FACTOID # 7: The top five best educated states are all in the Northeast.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Austrian nobility
Aristocrats gathering around Emperor Franz Joseph at a ball in the Hofburg Imperial Palace, painting by Wilhelm Gause (1900).
Aristocrats gathering around Emperor Franz Joseph at a ball in the Hofburg Imperial Palace, painting by Wilhelm Gause (1900).

Historically, the Austrian nobility (German: österreichischer Adel) was a privileged social class in Austria. The nobility was officially abolished in 1919 after the fall of the Austro-Hungarian Empire. Former noble families and their descendants are still a part of Austrian society today, but they no longer retain any specific privileges. Austria's system of nobility is very similar to Germany's system, as both countries were previously part of the Holy Roman Empire. Image File history File links Broom_icon. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Franz Joseph I (in Hungarian I. Ferenc József, in English Francis Joseph I) (August 18, 1830 – November 21, 1916) of the Habsburg Dynasty was Emperor of Austria, Apostolic King of Hungary, King of Bohemia from 1848 until 1916 and a German prince (Deutscher Fürst). ... A ball is a formal dance. ... Hofburg Neue Burg section, seen from Heldenplatz. ... Social class refers to the hierarchical distinctions between individuals or groups in societies or cultures. ... Official languages Latin, German, Hungarian Established church Roman Catholic Capital & Largest City Vienna pop. ... Nobility is a traditional hereditary status (see hereditary titles) that exists today in many countries (mainly present or former monarchies). ... This article is about the medieval empire. ...


Any noble living in the Habsburg-ruled lands, and who owed their allegiance to the dynasty and the Emperor of Austria, were also considered part of the Austrian aristocracy. This applied to any member of the Bohemian, Hungarian, Polish, Croatian, and other nobilities in the Habsburg dominion. Attempting to differentiate between ethnicities can be quite confusing, especially for nobles during the time of the Austro-Hungarian Empire. A noble from Galicia, for example, could call himself a Polish noble, but he also rightfully belonged to the Austrian nobility. Flag of the Habsburg Monarchy; also used as the flag of the Austrian Empire until the Ausgleich of 1867. ... The title of Emperor of Austria was proclaimed in 1804 by the Habsburg Holy Roman Emperor, Francis II, who feared for the future of the old Reich in the face of Napoleons aggressions, and wished to maintain his imperial title in the event that the Holy Roman Empire should... Bohemian nobility refers to the noble families of Bohemia. ... This article is about Dominions of the British Empire and of the Commonwealth of Nations. ... The term Ethnicity redirects here. ... Austria-Hungary, also known as the Dual monarchy (or: the k. ... Galicia (Ukrainian: Галичина (Halychyna), Polish: Galicja, German: Galizien, Slovak: Halič, Romanian: Galiţia, Hungarian: Gácsország) is the name of a region of Central Europe. ...


Religion, just like ethnicity, was also not used for any categorisation purpose. Austrian nobility could belong to any of the religions within the Habsburg empire, such as Roman Catholic nobles in Austria, Hungary and Poland, Protestants in Bohemia and Transylvania, Greek Catholics in eastern Galicia, as well as nobles of Jewish faith. The Roman Catholic Church, most often spoken of simply as the Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with over one billion members. ... Protestantism is a general grouping of denominations within Christianity. ... This article is about the region in Romania. ... The term Eastern Rites may refer to the liturgical rites used by many ancient Christian Churches of Eastern Europe and the Middle East that, while being part of the Roman Catholic Church, are distinct from the Latin Rite or Western Church. ... For other uses, see Jew (disambiguation). ...


When speaking of "Austrian nobility", two categories can be made: 1) the historic nobility that lived in the territories of the Habsburg empire and who swore allegiance to the dynasty, which included everyone until 1918; 2) the present, post-1918 Austrian nobility, specifically those who today retain Austrian citizenship, whose family originally come from Austria proper, South Tyrol, Burgenland and southern Bohemia, or who were ennobled at any point under Austrian rule and identify themselves as belonging to that class. The Autonomous Province of Bolzano-Bozen[1][2] (Italian: Provincia autonoma di Bolzano; German: Autonome Provinz Bozen; Ladin: Provinzia autonòma de Balsan), also called Alto Adige/Südtirol (Italian: Alto Adige; German: Südtirol; Ladin: Adesc Aut[3][4] or Sudtirol; English: Alto Adige or South Tyrol), is an... Burgenland (Hungarian Várvidék, Őrvidék or Felsőőrvidék, Croatian Gradišće, Slovenian Gradiščansko) is the easternmost and least populous state or Land of Austria. ... Flag of Bohemia Bohemia (Czech: ; German: ) is a historical region in central Europe, occupying the western and middle thirds of the Czech Republic. ...

Contents

History

From 1453 onwards, the Archduke of Austria had the right to grant nobility to non-nobles, as did the Archbishop of Salzburg, as Salzburg remained an independent territory. Besides the Holy Roman Emperor (an office which was almost uninterruptedly held by the Archduke of Austria from 1438 to 1806 anyway), only a few territorial rulers within the Empire had this right. In an era of Absolutism, the nobility residing in the cities slowly turned itself into the court-nobility (Hofadel). Service at the court became the primary goal of the nobility. This in turn initiated an interest in education and the interests of the court. Within the court, a close inner circle, called the 100 Familien (100 families), possessed enormous riches and lands. They also had great influence at the court and thus played an important role in politics and diplomacy. Look up Archduke in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The Archbishopric of Salzburg was an ecclesiastical state of the Holy Roman Empire, consisting of roughly of the present_day state of Salzburg in Austria. ... This article is about the capital of the Austrian state of Salzburg. ... The term absolutism can mean: A belief in absolute truth moral absolutism, the belief that there is some absolute standard of right and wrong political absolutism, a political system where one person holds absolute power, also called apolytarchy from Gr. ... A royal or noble court, as an instrument of government broader than a court of justice, comprises an extended household centered on a patron whose rule may govern law or be governed by it. ... For other uses, see Politics (disambiguation). ... This article is about negotiations. ...


After the end of the Holy Roman Empire in 1806, the Habsburg rulers, who were Austrian Emperors from 1804 onwards, continued to elevate deserving individuals to nobility until the end of the monarchy in 1918. Some of the noble families even earned themselves the right to be hereditary peers in the House of Lords (Herrenhaus) in the Imperial Council (Reichsrat) of the Austro-Hungarian Empire. Nobles from previously sovereign monarchies such as those in northern Italy also had their noble rights confirmed and were allowed to keep their titles. Anthem Volkshymne (Peoples Anthem) The Austrian Empire Capital Vienna Language(s) German Hungarian Romanian Czech Slovakian Slovenian Croatian Serbian Italian Polish Ruthenian Religion Roman Catholic Government Monarchy History  - Established 1804  - Ausgleich 1867 The Crown of the Austrian Emperor The Austrian Empire (German: ) was a modern era successor empire founded... The Peerage in the United Kingdom includes several hereditary peers, as well as life peers. ... This article is about the British House of Lords. ... The German term Herrenhaus is equivalent to the English House of Lords and describes roughly similar institutions as the English House of Lords in German-speaking countries. ... Between 1867 and 1918, the Reichsrat was the parliament of Cisleithania, the Austrian part of Austria-Hungary, which was officially known as the kingdoms and lands represented in the Reichsrat (German die im Reichsrat vertretenen Königreiche und Länder). ... Official languages Latin, German, Hungarian Established church Roman Catholic Capital & Largest City Vienna pop. ...


Jewish nobility

Because of the Patent of Tolerance (Toleranzpatent), which was decreed in 1781 by Emperor Joseph II, Jewish bankers and later entrepreneurs and industrialists could also be ennobled for their services and loyalty. Jews who were elevated into the aristocracy were allowed to keep their religion. Although the elevation into the aristocracy meant recognition for the work and services and a rise in social status, it could not hide the fact that Jews were for the most part still only being "tolerated". Jews could not freely choose the place and duration of their stay and had to regularly ask for permission from the authorities. This placed a huge burden on Jewish families. If the head of the family died, all his relatives had to leave the city. The right to purchase real estate was forbidden to Jews, even if they belonged to the nobility. This regulation stayed in place until 1860, when it was abolished by Emperor Franz Joseph I and Jewish citizens were given equal rights. But almost a century before the banker and protector of arts, Karl Wetzler [Wetzlar as well] von Plankenstern was created a Freiherr by Empress Maria Theresia, he converted to Catholicism. His son Raimund was well known in Vienna for being one of the most prominent protectors of Mozart, he lived in a palace at Hohe Brücke 412 (now no. 17). His grandson Alexander was a close friend of Ludwig van Beethoven. His great grandson Gustav Alexander Freiherr Wetzler von Plankenstern; was a commander of an ArmeeKorps (FmLt; VIII.-IX.1866 (interim). The family is extinct in Austria but there is a branch in Bavaria and Argentina. Joseph II (full name: Joseph Benedikt August Johannes Anton Michel Adam; March 13, 1741 – February 20, 1790) was Holy Roman Emperor from 1765 to 1790 and ruler of the Habsburg lands from 1780 to 1790. ... For other uses, see Jew (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Bank (disambiguation). ... An entrepreneur (a loanword from French introduced and first defined by the Irish economist Richard Cantillon) is a person who operates a new enterprise or venture and assumes some accountability for the inherent risks. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Business magnate. ... Real estate is a legal term that encompasses land along with anything permanently affixed to the land, such as buildings. ... Franz Joseph I (in Hungarian I. Ferenc József, in English Francis Joseph I) (August 18, 1830 – November 21, 1916) of the Habsburg Dynasty was Emperor of Austria, Apostolic King of Hungary, King of Bohemia from 1848 until 1916 and a German prince (Deutscher Fürst). ...


