FACTOID # 28: Austin, Texas has more people than Alaska.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Auto de fe
Representation of an Auto de fe, as depicted by Pedro Berruguete (around 1495[1]).

The phrase auto de fé refers to the ritual of public penance of condemned heretics and apostates that took place when the Spanish Inquisition or the Portuguese Inquisition had decided their punishment (that is, after the trial). Auto de fé in medieval Spanish means "act of faith". The phrase also commonly occurs in English in its Portuguese form auto-da-fé. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 351 × 598 pixelsFull resolution (447 × 762 pixel, file size: 127 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Pedro Berruguete. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 351 × 598 pixelsFull resolution (447 × 762 pixel, file size: 127 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Pedro Berruguete. ... Saint Dominic Presiding over an Auto-da-fe by Pedro Berruguete (1475), at the Prado Museum, Madrid. ... 1495 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see Penance (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Heresy (disambiguation). ... Apostasy (Greek απο, apo, away, apart, στασις, stasis, standing) is the formal renunciation of ones religion. ... This article is about one of the historical Inquisitions. ... An Inquisition - Auto-da-fe. ... Look up trial in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ...


In the popular imagination "auto-da-fé" has come to refer to burning at the stake for heresy. Jan Hus burned at the stake Execution by burning has a long history as a method of punishment for crimes such as treason, heresy and witchcraft (burning, however, was actually less common than hanging, pressing, or drowning as a punishment for witchcraft). ...

Contents

History

The auto de fé involved a Catholic Mass; prayer; a public procession of those found guilty; and a reading of their sentences (Peters 1988: 93-94). They took place in public squares or esplanades and lasted several hours: ecclesiastical and civil authorities attended.[2] Artistic representations of the auto de fé usually depict torture and the burning at the stake. However, this type of activity never took place during an auto de fé, which was in essence a religious act. Torture was not administered after a trial concluded, and executions were always held after and separate from the auto de fe (Kamen 1997: 192-213), though in the minds and experiences of observers and those undergoing the confession and execution, the separation of the two might be experienced as merely a technicality. For other uses of Mass, see Mass (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Prayer (disambiguation). ... A procession (via Middle English processioun, French procession, derived from Latin, processio, itself from procedere, to go forth, advance, proceed) is, in general, an organized body of people advancing in a formal or ceremonial manner. ... In law, a sentence forms the final act of a judge-ruled process, and also the symbolic principal act connected to his function. ... For other uses, see Torture (disambiguation). ... Jan Hus burned at the stake Execution by burning has a long history as a method of punishment for crimes such as treason, heresy and witchcraft (burning, however, was actually less common than hanging, pressing, or drowning as a punishment for witchcraft). ...


The first recorded auto de fé was held in Paris in 1242, under Louis IX.[3] The first Spanish auto de fé took place in Seville, Spain, in 1481; six of the men and women who participated in this first religious ritual were later executed. The Inquisition enjoyed limited power in Portugal, having been established in 1536 and officially lasting until 1821, although its influence was much weakened with the government of the Marquis of Pombal, in the second half of the 18th century. Autos de fé also took place in Mexico, Brazil and Peru: contemporary historians of the Conquistadors such as Bernal Díaz del Castillo record them. They also occurred in the Portuguese colony of Goa, India, following the establishment of Inquisition there in 1562-1563. This article is about the capital of France. ... Louis IX of France, as painted by El Greco in the 16th Century. ... For other uses, see Seville (disambiguation). ... The Marquis of Pombal, or Marquês de Pombal, (13 May 1699 - 15 May 1782) was a Portuguese politician and statesman, prime minister of king Joseph I of Portugal throughout his reign. ... A Conquistador (Spanish: []) (English: Conqueror) was a Spanish soldier, explorer and adventurer who took part in the gradual invasion and conquering of much of the Americas and Asia Pacific, bringing them under Spanish colonial rule between the 15th and 19th centuries. ... Bernal Díaz del Castillo (1492 or 1493 - 1581) was a conquistador, who wrote an eyewitness account of the conquest of Mexico under Hernán Cortés. ... For other uses, see Goa (disambiguation). ... St. ...


