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Encyclopedia > Austrian Empire
Kaisertum Österreich
Austrian Empire

1804 – 1867
Flag Coat of arms
Flag Coat of arms
Anthem
Volkshymne (People's Anthem)
Location of Austria
The Austrian Empire
Capital Vienna
Language(s) German, Hungarian, Romanian, Czech, Slovak, Slovene, Croatian, Serbian, Italian, Polish, Ruthenian
Religion Roman Catholic
Government Monarchy
History
 - Established 1804
 - Ausgleich 1867
History of Austria
Ancient times
Hallstatt culture
Noricum
March of Austria
Babenberger
Privilegium Minus
Habsburg era
House of Habsburg
Holy Roman Empire
Archduchy of Austria
Habsburg Monarchy
Austrian Empire
German Confederation
Austria-Hungary
World War I
Assassination of Franz Ferdinand
World War I
Interwar Years
German Austria
First Austrian Republic
Austrofascism
Anschluss
World War II
Austria at the Time of National Socialism
World War II
Post-war Austria
Allied-administered Austria
Second Austrian Republic
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The Austrian Empire (German: Kaisertum Österreich) was a modern era successor empire founded on a remnant of the Holy Roman Empire centered on what is today's Austria that officially lasted from 1804 to 1867. It was followed by combining the Royal House with that of Hungary creating the dual monarchy Austria-Hungary (also known as the Austro-Hungarian Empire (1867 to 1918), which itself as one of the losers was dissolved at the end of World War I and broken into separate new states). This article is about the medieval empire. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Austria-Hungary, also known as the Dual monarchy (or: the k. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_Habsburg_Monarchy. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (550x707, 498 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Austria-Hungary Otto von Habsburg Double-headed eagle Karl Habsburg-Lothringen User:Nihil aliud scit necessitas quam vincere... This is a list of flags used in Austria. ... The Coat of Arms of Austria has been used since the end of World War I to symbolize Austria. ... A national anthem is a generally patriotic musical composition that evokes and eulogizes the history, traditions and struggles of its people, recognized either by a countrys government as the official national song, or by convention through use by the people. ... Gott erhalte Franz den Kaiser (God Save Emperor Francis) is an anthem to the Emperor Francis II of the Holy Roman Empire and later of Austria, written by Lorenz Leopold Haschka (1749-1827) and set to a tune written by Joseph Haydn in 1797. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Throughout the world there are many cities that were once national capitals but no longer have that status because the country ceased to exist, the capital was moved, or the capital city was renamed. ... For other uses, see Vienna (disambiguation). ... Serbian (; ) is one of the standard versions of the Shtokavian dialect, used primarily in Serbia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Montenegro, Croatia, and by Serbs in the Serbian diaspora. ... Ruthenian was a historic East Slavic language, spoken in the Grand Duchy of Lithuania and later in the East Slavic territories of the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth. ... Catholic Church redirects here. ... For the documentary series, see Monarchy (TV series). ... The German term Ausgleich (Hungarian kiegyezés) refers to the compromise or composition of February 1867 that established the Dual Monarchy of Austria-Hungary, which was signed by Franz Joseph of Austria and a Hungarian delegation led by Ferenc Deák. ... This is the history of Austria. ... Image File history File links Austria_Bundesadler. ... The Hallstatt culture was the predominant Central European culture during the local Bronze Age, and introduced the Iron Age. ... Noricum in ancient geography was a celtic kingdom in Austria and later a province of the Roman Empire. ... German map showing the marcha orientalis (upper right) within the Duchy of Bavaria. ... Originally from Bamberg in Franconia, now northern Bavaria, the Babenbergs or Babenberger ruled Austria as counts of the march and dukes from 976 - 1248, before the rise of the house of Habsburg. ... The Privilegium Minus (as opposed to the later Privilegium Maius, which was a forgery), is a document issued by Emperor Frederick I on September 17, 1156. ... Flag of the Habsburg Monarchy; also used as the flag of the Austrian Empire until the Ausgleich of 1867. ... This article is about the medieval empire. ... susan kroh was a very important asset to austrias devolepment The Archduchy of Austria (German: ) was one of the most important states within Holy Roman Empire, the center of the Habsburg Monarchy, the predecessor of the Austrian Empire. ... The Habsburg Monarchy, often called Austrian Monarchy or simply Austria, are the territories ruled by the Austrian branch of the House of Habsburg, and then by the successor House of Habsburg-Lorraine, between 1526 and 1867/1918. ... The German Confederation (German: Deutscher Bund) was the association of Central European states created by the Congress of Vienna in 1815 to organize the surviving states of the Holy Roman Empire, which had been abolished in 1806. ... Austria-Hungary, also known as the Dual monarchy (or: the k. ... A new plaque commemorating the exact location of the Sarajevo Assassination On June 28, 1914, Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria, heir to the Austro-Hungarian throne, and his wife, Sophie, Duchess of Hohenberg, were shot to death in Sarajevo, capital of Bosnia and Herzegovina, by Gavrilo Princip, one of a... “The Great War ” redirects here. ... The Republic of German Austria (German: ) was the initial rump state successor to Austro-Hungarian Empire following World War I for areas with a predominantly ethnic German population. ... Capital Vienna Language(s) German Religion Roman Catholicism Government Republic President  - 1919–20 Karl Seitz  - 1920–28 Michael Hainisch  - 1928–38 Wilhelm Miklas Chancellor  - 1918–20 Karl Renner (first)  - 1922–29 Ignaz Seipel (brief absence 1924–26)  - 1932–34 Engelbert Dollfuß  - 1934–38 Kurt Schuschnigg  - 1938 Arthur Seyß-Inquart (last... Austrofascism is a term which is frequently used by historians to describe the authoritarian rule installed in Austria between 1934 and 1938. ... German troops march into Austria on 12 March 1938. ... Austria at the time of National Socialism describes in particular the time frame of the history of Austria from March 12, 1938 when the German annexation of Austria made Austria part of the German Third Reich. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... Occupation zones in Austria (1945) Capital Vienna Political structure Military occupation Governors (1945)  - UK zone Gen. ... The Second Austrian Republic was founded in 1945 with the re-establishment of Austrian independence in the aftermath of World War II. The First Republic is considered to have come to an end either in 1938, with Germanys annexation of the country (the Anschluss), or with the establishment of... Periodization is the attempt to categorize or divide time into discrete named blocks. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Succession of states. ... This article is about the political and historical term. ... This article is about the medieval empire. ... Austria-Hungary, also known as the Dual monarchy (or: the k. ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ...