Despite these difficulties, by 1821 there were at least nine ennobled Jewish families living in Vienna. Their elevation was due to their industrial and economic contributions. Some of the very wealthy included the Rothschilds, Arnstein, Eskeles, Gomperz, Kuffner, Lieben, Auspitz, Schey von Koromla, Todesco and Wertheimstein, Wetzlar or Wetzler von Plankenstern families. For example, in the case of the Rothschilds and Todescos, their secret of their personal economic success was their quick ability to adjust and innovate to the changing global economic situation. They founded banks that financed companies and infrastructure projects in a time of great economic and industrial growth in the late 19th century. Their contributions made it possible for Austria-Hungary to keep up with the international economic developments. The Rothschild banking family of Austria was founded by Salomon Mayer von Rothschild in 1820 in Vienna in what was then the Austrian Empire. ... Arnstein (disambiguation) Categories: | ... Eskeles This list is incomplete; you can help by expanding it. ... Gomperz, Gompertz, Gompers, Gumperz, Gumpertz famous Jewish Gomperz family of Vienna was originated from Brno: Philipp Gomperz (1782-1857), banker in Brno, married with Henriette Auspitz (1792-1881) Josephine Gomperz (Josephine von Wertheimstein) (1820-1894), married with Leopold von Wertheimstein (1801-1883) Max Gomperz, Max Ritter von Gomperz (about 1822... Lieben: German name for Libeň, Prague Lieben, one of the Austrian Jewish noble family Adolf Lieben (Adolph Lieben) (1836 -), Austrian Jewish chemist ([1]) Robert von Lieben, Austrian Jewish physicist Palais Lieben-Auspitz, Vienna Koppelmann Lieben, author of the Gal Ed Hock-Lieben This human name article is a disambiguation page... Auspitz refers to: Hustopece, Moravian town Heinrich Auspitz Auspitzs sign, named after Heinrich Auspitz This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... For other uses, see Bank (disambiguation). ...


The elevation into nobility also hastened the process of assimilation of Jewish families into the higher society. Some converted to Christianity in order to become fully accepted, but many kept their Jewish faith. Jewish Assimilation is social religious process of loss of the Jewish identity of the individual by marriage to a spouse that is not Jewish, or the changing ones religion to a different religion which is more acceptable at the new habitat of the soon to be former Jew. ...


Burgenland

On the former status of nobility in Burgenland, which was part of the Kingdom of Hungary until 1921, see Hungarian nobility. Burgenland (Hungarian Várvidék, Őrvidék or Felsőőrvidék, Croatian Gradišće, Slovenian Gradiščansko) is the easternmost and least populous state or Land of Austria. ... This article deals with some titles of the nobility and royalty in the Kingdom of Hungary. ...


Abolition of nobility in 1919

The Adelsaufhebungsgesetz of 1919 (Law on the Abolition of Nobility) abolished nobility as well as all noble privileges and, other than those in Germany, noble titles and names. Thus, no citizen of Austria can have any noble titles or even particles such as von and zu in his or her name. For example, the name of the grandson of the last Austrian emperor is simply Karl Habsburg. Similarly, Friedrich von Hayek became Friedrich Hayek and Kurt von Schuschnigg became Kurt Schuschnigg. Von (generally in small case only as von) is a German preposition which approximately means of or from. ... Zu or zu can mean: Zulu language (ISO 639 alpha-2, zu) Zu (mythology), a lesser god in Akkadian mythology a German word, meaning to. As part of a family name, it can indicate belonging to the nobility and posession of a place, estate etc. ... Karl I, a. ... Karl Thomas Grand Duke von Österreich is the son of Otto von Habsburg and Regina Helene Elisabeth Margarete Prinzessin von Sachsen-Meiningen. ... Friedrich August von Hayek, CH (May 8, 1899 in Vienna – March 23, 1992 in Freiburg) was an Austrian-born British economist and political philosopher known for his defense of liberal democracy and free-market capitalism against socialist and collectivist thought in the mid-20th century. ... Kurt Schuschnigg in a propagando manifesto. ...


This may sometimes be confusing, as descendants of nobles are sometimes referred to with noble names abroad, even though this is not legally accurate with respect to Austrian citizens. Also, different members of noble families often hold different citizenships, such as in the case of Otto von Habsburg (the son of the last Austrian emperor and father of the Karl Habsburg mentioned above), who is also a citizen of Germany, where this Austrian law does not apply to him. The law does not apply to artistic, performer's, or "stage names," where the von is sometimes used, as in the case of conductor Herbert von Karajan or the musician Hubert von Goisern. However, stage names are never recognized for official purposes. Otto, Crown Prince of Austria or Otto von Habsburg (born 20 November 1912 as Archduke Franz Joseph Otto Robert Maria Anton Karl Max Heinrich Sixtus Xaver Felix Renatus Ludwig Gaetan Pius Ignatius of Austria) is the current head of the Habsburg family and the eldest son of Karl of Austria... Herbert von Karajan (April 5, 1908 – July 16, 1989) was an Austrian conductor. ...


Members of the lower nobility especially (such as the civil servants) found this radical step of abolition degrading and humiliating, since working towards and finally earning a nobility title was a way for them and their families to rise within society. Members of the higher nobility were able to absorb the formal abolition more easily. They lost their titles and their privileges, but they still kept their social manners and standing and were allowed to keep their riches. Federal President Michael Hainisch called the official abolition Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... The Leopoldine Wing of Hofburg Imperial Palace in Vienna: home to the offices of the Federal President. ... Michael Hainisch (August 15, 1858 - February 26, 1940) was an Austrian politician, and second Federal President of Austria, after the fall of the monarchy at the end of World War I. He did not belong to any party and was an independent candidate. ...

...childish, because it did not hit those that it was supposed to hit. I once talked to the very fine and very intelligent Princess Fanny Starhemberg about this. 'To us', she said, 'the official abolition is quite irrelevant, because with or without the titles, we will always remain the Starhembergs.[1]

The law was never repealed, even during the period of Austrofascism (1934–1938). Following the Anschluss to Nazi Germany (1938-1945), this law remained active, although it was not enforced, allowing Austrian nobles to freely use titles again. For other uses, see Princess (disambiguation). ... Princess Franziska von Starhemberg (de: Franziska Fürstin von Starhemberg, also known as Fanny Starhemberg) born October 24, 1875 in Vienna - died April 27, 1943 in Bad Darkau (today Karviná), was an Austrian politician. ... Supporters of the Austrian Christian Social Party in 1934 Austrofascism is a term which is frequently used to describe the authoritarian rule installed in Austria between 1934 and 1938. ... German troops march into Austria on 12 March 1938. ... Nazi Germany, or the Third Reich, commonly refers to Germany in the years 1933–1945, when it was under the firm control of the totalitarian and fascist ideology of the Nazi Party, with the Führer Adolf Hitler as dictator. ...


Although the noble titles and the particles von and zu are not officially kept any more, some persons are still referred to with their titles in a private function. For example, Karl Schwarzenberg will occasionally still be referred to as Fürst Schwarzenberg (Prince Schwarzenberg) in the media; he holds Czech and Swiss citizenship, not Austrian. As opposed to nobility in Bohemia, Poland, Russia, or the former Prussian territories, the Austrian nobility never had its lands and riches confiscated. Social measures were introduced by the republican government in order to create more equality amongst the citizens and finance public projects, which put a strain on the traditional land-holding gentry and aristocracy, resulting in the forced sale of many palaces and lands, due to the expense of the upkeep. However, there was no measure by the government to specifically target only nobility and take away their possessions. As a side-note, the nobility in the Czech Republic had their property restituted in 1992, if they were Czechoslovak citizens before 1938. Karel Schwarzenberg Karel Schwarzenberg (IPA: ) (born on December 10, 1937 in Prague, Czechoslovakia), full name Karl Johannes Nepomuk Josef Norbert Friedrich Antonius Wratislaw Mena von Schwarzenberg is a scion of the House of Schwarzenberg, former chancellor of Czech President Václav Havel and current senator and Minister of the Foreign... Fürst (plural Fürsten) is a German title of nobility, usually translated into English as Prince; however this translation can be misleading, since a Fürst usually ranks below a Duke. ... There are things that have the name Schwarzenberg: Places In Austria Schwarzenberg (Vorarlberg) , a locality of Vorarlberg Schwarzenberg am Böhmerwald, Upper Austria in Germany Schwarzenberg (Erzgebirge), in Saxony Aue-Schwarzenberg, a district in Germany Schwarzenberg (Erzgebirge) Schwarzenberg, a part of Schömberg im Schwarzwald, in the [[(district)|]] district, Saxony... Social refers to human society or its organization. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Aristocrat redirects here. ...


