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Encyclopedia > Aviator
U.S. Army test pilot Lt. F.W. "Mike" Hunter wearing a flight suit. Image from the Office of War Information, 1942.
U.S. Army test pilot Lt. F.W. "Mike" Hunter wearing a flight suit. Image from the Office of War Information, 1942.

An aviator is a person who flies aircraft for pleasure or as a profession. The word is normally applied to pilots, but it can be applied more broadly, for example to include people such as wing-walkers who regularly take part in an aerobatic display sequence. The word aviatrix is sometimes used of women flyers, reflecting the word's Latin root. Aviator may refer to: The Aviator, an Academy Award-winning 2004 biographical drama film based on the life of Howard Hughes Aviator 1983 computer game by Geoff Crammond Aviator sunglasses, a style of sunglasses often worn by pilots The Aviator, a song by Deep Purple from their 1996 album Purpendicular... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (2400x3100, 4513 KB) Companion image TITLE Lieutenant Mike Hunter, Army pilot assigned to Douglas Aircraft Company, Long Beach, Calif. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (2400x3100, 4513 KB) Companion image TITLE Lieutenant Mike Hunter, Army pilot assigned to Douglas Aircraft Company, Long Beach, Calif. ... The United States Army is the largest and oldest branch of the armed forces of the United States. ... Lieutenant is a military, naval, paramilitary, fire service or police officer rank. ... A flight suit worn by an SR-71 Blackbird pilot, now in an Air Force museum. ... The United States Office of War Information (OWI) was a government agency created during World War II to consolidate government information services. ... Flying machine redirects here. ... The introduction to this article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject matter. ... Soon after aircraft were invented, pilots realised that they could be used as part of a flying circus to entertain people or impress others in what was termed aerobatics. ... For other uses, see Latin (disambiguation). ...


The term was more used in the early days of aviation and has connotations of bravery and adventure. Anyone can fly an aircraft, with or without a certificate. However, at all times the aircraft must be under the operational control of a properly certified and current pilot, who is responsible for the safe and legal completion of the flight. The first certificate was delivered by the Aero Club de France to Louis Blériot in 1908, followed by Glenn Curtiss, Leon Delagrange and Robert Esnault-Pelterie. The absolute authority given to the Pilot in Command is derived from that of a ship’s captain.[citation needed] Aviation encompasses all the activities relating to airborne devices created by human ingenuity, generally known as aircraft. ... Louis Blériot Louis Blériot (July 1, 1872 – August 2, 1936) was a French inventor and engineer, who performed the first flight over a large body of water in a heavier-than-air craft. ... Glenn H. Curtiss at the Grande Semaine dAviation in France in 1909 Glenn Hammond Curtiss (May 21, 1878 – July 23, 1930) was an aviation pioneer and founder of the Curtiss Aeroplane and Motor Company, now part of Curtiss-Wright Corporation. ... Léon Delagrange (1873 - January 4, 1910) was a French aviator; also a sculptor. ... Robert Esnault-Pelterie Avion Esnault-Pelterie, 1906 Avion Esnault-Pelterie, 1906 Robert Albert Charles Esnault-Pelterie (November 8, 1881–December 6, 1957) was a pioneering French aircraft designer and spaceflight theorist. ...


In the United Kingdom there were (in 2000) 31,885 private pilots and 16,449 airline and commercial pilots (ATPL and CPL) registered with the UK Civil Aviation Authority (CAA). Among private pilots, only 6% are female (approximately 1800). In the commercial sector this percentage drops to only 2%.


The United States Federal Aviation Administration estimates there are 609,737 active pilots with US Airmen certificates as of December 31, 2005. [1] Of these, about 6% (36,584) are female. “FAA” redirects here. ... is the 365th day of the year (366th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


The U.S. state of Alaska has the highest number of pilots per capita: out of an estimated 663,661 residents, 8,550 are pilots, or about one in every 78. For other uses, see Alaska (disambiguation). ...

Contents

Civilian

Delta Air Lines Pilots
Delta Air Lines Pilots

Civilian pilots fly privately for pleasure, charity, or in pursuance of a business, for non-scheduled commercial air transport companies, or for airlines. When flying for an airline, pilots are usually referred to as airline pilots, with the pilot in command often referred to as the captain. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (922x691, 115 KB) Summary Delta airlines pilots, taken by me, Twin Jalanugraha Licensing I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (922x691, 115 KB) Summary Delta airlines pilots, taken by me, Twin Jalanugraha Licensing I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ...