The term "Austrian Empire" is also used for the Habsburg possessions before 1804, which had no official collective name, although Austria is more frequent; the term has also been used, incorrectly, of Austria-Hungary. Flag of the Habsburg Monarchy; also used as the flag of the Austrian Empire until the Ausgleich of 1867. ... Austria-Hungary, also known as the Dual monarchy (or: the k. ...

Contents

The Austrian Empire was founded by the Habsburg monarch Holy Roman Emperor Francis II (who became Emperor Francis I of Austria), as a state comprising his personal lands within the larger Empire. Francis I in Austrian coronation regalia, 1832 Austrian thaler of Francis II, dated 1821. ... For other uses, see State (disambiguation). ...


This was a reaction to Napoleon Bonaparte's proclamation of the First French Empire in 1804. Napoléon I, Emperor of the French (born Napoleone di Buonaparte, changed his name to Napoléon Bonaparte)[1] (15 August 1769; Ajaccio, Corsica – 5 May 1821; Saint Helena) was a general during the French Revolution, the ruler of France as First Consul (Premier Consul) of the French Republic from... Map of the First French Empire in 1811, with the Empire in dark blue and satellite states in light blue Capital Paris Language(s) French Government Constitutional Monarchy Emperor  - 1804 - 1814/1815 Napoleon I  - 1814/1815 Napoleon II Legislature Parliament  - Upper house Senate  - Lower house Corps législatif Historical era...


Austria and some parts of the Holy Roman Empire then took the field against France and its German allies in the during the Third Coalition which lead to the crushing defeat at Austerlitz in early December 1805. By the fourth, the armies were in a cease fire in place and conducting peace talks nearby. In the Napoleonic Wars, the Third Coalition against Napoléon emerged in 1805, and consisted of an alliance of the United Kingdom, Austria, Russia, Naples, and Sweden against France. ... Combatants French Empire Russian Empire Austrian Empire Commanders Napoleon I Alexander I Francis II Strength 65,000[1] 73,000[2] Casualties 1,305 dead, 6,940 wounded, 573 captured, 1 standard lost[3] 15,000 dead or wounded, 12,000 captured, 180 guns lost, 50 standards lost[3] The...


Subsequently, Francis II agreed to the humiliating Treaty of Pressburg (December 1805), which in practice meant dissolution of the long-lived Holy Roman Empire with a reorganization of the lost German territories under a Napoleonic imprint into a precursor state of what became modern Germany, those possessions nominally having been part of the Holy Roman Empire within the present boundaries of Germany, as well as other measures weakening Austria and the Habsburgs in other ways. Certain Austrian holdings in Germany were passed to French allies — the King of Bavaria, the King of Württemberg and the Elector of Baden. Austrian claims on those German states were renounced without exception. The Treaty of Pressburg was signed on December 26, 1805 between France and Austria as a consequence of the Austrian defeats by France at Ulm (September 25 - October 20) and Austerlitz (December 2). ... This article is about the medieval empire. ... “Deutschland” redirects here. ... The Coat of arms of the Kings of Bavaria Bold textKing of Bavaria was a title held by the hereditary Wittelsbach rulers of Bavaria from 1805 till 1918, when the kingdom was abolished. ... // Counts of Württemberg Conrad I 1089-1122 Conrad II 1100-1130 John d. ...


One consequence of that was eight months later on 6 August 1806, Francis II dissolved the Holy Roman Empire, due to the formation of the Confederation of the Rhine by France; as he did not want Napoleon to succeed him. This action was unrecognized by George III of the United Kingdom who was also the Elector of Hanover who had also lost his German territories around Hanover to Napoleon. The English claims were settled by the creation of the Kingdom of Hanover which was held by George's British heirs until Queen Victoria's ascension, after which point it split into the British and Hanoverian royal families. is the 218th day of the year (219th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1806 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... The Confederation of the Rhine in 1812 Capital Frankfurt Political structure Confederation Protector Napoleon I Primate  - 1806-1813 Karl von Dalberg  - 1813 Eugène de Beauharnais Historical era Napoleonic Wars  - Formation 12 July, 1806  - Collapse 19 October, 1813 The Confederation of the Rhine or Rhine Confederation (German: ; French: ) lasted from... George III redirects here. ... The prince-electors or electoral princes of the Holy Roman Empire — German: Kurfürst (singular) Kurfürsten (plural) — were the members of the electoral college of the Holy Roman Empire, having the function of electing the Emperors of Germany. ... Capital Hanover Head of State King of Hanover Hanover (German: Hannover) is a historical territory in todays Germany. ... Hanover (German Hannover) is a historical territory in todays Germany. ... Queen Victoria redirects here. ...