To many Austrians, the abolition of nobility, its privileges and titles was and still is an important element of a democratic and republican state, where individuals are treated equally and thus should hold any titles of honour solely by their individual merit. The abolition of noble titles has been replaced with an almost obsessive usage of and fascination with academic titles and titles of office. Regardless, the nobility today are sometimes still treated slightly differently than ordinary citizens. Austrian nobility still plays a large part in movies made after World War II (for example Sissi and Sound of Music), and is still featured regularly in the media and literature. The social events of nobles are still spread large and far in tabloids. Besides, the law is gladly broken at many chances when members of the nobility are addressed at various events. Especially at the annual birthday celebration of Emperor Francis Joseph in Bad Ischl, present members of the Habsburg family are addressed as "Imperial and Royal Highnesses". For other uses, see Democracy (disambiguation). ... Look up republic in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... A degree is any of a wide range of awards made by institutions of higher education, such as universities, normally as the result of successfully completing a program of study. ... This article includes a list of works cited or a list of external links, but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ... The name Sissi may refer to: Elisabeth of Bavaria Sissi (model), a Cuban model Sissi (finnish guerillasoldier) This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Julie Andrews as Maria, seeks guidance from the Mother Abbess, played by Peggy Wood, in this scene from the 1965 film version. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


Apart from the loss of the titles, which hit the lower nobility harder than the higher nobility, most have fared remarkably well in modern Austria and still belong to some of the richest families, such as the Esterházy, Mayr-Melnhof, or Mautner-Markhof. Many members of the Austrian nobility today work in the traditional fields of diplomacy, politics, have business and financial interests, or are philanthropists or socialites. The House of Esterházy was a noble family in the Kingdom of Hungary since the Middle Ages. ... Mayr-Melnhof AG is a manufacturer in the paper & packaging industry, based in Vienna, Austria. ... This article is about negotiations. ... For other uses, see Politics (disambiguation). ... In economics, a business is a legally-recognized organizational entity existing within an economically free country designed to sell goods and/or services to consumers, usually in an effort to generate profit. ... FINANCIAL is the weekly English-language newspaper with offices in Tbilisi, Georgia and Kiev, Ukraine. ... A philanthropist is someone who engages in philanthropy; that is, someone who donates his or her time, money, or reputation to a charitable cause. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


It was estimated that there were about 20,000 Austrian nobles in 2005. That year, an association was founded, the Vereinigung der Edelleute in Österreich (Association of Austrian Nobles, or V.E.Ö.). It sees itself as the successor of the Vereinigung katholischer Edelleute in Österreich, which was founded in 1922 and banned under the Nazis in 1938. Until recently, all of the various attempts at revival were blocked by Austrian authorities. Nazism in history Nazi ideology Nazism and race Outside Germany Related subjects Lists Politics Portal         Nazism or National Socialism (German: Nationalsozialismus), refers primarily to the ideology and practices of the Nazi Party (National Socialist German Workers Party, German: Nationalsozialistische Deutsche Arbeiterpartei or NSDAP) under Adolf Hitler. ...


Noble titles

The Austrian nobility was divided up into two categories, the higher nobility (hoher Adel), and the lower nobility (niederer Adel). To the higher nobility belonged the princes and counts, the lower nobility was made up of the rest:


(English titles with German equivalents)

  • Duke/Duchess (Herzog/Herzogin)
  • Prince/Princess (Fürst/Fürstin)
  • Count/Countess (Graf/Gräfin) 1
  • Baron/Baroness (Freiherr/Freifrau and Freiin) 2
  • Knight (Ritter) (no female version existed)
  • Edler/Edle (roughly equivalent in meaning to "Sir" or "Dame", but not a common translation)

Non-ruling members of the imperial family were given the title of Archduke/Archduchess (Erzherzog/Erzherzogin) and styled Imperial Highness (Kaiserliche Hoheit); only the Crown Prince was addressed as Imperial and Royal Highness (Kaiserliche und königliche Hoheit). The wife of the emperor bore the title of Empress (Kaiserin) and styled Her Majesty. Herzog may refer to: Herzog (novel), a novel by Saul Bellow Herzog (game) and Herzog Zwei, two computer games by TechnoSoft Herzog is a German title of nobility, equivalent to Latin dux, English duke, Danish hertug, Afrikaans Hertog, Dutch Hertog, Icelandic Hertogi, Luxemburgish Herzog, Norwegian Hertug, Swedish Hertig. ... The term duke is a title of nobility which refers to the sovereign male ruler of a Continental European duchy, to a nobleman of the highest grade of the British peerage, or to the highest rank of nobility in various other European countries, including Portugal, Spain and France (in Italy... Fürst (plural Fürsten) is a German title of nobility, usually translated into English as Prince; however this translation can be misleading, since a Fürst usually ranks below a Duke. ... Fürst (plural Fürsten) is a German title of nobility, usually translated into English as Prince. The female form is Fürstin (plural Fürstinnen). ... For other uses, see Graf (disambiguation). ... Graf (from the Latin Grafio scribe from the Greek) is a German noble title equal in rank to a count (derived from the Latin Comes, with a history of its own) or a British earl (an original Anglo-Saxon title). ... Freiherr (German for Free Lord) is a title of lower nobility in Germany, the Baltic states and Austria-Hungary, considered equal to the title Baron. ... Freifrau (German for Free Lady) is a title of lower nobility in Germany, and Austria-Hungary, considered equal to the title Baronin. ... Freiherr (German for Free Lord) is a title of lower nobility in Germany, the Baltic states and Austria-Hungary, considered equal to the title Baron. ... Ritter is the lowest-ranking title of lower nobility, in German-speaking areas, considered equal to the title Knight. ... Edler (Edler von), was until 1919 a title for the lower nobility in Austria-Hungary, as well as Germany. ... Edler (Edler von), was until 1919 a title for the lower nobility in Austria-Hungary, as well as Germany. ... The title of Archduke ( in German Erzherzog) was invented in the Privilegium Maius, a forgery initiated by Duke Rudolf IV of Austria. ... ... A style of office, or honorific, is a form of address which by tradition or law precedes a reference to a person who holds a title or post, or to the political office itself. ... His/Her Imperial Highness (abbreviation HIH) is a title used by members of an Imperial family to denote Imperial - as opposed to royal - status to show that the holder in question is descended from an Emperor rather than a King (compare His/Her Royal Highness). ... His/Her Imperial Highness (abbreviation HIH) is a title used by members of an Imperial family to denote Imperial - as opposed to royal - status to show that the holder in question is descended from an Emperor rather than a King (compare His/Her Royal Highness). ... Imperial and Royal Highness (in German:Kaiserliche und königliche Hoheit) is a style possessed by someone who either through birth or marriage holds two individual styles, Imperial Highness and Royal Highness. ... Imperial and Royal Highness (in German:Kaiserliche und königliche Hoheit) is a style possessed by someone who either through birth or marriage holds two individual styles, Imperial Highness and Royal Highness. ...


Agnates of the imperial family, who were excluded from the line of succession, were created dukes and duchesses or princes and princess and addressed as Highness (Hoheit) or Serene Highness (Durchlaucht). An order of succession is a formula or algorithm that determines who inherits an office upon the death, resignation, or removal of its current occupant. ... Highness, often used with a personal possessive pronoun (His/Her/Your Highness, the first two abbreviated HH) and/or an adjective referring to the rank of the dynasty (e. ... Serene Highness (acronym HSH) – His Serene Highness or Her Serene Highness. ...


Below is an incomplete list of Austrian noble families, listed by rank of title[2]. Note that some members of a family were sometimes given higher titles by the emperor because of merit. Titles, styles, and rights could only be conferred by the monarch. In some cases, they could even be revoked because of fall from favour. An emperorrefers to Nick Herringshaw, a title, empress may only indicate the wife of an emperor (empress consort. ... A title is a prefix or suffix added to a persons name to signify either veneration, an official position or a professional or academic qualification. ... For the direction right, see left and right or starboard. ...