United States

Legacy airlines such as American Airlines, United Airlines, and Delta Air Lines, long considered the most prestigious and lucrative employers, have slashed their pilot payscales and benefits in the face of fierce competition from low-cost carriers. In fact, Southwest Airlines captains and first officers both start off with significatly higher salaries then the legacy carriers. As of May 2004, median annual earnings of airline pilots, copilots, and flight engineers were $129,250. [2] However, such salaries represent the upper level of airline pay scales. Salaries at regional airlines can be considerably less - though according to the Bureau of Labor statistics, median annual earnings of commercial pilots were $53,870, with the middle 50 percent earning between $37,170 and $79,390. [3] Pilots making very large salaries are typically senior airline captains, while pilots making very small salaries are generally low-seniority first officers. In practice, most pilots make reasonable average working salaries. A large variability in salaries can easily skew an average. Thus, the use of median wages to gauge such things as salary. Where large gaps are seen between a median figure, and a lower bound figure, this usually reflects those who don't stay in that particular field. Viewing this middle ground in context to the upper bound numbers can give a burgeoning pilot an idea of what to expect if they are able to stay with flying as a full time career. Based upon voluntary pilot reports, many US airline payscales are listed here: [4]. Most airline pilots are unionized, with the Air Line Pilot's Association(ALPA) being the largest pilot labor union in the United States. American Airlines, Inc. ... United Airlines, also known as United Air Lines, Inc. ... Delta Air Lines, Inc. ... This article is about the American airline. ... Regional Airlines redirects here. ...


International

In some countries (e.g., Pakistan, Thailand and several African countries), there is a strong relationship between the military and the principal national airlines, such that many or most airline pilots come from the military; that is no longer the case in the USA and Western Europe. While the flight decks of US and European airliners do have many ex-military pilots, they have just as many, if not more, pilots who spend their entire career as civilians. With the increasing popularity of European-style airline training schools in the USA and the fact that military training and flying, while rigorous, is fundamentally different in many ways from civilian piloting, it seems likely that the percentage of ex-military pilots flying for the airlines will continue to decrease.

F-16 pilot in flight
F-16 pilot in flight

Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1600x1200, 453 KB) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1600x1200, 453 KB) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ...

Military

Military pilots fly under government contract for the defence of countries. Their tasks involve combat and non-combat operations, including direct hostile engagements and support operations. Military pilots undergo specialized training, often with weapons operation and defensive maneuvering. Some military pilots are also civilian pilots. “Fights” redirects here. ... A weapon is a tool used to kill or incapacitate a person or animal, or destroy a military target. ...


Aviators in space

In human spaceflight, a pilot is someone who directly controls the operation of a spacecraft while located within the same craft. This term derives directly from the usage of the word "pilot" in aviation, where it is synonymous with "aviator". Note that on the US Space Shuttle, the term "pilot" is analogous to the term "co-pilot" in aviation, as the "commander" has ultimate responsibility for the shuttle. Edward White on a spacewalk during the Gemini 4 mission. ... The Space Shuttle Discovery as seen from the International Space Station. ... Aviation encompasses all the activities relating to airborne devices created by human ingenuity, generally known as aircraft. ... This article is about the space vehicle. ...


Well-known aviators

People largely known for their contributions to the history of aviation

While all of these people were pilots (and some still are), many are also noted for contributions in areas such as aircraft design and manufacturing, navigation or popularization.