Although the office of Holy Roman Emperor was elective, the House of Habsburg had held the title since 1440 (with one brief interruption) and Austria was the core of their territories. Flag of the Habsburg Monarchy; also used as the flag of the Austrian Empire until the Ausgleich of 1867. ...


The Austrian Empire did not originally include the Kingdom of Hungary, and its extensive dependent territories, which the Habsburgs had ruled since 1541; Hungary was incorporated after the defeat of the revolutionaries during the 1848/49 revolution. Much controversy ensued, including Hungarian efforts to obtain constitutional reform by declining to crown the new Emperor Francis Joseph as King of Hungary, After Austria was defeated in the Austro-Prussian War of 1866, and left the German Confederation, the Austrian Empire was transformed into the Austro-Hungarian Empire by the Austro-Hungarian Compromise of 1867, which granted Hungary and the Hungarian lands equal status to the rest of Austria as a whole. This article does not cite any references or sources. ... From March 1848 through July 1849, the Habsburgs Austrian Empire was threatened by revolutionary movements. ... Franz Joseph I Franz Joseph I (in English also Francis Joseph) ( August 18, 1830 – November 21, 1916) of the Habsburg Dynasty was Emperor of Austria and King of Bohemia from 1848 until 1916 and King of Hungary from 1867 until 1916. ... Combatants Austria, Saxony, Bavaria, Baden, Württemberg, Hanover and some minor German States (formerly as the German Confederation) Prussia, Italy, and some minor German States Strength 600,000 Austrians and German allies 500,000 Prussians and German allies 300,000 Italians Casualties 20,000 dead or wounded 37,000 dead... The German Confederation (German: Deutscher Bund) was the association of Central European states created by the Congress of Vienna in 1815 to organize the surviving states of the Holy Roman Empire, which had been abolished in 1806. ... Austria-Hungary, also known as the Dual monarchy (or: the k. ... The Austro-Hungarian Compromise of 1867 (German: , Hungarian: ) established the Dual Monarchy of Austria-Hungary. ...


Creation

Changes shaping the nature of the Austrian Empire took place during conferences in Rastatt (1797-1799) and Regensburg (1801-1803). On 24 March 1803, the Imperial Recess (Reichsdeputationshauptschluss) was declared, which greatly reduced the number of clerical territories from 81 to only 3 and imperial cities from 51 to 6. This measure was aimed at replacing the old constitution of the Holy Roman Empire, but the actual consequence of the Imperial Recess was the end of the Holy Roman Empire. Taking this significant change into consideration, Francis II created the title Emperor of Austria, for himself and his successors, abandoning the title of Holy Roman Emperor later in 1806. Map of Germany showing Rastatt Rastatt is a city in the District of Rastatt, Baden-Württemberg, Germany. ... Regensburg (also Ratisbon, Latin Ratisbona) is a city (population 151. ... is the 83rd day of the year (84th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1803 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... Children can be found playing on playhouses such as this during recess. ...


The fall and dissolution of the Empire was accelerated by French intervention in the Empire in September 1805. On 20 October 1805, an Austrian army led by general Karl Mack von Leiberich was defeated by French armies near the town of Ulm. The French victory resulted in the capture of 20,000 Austrian soldiers and many cannons. Napoleon’s army won another victory in the Battle of Austerlitz on 2 December 1805. In light of those events, Francis was forced to negotiate with the French from 4 December to 6 December 1805. These negotiations were concluded by an armistice on 6 December 1805. is the 293rd day of the year (294th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Thomas Jefferson. ... Karl Mack (1752—1828) was an Austrian general during the Napoleonic Wars. ... For other uses, see Ulm (disambiguation). ... Combatants French Empire Russian Empire Austrian Empire Commanders Napoleon I Alexander I Francis II Strength 65,000[1] 73,000[2] Casualties 1,305 dead, 6,940 wounded, 573 captured, 1 standard lost[3] 15,000 dead or wounded, 12,000 captured, 180 guns lost, 50 standards lost[3] The... is the 336th day of the year (337th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Thomas Jefferson. ... is the 338th day of the year (339th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 340th day of the year (341st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Thomas Jefferson. ... is the 340th day of the year (341st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Thomas Jefferson. ...