Note 1: For a Countess not being married, the title Komtesse was used, borrowed from the French language Comtesse.
Note 2: In German, a distinction between baronesses exists, a Freifrau being a baroness by marriage and Freiin being a baroness by birth.

French (français, langue française) is one of the most important Romance languages, outnumbered in speakers only by Spanish and Portuguese. ... Look up Count in Wiktionary, the free dictionary A count is a nobleman in most European countries, equivalent in rank to a British earl, whose wife is still a countess (for lack of an Anglo-Saxon term). ...

Erzherzog / Erzherzogin (Archduke / Archduchess)

  • of Austria (House of Habsburg-Lorraine)
  • of Austria-Este (House of Habsburg-Lorraine, dukes of Modena & Este)

Habsburg - Wikipedia /**/ @import /skins/monobook/IE50Fixes. ... Austria-Este is now the surname, and a sort of title, which purports to continue the tradition of the extinguished Italian princely and feudal family of Este, as well as their Duchy of Modena. ...

Großherzog / Großherzogin (Grand Duke / Grand Duchess)

  • of Tuscany (House of Habsburg-Lothringen, archdukes of Austria)

For other uses, see Tuscany (disambiguation). ...

Herzog / Herzogin (Duke / Duchess)

  • of Babenberg extinct 1246
  • of Hohenberg (Wife and children of Successor to the Throne Archduke Franz Ferdinand)
  • of Modena & Este (House of Habsburg-Lothringen, archdukes of Austria-Este)
  • of Reichstadt (see Napoleon II)
  • of Teschen (House of Habsburg-Lothringen, archdukes of Austria)

Because of the abolition of the prepositions, many families were forced to completely reinvent their family names. This brought in many complications. The following list of the non-Habsburg nobles shows the pre-1919 family names or preposition in brackets, followed by the standard appearance today. Noble families could have the preposition "von", "zu" or a combination of it ("von und zu"). Non-German-speaking nobility, however, preferred to use "de", such as in Bohemia, Hungary, and Galicia, as they felt that it was less Germanic-sounding. Since Austria-Hungary was a multiethnic empire, both versions could be officially used and were recognised by the government. Originally from Bamberg in Franconia, now northern Bavaria, the Babenbergs or Babenberger ruled Austria as counts of the march and dukes from 976 - 1248, before the rise of the house of Habsburg. ... (in German: von Hohenberg). ... Modena (Mòdna in Modenese dialect) is a city and a province on the south side of the Po valley, in Emilia-Romagna, Italy. ... Ercole I dEste was one of the most important patrons of arts in the Italian Renaissance. ... Zákupy (in German Reichstadt) is town in the Liberec Region of the Czech Republic. ... Napoleon Francis Joseph Charles Bonaparte (March 20, 1811 -July 22, 1832), Duke of Reichstadt, was the son of Emperor Napoleon Bonaparte and his second wife, Archduchess Marie Louise of Austria. ... Divided city. ... Flag of Bohemia Bohemia (Czech: ; German: ) is a historical region in central Europe, occupying the western and middle thirds of the Czech Republic. ... Galicia (Ukrainian: Галичина (Halychyna), Polish: Galicja, German: Galizien, Slovak: Halič, Romanian: Galiţia, Hungarian: Gácsország) is the name of a region of Central Europe. ...


Conversely, family names using prepositions like "de" and "de la" could not replace the preposition with the Germanic "von". For example, the family "Sanchez de la Cerda" originally came from Spain, therefore the preposition remained as in the original. The same exception applies to other families such as "Schönburg-de Laserna" and "de la Fontaine und d´Harnoncourt-Unverzagt". The latter is an interesting combination of French- and German-language prepositions, which again is a reflection of the colourful multiethnic history of the Austrian Empire.


Often, family names with a predicate were written "von X-Y", even though the correct form is "X von Y".


Fürst / Fürstin (Prince / Princess)

See:List of princes of Austria-Hungary

The style of address is Durchlaucht (Serene Highness). Also used was Fürstliche Gnaden (Princely Grace). This page lists princely families in the territories of the Austro-Hungarian Empire, whether extant or extinct. ... Serene Highness (acronym HSH) – His Serene Highness or Her Serene Highness. ...

Isabella Esterházy de Galánta. The wealth and power of the princely Esterházy family was legendary.
Isabella Esterházy de Galánta. The wealth and power of the princely Esterházy family was legendary.
Countess Draskovich accompanied by Prince Ferdinand of Auersperg at the horse-races in Freudenau, close to Vienna. Horse racings were popular and played a similar role like Ascot in the United Kingdom.
Countess Draskovich accompanied by Prince Ferdinand of Auersperg at the horse-races in Freudenau, close to Vienna. Horse racings were popular and played a similar role like Ascot in the United Kingdom.
  • (von) Auersperg
  • (Batthyány von Német-Ujvár) Batthyány-Strattmann
  • Barth von Barthenheim, or de Bart(-Barthenheim), also comital with the title of Reichsgraf and raised to princely rank by Emperor Karl I of Austria in 1917
  • (von Clary und Aldringen) Clary-Aldringen
  • (von) Croÿ
  • Esterházy (von Galántha, or Esterházy de Galántha)
  • Festetics (von Tolna, or Festetics de Tolna)
  • (von und zu) Fürstenberg
  • (von) Grassalkovics
  • (von) Hohenlohe-Waldenburg-Schillingsfürst
  • (von) Khevenhüller-Metsch
  • Kinsky (von Wchinitz und Tettau), also comital with the title of Graf
  • Koháry (von Csábrág und Szitnya), also comital with the title of Graf
  • (von) Lichnowsky
  • (von) Lobkowitz
  • (von) Dietrichstein-Mensdorff-Pouilly
  • (von Metternich-Winneburg, or de Metternich) Metternich
  • (von) Montenuovo
  • von und zu Liechtenstein, sovereign since 1719.
  • (zu) Oettingen-Oettingen und Oettingen-Wallerstein
  • (von Orsini und Rosenberg) Orsini-Rosenberg, also comital with the title of Graf
  • (von) Rohan, normally used the title Prinz
  • (zu) Sayn-Wittgenstein-Sayn
  • (von) Starhemberg
  • (von) Schönburg-Hartenstein
  • (von) Schönburg-Waldenburg
  • (zu) Schwarzenberg
  • (von) Thun und Hohenstein, also comital with the title of Graf
  • (von) Thurn und Taxis
  • (von) Waldburg-Zeil-Hohenems
  • (zu) Windisch-Graetz, sometimes also spelled Windisch-Grätz

Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... The House of Esterházy was a noble family in the Kingdom of Hungary since the Middle Ages. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... For other uses, see Vienna (disambiguation). ... Horse-racing is an equestrian sporting activity which has been practiced over the centuries; the chariot races of Roman times were an early example, as was the contest of the steeds of the god Odin and the giant Hrungnir in Norse mythology. ... Ascot Racecourse is a racecourse, located in the village of Ascot in the English county of Berkshire used for thoroughbred horse racing. ... Auersperg was a German Princely family, which held estates in Austria and Thengen (located in southern Baden-Württemberg, Germany, north of Schaffhausen, Switzerland. ... The Blessed Ladislaus Batthyány-Strattmann, in Hungarian Batthyány-Strattmann László, (born October 28, 1870 in Dunakiliti, Austria-Hungary, died January 22, 1931 in Vienna, Austria) was a Hungarian aristocrat and physician. ... Karl I of Austria, Károly IV. of Hungary, Karel III of Bohemia Karl I (August 17, 1887 – April 1, 1922), Karl Franz Josef Ludwig Hubert Georg Maria von Habsburg-Lothringen (Hungarian: Károly IV (Károly Ferenc József)), was (among other titles) the last Emperor of Austria, the... Arms of Philippe I de Croÿ, detail of Rogiers diptych (ca. ... The House of Esterházy was a noble family in the Kingdom of Hungary since the Middle Ages. ... The Festetics (pronounce: Fesh-Tat-Itch) Quartet are a string quartet from Budapest, Hungary. ... Fürstenberg is the name of a noble house in Germany, primarily based in southern Baden-Württemberg). ... The Kinsky family of the Counts and later Princes Kinsky (formerly Wchinsky or Tynsky) are one of the oldest and most illustrious dynasties originating from Bohemia, now in the Czech Republic. ... The Lobkowicz (also spelled Lobkowitz or Lobkovic) family is one of the oldest still existing Bohemian noble families dating back to the 14th century. ... Klemens Wenzel von Metternich Klemens Wenzel Nepomuk Lothar Fürst von Metternich-Winneberg-Beilstein (May 15, 1773 - June 11, 1858) (sometimes rendered in English as Prince Clemens Metternich) was an Austrian politician and statesman and perhaps the most important diplomat of his era. ... “Sovereign” redirects here. ... For other uses, see Rohan (disambiguation). ... Sayn-Wittgenstein-Sayn was a County of Rhineland-Palatinate, Germany, comprising of the lands of the region of Sayn. ... Ernst Rüdiger Starhemberg Ernst Rüdiger Starhemberg (May 10, 1899, Eferding -March 15, 1956, Schruns; Ernst Rüdiger Fürst von Starhemberg until the 1919 abolition of nobility) was an Austrian Fascist and politician prior to World War II. Born in Eferding, Upper Austria, in 1899, von Starhemberg hailed... Hartenstein is a town in the Zwickauer Land district, in the Free State of Saxony, Germany. ... Waldenburg is a city in the district Chemnitzer Land in Saxony, Germany. ... There are things that have the name Schwarzenberg: Places In Austria Schwarzenberg (Vorarlberg) , a locality of Vorarlberg Schwarzenberg am Böhmerwald, Upper Austria in Germany Schwarzenberg (Erzgebirge), in Saxony Aue-Schwarzenberg, a district in Germany Schwarzenberg (Erzgebirge) Schwarzenberg, a part of Schömberg im Schwarzwald, in the [[(district)|]] district, Saxony... Coat of arms Capital Regensburg Government Principality Historical era Middle Ages  - House raised to Briefadel 1512  - Raised to Freiherren 1608  - Hereditary Imperial     Postmasters General   1615  - Raised to County 1624  - Granted princely rank in     the Spanish Court   1681  - Raised to Princely county 1695  - Mediatised to Bavaria 1806  - Postal monopoly     nationalised   1867... The House of Windisch-Graetz (also Windischgraetz) was a princely family of the Holy Roman Empire. ...

