a full 1960 calendar). ... 1970 (MCMLXX) was a common year starting on Thursday. ... 1980 (MCMLXXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday. ... MCMXC redirects here; for the Enigma album, see MCMXC a. ... 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Geography

According to the United States Census Bureau, the town has a total area of 60.9 km² (23.5 mi²). 59.9 km² (23.1 mi²) of it is land and 1.0 km² (0.4 mi²) of it (1.70%) is water. The United States Census Bureau (officially Bureau of the Census as defined in Title ) is a part of the United States Department of Commerce. ... A square metre (US spelling: square meter) is by definition the area enclosed by a square with sides each 1 metre long. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ...


Demographics

As of the census2 of 2000, there were 15,832 people, 6,192 households, and 4,483 families residing in the town. The population density was 264.4/km² (684.8/mi²). There were 6,480 housing units at an average density of 108.2/km² (280.3/mi²). The racial makeup of the town was 94.93% White, 0.98% African American, 0.05% Native American, 2.96% Asian, 0.02% Pacific Islander, 0.28% from other races, and 0.77% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.57% of the population. 1870 US Census for New York City A census is the process of obtaining information about every member of a population (not necessarily a human population). ... The following is a list of sources used in the creation of encyclopedia articles on various geographic topics and locations, such as cities, counties, states, and countries. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... Race, as defined by the United States Census Bureau and the Federal Office of Management and Budget (OMB), is a self-identification data item in which residents choose the race or races with which they most closely identify. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ...


There were 6,192 households out of which 34.0% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 65.8% were married couples living together, 4.7% had a female householder with no husband present, and 27.6% were non-families. 23.5% of all households were made up of individuals and 9.5% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.53 and the average family size was 3.03. “Matrimony” redirects here. ...


In the town the population was spread out with 26.1% under the age of 18, 3.3% from 18 to 24, 26.1% from 25 to 44, 29.5% from 45 to 64, and 15.0% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 42 years. For every 100 females there were 91.8 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 88.0 males.


The median income for a household in the town was $90,934, and the median income for a family was $109,161. Males had a median income of $76,882 versus $44,848 for females. The per capita income for the town was $51,706. About 0.9% of families and 1.7% of the population were below the poverty line, including 1.2% of those under age 18 and 1.9% of those age 65 or over. The per capita income for a group of people may be defined as their total personal income, divided by the total population. ... Map of countries showing percentage of population who have an income below the national poverty line The poverty line is the level of income below which one cannot afford to purchase all the resources one requires to live. ...

Voter Registration and Party Enrollment as of October 25, 2005[3]
Party Active Voters Inactive Voters Total Voters Percentage
Republican 3,956 187 4,143 35.11%
Democratic 2,655 100 2,755 23.35%
Unaffiliated 4,639 251 4,890 41.44%
Minor Parties 10 1 11 0.09%
Total 11,260 539 11,799 100%

October 25 is the 298th day of the year (299th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Republican Party is one of two major contemporary political parties in the United States, along with the Democratic Party. ... The Democratic Party is one of two major contemporary political parties in the United States; the other being the Republican Party. ...

History

How did our little piece of Connecticut develop? Avon was incorporated in 1830, a blink of time away. Two hundred million years before that, dinosaurs walked here: Coelophysis, Anchisaurus, Eubrontes. Four million years ago, a shallow sea covered Connecticut, and mountains as grand as the Alps rose up. Time blew the mountains away bit by bit, and rivers carried their pieces to places like Avon, located low and central. Over eons this sediment hardened into sandstone and shale. Then came fiery lava and the grinding land twisted itself into the steep cliffs of Talcott Mountain.


For the next two million years, glaciers came and went. Thick ice buried Avon at least four times, rubbing the rocks raw and leaving behind boulders from Vermont, New Hampshire, and Massachusetts. It was enough to make a river go crazy. The Farmington River, which once flowed south, cranked into reverse and burst into the Connecticut River.