Sir John William Alcock (November 5, 1892 – 18 December 1919) was a Captain in the Royal Air Force who, together with navigator Lieutenant Arthur Whitten Brown, piloted the first successful non-stop transatlantic flight from St. ... This article is about the former American astronaut. ... Jacqueline Auriol (November 5, 1917 - February 11, 2000) was a French aviatrix who set several world speed records. ... Richard David Bach (b. ... Brian Reed (born July 1, 1973 in Anderson, Indiana) is an American comic book and video game writer, currently residing near Atlanta, Georgia. ... Air Marshal Italo Balbo Italo Balbo (June 6, 1896 - June 28, 1940) was an Italian aviator, blackshirt leader and possible successor of Mussolini. ... Bernt Balchen (1899-1973) Bernt Balchen, D.F.C., (23 October 1899 – 17 October 1973), was a Norwegian-American polar (and general) aviation pioneer. ... Florence Lowe Pancho Barnes (July 14, 1901 – March 30, 1975), was a pioneer of womens aviation and the owner of the celebrated Happy Bottom Riding Club located on land annexed into Edwards Air Force Base in southern Californias Antelope Valley in the southwestern United States. ... Jean Gardner Batten (September 15, 1909 – November 22, 1982) was a New Zealand aviator, born in Rotorua. ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Jean-Pierre Blanchard (aka Jean Pierre François Blanchard), (7 July 1753 – 7 March 1809) was a French inventor, most remembered a pioneer in aviation and ballooning. ... Louis Blériot Louis Blériot (July 1, 1872 – August 2, 1936) was a French inventor and engineer, who performed the first flight over a large body of water in a heavier-than-air craft. ... Johan Nicolaas Block (May 18, 1929, Amsterdam - April 11, 1994) was a Dutch aviation pioneer. ... William E. Boeing (October 1, 1881 - September 28, 1956) was the aviation pioneer who founded the Boeing Company. ... Sir Arthur Whitten Brown (July 23, 1886 - October 4, 1948) was, as a Lieutenant in the Royal Air Force together with Captain John Alcock, the navigator of the first successful non-stop transatlantic flight, from St Johns, Newfoundland to Clifden, Connemara, Ireland which took place on 14 June 1919... Please wikify (format) this article as suggested in the Guide to layout and the Manual of Style. ... Clarence Johnson (right) congratulates Milo Burcham on the successful first flight of the XP-80 Shooting Star. ... Rear Admiral Richard Evelyn Byrd, USN (October 25, 1888 – March 11, 1957) was an pioneering polar explorer and famous aviator. ... Sacadura Cabral (1881-1924), was a Portuguese aviation pioneer that, together with Gago Coutinho (1869-1959), was the first to cross the South Atlantic Ocean by air in 1922, from Lisbon, in Portugal, to Rio de Janeiro, in Brazil. ... Don Cameron founder of Cameron Balloons the worlds largest hot air balloon manufacturer. ... Sir George Cayley, 6th Baronet (December 27, 1773 – December 15, 1857) was a prolific English engineer from Brompton-by-Sawdon, near Scarborough in Yorkshire. ... Hezarfen Ahmet Celebi (Turkish: Hezarfen Ahmet Çelebi), who lived in the 17th century in Istanbul in the Ottoman Empire, is one of the first aviators to have succeeded in flying with artificial wings. ... Sir Francis Chichester, (born September 17, 1901, Barnstaple, Devon, England – died August 26, 1972, Plymouth, Devon) was knighted by Queen Elizabeth II for his achievement of sailing solo around the world in only nine months and one day. ... Juan de la Cierva (21 September 1895 – 19 December 1936) was a Spanish aeronautical engineer and pilot. ... Henri Marie Coandă (June 7, 1886 – November 25, 1972) (IPA: /ɐʁi maʁi kwandÉ™/) was a Romanian inventor, aerodynamics pioneer and the builder of worlds first jet powered aircraft, the Coanda-1910. ... Sir Alan Cobham (May 6, 1894- October 21, 1973) - British Aviation Pioneer. ... Jacqueline Cochran (11 May 1906 – 9 August 1980) was a pioneer American aviatrix, considered to be one of the most gifted race pilots of her generation. ... Bessie Coleman (1892-1926) Bessie Queen Bess