Graf / Gräfin (Count / Countess)

The style of address is, in most cases, Erlaucht (Illustrious Highness). Also used was Gräfliche Gnaden (Comital Grace).

  • (von Abensberg und Traun) Abensberg-Traun
  • Aichelburg (or Aichelburg-Zassenegg)
  • (Alberti von Enno)
  • Almásy
  • Almeida
  • (von) Althann
  • (von Andechs-Meranien) extinct 1248
  • Andrassy
  • Apponyi
  • Arco
  • Arz-Vasegg
  • (von) Attems (or Attems-Gilleis)
  • (Bartolotti von Partenfeld)
  • (Barth von Barthenheim), or de Bart(-Barthenheim), with title Reichsgraf since December 2, 1802
  • Badeni
  • Baillet (de Latour)
  • Bánffy (von Losontz)
  • Barbo (von Waxenstein)
  • Beck (or Beck-Rzikowsy)
  • Belcredi
  • Béldi
  • Bellegarde
  • Belrupt-Tissac
  • Berchtold
  • Berenyi
  • Bethlen
  • Blanckenstein
  • Bolza
  • Bona House of Bona
  • Bonda House of Bonda
  • Borkowski
  • Bossi-Fedrigotti
  • Bozen (see Maurer)
  • Braida
  • Brandis
  • (von Breuner-Asparn) extinct 1894
  • (von Breuner-Nußdorf) extinct 1862
  • Breunner
  • Bubna-Litic
  • Bucquoi (von Longueval)
  • (Bukuwky von Bukuwka)
  • Bulgarini
  • (von) Buol-Schauenstein
  • Butler (von Clonebough)
The Countess Clam-Gallas (left, wearing an ermine coat) arriving at the Votivkirche in Vienna for the wedding of one of her seven daughters, (right couple) Countess Gabrielle Clam-Gallas to Adolf, Prince of Auersperg. The high aristocracy tended to intermarry, making weddings a spectacular social event for all.
The Countess Clam-Gallas (left, wearing an ermine coat) arriving at the Votivkirche in Vienna for the wedding of one of her seven daughters, (right couple) Countess Gabrielle Clam-Gallas to Adolf, Prince of Auersperg. The high aristocracy tended to intermarry, making weddings a spectacular social event for all.
  • (von) Caboga House of Caboga
  • (von Caprara)
  • Cassis-Faraone
  • (von) Cavriani
  • (Ceschi a Santa Croce)
  • (von) Chorinsky
  • Chotek (von Chotkova und Wognin)
  • Christalnigg
  • Clam-Gallas
  • Clam-Martinic
  • (von) Clary-Aldringen
  • (von) Cobenzl
  • (von Collalto und San Salvatore) Collalto
  • (von) Colloredo-Mannsfeld
  • Consolati (von und zu Heiligenbrunn)
  • Coreth (zu Coredo und Starkenberg)
  • Coronini-Cronberg
  • (von) Coudenhove-Kalergi
  • Csáky (von Köröszegh) or Csáky-Pallavicini
  • Czernin (von und zu Chudenitz)
  • Cziraky
  • Daun
  • Degenfeld-Schonburg
  • Des Fours
  • Deym-Stritez
  • Dezasse (de Petit-Verneuil)
  • (von Dietrichstein)
  • Dobrzensky (von Dobrzenicz)
  • Dohalsky (von Dohalitz)
  • Drašković (von Trakostjan, or Draskovich de Trakostjan)
  • Dubsky (von Trebomislyc)
  • Edelsheim-Gyulai
  • Eltz (zu Eltz)
  • Emo (-Capodilista)
  • (von) Enzenberg
  • (von) Erdödy
  • (von Eppan) extinct 1248
  • (von Eppensteiner) extinct 1122
  • (von Eyczing) extinct 1620
  • (Vrints zu Falkenstein)
  • Falkenhayn
  • Ferrari(s)-Ochieppo
  • Finck von Finckenstein
  • (von) Firmian
  • Folliot de Crenneville-(Poutet)
  • Forni
  • Francken-Sierstorpff
  • Fredro
  • Fries
  • Fünfkirchen
  • Gallenberg
  • Galler
  • Gatterburg
  • (von) Ghetaldi-Gondola
  • Gleispach
  • (von) Goëss
  • Gorcey
  • Grimani-Giustinian
  • Grundemann-Falkenberg
  • (von Grünne), also carried title Graf von Pinchard
  • (von) Gudenus
  • Hadik (von Futak)
  • (zu) Hardegg
  • (de la Fontaine und d'Harnoncourt-Unverzagt) Harnoncourt
  • (von Harrach zu Rohrau und Thannhausen) Harrach
  • Hartenau
  • Hartig
  • Haslingen
  • (von Henckel zu Donnersmarck) Henckel-Donnersmarck
  • (von) Herberstein
  • Hohenberg
  • (von) Hohenems
  • (von) Hoyos
  • Hunyady-Kethely
During the baroque era, the nobility started to move into the cities and built themselves lavish residences called Palais. The Palais Kinsky in Vienna, belonging to the princely Kinsky family, is one of the most outstanding pieces.
During the baroque era, the nobility started to move into the cities and built themselves lavish residences called Palais. The Palais Kinsky in Vienna, belonging to the princely Kinsky family, is one of the most outstanding pieces.
  • Kálnoky
  • Károlyi
  • (von Kaszongi)
  • (von) Kaunitz
  • (von) Keyserling
  • (von) Khevenhüller or Khevenhüller-Metsch
  • Kinsky (von Wchinitz und Tettau), also princely with the title of Fürst
  • (von) Kuefstein
  • (von) Kollonitsch
  • (von) Kolowrat
  • (von) Kolowrat-Krakowsky
  • (von Kolowrat-Liebsteinsky) extinct 1861
  • (Königsegg zu Aulendorf)
  • Kornis
  • Kottulinsky (von Kottulin)
  • Khuen-Belasi
  • (von) Kuefstein
  • Küenburg
  • Künigl
  • Kulmer (zum Rosenpichl und Hohenstein)
  • (von) Kurzberg
  • (von) Lamberg
  • Lanckoronski
  • Lanthieri
  • Larisch (zu Moennich)
  • Lazanski (von Bukowa)
  • Ledóchowski
  • Lexa (von Aehrenthal)
  • Lodron-Laterano
  • Lodron-Löwenstein
  • Ludwigstorff
  • (MacCaffry of Kean More)
  • Magnis
  • Mailáth
  • Mamming
  • Marzani
  • Matuschka
  • Maurer (1919: Mauriello)
  • Mels-Colloredo
  • (von) [[Mensdorff-Pouilly], also princely with the title of Fürst(Mensdorff-Pouilly-Dietrichstein
  • Meran
  • Meraviglia-Crivelli
  • Migazzi
  • (von Mir)
  • Mittrowsky
  • Montecuccoli
  • (von Montfort) extinct 1787
  • (von) Neipperg
  • Neuhaus
  • (von Norman und von Audenhove) Norman-Audenhove
  • Nostitz-Rieneck
  • Nyary (von Bedegh und Berench)
  • Oeynhausen
  • O’Donell
  • Oppersdorff
  • (von Orsini und Rosenberg) Orsini-Rosenberg, also princely with the title of Fürst
  • Orssich (de Slatevich)
  • Osiecimski-Hutten-Csapski
  • Ostrowski
  • Paar
  • Pace
  • Pacata
  • (Pálffy von Erdöd) Pálffy
  • (von) Pallavicini, also with title Margrave (Markgraf)
  • Paumgarten
  • Piatti
  • Pilati
  • Podstatzky-Lichtenstein
  • Pötting und Persing
  • Potulicki
  • Pozza Von Zagorien House of Pozza
  • Praschma
  • Prokesch-Osten
  • Puppi
  • Radetzky
  • Rességuier
  • Revertera (or Revertera-Salandra)
  • (von) Rohrbacher
  • (Jordan-)Rozwadowski (a Polish/Galician title)
  • Rumerskirch
A young countess of the Schönborn family posing for an artistic photo.
A young countess of the Schönborn family posing for an artistic photo.
Countess Marietta Silva-Tarouca with her daughters at the horse races in Prague.
Countess Marietta Silva-Tarouca with her daughters at the horse races in Prague.
  • Salburg
  • Salis
  • (Sanchez) de la Cerda
  • Saurma
  • Scapinelli-Lèguigno
  • Schallenberg (or Schallenberg-Krassl)
  • Schirndinger (von Schirnding)
  • Schnitzer
  • Schmettow
  • (von) Schönborn (or Schönborn-Bucheim)
  • Schönfeld(t)
  • Sedlnitzky-Odrowaz
  • Ségur-Cabanac
  • Seilern-Aspang
  • Serényi
  • Sermage
  • Siemienski-Lewicki
  • Sierakowski
  • (de Sylva von Tarouca, or Silva-Tarouca) Silva-Tarouca
  • Sizzo-Noris
  • Skarbek
  • Somogyi (von Medgyes)
  • Spangen von Uyternesse
  • Spannocchi
  • Spaur
  • Spee
  • (Matz von) Spiegelfeld
  • Sprinzenstein
  • Stainach
  • Starhemberg
  • Sternberg
  • Stolberg
  • Stras(s)oldo
  • (von) Strozzi
  • (von Stubenberg) extinct 1868
  • Stubick
  • Stürgkh
  • Széchényi
  • Taaffe
  • Taczanowski (or Dassanowsky; Prussian title but long present in Galicia and Vienna)
  • Tarnowski
  • Tattenbach
  • Taxis-Bordogna
  • Teleki (von Szek)
  • Terlago
  • (von) Teuffenbach
  • (von Thonradel) fled 1620
  • (von) Thürheim
  • (von) Thun und Hohenstein, also princely with the title of Fürst
  • Thurn-Valsassina
  • Tisza (de Boros-Jenö er Szeged)
  • Trapp
  • Traun
  • (von und zu) Trauttmansdorff-Weinsberg, carried title Erbgraf
  • (von) Trautson
  • (von der) Trenck
  • Treuberg
  • Ueberacker
  • (Ungnad von Weißenwolff)
  • Vay (von Vaja)
  • (Vetter von der Lilie)
  • Wagensperg
  • Waldburg(-Zeil-Trauchberg)
  • Walderdorff
  • Waldstein (or Waldstein-Wartenberg)
  • (von Wallis), also carried title Freiherr auf Carighmain
  • Walterskirchen, also carried title Freiherr zu Wolfsthal
  • Weikersheim
  • Welczeck
  • (Welser von) Welsersheimb
  • Welsperg
  • Wenckheim
  • Wengersky
  • Wickenburg
  • Widmann-Sedlnitzky
  • (von) Wilczek
  • (von) Wimpffen
  • (von) Wodzicki
  • Wolanski
  • Wolkenstein
  • Wratislaw von Mitrowitz
  • (von) Wurmbrand(-Stuppach)
  • Wydenbruck
  • Zaleski
  • Zamoyski
  • (von) Zichy(-Ferraris)
  • Zierotin
  • (von) Zinzendorf