And then, that part of the show was over. Twenty-five thousand years ago, after the ice left, mastodons lived here. According to Christopher Bickford in his book Farmington, in the period of 6,000 – 4,000 B.C, the first human inhabitants of the Farmington Valley arrived. About 1,000 years ago, Tunxis settled the area and named it Tunxis Sepus. They belonged to the Algonquian family of tribes, which included Podunk and Naugunk tribes and members of tribes living in the area stretching from Windsor to Haddam. In 1640, the Tunxis Indians sold their land to English proprietors, and the Town of Farmington was established in 1645.


Out from Farmington came Stephen Hart, the first white settler to own land in what is today Avon, called then the “land att Nod.” In 1750, the land of Nod broke off from Farmington when the General Assembly established it as the separate parish of Northington. With this, the Society of Northington took control of its religious affairs, called its first pastor (Rev.Ebenezer Booge, 1751), and built its own meetinghouse (1754).


These were wonderful improvements for the approximately 160 residents. They wrote that they had “reason to hope, with the blessing of God on our labors, [that] we shall be well able to support the Gospel among ourselves for the future....”


The question of where to put the new meetinghouse, however, caused great local concern. At the time, most homes were located east of the Farmington River in today’s Waterville Road vicinity. Accordingly, the Hartford County Court said the meetinghouse must be there. Twenty-two inhabitants living west of the river signed a petition claiming hardship at crossing the river to attend church. The Court didn’t budge, and the first meetinghouse went up east of the river in 1754. The site, located at the end of today’s Reverknolls, off of Route 10, is marked by a small monument.


Northington’s population in the western section grew, but there was no bridge for these inhabitants to use to get to church until 1763. Even then, ice and floods destroyed that bridge and at least five other bridges over the next few decades.


Time and population growth - and a suspicious meetinghouse fire in 1817, resolved the one-meetinghouse problem. With the development of Lovely Street and Whortleberry Hill to the west, political power shifted west. Every voice counted for the vote to build a new meetinghouse in what is today West Avon. By a vote of 44 to 37, a new meetinghouse went up in 1818 (today the West Avon Congregational Church on Country Club Road). Fourteen of the minority votors formed a new Congregational society, and built Avon’s second church the very next year, 1819 (today the Avon Congregational Church on West Main Street).


With the meetinghouse issue at rest - if not exactly at peace - the time was coming to make the parish into a town. A book published in 1820 highlighted the area’s natural beauty: Remarks Made on a Short Tour between Hartford and Quebec in the Autumn of 1819. Its author was Benjamin Silliman, a Yale College professor of Chemistry and Natural History. Inside were engravings based on Daniel Wadsworth’s drawings, including two spectacular views of Avon Mountain and the Wadsworth estate.


The parish’s business outlook looked good with the completion in 1828 of the Farmington Canal, a 36-foot wide highway of water linking Northington to Northampton, Long Island Sound, and New York City. On Dec. 22, 1828, Northington residents voted to incorporate, and to petition the Connecticut General Assembly to become a town. The vote was 59 in favor, and 44 opposed. With this vote, Avon agreed to sever ties with Farmington, its mother town. Farmington, founded in 1645, would eventually spin off a total ofseven daughter towns: Southington (1779), Berlin (1785), Bristol (1785), Burlington (1806), Avon (1830), New Britain (1850), and Plainville (1869).


The General Assembly finally approved the petition on May 5, 1830, granting that Northington parish “is hereby incorporated into a distinct town, by the name of Avon….” The voters met seven weeks later at the West Avon Congregational Church on June 21, 1830 to organize their government. At this meeting they had elections for moderator, selectmen, town clerk, treasurer, constables, grand jurors, tythingmen, fence viewers, keykeepers, sealers of weights and measures, assessors, a board of relief, and a committee to sell highways and remove nuisances. Town and electors’ meetings alternated between the West Avon Congregational Church and the Avon Congregational Church from 1830 until 1891, when the town built its first town hall.


Why the name Avon? The accepted story is that the name came from the Avon River in England. “Avon” had been in use here as early as 1753, when church marriage records began to record the bride or groom’s residence as “Avon” or “Northington.”