Coleman (January 26, 1892 – April 30, 1926), was the first African American woman to become an airplane pilot, and the first American woman to hold an international pilot license. ... Dieudonné Costes (14 November 1892 - 18 May 1973) was a French aviator, known of long distance and record breaking flights, a fighter ace of World War I. Costes was born in Septfonds, Tarn-et-Garonne. ... Gago Coutinho (1869-1959) was a Portuguese aviation pioneer that, together with Sacadura Cabral (1881-1924), was the first to cross the South Atlantic Ocean by air in 1922, from Lisbon, in Portugal, to Rio de Janeiro, in Brazil. ... Henry Tracey Coxwell (March 2nd 1819, Wouldham, Kent - January 5th 1900, Lewes, Sussex, England), was an English aeronaut. ... Born in Montreal Quebec Canada on March 12, 1954 - Age 9, professional magician in Montreal theatres under the name “The Great Donovan” - Age 13, summer job in a remake of Harry Houdini’s handcuffed underwater mailbag escape (for Expo ‘67 in Montreal) - Age 14, world hypnotism record: keeps a 24... Glenn H. Curtiss at the Grande Semaine dAviation in France in 1909 Glenn Hammond Curtiss (May 21, 1878 – July 23, 1930) was an aviation pioneer and founder of the Curtiss Aeroplane and Motor Company, now part of Curtiss-Wright Corporation. ... Doru Davidovici Doru Davidovici (b. ... Beverly Homer DeLay, known as B.H. DeLay, was an innovator and an aviator actor of French descent. ... General James Harold Jimmy Doolittle, Sc. ... Claude (Claudius) Honoré Desiré Dornier born in 1884 and died 1969. ... Donald Wills Douglas, Sr. ... Douglas Douglas-Hamilton, 14th Duke of Hamilton, 11th Duke of Brandon (February 3, 1903 - March 30, 1973), was born in Pimlico, London, England. ... Hélène Dutrieu (10 July 1877 – 26 June 1961), was a cycling world champion, stunt cyclist, stunt motorcyclist, automobile racer, stunt driver, pioneer aviator, wartime ambulance driver, and director of a military hospital. ... Amelia Mary Earhart (24 July 1897 – missing 2 July 1937, declared deceased 5 January 1939) was a noted American aviation pioneer, author and womens rights advocate. ... Eugene Burton Ely (October 21, 1886 - October 19, 1911) was an aviation pioneer, credited with the first shipboard aircraft take off and landing. ... Henry Farman Henry Farman (May 26, 1874 - July 18, 1958) was a French aviator and aircraft designer and manufacturer with his brother Maurice Farman. ... Anton Herman Gerard Anthony Fokker (April 6, 1890 – December 23, 1939), was born in Kediri (Dutch East Indies, now Indonesia) and became a Dutch aircraft manufacturer. ... James Stephen Fossett (born April 22, 1944 - missing September 3, 2007) is an American aviator, sailor and adventurer. ... Ramón Franco. ... Ernest Kellogg Gann (October 13, 1910 - December 19, 1991) was an aviator, author, filmmaker, sailor, fisherman and conservationist. ... Roland Garros has been considered the world’s first fighter pilot. ... Marlon D. Green (b. ... Geoffrey de Havilland (left) with Frederick Handley Page. ... Ernst Heinkel (January 24, 1888 - January 30, 1958) was a German aircraft designer and manufacturer. ... Herbert John Louis Hinkler (December 8, 1892 - January 7, 1933) - better known as Bert Hinkler, was a pioneer Australian aviator. ... R. A. Bob Hoover (born c. ... For the Welsh murderer, see Howard Hughes (murderer). ... Elrey Borge Jeppesen (January 28, 1907 – November 26, 1996) was an aviation pioneer. ... Amy Johnson in Kalgoorlie, Western Australia, July 1930. ... Alvin M. Tex Johnston (August 18, 1914 - November 14, 1998) was a test pilot for Bell Aircraft and the Boeing Company. ... Hubert Fauntleroy Julian (21 September 1897 – 19 February, 1983jfgvnkxfgjjhgijztjynkjnjknkjntjndufhunyhnjgftyn African American aviation pioneer. ... Hugo Junkers Hugo Junkers (3 February 1859 - 3 February 1935) was an innovative German engineer, as his many patents in varied areas (gas engines, aeroplanes) show. ... Kingsford Smith in his flying gear bad things he was a great man but he was also and mean cold blooded man he raped 10 kids and