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Encyclopedia > Australian and New Zealand Army Corps

This article is part of the
ANZAC series.
Military History

Australia | New Zealand Image File history File links Australian_Army_Rising_Sun_Badge_1904. ... ANZAC stands for Australian and New Zealand Army Corps — t[[Image: ]]he name used to describe the combination of the Australian Army and New Zealand Army Corps during wartime. ...

Expeditionary Forces

AIF | NZEF The First Australian Imperial Force (1st AIF) was the main expeditionary force of the Australian Army during World War I. It was formed from August 15, 1914, following Britains declaration of war on Germany. ... The New Zealand Expeditionary Force (NZEF) was the title of the military force sent from New Zealand to fight for Britain in World War I. Upon the outbreak of war, New Zealand immediately offered to provide two brigades — one of infantry and one of mounted troops — a total of 8...

Corps

ANZAC | I Anzac | II Anzac
Australian | Desert Mounted The I Anzac Corps was an Australian and New Zealand World War I army corps formed in Egypt in February 1916 as part of the reorganization of the Australian Imperial Force following the evacuation of Gallipoli in November 1915. ... The II Anzac Corps was an Australian and New Zealand First World War army corps formed in Egypt in February 1916 as part of the reorganization of the Australian Imperial Force following the evacuation of Gallipoli in November 1915. ... The Desert Mounted Corps was a World War I Allied army corps that operated in the Middle East (Sinai and Palestine) during 1917 and 1918. ...

Divisions

Aus 1st | 2nd | 3rd | 4th | 5th
NZ & Aus | New Zealand
Anzac Mounted | Aus Mounted 11th Battalion posing on the Great Pyramid of Giza, 1915. ... // The Australian 2nd Division was formed from reinforcements training in Egypt on July 10, 1915 as part of the Australian Imperial Force to fight in World War I. It fought at Gallipoli during the latter stages of the campaign and then moved to the Western Front in France where it... The Australian 3rd Division was a first formed in World War I, as part of the Australian Imperial Force. ... The 5th Division was a Militia unit of the Australian Army. ... The New Zealand and Australian Division was formed at the start of the Battle of Gallipoli as a composite division under the command of New Zealand general Alexander Godley. ... The New Zealand Division was a World War I division formed in Egypt in January 1916 following the evacuation of Gallipoli. ... The Anzac Mounted Division was a mounted infantry (light horse) division formed in March Egypt during World War I following the Battle of Gallipoli when the Australian and New Zealand mounted regiments returned from fighting as infantry. ... The Australian Mounted Division was a mounted infantry (light horse) division formed in Egypt during World War I. When the British forces in the Middle East expanded in late 1916, a second mounted division was created called the Imperial Mounted Division. ...

Australian Army

Components
Australian Army
Army Reserve
List of current regiments
List of Australian Army Corps
Current structure
Equipment
Weaponry and equipment
History
History of the Australian Army
Australian Imperial Force
Australian and New Zealand Army Corps
Personnel
List of senior officers
Officer rank insignia
Enlisted rank insignia
New Zealand Army
Ngāti Tumatauenga

Components
Regular Force
Territorial Force
Structure of the New Zealand Army
History
History of the New Zealand Army
Australian and New Zealand Army Corps
Battle of Gallipoli
Personnel
List of senior officers
Officer rank insignia
Enlisted rank insignia
Notable Units
SAS
Infantry Regiment
Intelligence