The Bona or Bunić family (Bona is the Ragusan Dalmatian/Italian rendition; Bunić is the Croatian/Serbian rendition). ... The Bonda family (Bonda is the Ragusan Dalmatian/Italian rendition; were an old noble family from Dubrovnik (Ragusa), with origins in Dalmatia and Italy. ... Maurer is or was a surname of several people: Georg Maurer, German poet, esseyist and translator (1907-1971) Georg Ludwig von Maurer, German statesman and historian (1790-1872) Ion Gheorghe Maurer, Romanian politician (1902–2000) John Maurer, American punk musician (born 1964) Ludwig Maurer, German mathematician (1859-1927) Ne... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 516 pixel Image in higher resolution (813 × 524 pixel, file size: 97 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Austrian nobility ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 516 pixel Image in higher resolution (813 × 524 pixel, file size: 97 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Austrian nobility ... The ermine (Mustela erminea) is a dark brown weasel, with a distinctive black-tipped tail. ... Coat can refer to any one of the following: The fur coat of a mammal. ... The Votivkirche in Vienna is one of the most important neo-Gothic religious architectural sites in the world. ... The family Caboga, is one of the most recognized and oldest in the Republic of Ragusa, start in the VIII century, many of your integrants were Knez of the Republic, the Austrian Empire recognized your nobility in 1818, one of the ultime line of yours genealogie is: Franz Blasius Maria... Colloredo-Mannsfeld was a German Princely family which was based in Austria. ... Richard Nikolaus Graf Coudenhove-Kalergi (Count Richard Nikolaus von Coudenhove-Kalergi), (Tokyo, November 17, 1894 to Schruns, Vorarlberg, July 27, 1972) was the son of a Austro-Hungarian count and diplomat, and a Japanese mother. ... The House of DraÅ¡ković was one among the oldest Croatian noble families, originally descended from lower-rank nobility of the Lika region. ... Trakošćan (also spelled Trakostyan) is a castle located in northern Croatia (in the Varaždin county) that dates back to the 13th century (first written mention in 1334). ... Erdödy (or ErdÅ‘dy) was the name of a noble family in the Kingdom of Hungary. ... see for more details about the German aristocratic Finck von Finckenstein family http://de. ... Coat-of-arms of the House of Gondola The Gondola or Gundulić family (Gondola is the Ragusan Dalmatian/Italian rendition; Gundulić is the Croatian rendition) were an old noble family from Dubrovnik (Ragusa), with origins in southern Croatia and the Tyrol. ... Nikolaus Harnoncourt or Johann Nicolaus Graf de la Fontaine und d´Harnoncourt-Unverzagt, (born December 6, 1929) in Berlin. ... Harrach is the name of a Bohemian and Austro-German noble family. ... Siegmund (Sigismund) Freiherr von Herberstein, (or Baron Sigismund von Herberstein), (b. ... Hoyos is a municipality located in the province of Cáceres, Extremadura, Spain. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (1920 × 2560 pixel, file size: 877 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Austrian nobility Metadata... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (1920 × 2560 pixel, file size: 877 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Austrian nobility Metadata... For other uses, see Baroque (disambiguation). ... The quintessential medieval European palace: Palais de la Cité, in Paris, the royal palace of France. ... The Palais Kinsky in Vienna The lavish baroque interior Palais Kinsky is a baroque palace in Vienna. ... Wenzel Anton Count of Kaunitz-Rietberg (part of the Maria Theresa monument in Vienna) Wenzel Anton Graf Kaunitz (en: Count Wenceslaus Anthony von Kaunitz, cz: Václav Antonín hrabÄ› Kounic-Rietberg) (Vienna, February 2, 1711 – Vienna, June 27, 1794), born into an old Bohemian noble family settled in Moravia... Keyserling may refer to any of the following people: Alexander Keyserling (1815–1891), German geologist Arnold Keyserling (1922–2005), German philosopher Eduard von Keyserling (1855–1918), German writer Eugen von Keyserling (1833-1889) , German arachnologist Hermann Graf Keyserling (1880–1946), German philosopher This page or section lists people with the... The Kinsky family of the Counts and later Princes Kinsky (formerly Wchinsky or Tynsky) are one of the oldest and most illustrious dynasties originating from Bohemia, now in the Czech Republic. ... Kolovrat or kolowrat (also Colovrat, sometimes anglicized as Collowrath) means spinning wheel in a number of Slavic languages (contemporary or archaic meaning): kolo means wheel, vrat is the stem for turning/spinning/etc. ... Neipperg refers to: Part of Brackenhim, Germany Wilhelm Reinhard von Neipperg (1684-1774), Austrian general Adam Albert von Neipperg (1775-1829), Austrian general Category: ... The Pallavicini or Pallavicino were an Italian noble family descended from Oberto I (died 1148). ... Margrave (Latin: marchio) is the English and French form (recorded since 1551) of the German title Markgraf (from Mark march and Graf count) and certain equivalent nobiliary (princely) titles in other languages. ... 200px coat_of_arms_Pozza The Pozza or Pucić family (Pozza is the Ragusan Dalmatian/Italian rendition; Pucić is the Croatian/Serbian rendition) were an old noble family from Dubrovnik (Ragusa), with origins in Dalmatia and Italy. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 262 × 599 pixel Image in higher resolution (283 × 647 pixel, file size: 27 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Austrian nobility ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 262 × 599 pixel Image in higher resolution (283 × 647 pixel, file size: 27 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Austrian nobility ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 521 × 599 pixel Image in higher resolution (566 × 651 pixel, file size: 64 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Austrian nobility ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 521 × 599 pixel Image in higher resolution (566 × 651 pixel, file size: 64 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Austrian nobility ... For other uses, see Prague (disambiguation). ... Nikolaus Ludwig von Zinzendorf, Count of Zinzendorf and Pottendorf, (May 26, 1700 – May 9, 1760), German religious and social reformer, was born at Dresden. ...