was also a murder he was a mean man who also so liked guys wene he was flying in 1900 he and his... Raymonde de LaRoche in August 1909 Raymonde de LaRoche (born Elise Roche on August 22, 1884 - died July 18, 1919) was the first woman to be made a pilot. ... Ruth Law at the controls of a Wright aircraft. ... Anthony W. Tony LeVier (February 14, 1913 - February 6, 1998) was an air racer and test pilot for the Lockheed Corporation from the 1940s to the 1970s. ... Otto Lilienthal Otto Lilienthal (23 May 1848 – 10 August 1896), the German Glider King, was a pioneer of human aviation. ... Charles Augustus Lindbergh (4 February 1902 – 26 August 1974), known as Lucky Lindy and The Lone Eagle, was an American pilot famous for the first solo, non-stop flight across the Atlantic, from Roosevelt Field, Long Island to Paris in 1927 in the Spirit of St. ... Per Lindstrand (right) with Richard Branson and the Virgin Pacific Flyer capsule in Miyakonojo, Japan Per Lindstrand (born August 8, 1948, Sweden) is an aeronautical engineer, pilot and adventurer who has lived in Oswestry, England, since 1978. ... Ormer Lock Locklear (October 28, 1891 - August 2, 1920) was a daredevil stunt flyer during and immediately after World War I. Born in Greenville, Texas, Locklear was brought up in Fort Worth, and trained as a carpenter. ... Albert Paul Mantz (August 2, 1903 – July 8, 1965) was a noted movie stunt pilot and consultant from the late 1930s until his death in the mid 1960s. ... Beryl Markham (26 October 1902 - 3 August 1986), was a British-born Kenyan author, pilot, horse trainer and adventurer. ... Marie Marvingt (February 20, 1875 – December 14, 1963) was a world-class athlete who won numerous awards in swimming, fencing, shooting, ski jumping, ice skating, and bobsledding. ... Angela Masson, hired by American Airlines in 1975, was the first woman to fly a Boeing 747 as captain. ... Wilfrid Reid Wop May, DFC (April 20, 1896 – June 21, 1952), was a pioneering aviator who created the rôle of bush pilot while working the Canadian west. ... SpaceShipOne test pilot Mike Melvill Michael W. Melvill (born November 1941) is one of the test pilots for SpaceShipOne, the experimental spaceplane developed by Scaled Composites. ... Jean Mermoz (December 9, 1901 – December 7, 1936) was an aviator, viewed as a hero by many in both Argentina and his native France, where many schools bear his name. ... Russel (Russ) Hyde Merrill (April 8, 1894 in Des Moines, Iowa - September 16, 1929 over Alaska) was an Alaskan aviation pioneer. ... For other people with the same name, see Billy Mitchell (disambiguation). ... James Allan (Jim) Mollison (1905-1959) was a famous Scottish pioneer airplane pilot. ... Jacques Étienne Montgolfier For the indie pop band, see The Montgolfier Brothers. ... Charles Nungesser (1892-1927) was a French aviator and adventurer who is best known as a rival of Charles A. Lindbergh in the race to be first to fly non-stop between New York and Paris. ... Richard Pearse Richard William Pearse (3 December 1877 — 29 July 1953), a New Zealand farmer and inventor, performed pioneering experiments in aviation. ... Percy Sinclair Pilcher (January 1866 — 2 October 1899) was a British inventor and pioneer aviator who, in one of the big what if events of history, could well have become the first person to achieve controlled, powered, heavier-than-air flight well before the Wright brothers had he not been... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Dr. Albert Plesman (7 September 1889 – 31 December 1953) was a Dutch pioneer in aviation and co-founder of KLM. He was born as the son of an egg trader from The Hague. ... Wiley Hardeman Post (November 22, 1898 – August 15, 1935) was the first pilot to fly solo around the world. ... Harriet Quimby in her Blériot XI monoplane Harriet Quimby (May 11, 1875 - July 1, 1912) was the first female to get a pilot license in the United States. ... Bessica Medlar Raiche (April, 1875 – April 11, 1932) was a dentist, businesswoman, and physician, notable for being the first woman in the United States accredited with flying solo in an airplane. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Born June 17, 1921, in Fort Wayne, Indiana, Margaret Ringenberg is an active pilot with more than 40. ... Yves Rousseau (France) is credited with some ultralight aircraft FAI world records and has received international recognition for his 13 years of work on human-powered ornithopter flight. ... Rust in a Moscow courtroom Mathias Rust (born 1968) is a German man known for his illegal landing near the Red Square in Moscow in 1987. ... Elbert Leander Burt Rutan (born June 17, 1943 in Estacada, Oregon) is an American aerospace engineer noted for his originality in designing light, strong, unusual-looking, energy-efficient aircraft. ... Richard “Dick” Rutan (born July 1, 1938) is an aviator who is most famous for flying the Voyager aircraft around the world non-stop with the assistance of Jeana Yeager. ... Antoine de Saint-Exupéry[1] (pronounced ) (June 29, 1900 – presumably July 31, 1944) was a French writer and aviator. ... This article is about the aviator. ... Blanche Stuart Scott (1889-1970) February 17 through 25, 1912 in Oakland, California Trenton Evening Times, Trenton, New Jersey on May 28, 1910 Blanche Stuart Scott (April 8, 1885 - January 12, 1970) aka Betty Scott was the first female aviator. ... Sheila Scott before her 1971 record-breaking trip Sheila Scott (April 27, 1922 in Worcester, Worcestershire, England – October 20, 1988 in London, England), was a British aviatrix. ... Melitta Schenk Gräfin von Stauffenberg, born Melitta Schiller (* january 9th 1903 in Krotoschin, Poland; † april 8th 1945, shot down near Straßkirchen, Bavaria) was a german aviatrix before and during World War II. Melittas father was Michael Schiller, son of a jewish fur trading family, who converted to... For another meanings and similar spellings, see Sikorsky. ... Sir Ross Macpherson Smith KBE MC DFC AFC 4 December 1892 - 13 April 1922 was an Australian aviator, who along with his brother, Sir Keith Macpherson Smith, became the first pilots to fly from England to Australia (in 1919). ... Sir Thomas Octave Murdock Sopwith (January 18, 1888 - January 27, 1989) was a British aviation pioneer as well as a celebrated yachtsman. ... Katherine Stinson (February 14, 1891, in Fort Payne, Alabama– July 8, 1977, in Santa Fe, New Mexico). ... Kurt Waldemar Tank, 1944. ... Iris Louise McPhetridge Thaden (November 12, 1905-November 9, 1979) was an aviation pioneer, holder of numerous aviation records, and the first woman to win the Bendix Trophy. ... Traian Vuias flying machine (March 18, 1906) Traian Vuia (August 17, 1872 - September 3, 1950) was a Romanian inventor, designed and built a self-propelling heavier-than-air aircraft. ... Patty Wagstaff (née Patricia Rosalie Kearns Combs) was born in St. ... Sir Arthur Whitten Brown (July 23, 1886 - October 4, 1948) was, as a Lieutenant in the Royal Air Force together with Captain John Alcock, the navigator of the first successful non-stop transatlantic flight, from St Johns, Newfoundland to Clifden, Connemara, Ireland which took place on 14 June 1919... Frank Whittle speaking to employees of the Flight Propulsion Research Laboratory (Now known as the NASA Glenn Research Center), USA, in 1946 Air Commodore Sir Frank Whittle, OM, KBE, FRS, Hon FRAeS (1 June 1907–9 August 1996) was an English Royal Air Force officer and is seen as the... The Wright brothers, Orville (August 19, 1871–January 30, 1948) and Wilbur (April 16, 1867–May 30, 1912), were two Americans generally credited with building the worlds first successful airplane and making the first controlled, powered and heavier-than-air human flight on December 17, 1903. ... Charles Elwood Chuck Yeager (born February 13, 1923) is a retired Brigadier General in the United States Air Force and a noted test pilot. ... Jeana Yeager (born May 18, 1952 in Fort Worth, Texas) is an aviator, most famous for flying with Dick Rutan on a non-stop, non-refueled flight around the world in the Voyager aircraft in 1986 from December 14 to December 23. ...