The Australian and New Zealand Army Corps was a First World War army corps of the Mediterranean Expeditionary Force that was formed in Egypt in 1915 and operated during the Battle of Gallipoli. The corps was disbanded in 1916 following the evacuation of Gallipoli. The corps is best remembered today as the source of the acronym ANZAC which has since become a term, "Anzac", for a person from Australia or New Zealand. ALANAH IS COOOLLLLL, JUST LIKE YOUUUUUUUU The Australian Army is Australias military land force. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... The Australian Army is Australias military land force. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... The following is a list of regiments and corps of the Australian Army, as of 2005. ... The following is a list of Corps of the Australian Army, ordered according to the traditional seniority of all the Corps. ... The Australian Army, as with many other armies of nations that were formerly part of the British Empire, is structured in a similar way to the British Army, with divisions and brigades as the main formations, subdivided into regiments and battalions. ... A soldier armed with a F88 AuSteyr fitted with a grenade launcher A Bushmaster (left) and ASLAV (right) in Iraq Soldiers and a M113 M198 Howitzers firing during an exercise From left to right, a Chinook, Blackhawk and Tiger helicopter Australian soldiers and an ASLAV in Iraq A MH-90... // The Two Armies: Militia and Permanent forces 1870–1947 For more than 80 years after the first British settlement, the only professional soldiers in Australia were members of British Army garrisons. ... The Australian Imperial Force (AIF) was the name given to two all-volunteer Australian Army forces dispatched to fight overseas during World War I and World War II. First Australian Imperial Force (1914-18) Second Australian Imperial Force (1939-45) Following the Federation of Australia in 1901, Australia had a... Chief of the Army in reverse chronological order Lieutenant General Peter Leahy, 28 June 2002 to present Lieutenant General Peter Cosgrove, July 2000 to 28 June 2002 Lieutenant General Frank Hickling, June 1998 to July 2000 Lieutenant General John Sanderson, June 1995 to June 1998 Chief of the General Staff... Australian Army Officers receive a commission that is personally signed by the Governor-General of Australia, acting for the Queen. ... Like the British Army, the Australian Army does not use the term enlisted to describe its non-commissioned ranks. ... Ngāti Tumatauenga or New Zealand Army is the land armed force of the New Zealand military and comprises around 4,500 regular personnel and 2,500 non-regulars and civilians. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_New_Zealand. ... Ngāti Tumatauenga or New Zealand Army is the land armed force of the New Zealand military and comprises around 4,500 regular personnel and 2,500 non-regulars and civilians. ... Ngāti Tumatauenga or New Zealand Army is the land armed force of the New Zealand military and comprises around 4,500 regular personnel and 2,500 non-regulars and civilians. ... Ngāti Tumatauenga or New Zealand Army is the land armed force of the New Zealand military and comprises around 4,500 regular personnel and 2,500 non-regulars and civilians. ... Belligerents British Empire Australia British India Newfoundland New Zealand United Kingdom Egyptian labourers[1] France Senegal Ottoman Empire German Empire[2] Austria-Hungary[3] Commanders Sir Ian Hamilton Lord Kitchener John de Robeck Otto Liman von Sanders Mustafa Kemal Strength 5 divisions (initial) 16 divisions (final) 6 divisions (initial) 15... The Special Air Service of New Zealand (NZ SAS) was formed in June 1955 as an elite New Zealand Army unit capable of undertaking special missions. ... The Royal New Zealand Infantry Regiment (1 NZIR) is the main unit in the regular army of New Zealand. ... The New Zealand Intelligence Corp is one of the smallest corps in the New Zealand Army. ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ... This article is about a military unit. ... The Mediterranean Expeditionary Force (MEF) was a World War I British Army headquarters formed in March 1915 that commanded all Allied forces at Gallipoli and Salonika. ... Year 1915 (MCMXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday[1] of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Belligerents British Empire Australia British India Newfoundland New Zealand United Kingdom Egyptian labourers[1] France Senegal Ottoman Empire German Empire[2] Austria-Hungary[3] Commanders Sir Ian Hamilton Lord Kitchener John de Robeck Otto Liman von Sanders Mustafa Kemal Strength 5 divisions (initial) 16 divisions (final) 6 divisions (initial) 15... Year 1916 (MCMXVI) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Friday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Backronym and Apronym (Discuss) Acronyms and initialisms are abbreviations, such as NATO, laser, and ABC, written as the initial letter or letters of words, and pronounced on the basis of this abbreviated written form. ... ANZAC stands for Australian and New Zealand Army Corps — t[[Image: ]]he name used to describe the combination of the Australian Army and New Zealand Army Corps during wartime. ...


Headline text

Plans for the formation of the corps began in November 1914 while the first contingent of Australian and New Zealand troops were still in convoy bound for, as they thought, Europe. However, following the experiences of the Canadian Expeditionary Force encamped on Salisbury Plain, it was decided not to subject the Australians and New Zealanders to the English winter and so they were diverted to Egypt for training before moving on to the Western Front in France. READ THE BIBLE :) The British Secretary of State for War, Horatio Kitchener, appointed General William Birdwood, an officer of the British Indian Army, to the command of the corps and he furnished most of the corps staff from the Indian Army as well. Birdwood arrived in Cairo on 21 December 1914 to assume command of the corps. Year 1914 (MCMXIV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... 26th Battalion of the Second Canadian Expeditionary Force, 1915 The Canadian Expeditionary Force was the group of Canadian military units formed for service overseas in the First World War. ... This article is about the plateau in southern England; Salisbury Plain is also an area on South Georgia Island. ... Western Front was a term used during the First and Second World Wars to describe the contested armed frontier between lands controlled by Germany to the East and the Allies to the West. ... The secretary of war in cabinet position was Henry Knox. ... Horatio Herbert Kitchener, 1st Earl Kitchener of Khartoum (June 24, 1850 - June 5, 1916) was a British Field Marshal and statesman. ... William Riddell Birdwood, 1st Baron Birdwood (13 September 1865 - 17 May 1951) was a World War I general who is best known as the commander of the Australian and New Zealand Army Corps (ANZAC) during the Battle of Gallipoli in 1915. ... A group of native Indian Muslim soldiers posing for volley firing orders. ... For other uses, see Cairo (disambiguation). ... is the 355th day of the year (356th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