In 1830, Avon had 1,025 residents, two Congregational meetinghouses, the Baptist Church, the Farmington Canal, a bustling Canal Warehouse, Francis Woodford’s three story hotel across the road from Obadiah Gillet’s Tally Ho Tavern and Inn, and the Talcott Mountain Turnpike conveniently linking Avon with Boston, Hartford, Albany (N.Y.) and points west. With this Albany Turnpike (today Route 44) and the busy canal, Avon was at a dynamic crossroads.


Just six years later, in 1836, Avon was among the towns included in Connecticut Historical Collections, John Barber’s sumptuous book about Connecticut’s history. Barber described Avon as “for the most part a level and fertile tract of land in the valley of the Farmington river, between two mountainous ridges on the east and west.”


John Barber got that one right. Avon was fertile. Families thrived on dairy, poultry, and tobacco farms, notably the Alsop, Buckland, Colton, Delbon, Distin, Stone, Strong, Thompson, Watson, Westerman and Viti farms.


Avon blossomed with the coming of energetic and talented men and women from Italy, Ireland, Eastern Europe, and Germany. They worked at the impressive yet volatile Climax Fuse factory (later named Ensign-Bickford), farmed, and operated shops. Education advanced even within the constraints of one-room schoolhouses. Pleasures and problems brought by the automobile continue today.


Avon’s past is present. The 1778 First Company Horse Guards still operates. The Town converted the former Ensign-Bickford Company fuse factory buildings into offices and workshops. The North Blacksmith Shop is now Avon Old Farms Inn’s Forge Room.


Life in early Avon is frozen in the remarkable diaries of Reverend Rufus Hawley, covering 1767-1812, and the journals and notebooks of Frank Hadsell, covering 1845-1942. Frank and his brother Clinton, both photographers, left behind hundreds of glass plate negatives taken about 1889-1919, when Avon’s population was still – as it had been in 1830 - just over 1,000.


People and places of special interest include the Heublein Tower overlooking Avon, a familiar landmark. It was there that Republicans asked General Dwight Eisenhower to run for president. The innovative Avon Old Farms School for boys opened in 1927, planned and financed by Theodate Pope Riddle, an architect with personal flair and firm convictions about design. Mrs. Riddle employed stonemasons from the English Cotswolds, and skilled Italian immigrants who had built Ensign-Bickford’s stone buildings.


In Avon’s landscape of 22.6 square miles are reminders of the Farmington Canal, the railroad, and Albany Turnpike. The Avon Historical Society operates the restored Pine Grove Schoolhouse, the Living Museum, and the Derrin House, a circa 1810 farmhouse.


In 1950, Avon’s population was projected to soon pass 5,000. Town officials adopted a development plan in 1954. Avon’s Home Rule Charter, was adopted in 1959 and amended in 1962, 1969, 1975, 1980 and 1998. On July 1, 1981, the revised Charter provided for a Town Manager, Town Council, Board of Finance and Town Meeting. Today Avon’s population is estimated at 16,055.


On Nov. 11, 1996, the Town and the Gildo T. Consolini Post 3272, Veterans of Foreign Wars, dedicated the Avon Veterans Memorial on the Town Green. In the Mexican War (1846-1848), three Avon men served, and one was lost. During the Civil War (1861-1865), Avon sent off a heartbreaking sum of 98 men to fight when the whole population of the town was only 1,059. Twenty-five soldiers did not return. For the First World War (1917-1918), Avon contributed 77 men, and lost none. For the Second World War (1941-1946), 300 men and women from Avon served, and losses numbered 13. In the Korean War (1950-1955) 51 from Avon served, with no losses. In the Gulf War (1990-1994), 32 men and women served, with no losses. In Vietnam (1961-1975), among the 153 men and women were served, there was one death and one man Missing in Action.


Avon reaches a fine milestone in 2005: it has been a town for 175 years. Its history stretches back to 1830, and much further. With help from volunteers and donors, the historical collections and programs of the town continue to grow. The Avon Historical Society, and the Avon Free Public Library’s Marian Hunter History Room continue to collect (respectively) Avon-related artifacts and archives.


