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Encyclopedia > Autonomous banner


This article is part
of the series:
Political divisions of China
Province level
Provinces
Autonomous regions
Municipalities
Special Administrative Regions
Prefecture level
Prefectures
Autonomous prefectures
Prefecture-level cities
(incl. Sub-provincial cities)
Leagues
County level
Districts
Counties
Autonomous counties
County-level cities
(incl. Sub-prefecture-level cities)
Banners
Autonomous banners
Township level
District public offices
Townships
Ethnic townships
Towns
Subdistricts
Sumu
Ethnic sumu


A banner (Mongolian: khoshuu, Chinese: 旗, pinyin: q) is an administrative division of Inner Mongolia.


Banners were first used during the Qing Dynasty, which organized the Mongols into banners except those who belonged to the Mongol Eight Banners. Each banner had sumun as nominal subdivisions, which also means arrow. In Inner Mongolia, several banners made up a league. In the rest, including Outer Mongolia, northern Xinjiang and Qinghai, ayimagh was the largest administrative division. While it restricted the Mongols from crossing banner borders, the dynasty protected Mongolia from population pressure from China proper.


Today, banners are a county level division in the Chinese administrative hierarchy. There are 49 banners in total.


An autonomous banner (自治旗 pinyin: zzhq) is a special type of banner set up by the People's Republic of China. There are 3 autonomous banners, all of which are found in northeastern Inner Mongolia, each with a designated ethnic minority:

  • Oroqin Autonomous Banner (鄂伦春自治旗) for the Oroqin
  • Evenki Autonomous Banner (鄂温克族自治旗) for the Evenks
  • Morin Dawa Daur Autonomous Banner (莫力达瓦达斡尔族自治旗) for the Daur

See also:


  Results from FactBites:
 
Autonomous areas of China - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (989 words)
Autonomous regions, prefectures, counties, and banners are covered under Section 6 of Chapter 3 (Articles 111-122) of the Constitution of the People's Republic of China, and with more detail under the Law of the People's Republic of China on Regional National Autonomy (《中华人民共和国民族区域自治法》).
Xinjiang was converted from a province to an autonomous region in 1955.
Autonomous administrative areas, as well as the various rights granted to them, are affirmed by the government as a positive example of local self-rule in ethnic areas, and an acknowledgement of minority self-determination unprecedented in Chinese history.
Phayul Message Forums - www.phayul.com (7913 words)
In October 1955, the Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region was established; in March 1958, the Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region was established; in October 1958, the Ningxia Hui Autonomous Region was established; and in September 1965, the Tibet Autonomous Region was established.
The head of an autonomous region, autonomous prefecture or autonomous county shall be a citizen of the ethnic group exercising regional autonomy in the area concerned.
The heads of all autonomous regions, autonomous prefectures and autonomous counties are all citizens of the ethnic groups exercising regional autonomy in the areas concerned.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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