It was originally intended to name the corps the "Australasian Army Corps" — this title being used in the unit diary — but understandable protests from New Zealand led to the name "Australian and New Zealand Army Corps" being adopted. The administration clerks found the title too cumbersome so quickly adopted the abbreviation "A. & N.Z.A.C." or simply "ANZAC". Shortly afterwards it was officially adopted as the codename for the corps but it did not enter common usage amongst the troops until after the Gallipoli landings.


At the outset the corps comprised only one complete division, the Australian 1st Division. In addition there were the New Zealand Infantry Brigade and two mounted brigades — the Australian 1st Light Horse Brigade (1st LH) and the New Zealand Mounted Rifles Brigade (NZMR). The Australian 1st Division was formed in August 1914, at the outbreak of the First World War, as part of the Australian Imperial Force. ... In military science a brigade is a military unit that is part of a division and includes regiments (where that level exists), or (in modern armies) is composed of several battalions (typically two to four) and directly attached supporting units. ... The New Zealand Mounted Rifles Brigade consisted of over time of 4 units of mounted infantry and fought in World War One and World War Two. ...


Another convoy transporting an Australian infantry brigade (the 4th) and two light horse brigades arrived shortly afterwards. Initially the brigades were arranged by combining the two extra infantry brigades into the "New Zealand Division" and the mounted brigades into the "Mounted Division" but this was deemed unsatisfactory. Instead the New Zealand and Australian Division was formed with the two infantry brigades plus two mounted brigades (1st LH and NZMR). The remaining light horse brigades became corps troops. These two divisions would remain the core of ANZAC for the duration of its existence. The Australian Light Horse in Palestine during World War I The Australian Light Horse soldiers were mounted infantry who served during the Second Boer War and World War I. The Light Horse differed from cavalry in that they usually fought dismounted, using their horses as transport to the battlefield and... The New Zealand and Australian Division was formed at the start of the Battle of Gallipoli as a composite division under the command of New Zealand general Alexander Godley. ...


Despite being synonymous with Australia and New Zealand, ANZAC was quite a multi-national body. In addition to the many British officers in the corps and division staffs, ANZAC contained at various times:

This article is about the Jewish Legion, also known as the Zion Mule Corps of the British Army that fought in World War I against the Ottoman Empire. ... The British 63rd (Royal Naval) Division was a First World War division of the New Army. ... The 13th (Western) Division was one of the Kitcheners Army divisions raised from volunteers by Lord Kitchener. ... The 10th (Irish) Division, was a New Army division, one of Kitcheners New Army K1 Army Group divisions raised largely in Ireland from the Irish National Volunteers in 1914. ...

See also

Anzac Day is commemorated by Australia and New Zealand on 25 April every year to remember members of the Australian and New Zealand Army Corps (ANZAC) who landed at Gallipoli in Turkey during World War I. Anzac Day is also a public holiday in the Cook Islands, Niue, Samoa and... Simpson and his donkey statue by Peter Corlett outside the Australian War Memorial, Canberra. ... An Australian WWI recruiting poster, titled Would you stand by while a bushfire raged?. When WWI broke out in 1914, all of the Commonwealth nations, including Australia, were called to defend Great Britain. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
The Anzac Day Tradition [Australian War Memorial] (1132 words)
News of the landing at Gallipoli made a profound impact on Australians at home and 25 April quickly became the day on which Australians remembered the sacrifice of those who had died in war.
The date, 25 April, was officially named ANZAC Day in 1916; in that year it was marked by a wide variety of ceremonies and services in Australia, a march through London, and a sports day in the Australian camp in Egypt.
ANZAC Day was first commemorated at the Australian War Memorial in 1942, but due to government orders preventing large public gatherings in case of Japanese air attack, it was a small affair and was neither a march nor a memorial service.
Australian and New Zealand Army Corps - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (695 words)
The Australian and New Zealand Army Corps (popularly abbreviated as ANZAC) was originally an army corps of Australian and New Zealand troops who fought in World War I at Gallipoli, in the Middle East and on the Western Front.
The original formation (the Australian and New Zealand Army Corps), which served at Gallipoli, was commanded by General William Birdwood and comprised the Australian 1st Division and the New Zealand and Australian Division.
Australian and New Zealand Divisions were involved in a number of engagements during the Battle of the Somme (1916) while components of British corps but it was only during the Battle of Pozieres, 23rd July 1916, that an Anzac formation participated as a whole.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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