Freiherr / Freifrau / Freiin (Baron / Baroness)

There was no official style, but "Gnädiger Herr", "Gnädige Frau", or "Gnädiges Fräulein" were common forms of address. Although strictly speaking the title was "Freiherr", the usage of "Baron" in written and verbal communication was very common, even if incorrect. The title "Freiin" was also often replaced for "geborene (née) Baronin", which was strictly speaking also incorrect since a "Baronin" would have been wed already. The French word née (feminine) or né (masculine) (or the English word nee) is still commonly used in some newspapers when mentioning the maiden name of a woman in engagement or wedding announcements. ...

Alphonse, Baron de Rothschild, member of the famous Rothschild family. Already in his lifetime he was known to be the living epitome of a "perfect gentleman".
Alphonse, Baron de Rothschild, member of the famous Rothschild family. Already in his lifetime he was known to be the living epitome of a "perfect gentleman".
  • Abele von Lilienberg
  • Adamovich (de Csepin)
  • (von) Arnstein
  • Apfaltern
  • (Arz von Straussenburg)
  • (von) Auspitz
  • (von) Bach
  • Bakonyi
  • (von) Baselli
  • (Berger-Waldenegg)
  • Berlakovich
  • (von Bienerth)
  • Blomberg
  • (von) Blumencron
  • Chledowski(von)Pfaffenhofen
  • (von Columbus)
  • (von) Cornaro
  • Cseszneky de Milvány
  • (von) Drasche-Wartinberg
  • Eötvös de Vásárosnamény
  • (von) Eskeles
  • (von) Ferstl
  • Fraydt (von) Fraydenegg
  • (von Fries)
  • (von) Froelichsthal (or von Frölichsthal)
  • (von Gagern)
  • (von) Gomperz
  • (von Ghetaldi-Gondola)
  • (von) Haas
  • (von) Hagenauer
  • (von) Helfert
  • (von) Hess
  • (von Hofkirchen) extinct 1692
  • (von Isbary)
  • (Jörger von Tollet) extinct 1772
  • (von Marguti)
  • (Kalchegger von Kalchberg)
  • (Kay von Bebenburg)
  • (Kiß von Ittebe)
  • (von) Kubinzky
  • (von) Klimburg
  • (von) Kuffner
  • (von) Laudon
  • (von) Leitenberger
  • (Leonhardi)
  • (von) Lieben
  • (von) Ludwigstorff
  • Matz von Spiegelfeld
  • (Mayr von Melnhof) Mayr-Melnhof
  • (von) Mensshengen
  • (von Miller zu Aichholz) Miller-Aichholz, also carried title
  • Milutinovich-Milovski
  • (Nadherny von Borutin)
  • (Nagy von Töbör-Ethe)
  • Obenaus von Felsöház
  • (von) Oppenheimer
  • (von) Pereira-Arnstein
  • (von Prandau)
  • (von) Quiqueran-Beaujeu
  • Reitzes (von Marienwerth), sometimes also "de Reitzes-Marienwerth"
  • (von) Riefel
  • (von or de) Rothschild, normally used the title Baron
  • (von) Ringhoffer
  • (von) Schey
  • (Schey von Koromla)
  • (Sebottendorf von der Ronse)
  • Seiller-Tarbuk
  • (von) Silber
  • (von) Sina
  • (von Skrbensky)
  • (von) Spaun
  • (von) Stipsicz de Ternova
  • (zu) Stübing
  • Sypniewski Ritter von Odrowaz (1480)
  • Thavonat-Thavon
  • (von) Todesco
  • Wadenstierna
  • (Jäger von) Waldau
  • (von) Waechter
  • Wetzler von Plankenstern
  • (von Widmann)
  • (von Weigelsperg)
  • (von) Wertheimstein
  • (von) Westenholz
  • (Zeidler-Daublebsky von Sterneck)

Image File history File links Size of this preview: 498 × 599 pixel Image in higher resolution (557 × 670 pixel, file size: 104 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Austrian nobility ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 498 × 599 pixel Image in higher resolution (557 × 670 pixel, file size: 104 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Austrian nobility ... Coat of arms of the Rothschild family The Rothschild family (often referred to simply as the Rothschilds), is an international banking and finance dynasty of German Jewish origin that established operations across Europe, and was ennobled by the Austrian and British governments. ... An epitome (Greek epitemnein—to cut short) is a summary or miniature form, also used as a synonym for embodiment. ... For other uses, see Gentleman (disambiguation). ... Cornaro is an illustrious patrician family in Venice, from which for centuries several Doges sprung. ... The coat of arms of the Barons Cseszneky de Milvány The Cseszneky family (in Hungarian also spelled: Csesznegi, in Slovak: Česnegi and in Croatian: Česnegić) was a noble family in Hungary, Slovakia and Croatia. ... Coat-of-arms of the House of Gondola The Gondola or Gundulić family (Gondola is the Ragusan Dalmatian/Italian rendition; Gundulić is the Croatian rendition) were an old noble family from Dubrovnik (Ragusa), with origins in southern Croatia and the Tyrol. ... Look up haas in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Feldmarschall Laudon Ernst Gideon Freiherr von Laudon (or Loudon) (February 2, 1717 in Tootzen, Livonia, now Tootsi, Estonia – July 14, 1790 in Nový Jičín, now Czech Republic) was Austrian field marshal. ... Mayr-Melnhof AG is a manufacturer in the paper & packaging industry, based in Vienna, Austria. ... Oppenheimer may be the surname of: Alan Oppenheimer, a film actor David Oppenheimer, a mayor of Vancouver, British Columbia Sir Ernest Oppenheimer, founder of a producers cooperative & single channel marketing, the forerunner of De Beers Frank Oppenheimer, a physicist Franz Oppenheimer, a German sociologist and political economist Harry Oppenheimer, a... The Rothschild banking family of Austria was founded by Salomon Mayer von Rothschild in 1820 in Vienna in what was then the Austrian Empire. ... The surname Sypniewski is of Polish origin and centered around the Oder region where families bearing this surname are still found today. ...

Ritter (Knight)

There was no official style, but "Gnädiger Herr" was a common form of address. The title was for males only; no female version exists. Female members of a family with the title Ritter however were often addressed as "Edle von", which was totally incorrect, unless the family already carried the "Edle" honour before being raised as into the "Ritter" class.

  • Bloch (von Brodnegg), ennobled in 1915
  • (von Brasseur)
  • (von) Ephrussi
  • (von) Epstein
  • (von) Doderer
  • (Friedmann, Ritter von) Prawy
  • (von) Ghega
  • (von Grumpenberger)
  • (von Hauslab)
  • (von) Karajan
  • (von) Klinkosch
  • (Korybut de Ostoja)
  • (von Kriegelstein), carried the title Reichsritter as well as Edler von Sternfeld
  • (La Rénotiere, Ritter von Kriegsfeld)
  • (von Klaudy)
  • (von Kriehuber)
  • Launsky (von Tieffenthal)
  • (von) Leeb
  • (von) Mallmann
  • (von) Maurer (also Mauerer)
  • (Mautner von Markhof) Mautner-Markhof
  • (von) Merkl
  • (von Miller zu Aichholz) Miller-Aichholz, also carried title Baron
  • (von) Nadherny
  • (von Nahujowski)
  • (von Neumann)
  • (von) Pellendorf
  • (von Premerstein)
  • (von) Ponteuxin
  • (von Rumpler)
  • (Schönwies von) Schönowsky
  • (von Schwarz)
  • (Skrebeciowicz de Sielecki, or von Sielecki) Sielecki
  • (Stermich von Valcrociata or von Kreuzenthal) de Stermich di Valcrociata: also carries the title of Edler von Valrociata or von Kreuzenthal
  • (von) Trapp
  • (von) Wertheim
  • de Weryha-Wysoczański
  • (von) Winiwarter
  • (von) Wessely

The surname Eppstein (Epstein, Ebstein) is one of the oldest Jewish family names in the Slavic countries. ... Herbert von Karajan (April 5, 1908 – July 16, 1989) was an Austrian conductor, one of the most prominent of the postwar period. ... Georg Ritter von Trapp Georg Ritter von Trapp (April 4, 1880 - May 30, 1947) headed the famous Austrian singing family memorialized in the musical The Sound of Music. ... Wertheim is the name of a German town, located at the river Main, see Wertheim am Main Burg Wertheim is the name of a castle nearby the town Wertheim Wertheim is the name of some German department stores, the Wertheim group was founded by Georg Wertheim Kreuzwertheim is a market... WysoczaÅ„ski plural: WysoczaÅ„scy (with by-names such as “de Weryha”, “de Minkowicz” or “Pietrusiewicz”) is the surname of a Polish szlachta (nobility) family, which traces its lineage back to Comes Vane Valachus who was granted land in 1431 by Polish King Ladislaus II. JagieÅ‚Å‚o. ... Direct copy of the first two sentences of the second pragraph. ...