The French victories encouraged rulers of certain imperial territories to assert their formal independence from the Empire. On 10 December 1805, the prince-elector Duke of Bavaria proclaimed himself King, followed by the elector Duke of Württemberg on 11 December. Finally, on 12 December, the Margrave of Baden was given the title of Grand Duke. In addition, each of these new countries signed a treaty with France and became French allies. The Treaty of Pressburg between France and Austria, signed in Pressburg (today Bratislava, Slovakia) on 26 December, enlarged the territory of Napoleon's German allies at the expense of defeated Austria. is the 344th day of the year (345th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Thomas Jefferson. ... The prince-electors or electoral princes of the Holy Roman Empire — German: Kurfürst (singular) Kurfürsten (plural) — were the members of the electoral college of the Holy Roman Empire, having the function of electing the Emperors of Germany. ... is the 345th day of the year (346th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 346th day of the year (347th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Margrave (Latin: marchio) is the English and French form (recorded since 1551) of the German title Markgraf (from Mark march and Graf count) and certain equivalent nobiliary (princely) titles in other languages. ... Baden is a historical state in the southwest of Germany, on the right bank of the Rhine. ... The title of Grand Duke (Latin, Magnus Dux; German, Großherzog, Russian, Великий князь) used in Slavic, Baltic, and Germanic countries, is ranked in honour below King but higher than a sovereign Duke (Herzog) or Prince (Fürst). ... The Treaty of Pressburg was signed on December 26, 1805 between France and Austria as a consequence of the Austrian defeats by France at Ulm (September 25 - October 20) and Austerlitz (December 2). ... , Nickname: Beauty on the Danube Country  Slovakia Region Districts Rivers Elevation 134 m (440 ft) Coordinates , Highest point Devínska Kobyla  - elevation 514 m (1,686 ft) Lowest point Danube River  - elevation 126 m (413 ft) Area 367. ... is the 360th day of the year (361st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


On 12 July 1806, the Confederation of the Rhine was established comprising 16 sovereigns and countries. This confederation, under French influence, put an end to the Holy Roman Empire. On 6 August 1806, even Francis recognized the new state of things and claimed the dissolution of the Holy Roman Empire. is the 193rd day of the year (194th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1806 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... The Confederation of the Rhine in 1812 Capital Frankfurt Political structure Confederation Protector Napoleon I Primate  - 1806-1813 Karl von Dalberg  - 1813 Eugène de Beauharnais Historical era Napoleonic Wars  - Formation 12 July, 1806  - Collapse 19 October, 1813 The Confederation of the Rhine or Rhine Confederation (German: ; French: ) lasted from... This article is about the medieval empire. ... is the 218th day of the year (219th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1806 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ...


When, on 11 August 1804, Francis II assumed the title of first Emperor of Austria, the empire spanned from present-day Italy to the Netherlands and from present-day Poland to the Balkans. The multi-national makeup of the empire is illustrated by the fact that its population included 6,500,000 Germans, 4,000,000 Poles, 3,360,000 Czechs, 2,000,000 Walloons and Flemings, 900,000 Croats, 700,000 Serbs, 700,000 Slovenes and numerous smaller nationalities. The emperor ruled Austria as the namesake, but also held the title of King of Hungary, Bohemia, Croatia, Slavonia and Dalmatia, leading to the Empire's multi-national army being styled the Kaiserlich-königliche Armee (Imperial-Royal Army). The Empire had a centralist structure, although some degree of autonomy was left to Hungary which was ruled by its own Diet, and to Tyrol. is the 223rd day of the year (224th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1804 was a leap year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... See the appropriate page for Francis II of the Holy Roman Empire François II of France Francis II of the Two Sicilies This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... The title of Emperor of Austria was proclaimed in 1804 by the Habsburg Holy Roman Emperor, Francis II, who feared for the future of the old Reich in the face of Napoleons aggressions, and wished to maintain his imperial title in the event that the Holy Roman Empire should... Balkan redirects here. ... Czechs (Czech: ÄŒeÅ¡i) are a western Slavic people of Central Europe, living predominantly in the Czech Republic. ... The term Walloons (French: Wallons, Walloon: Walons) refers, in daily speech, to Belgians from Wallonia, roughly the southern half of the country. ... Flemings and Flem redirect here. ... Croats (Croatian: Hrvati) are a south Slavic people mostly living in Croatia and Bosnia and Herzegovina (where theyre one of the constitutive nations). ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... This is a list of all rulers of Hungary since Árpád. ... For other uses, see Bohemia (disambiguation). ... Slavonia is a region in eastern Croatia. ... Dalmatia, highlighted, on a map of Croatia. ... // Background to the Army The Imperial and Royal Army (German: Kaiserlich-königliche Armee) was that of the Austrian Empire, formed on 11 August 1804 preceding the dissolution of the Holy Roman Empire ruled by the Habsburgs, under Emperor Francis II (Emperor Francis I of Austria). ... Centralization is the process by which the activities of an organization, particularly those regarding decision-making, become concentrated within a particular location and/or group. ... In politics, a diet is a formal deliberative assembly. ... Coat of arms of the Counts of Tyrol Austria-Hungary in 1914, showing Tirol–Vorarlberg as the left-most province, coloured cream Capital Meran (Merano), until 1848 Government Principality Historical era Middle Ages  - Created County 1140  - Bequeathed to Habsburgs 1363 or 1369  - Joined Council of Princes 1582  - Trent, Tyrol and...