Famous military pilots

Pakistans Squadron Leader Muhammad Mahmood Alam, a retired pilot of the Pakistan Air Force was born July 6, 1935, in Calcutta, West Bengal. ... Group Captain Sir Douglas Robert Steuart Bader, CBE, DSO and Bar, DFC and Bar, FRAeS, DL, RAF (21 February 1910–5 September 1982); surname pronounced IPA: ) was a successful fighter pilot in the Royal Air Force during the Second World War. ... Air Marshal William Avery Billy Bishop VC CB DSO & Bar MC DFC ED (8 February 1894 – 11 September 1956) was a Canadian First World War flying ace, officially credited with 72 victories, the highest number for a British Empire pilot. ... Maj. ... Colonel John (Richard) Boyd (January 23, 1927–March 9, 1997) was a United States Air Force fighter pilot and military strategist of the late 20th century whose theories have been highly influential in the military and in business. ... Colonel Gregory Pappy Boyington, USMC, (December 4, 1912 - January 11, 1988) was an American fighter ace. ... Captain Arthur Roy Brown Captain Arthur Roy Brown (DFC and bar) (23 December 1893–9 March 1944) was a Canadian World War I flying ace whom the Royal Air Force officially credited with shooting down Manfred von Richthofen, the Red Baron, although evidence has shown that it is very unlikely... Pierre Clostermann, DFC and bar (February 28, 1921 – March 22, 2006) was a French pilot, flying ace, author, engineer, politician, and sport fisherman. ... Benjamin O. Davis, Jr. ... General James Harold Jimmy Doolittle, Sc. ... Joseph Jacob Joe Foss (April 17, 1915 – January 1, 2003) was an American politician, an ace fighter pilot, and a recipient of the Medal of Honor in 1943. ... “Gagarin” redirects here. ... Roland Garros has been considered the world’s first fighter pilot. ... Roy Geiger Roy Stanley Geiger (January 25, 1885 - January 23, 1947) was a United States Marine Corps general who, during World War II, became the first Marine to lead an army. ... Erich Alfred Bubi Hartmann (April 19, 1922 - September 20, 1993), also nicknamed The Blond Knight Of Germany by friends and The Black Devil by his enemies, is the most successful fighter ace in the history of aerial combat. ... Major Edward Corringham Mick Mannock VC DSO & Two Bars MC & Bar (24 May 1887 – 26 July 1918) was a British First World War flying ace and posthumous recipient of the Victoria Cross. ... Newbery at his planecirca 1912-1914. ... Lt. ... Red Baron redirects here. ... Eddie Rickenbacker (October 8, 1890 – July 27, 1973) was best known as a World War I fighter ace and Medal of Honor recipient. ... Hans Rudel Hans-Ulrich Rudel (July 2, 1916 - December 18, 1982) was a highly decorated German fighter pilot during World War II. Rudel was born in German Silesia. ... Flying Officer Nirmal Jit Singh Sekhon, PVC Stamp Issued by India Post in 2000 on Nirmal Jeet Singh Sekhon Folland Gnat - former Red Arrows aircraft XR537 Flying Officer Nirmal Jit Singh Sekhon was born on July 17, 1943 at Rurka Isewal village in Ludhiana District, Punjab. ... Friedrich Wilhelm Fred Zinn of Battle Creek, Michigan, was one of the volunteer American aviators who flew with the French Aéronautique Militaire in World War I. He is one of the early pioneers of using aerial photography for wartime reconnaissance. ...