Cultural references

Auto da fé as burning a heretic at the stake is a symbol used widely throughout the arts. The Portuguese form, auto-da-fé, is in the eponymous line from Vladimir Nabokov’s Pale Fire. “I recall seeing [John Slade] from my porch, on a brilliant morning, burning a whole stack of [his drafts] in the pale fire of the incinerator before which he stood with bent head like an official mourner among the wind-borne black butterflies of that backyard auto-da-fé.”[4] Vladimir Vladimirovich Nabokov (Russian: Влади́мир Влади́мирович Набо́ков, pronounced ) (April 22 [O.S. April 10] 1899, Saint Petersburg – July 2, 1977, Montreux) was a Russian-American, Academy Award nominated author. ... Penguin Classics edition of Pale Fire Pale Fire (1962) is a novel by Vladimir Nabokov, his fourteenth in total and fifth in English. ...


"Miss Morgan nearly screamed with relief. She walked a little unsteadily toward the stake. The free man turned and saw her. For a second he seemed surprised, but immediately recovering, he bowed. Coming from a man with torn overalls and a matted beard, the bow was ridiculous and charming. “I’m the teacher, “ Miss Morgan explained breathlessly. “I was just out for a walk, and I saw this house. For a moment I thought this auto-da-fé was serious.” Junius smiled. “But it is serious. It’s more serious than you think. For a moment I thought you were the rescue. The relief is due at ten o’clock, you know.”[5]


Auto-da-Fé is also the English-language title of a novel by Elias Canetti (Die Blendung 1935) Elias Canetti, Nobel Laureate in Literature Canettis tomb-stone in Zürich, Switzerland Elias Canetti (Rousse, Bulgaria, 25 July 1905 – 14 August 1994, Zurich) was a Bulgaria-born novelist of Sephardi Jewish ancestry who wrote in German and won the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1981. ...


In Chapter six of 'Candide' by Voltaire there is an Auto-da-fé. For the singer of the same name, see Voltaire (musician). ...


Leonard Bernstein's Candide includes a song called "Auto-da-Fé." Leonard Bernstein in 1971 Leonard Bernstein (IPA pronunciation: )[1] (August 25, 1918 – October 14, 1990) was an American conductor, composer, and pianist. ...


Auto Da Fé is the title of an album by Industrial band SPK. SPK, formed in 1978 in Sydney, Australia, was a 1980s and early 1990s industrial music and noise music act featuring Graeme Revell, who would later go on to become a successful Hollywood movie composer. ...


Notes

  1. ^ *Page of the painting at Prado Museum.
  2. ^ Many of the public autos were described in contemporary published works listing the dignitaries in attendance, the condemned and their sentences. See for example, Matias de Bocanegra, Auto general de la fee..., Mexico: 1649
  3. ^ Stavans 2005:xxxiv
  4. ^ Nabokov:15
  5. ^ Steinbeck

The Museo del Prado is a world class museum and art gallery located in Madrid, Spain. ...

References

  • Arouet, Francois-Marie (Voltaire) (1758). Candide
  • Kamen, Henry. (1997) The Spanish Inquisition : A Historical Revision. London: Weidenfeld & Nicolson.
  • Lea, Henry Charles (1906–1907). A History of the Inquisition of Spain (4 volumes). New York and London.
  • Nabokov, Vladimir. (1989) Pale Fire. First Vintage International Edition. Random House. New York.
  • Peters, Edward. (1988) Inquisition. New York: The Free Press.
  • Stavans, Ilan. (2005) The Schocken Book of Modern Sephardic Literature. Random House, Inc. New York
  • Steinbeck, John. (1932) "The Pastures of Heaven". Penguin.
  • Whitechapel, Simon (2003). Flesh Inferno: Atrocities of Torquemada and the Spanish Inquisition. Creation Books. ISBN 1-84068-105-5

External links

  • Jewish Encyclopedia
  • (Spanish) La Inquisición Española: origen, desarrollo, organización, administración, métodos y proceso inquisitorial

  Results from FactBites:
 
Auto de fe - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (504 words)
The phrase auto de fe refers to the ritual of public penance of condemned heretics and apostates that took place when the Spanish Inquisition or the Portuguese Inquisition had decided their punishment (that is, after the trial).
Artistic representations of the auto de fe usually depict torture and the burning at the stake.
The first recorded auto de fe was held in Paris in 1242, under Louis IX (Stavans 2005:xxxiv) The first Spanish auto de fe took place in Seville, Spain, in 1481; six of the men and women that participated in this first religious ritual were later executed.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m