Foreign policy

The years 1804-1815 in Austrian foreign policy were significantly determined by the Napoleonic Wars. After Prussia signed a peace treaty with France on April 5, 1795, Austria was forced to carry the main burden of war with the French Republic/Empire for almost ten years. This situation led to a distortion of Austrian economy contributing Austrians perceived the war in a highly unpopular manner. With regard to the mentioned mood, Emperor Francis II refused to join the next war against Napoleonic France for long time. On the other hand, Francis II did not abandon a possibility of a revenge on France and therefore he entered into a secret military agreement with the Russian Empire in November 1804. This convention was to assure a mutual cooperation between Austria and Russia in the case of a new war against France. Combatants Austria[a] Portugal Prussia[a] Russia[b] Sicily[c] Sardinia  Spain[d]  Sweden[e] United Kingdom French Empire Holland[f] Italy Etruria[g] Naples[h] Duchy of Warsaw[i] Confederation of the Rhine[j] Bavaria Saxony Westphalia Württemberg Denmark-Norway[k] Commanders Archduke Charles Prince Schwarzenberg Karl Mack... For other uses, see Prussia (disambiguation). ... is the 95th day of the year (96th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1795 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Map of the First French Empire in 1811, with the Empire in dark blue and satellite states in light blue Capital Paris Language(s) French Government Constitutional Monarchy Emperor  - 1804 - 1814/1815 Napoleon I  - 1814/1815 Napoleon II Legislature Parliament  - Upper house Senate  - Lower house Corps législatif Historical era... The subject of this article was previously also known as Russia. ...


An apparent unwillingness of Austria to join the Third Coalition was overcome by British subsidies. A decisive defeat at Battle of Austerlitz put an end to Austrian membership in the Third Coalition. Although Austrian budget suffered from wartime expenditures and its international position was significantly undermined, the humiliating Treaty of Pressburg provided plenty of time to strengthening the army and economy. Moreover, an ambitious Archduke Charles together with Johann Philipp von Stadion pursued a new war with France. In the Napoleonic Wars, the Third Coalition against Napoléon emerged in 1805, and consisted of an alliance of the United Kingdom, Austria, Russia, Naples, and Sweden against France. ... Combatants French Empire Russian Empire Austrian Empire Commanders Napoleon I Alexander I Francis II Strength 65,000[1] 73,000[2] Casualties 1,305 dead, 6,940 wounded, 573 captured, 1 standard lost[3] 15,000 dead or wounded, 12,000 captured, 180 guns lost, 50 standards lost[3] The... In the Napoleonic Wars, the Third Coalition against Napoléon emerged in 1805, and consisted of an alliance of the United Kingdom, Austria, Russia, Naples, and Sweden against France. ... For the rental car company, see Budget Rent a Car. ... The Treaty of Pressburg was signed on December 26, 1805 between France and Austria as a consequence of the Austrian defeats by France at Ulm (September 25 - October 20) and Austerlitz (December 2). ... Victorious Archduke Charles of Austria during the Battle of Aspern_Essling (May 21_22, 1809) The epileptic younger brother of Holy Roman Emperor Francis II, Archduke Charles of Austria (Erzherzog Karl) (September 5, 1771 - April 30, 1847) achieved respect both as a commander and as a reformer of Austrias army. ... Johann Philipp von Stadion (June 18, 1763, Mainz - May 15, 1824, Baden, Austria) was a statesman, foreign minister, and diplomat who served the Habsburg empire during the Napoleonic Wars. ...


Archduke Charles of Austria served as the Head of the Council of War and Commander in Chief of the Austrian army. Endowed with the enlarged powers, he reformed Austrian Army to preparedness for another war. Johann Philipp von Stadion, the foreign minister, personally hated Napoleon due to an experience of confiscation of his possessions in France by Napoleon. In addition, the third wife of Francis II, Marie Ludovika of Austria-Este, agreed with Stadion's efforts to begin a new war. Klemens Wenzel von Metternich, located in Paris, called for careful advance in the case of the war against France. The defeat of French army at the Battle of Bailén in Spain on 27 July 1808 triggered the war. On 9 April 1809, an Austrian force of 170,000 men attacked Bavaria. For other uses, see Napoleon (disambiguation). ... Klemens Wenzel von Metternich Klemens Wenzel Nepomuk Lothar Fürst von Metternich-Winneburg-Beilstein (May 15, 1773 – June 11, 1859) was an Austrian politician, statesman and one of the most important diplomats of his era. ... This article is about the capital of France. ... Combatants First French Empire Kingdom of Spain Commanders Pierre Dupont Francisco Castaños Strength 24,000 regulars 33,000 regulars and militia Casualties 2,200 dead, 400 wounded, 17,600 captured 240 dead, 730 wounded The Battle of Bailén was contested between the Spanish regular army, led by Generals... is the 208th day of the year (209th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1808 (MDCCCVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 99th day of the year (100th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1809 (MDCCCIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar). ... For other uses, see Bavaria (disambiguation). ...