We hope that Avon’s anniversary events this year will heighten appreciation for our history, and strengthen those organizations, town officials, residents, businesses and volunteers who seek to promote and preserve Avon’s heritage.


Trivia

  • Avon was a filming location for the movie Three Card Stud, released in 1999.[4]
  • Andy Sachs, the fictional main character of The Devil Wears Prada, is from Avon.
  • Will Friedle, "Eric" on the television show "Boy Meets World" is from Avon and attended the public middle and high schools.
  • In Michelle Branch's first video, "Everywhere," she is seen wearing a shirt that says: "Avon Governor's Ranch." This is, in fact, in reference to the First Company Governer's Horse Guard ranch found along West Avon Road in Avon.
  • An episode of My Super Sweet Sixteen was shot in Avon.
  • On July 29, 2005 one of the worst traffic accidents in Connecticut history occurred at the intersection of US 44 and Route 10 at the foot of Avon Mountain. A runaway dump truck plowed into many stopped vehicles, causing four deaths.[5] Governor M. Jodi Rell has since proposed safety improvements for this road[6]

The Devil Wears Prada is a 2003 novel by Lauren Weisberger about a young woman who, fresh from college, gets a job working as a personal assistant to a powerful fashion magazine editor that turns increasingly hellish as she struggles to keep up with her bosss capricious and demeaning... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Boy Meets World is an American television sitcom that chronicles the events and everyday life lessons of Cory Matthews, who grows up from a pre-pubescent boy to a married man. ... Michelle Jacquet DeSevren Branch Landau (born July 2, 1983) is a Grammy Award-winning American singer, songwriter and guitarist. ... My Super Sweet 16 is an MTV reality series which depicts the travails of wealthy teenagers planning extravagant parties and balls, including 16th birthday parties, Cotillion Balls, and Quinceañeras. ... July 29, 2005 (Friday) Astronomers have discovered a large new trans-Neptunian object, provisionally named 2003 UB313, which is larger than Pluto. ... United States Highway 44 is an east-west United States highway that runs for 238 miles (383 km) from Plymouth, Massachusetts to the Hudson Valley region of New York. ... CT 10 is a 54. ... Connecticut welcome sign being fixed as Rell takes office on July 1, 2004 M. Jodi Rell (born June 16, 1946) is a Republican politician who became the 87th Governor of Connecticut on July 1, 2004. ...

References

  1. ^ U.S. Census Bureau Population Estimates
  2. ^ American FactFinder profile at United States Census Bureau
  3. ^ Registration and Party Enrollment Statistics as of October 25, 2005 (PDF). Connecticut Secretary of State. Retrieved on 2006 October 2.
  4. ^ [1] Internet Movie DataBase filming location page for Avon, Connecticut, accessed August 4, 2006
  5. ^ http://www.nytimes.com/2005/07/30/nyregion/30avon.html?ex=1280376000&en=0a5a121baf1afd4b&ei=5088&partner=rssnyt&emc=rss
  6. ^ http://www.ct.gov/governorrell/cwp/view.asp?Q=318192&A=2425

The United States Census Bureau (officially Bureau of the Census as defined in Title ) is a part of the United States Department of Commerce. ... October 25 is the 298th day of the year (299th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... October 2 is the 275th day (276th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, with 90 days remaining. ... August 4 is the 216th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (217th in leap years), with 149 days remaining. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Avon, Connecticut - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (628 words)
Avon is a town in Hartford County, Connecticut, United States.
Avon was settled in 1645 and was originally a part of Farmington but sold to the Puritans in a land charter granted by the Duke of York in 1830.
Avon was listed as one of the "preppiest" places in the United States in the 1980s best-seller The Official Preppy Handbook.
Avon - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (220 words)
Avon, New Brunswick, in the province of New Brunswick
New Avon, New Brunswick, in the province of New Brunswick
Avon is a "sin of lust or uncontrollable emotion" under Jewish Halakha law.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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