People from other walks of life with aviation in their history

David Ascalons Holocaust Memorial for the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania (1994), on the Susquehanna River, Harrisburg David Ascalons Totem, fabricated bronze sculpture at the Cherry Hill Public Library, Cherry Hill, New Jersey From a series of abstract stained glass windows for Beth El Congregation near Washington, DC The artist... Rowan Sebastian Atkinson (born 6 January 1955) is an English comedian, actor and writer, famous for his title roles in the British television comedies Blackadder and Mr. ... Michael Bloomberg Michael Bloomberg Michael Rubens Mike Bloomberg (born February 14, 1942) is a businessman and mayor of New York City. ... Sir Richard Charles Nicholas Branson (born 18 July 1950 ) in Shamley Green, Surrey, England), is a British entrepreneur, best known for his Virgin brand of over 360 companies. ... Jimmy Buffett (born James William Buffett on December 25, 1946, in Pascagoula, Mississippi) is a singer, songwriter, author, businessman, and recently a film producer best known for his island escapism lifestyle and music including hits such as Margaritaville (No. ... George Herbert Walker Bush (born June 12, 1924) was the 41st President of the United States, serving from 1989 to 1993. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the forty-third and current President of the United States of America, originally inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ... Tom Cruise (born Thomas Cruise Mapother IV on July 3, 1962) is an Academy Award-nominated, Golden Globe Award-winning American actor and film producer. ... Roald Dahl (IPA: ) (13 September 1916 – 23 November 1990) was a British novelist, short story author and screenwriter of Norwegian parentage, famous as a writer for both children and adults. ... John Denver (December 31, 1943 â€“ October 12, 1997), born Henry John Deutschendorf, Jr. ... For the record producer in the Saturday Night Live skit, see More cowbell. ... Noel Ernest Edmonds (born 22 December 1948 in Ilford, Essex) is a British television presenter, DJ, executive who made his name on BBC Radio 1 in the UK. He is more recently known as the presenter of the television gameshow Deal or No Deal. ... For the silent film actor, see Harrison Ford (silent film actor). ... Dawsons Creek director, see Morgan J. Freeman. ... David Jon Gilmour CBE (born March 6, 1946 in Cambridge) is an English musician best known as a guitarist, singer, and songwriter in the band Pink Floyd. ... Hermann Wilhelm Göring ( ) (also Goering in English) (January 12, 1893 – October 15, 1946) was a German politician and military leader, a leading member of the Nazi Party, second in command of the Third Reich, and commander of the Luftwaffe. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... Not to be confused with Rudolf Hoess. ... Houdini redirects here. ... Angelina Jolie (born June 4, 1975) is an American film actress, a former fashion model and a Goodwill Ambassador for the UN Refugee Agency. ... John F. Kennedy, Jr. ... John Forbes Kerry (born December 11, 1943) is the junior United States Senator from Massachusetts, in his fourth term of office. ... Cory Fulton Lidle (March 22, 1972 – October 11, 2006) was an American right-handed pitcher in Major League Baseball. ... Dean Paul Martin (November 17, 1951 - March 21, 1987) was an American singer and actor. ... For McCains grandfather and father, see John S. McCain, Sr. ... Paul Moyer on KNBCs Channel 4 News in 2005. ... Susan Oliver Susan Oliver (February 13, 1932 – May 10, 1990) was an American actress, television director and record-setting pilot. ... Dennis William Quaid (born April 9, 1954) is an American actor. ... Christopher DOlier Reeve[1] (September 25, 1952 – October 10, 2004) was an American actor, director, producer and writer. ... Dr. Earl W. Renfroe. ... The Hon. ... Chuck Scarborough on WNBC-TVs 11pm newscast in 2005. ... Nevil Shute (London, January 17, 1899 – Melbourne, January 12, 1960) (full name Nevil Shute Norway) was one of the most popular novelists of the mid-20th century. ... Norman Beresford Tebbit, Baron Tebbit, CH, PC (born 29 March 1931) is a British Conservative politician and former Member of Parliament (MP) for Chingford, who was born in Southgate in Enfield. ... John Joseph Travolta (born February 18, 1954) is an Academy Award-nominated, Golden Globe Award-winning American actor, dancer, and singer. ... Eugene Luther Gore Vidal (born October 3, 1925) (pronounced and , ) is an American author of novels, stage plays, screenplays, and essays, and the scion of a prominent political family. ... Theodore Samuel Williams (August 30, 1918 – July 5, 2002), best known as Ted Williams, nicknamed The Kid, the Splendid Splinter, Teddy Ballgame and The Thumper, was an American left fielder in Major League Baseball. ...

Trivia

  • Major General Charles E. "Chuck" Yeager's drawling manner of speech during flight (which Tom Wolfe refers to as "poker-hollow") was emulated by his fellow test pilots after he broke the sound barrier. This permeated into the general pool of military pilots, who became the core of the US airline pilot roster, and so was the basis for the characteristic tone used by American airline pilots to this day.[1]

Charles Elwood Chuck Yeager (born February 13, 1923) is a retired Brigadier General in the United States Air Force and a noted test pilot. ... Tom Wolfe gives a speech at the White House. ... Test pilots are aviators who fly new and modified aircraft in specific maneuvers, allowing the results to be measured and the design to be evaluated. ... U.S. Navy F/A-18 at transonic speed. ...

See also

This is a list of aerospace engineers, people who were trained in or practiced aerospace engineering. ... Pilot licences (in the United States, certificates) are issued by national aviation authorities, and establish that the holder has been trained by a qualified instructor and has met a specific set of knowledge and experience requirements. ... Workplace safety is an important management responsibility in industry. ...

References

  1. ^ Wolfe, Tom. The Right Stuff. Pages 44-46, 68 (hardcover). Farrar-Straus-Giroux, New York. 1979. ISBN 0374250332.

Tom Wolfe gives a speech at the White House. ... The Right Stuff is a 1979 book (ISBN 0374250332) by Tom Wolfe, and a 1983 film adapted from the book. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ...

External links


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