Despite military defeats - especially high magnitude losses like those at the Battles of Marengo, Ulm, Austerlitz and Wagram - and consequently lost territory throughout the Revolutionary and Napoleonic Wars (the Treaties of Campo Formio in 1797, Pressburg in 1806, and Schönbrunn in 1809), Austria played a decisive part in the overthrow of Napoleon in the campaigns of 1813-14. Combatants French Consulate Austrian Empire Commanders Napoleon Bonaparte, Desaix† Michael von Melas Strength 28,000, 24 guns 31,000, 100 guns Casualties 1,100 killed, 3,600 wounded, 900 missing or captured 963 killed, 5,518 wounded, 2,921 captured In the Battle of Marengo (14 June 1800) Napoleons... Combatants First French Empire Austrian Empire Commanders Napoleon I Mack von Liebereich # Strength 150,000 72,000 Casualties 5,980 dead or wounded 12,000 dead or wounded, 30,000 captured The Ulm Campaign September-October 1805. ... Combatants French Empire Russian Empire Austrian Empire Commanders Napoleon I Alexander I Francis II Strength 65,000[1] 73,000[2] Casualties 1,305 dead, 6,940 wounded, 573 captured, 1 standard lost[3] 15,000 dead or wounded, 12,000 captured, 180 guns lost, 50 standards lost[3] The... The Battle of Wagram, around the isle of Lobau on the Danube and on the plain of the Marchfeld around the town of Deutsch-Wagram, 15 km north-east of Vienna, Austria, took place on July 5 and 6, 1809 and resulted in the decisive victory of French forces under... The Treaty of Campo Formio was signed on October 17, 1797 (26 Vendémiaire, Year VI of the French Republic) by Napoleon Bonaparte and Count Ludwig von Cobenzl as representatives of France and Austria. ... The Treaty of Pressburg was signed on December 26, 1805 between France and Austria as a consequence of the Austrian defeats by France at Ulm (September 25 - October 20) and Austerlitz (December 2). ... The Treaty of Schönbrunn was signed between France and Austria in 1809, ending the war of the Fifth Coalition during the Napoleonic Wars, at the beautiful castle Schloss Schönbrunn, which can be visited today as a tourist site. ...


The latter period of Napoleonic Wars featured Metternich exerting a large degree of influence over foreign policy in the Austrian Empire, a matter nominally decided by the Emperor. Metternich initially supported an alliance with France, arranging the marriage between Napoleon and the Francis II's daughter, Marie-Louise; however, by the 1812 campaign, he had realised the inevitability of Napoleon's downfall and took Austria to war against France. Metternich's influence at the Congress of Vienna was remarkable, and he became not only the premier statesman in Europe but virtual ruler of the Empire until 1848 - the Year of Revolutions - and the rise of liberalism equated to his political downfall. Metternich redirects here. ... The Congress of Vienna by Jean-Baptiste Isabey, 1819. ... The European Revolutions of 1848, known in some countries as the Spring of Nations or the Year of Revolution, were a revolutionary wave which erupted in Sicily and then, further triggered by the revolutions of 1848 in France, soon spread to the rest of Europe and as far afield as... Liberalism is an ideology, philosophical view, and political tradition which holds that liberty is the primary political value. ...


Constituent lands

Bohemia, Moravia, Austrian Silesia - 1892, then part of Austria_Hungary The Czech lands (in Czech: České země) or Czechia (in Czech: Česko) is an auxiliary term used for Bohemia + Moravia + Czech part of Silesia + other territories that were parts of the Kingdom of Bohemia (Lands of the Bohemian/Czech Crown) at... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Dalmatia (Croatian Dalmacija, Italian Dalmazia, Serbian Далмација) is a region of Croatia on the eastern coast of the Adriatic Sea, spreading between the island of Pag in the northwest and the Bay of Kotor in the southeast. ... Galicia (Ukrainian: Галичина (Halychyna), Polish: Galicja, German: Galizien, Slovak: Halič, Romanian: Galiţia, Hungarian: Gácsország) is the name of a region of Central Europe. ... Following the Battle of Mohács, in 1527 some of the Croatian (and Hungarian) nobles supported Ivan Zapolja, while some preferred suzerainty to the Austrian king Ferdinand of Habsburg. ... Frontiersman from PomoriÅ¡je, first half of the 18th century. ... The Kingdom of Lombardy-Venetia (Italian: Regno Lombardo-Veneto, in German: Lombardo-Venezianisches Königreich) was established after the defeat of Napoleon, according to the decisions of the Congress of Vienna (9 June 1815). ... susan kroh was a very important asset to austrias devolepment The Archduchy of Austria (German: ) was one of the most important states within Holy Roman Empire, the center of the Habsburg Monarchy, the predecessor of the Austrian Empire. ... Carinthia within Austria-Hungary (number 3) Coat of arms of the Dukes of Carinthia, today state arms The Duchy of Carinthia (German: ; Slovenian: ) was a duchy located in southern Austria and parts of northern Slovenia. ... Carniola (Slovenian Kranjska, German Krain) is a region in Slovenia. ... Salzburg is a city in western Austria and the capital of the federal state of Salzburg (population 150,000 in 2006). ... Silesia (Polish Śląsk, German Schlesien, Czech Slezsko) is a historical region in central Europe. ... Styria was a duchy of the Holy Roman Empire until its dissolution in 1806, and a crownland of Austria-Hungary until it dissolved in 1918. ... Bukovina (Bucovina in Romanian; Буковина, Bukovyna in Ukrainian; Buchenland or Bukowina in German; Bukowina in Polish), on the slopes of the Carpathian Mountains, comprises an historic province now split between Romania and Ukraine. ... Vojvodina of Serbia and TamiÅ¡ Banat and Principality of Serbia in 1849 The Vojvodina of Serbia and TamiÅ¡ Banat (Hungarian: Szerb Vajdaság és Temesi Bánság, German: Woiwodschaft Serbien und Temescher Banat, Serbian: Vojvodstvo Srbija i TamiÅ¡ki Banat) was an Austrian crownland, which existed between 1849 and... Transylvania (Romanian: Transilvania or Ardeal, Hungarian: Erdély, German: Siebenbürgen, Serbian: Transilvanija, Turkish: Erdel, Slovak: Sedmohradsko or Transylvánia, Polish: Siedmiogród) forms the western and central parts of Romania. ... Moravia (Czech: Morava, German: Mähren, Polish: Morawy, Hungarian: Morvaország) is the eastern part of the Czech Republic. ... This article is about Tyrol, the region in the eastern Alps. ... Gorizia and Gradisca (German: ; Italian: ; Slovenian: GoriÅ¡ka in Gradiščanska; Friulian: Gurize e Gradiscje) was a county in what is now a multilingual border area of Italy and Slovenia. ... Vorarlberg is the westernmost state (Land) of Austria. ... This article is about a geographical region bordering the Adriatic Sea. ... For other uses, see Trieste (disambiguation). ...

