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Encyclopedia > Autosomal dominant
Autosomal Dominant Pedigree Chart
Autosomal Dominant Pedigree Chart

An autosomal dominant gene is one that occurs on an autosomal (non-sex determining) chromosome. As it is dominant, the phenotype it gives will be expressed even if the gene is heterozygous. This contrasts with recessive genes, which need to be homozygous to be expressed. Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... It has been suggested that dominant allele be merged into this article or section. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... It has been suggested that sex chromosome be merged into this article or section. ... Image File history File links Autosomal_Dominant_Pedigree_Chart. ... Image File history File links Autosomal_Dominant_Pedigree_Chart. ... For other meanings of this term, see gene (disambiguation). ... An autosome is a non-sex chromosome. ... Figure 1: A representation of a condensed eukaryotic chromosome, as seen during cell division. ... Individuals in the mollusk species Donax variabilis show diverse coloration and patterning in their phenotypes. ... Heterozygote cells are diploid or polyploid and have different alleles at a locus (position) on homologous chromosomes. ... In genetics, the term recessive gene refers to an allele that causes a phenotype (visible or detectable characteristic) that is only seen in a homozygous genotype (an organism that has two copies of the same allele). ... Homozygote cells are diploid or polyploid and have the same alleles at a locus (position) on homologous chromosomes. ...


The chances of an autosomal dominant disorder being inherited are 50% if one parent is heterozygous for the mutant gene and the other is homozygous for the normal, or 'wild-type', gene. This is because the offspring will always inherit a normal gene from the parent carrying the wild-type genes, and will have a 50% chance of inheriting the mutant gene from the other parent. If the mutant gene is inherited, the offspring will be heterozygous for the mutant gene, and will suffer from the disorder. If the parent with the disorder is homozygous for the gene, the offspring produced from mating with an unaffected parent will always have the disorder. See Mendelian inheritance. Mendelian inheritance (or Mendelian genetics or Mendelism) is a set of primary tenets relating to the transmission of hereditary characteristics from parent organisms to their children; it underlies much of genetics. ...


The term vertical transmission refers to the concept that autosomal dominant disorders are inherited through generations. This is obvious when you examine the pedigree chart of a family for a particular trait. Because males and females are equally affected, they are equally likely to have affected children. Vertical transmission refers to transmission of an infection, such as HIV, hepatitis B, or hepatitis C, from mother to child during the perinatal period, the period immediately before and after birth. ... A pedigree chart is a chart which tells you all of the known phenotypes for an organism and its ancestors, most commonly humans, show dogs, and race horses. ...


Although the mutated gene should be present in successive generations in which there are more than one or two offspring, it may appear that a generation is skipped if there is reduced penetrance. Penetrance is a term used in genetics that describes the extent to which the properties controlled by a gene, its phenotype, will be expressed. ...


Examples of human autosomal dominant disorders


  Results from FactBites:
 
Autosomal dominant - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (456 words)
autosomal dominant gene is one that occurs on an autosomal (non-sex determining) chromosome.
The chances of an autosomal dominant disorder being inherited are 50% if one parent is heterozygous for the mutant gene and the other is homozygous for the normal, or 'wild-type', gene.
Some medical conditions may have multiple inheritance patterns, such as in centronuclear myopathy or myotubular myopathy, where the autosomal dominant form is on chromosome 19 but the sex-linked form is on the X chromosome.
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