Edler / Edle (Sir / Dame)

There was no official style, but "Gnädiger Herr" or "Gnädige Frau" were common forms of address.

  • (Fedrigoni von Etschthal)
  • (von Günner)
  • Hofmann von Hofmannsthal
  • (von) Holzmeister
  • (von) Khol
  • (von Korbuss)
  • (Milutinowits von Gottesheim)
  • (von) Mises
  • (von Nespern)
  • (Schallber von Schalberg)
  • (von Schuppler)
  • (Sepp von Seppenburg)
  • (von Sternfeld), also carried the title Reichsritter von Kriegelstein
  • (von) Sypniewski, also carried the title "Baron Sypniewski"
  • (von) Thurneyssen
  • (von) Weingartner

Edler Hofmann von Hofmannsthal refers to: Isaak Löw Hofmann, Edler von Hofmannsthal Hugo von Hofmannsthal This is a disambiguation page—a list of articles associated with the same title. ... Small drumhead of a khol The khol also known as a mrdanga is a terracotta two-sided drum used in northern and eastern India for accompaniment with devotional music (bhakti). ... Ludwig von Mises Ludwig von Mises (September 29, 1881, Lwów - October 10, 1973) was a notable economist and a major influence on the modern Libertarian movement. ... The surname Sypniewski is of Polish origin and centered around the Oder region where families bearing this surname are still found today. ... Weingarten (German for vine garden, vinyard) is the name of several places Weingarten (Württemberg) Weingarten (Baden) Weingarten Abbey in Weingarten Last names Gene Weingarten (born 1951), a humor writer and journalist Hermann Weingarten 1834–1892, protestant theologian Johnny Wayne (born Louis Weingarten) (1918-1990), a Canadian comedian and comedy...

Erbsälzer

  • (von) Lilien
  • (von) Papen

Untitled noble families or status unknown

  • (Anthony von Siegenfeld)
  • (von) Benda
  • Bielka-Karlstreu
  • (von Brenner)
  • (von or de) Chledowski
  • (von) Doblhoff
  • (Dobner von Dobenau)
  • (von) Eidlitz
  • (von) Einem
  • (von Ernst)
  • (von Fischer)
  • (Fischer von See)
  • (Froschmayr von Scheiblenhof)
  • (von Fürstenmühl)
  • (von) Gaupp
  • (von) Gauster-Filek
  • (Gelb von Siegesstern)
  • (von) Gera
  • (von Göhausen)
  • (von Greschke)
  • (Grognet d’Orleans)
  • (von Hellenau)
  • (von) Holbein
  • (von) Hornbostel
  • Jakabffy (von Nemeshetes und Zaguzsen)
  • (Korper von Marienwert)
  • (von Lambort)
  • (von) Lennkh
  • (Levasori della Motta)
  • (Lippich von Lindburg)
  • (von) Lónyay (Hungarian Count Elémer Lonyay married Archduchess Stephanie, widow of Crown Prince Rudolf, and was elevated to Prince (Fürst))
  • (von Löwenthal-Linau)
  • (von) Lütgendorff
  • (von) Mendelssohn
  • Müller-Hartburg
  • (von) Neumann
  • (von) Ofenheim
  • (von Pechmann)
  • (von Praxenthaler)
  • (von Preradovic)
  • (von Radak)
  • (von Remenyik)
  • (von) Rigel
  • (von) Rottal
  • (von) Saar
  • (de) Saeger (since 1731)
  • Schiff (von Suvero)
  • (von) Scholten
  • (Schönburg-de Laserna)
  • Schumacher (von Marienfrid)
  • (von) Strachwitz (the German Franz Graf (Count) Strachwitz von Groß-Zauche und Camminetz gained Austrian citizenship without having to eliminate his title or the "von")
  • (von Stremnitzberg)
  • (Suchy von Weißenfeld)
  • (Toscano dell Banner)
  • (Tuschner von Hirschberg)
  • (von Ürmenyi)
  • (von Zepharovich)
  • (von) Zumbusch
  • (Zeßner-Spitzenberg)

Gera is the largest Town in the east of Thuringia, Germany. ... Hornbostel-Sachs Erich Moritz von Hornbostel Category: ... Mendelssohn (or Mendelsohn) can refer to several subjects. ... Rigel (pronounced ) (β Orionis) is the brightest star in the constellation Orion and the seventh brightest star in the sky, with visual magnitude 0. ... With an area of 2570 km² and 1. ...

Marquis

  • Gozeni di St. Georges (came from the Austrian parts of northern Italy)

See also

Bohemian nobility refers to the noble families of Bohemia. ... Graf is a German noble title equal in rank to a count or an earl. ... This article deals with some titles of the nobility and royalty in the Kingdom of Hungary. ...

References

  1. ^ ..ein kindisches Beginnen, schon deshalb, weil man gar nicht diejenigen traf, die man hatte treffen wollen. Ich sprach einmal mit der ebenso feinen wie klugen Fürstin Fanny Starhemberg über diesen Punkt. 'Uns', sagte sie, 'macht die Aufhebung des Adels nichts, wir bleiben mit oder ohne den Titel immer die Starhembergs. original (German) text, on the German wikipedia
  2. ^ Source: Der Gotha

Literature

  • Binder-Krieglstein, Reinhard. Österreichisches Adelsrecht 1868-1918/19. Peter Lang, Vienna 2000, ISBN 978-3-631-34833-8
  • Coudenhove-Kalergi, Richard. Adel. Vienna. 1923.
  • Frank-Döfering, Peter. Adelslexikon des österreichischen Kaisertums 1804–1918. Herder, Vienna 1989. ISBN 3-210-24925-3
  • Lieven, Dominic. The aristocracy in Europe. London 1992.
  • Siegert, Heinz. Adel in Österreich. Vienna 1971.
  • Stekl, Hannes. Adel und Bürgertum in der Habsburgermonarchie 18. bis 20. Jahrhundert. Oldenbourg, Vienna 2004. ISBN 3-486-56846-9
  • Walterskirchen, Gudula. Blaues Blut für Österreich. Amalthea, Vienna 2000. ISBN 3-85002-452-0
  • Walterskirchen, Gudula. Der verborgene Stand. Adel in Österreich heute. Amalthea, Vienna 2007. ISBN 3-85002-428-8
  • Der Gotha. Supplement. Der "Österreich-Gotha". Mit Ergänzungswerken zum deutschen Adel. Saur, Munich 1997. ISBN 3-598-30359-9

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Nobility of Austria
  • Stiftung Seeau Lexikon Adel Online encyclopedia about the history of nobility in Europe

  Results from FactBites:
 
Nobility - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1220 words)
Originally, knights or nobles were mounted warriors who swore allegiance to their sovereign and promised to fight for him in exchange for allocation of land (usually together with serfs living there).
Nobility in its most general and strict sense is an acknowledged preeminence that is hereditary, i.e., legitimate descendants (or all male descendants, in some societies) of nobles are nobles, unless explicitly stripped of the privilege.
Nobles typically commanded resources, such as food, money, or labor, from common members or nobles of lower rank of their societies, and could exercise religious or political power over them.
Austrian nobility - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1950 words)
Especially members of the lower nobility (such as the civil servants) found this radical step of abolition degrading and humiliating, since working towards and finally earning a nobility title was a way for them and their families to rise within society.
To many Austrians, the abolition of noble privileges and titles was and still is an important element of a democratic and republican state, where indivdiuals are treated equally and thus should hold any titles of honor solely by their individual merit.
Noble families could have the preposition "von", "zu" or a combination of it ("von und zu"), non-German-speaking nobility however preferred to use the "de" such as in Bohemia, Hungary, and Galicia, as that was less germanic-sounding.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m