See also

For the history of these states before 1804, see Holy Roman Empire, Habsburg Monarchy, and articles on each of the component countries. After 1867, see Austria-Hungary. This article is about the medieval empire. ... The Habsburg Monarchy, often called Austrian Monarchy or simply Austria, are the territories ruled by the Austrian branch of the House of Habsburg, and then by the successor House of Habsburg-Lorraine, between 1526 and 1867/1918. ... Austria-Hungary, also known as the Dual monarchy (or: the k. ...


See also:

Flag of the Habsburg Monarchy; also used as the flag of the Austrian Empire until the Ausgleich of 1867. ... The Austro-Hungarian Compromise of 1867 (German: , Hungarian: ) established the Dual Monarchy of Austria-Hungary. ... This article gives an overview of countries (including puppet-countries) that existed in Europe after the Congress of Vienna in 1815. ...

References

  • Lalor, John J. (Ed), 1881. Encyclopædia of Political Science, Political Economy, and the Political History of the United States by the Best American and European Writers. New York, NY: Maynard, Merrill, and Co.
  • Manfred, Albert M., 1973. Napoleon Bonaparte. Prague, Czech Republic: Svoboda.
  • Skřivan, Aleš, 1999. European Politics 1648-1914 [Evropská politika 1648-1914]. Prague, Czech Republic: Aleš Skřivan.
Image File history File links Wappen_Deutscher_Bund. ... The States of the German Confederation were those member states that from June 20, 1815 were part of the German Confederation, which lasted, with some changes in the member states, until August 24, 1866, under the presidency of the Austrian imperial house of Habsburg, which was represented by an Austrian... The German Confederation (German: Deutscher Bund) was the association of Central European states created by the Congress of Vienna in 1815 to organize the surviving states of the Holy Roman Empire, which had been abolished in 1806. ... April 5-12: Mount Tambora explodes, changing climate. ... 1866 (MDCCCLXVI) is a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 551 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2934 × 3194 pixel, file size: 1. ... Anthem Preußenlied, Heil dir im Siegerkranz (both unofficial) The Kingdom of Prussia at its greatest extent, at the time of the formation of the German Empire, 1871 Capital Berlin Government Monarchy King  - 1701 — 1713 Frederick I (first)  - 1888 — 1918 William II (last) Prime minister  - 1848 Adolf Heinrich von Arnim... Anthem Königsstrophe Kingdom of Bavaria within the German Empire. ... The Kingdom of Saxony, lasting between 1806 and 1918, was an independent member of a number of historical confederacies in Germany, finally being absorbed into the Weimar Republic in 1918. ... Hanover (German Hannover) is a historical territory in todays Germany. ... Coat of Arms of the (formerly royal) Württemberg family, on a gate of the familys current residence, Schloss Altshausen in Altshausen, Germany // Counts of Württemberg Conrad I 1089-1122 Conrad II 1100-1130 John d. ... Hesse-Kassel (Hessen-Kassel in German) was a German principality that came into existence when the Landgraviate of Hesse was divided in 1568 upon the death of Landgrave Philip I of Hesse. ... Baden was a territory in the southwest of what later became unified Germany. ... The Landgraviate of Hesse-Darmstadt came into existence in 1568, as the portion of George, youngest of the four sons of Landgrave Philip I of Hesse. ... Mecklenburg-Schwerin was a Duchy (from 1815 a Grand Duchy) in northeastern Germany, formed by a partition of the Duchy of Mecklenburg. ... Mecklenburg-Strelitz was a duchy in northern Germany, roughly consisting of the present day district of Mecklenburg-Strelitz (the historical Stargarder Land), bordering areas of modern-day Brandenburg with the town of Fürstenberg and the area around Ratzeburg in modern Schleswig-Holstein. ... Oldenburg is a historical state in todays Germany named for its capital, Oldenburg. ... The Duchy of Saxe-Weimar-Eisenach (Herzogtum Sachsen-Weimar-Eisenach) was created in 1809 by the merger of the Ernestine duchies of Saxe-Weimar and Saxe-Eisenach, which had been in personal union since 1741, when the Saxe-Eisenach line had died out. ... Anhalt is a historical region of Germany, which is now included in the state of Saxony-Anhalt. ... Anhalt is a historical region of Germany, which is now included in the state of Saxony-Anhalt. ... Anhalt is a historical region of Germany, which is now included in the state of Saxony-Anhalt. ... Location of the Duchy of Brunswick within the German Empire Capital Braunschweig Government Monarchy Duke  - 1813-1815 Frederick William  - 1913-1918 Ernest Augustus History  - Restoration 1815  - Abdication 1918 Area  - 1910 3,672 km² Population  - 1910 est. ... Holstein (Hol-shtayn) (Low German: Holsteen, Danish: Holsten, Latin and historical English: Holsatia) is the southern part of Schleswig-Holstein in Germany, between the rivers Elbe and Eider. ... The Duchy of Limburg was a state of the Holy Roman Empire in the Low Countries, located between the river Meuse and the city of Aachen. ... For other uses, see Nassau (disambiguation). ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... Saxe-Coburg (German Sachsen-Coburg) is a historical state in todays Bavaria, Germany. ... Capitals Coburg and Gotha Head of State Duke of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha Saxe-Coburg and Gotha or Saxe-Coburg-Gotha (German: Sachsen-Coburg und Gotha) served as the name of the two German duchies of Saxe-Coburg and Saxe-Gotha in Germany, in the present-day states of Bavaria... Capitals Coburg and Gotha Head of State Duke of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha Saxe-Coburg and Gotha or Saxe-Coburg-Gotha (German: ) served as the name of the two German duchies of Saxe-Coburg and Saxe-Gotha in Germany, in the present-day states of Bavaria and Thuringia, which were... Hildburghausen is a district in Thuringia, Germany. ... The Coat of Arms of Lauenburg The Duchy of Lauenburg, also known as Saxe-Lauenburg was a medieval Duchy (Reichsfreiheit) that existed from 1296 in the extreme southeast region of Schleswig-Holstein with its territorial center in the modern district of Lauenburg. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... Hesse-Homburg was formed into a separate landgraviate in 1622 by the landgrave of Hesse-Darmstadt to be ruled by his son, although it did not become independent of Hesse-Darmstadt until 1668. ... Hohenzollern-Hechingen is a branch of the senior Swabian branch of the Hohenzollern dynasty, less known however than the Franconian branch which became Burgraves of Nuremberg and later ruled Brandenburg, Prussia and ultimately Germany in the centuries to 1918. ... Hohenzollern-Sigmaringen is the cadet branch of the senior Swabian branch of the Hohenzollern dynasty, less known however than the Franconian branch which became Burgraves of Nuremberg and later ruled Brandenburg, Prussia and ultimately Germany in the centuries to 1918. ... Lippe within the German Empire Capital Detmold Government Principality History  - Established 1123  - Raised to County 1528  - Raised to Principality 1789  - German Revolution 1918 Lippe was a historical state in Germany. ... Reuss Elder Line within the German Empire Capital Greiz Government Principality History  - Established 1778  - German Revolution 1918  - Merged into Thuringia 1919 The Principality of Reuss Elder Line (German: ) was a state in Germany. ... Reuss (German: Reuß) is the name of several historical states in todays Thuringia, Germany. ... Schaumburg is a district in Lower Saxony, Germany. ... Schwarzburg-Rudolstadt was a small state in Germany, in the present-day state of Thuringia, with capital at Rudolstadt. ... Schwarzburg-Sondershausen was a small state in Germany, in the present day state of Thuringia, with capital at Sondershausen. ... Waldeck (or later Waldeck-Pyrmont) was a sovereign principality in what is now Lower Saxony and Hesse (Germany). ... Location Time zone CET/CEST (UTC+1/+2) Administration Country NUTS Region DE5 State subdivisions 2 urban districts Capital Bremen Senate President Jens Böhrnsen (SPD) Governing parties SPD / Alliance 90/The Greens Votes in Bundesrat 3 (from 69) Basic statistics Area  408 km² (158 sq mi) Population 664,000... Main Station Frankfurt Frankfurt International Airport For other articles with similar names, see Frankfurt (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Hamburg (disambiguation). ... Location of the Free City of Lübeck with the German Empire   Capital Lübeck Government Republic History  - Formation 1226  - Abolition April 1, 1937 The title of this article contains the character ü. Where it is unavailable or not desired, the name may be represented as Luebeck. ... Anhalt is a historical region of Germany, which is now included in the state of Saxony-Anhalt. ... Year 1863 (MDCCCLXIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... 1847 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... The oldest surviving photograph, Nicéphore Niépce, circa 1826 1826 (MDCCCXXVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... The oldest surviving photograph, Nicéphore Niépce, circa 1826 1826 (MDCCCXXVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... For the game, see: 1850 (board game) 1850 (MDCCCL) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday [1] of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Austrian Krakow | Hapsburg Empire | Krakow during the Habsburg Empire (1171 words)
But this all came to an end after a Polish Uprising in 1846, and two years later the Austrians were firing cannons on the Old Town from the former Royal Castle of Wawel.
Austrian and Polish families inter-married, and even a branch of the Habsburgs became proud Polish patriots.
The Kosciuszko Mound, west of the Old Town, was hijacked by the Austrians and heavily fortified.
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