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Encyclopedia > Australian Rules Football
High marking is a key skill and spectacular attribute of Australian rules football
High marking is a key skill and spectacular attribute of Australian rules football
Precise field and goal kicking using the oval shaped ball is the key skill in Australian rules football

Australian rules football, also known as Australian football, Aussie rules, or simply "football" or "footy" is a code of football played with a prolate spheroid ball, on large oval shaped fields (cricket fields), with four posts at each end. No more than 18 players of each team are permitted to be on the field at any time, with four[1] interchange players on the bench, and the primary aim of the game is to score by kicking the ball between the posts. The winner is the team who has the higher total score by the end of the match. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (400x759, 299 KB)[edit] Summary Jeff White of the Melbourne Demons attempts a mark while the Sydney Swans Darren Jolly tries to spoil. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (400x759, 299 KB)[edit] Summary Jeff White of the Melbourne Demons attempts a mark while the Sydney Swans Darren Jolly tries to spoil. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Aussie_rules_kicking. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Aussie_rules_kicking. ... Look up Football in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... A spheroid is a quadric surface in three dimensions obtained by rotating an ellipse about one of its principal axes. ... A football is a ball that is round. ... In geometry, an oval or ovoid (from Latin ovum, egg) is any curve resembling an egg or an ellipse. ... Bowler Shaun Pollock bowls to batsman Michael Hussey. ... Kicking is a method used by many types of football, including: football (soccer) Australian rules football International rules football American football Canadian football Gaelic football Rugby League Rugby Union List of common kicking styles Grubber kick - rugby league, rugby union, Australian rules football Bomb kick - rugby league, Australian Rules football...


There are several different ways to advance the ball, including kicking and hand passing. When hand passing one hand must be used to hold the ball and the other fist to hit it — throwing the ball is not allowed. Players running with the ball must bounce or touch it on the ground every 15 metres. There is no offside rule and players can roam the field freely. Australian rules is a contact sport. Possession of the ball is in dispute at all times except when a free kick is paid. Players who hold on to the ball too long are penalised if they are tackled by an opposition player who is then rewarded, whilst players who catch a ball from a kick exceeding 15 metres (known as a mark) are awarded uncontested possession. The duration of play varies, but is longer than in any other code of football. Sydney AFL league East Coast Eagles AFC player uses a handball pass to dispose of the ball before he is tackled by a Campbelltown Kangaroos AFC opponent. ... Offside, off-side or off side can mean: The offside rule that occurs in a number of field sports including most versions of football (see offside law (football)), ice hockey (see offside (hockey)) and, until recently, in field hockey. ... Tackles like this one (Womens Australian rules football) are used in contact sports including many varieties of Football. ... A free kick in Australian rules football is a penalty awarded by a field umpire to a player who has been infringed. ... Most forms of football have a move known as a tackle. ... A mark is a skill in Australian Rules Football where a player cleanly catches a kicked ball that has travelled more than 15 metres without anyone else touching it. ...


Frequent contests for possession including aerial marking or "speckies," and vigorous tackling with the hands, bumps and the fast movement of both players and the ball are the game's main attributes as a spectator sport. A specky (also called a screamer, or a hanger) is a slang term for a type of mark in Australian rules football. ... The following forms of football feature moves described a bump : Aussie Rules players applying a bump or hip and shoulder. ... A spectator sport is one that is characterized by the presence of spectators, or watchers, at its matches. ...


The code originated in Melbourne, Australia in 1858, and was devised to keep cricketers fit during the winter months. The first laws of Australian football were published in 1859 by the Melbourne Football Club. The most prestigious professional competition is the Australian Football League (AFL), which culminates in the annual AFL Grand Final, the highest attended club championship event in the world. The league has governed the sport through the AFL Commission and the AFL Rules Committee, since it disbanded the Australian National Football Council in 1993. This article is about the Australian city; the name may also refer to City of Melbourne or Melbourne city centre. ... Year 1858 (MDCCCLVIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Bowler Shaun Pollock bowls to batsman Michael Hussey. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Winter is one of the four seasons of temperate zones. ... A ruck contest in Australian rules. ... Year 1859 (MDCCCLIX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Melbourne Football Club, nicknamed The Demons, is an Australian rules football club playing in the Australian Football League, based in Melbourne, Victoria. ... Professional sports are sports in which the participants receive payment for playing, as opposed to amateur sports where they are not. ... This article is about the national league in Australian rules football. ... Part of the pre-match entertainment at the 2006 AFL Grand Final at the Melbourne Cricket Ground. ... The AFL Commission is the official governing body of the Australian Football League, the elite national Australian rules football competition in Australia. ...

Contents

Structure and competitions

See also: Australian rules football around the world
An Australian Football League Premiership season match at Carrara Stadium on the Gold Coast between Adelaide and Melbourne. The AFL is the most most attended national competition in Australia and the only fully professional league for Australian Rules in the world.
An Australian Football League Premiership season match at Carrara Stadium on the Gold Coast between Adelaide and Melbourne. The AFL is the most most attended national competition in Australia and the only fully professional league for Australian Rules in the world.

The football season, proper, is from March to August (early autumn to late winter in Australia) with finals being held in September. In the tropics, the game is played in the wet season (October to March). Pre-season competitions in southern Australia usually begin in late February. Australian rules football in Australia is a popular spectator and team sport which originated in Melbourne and has become an important part of Australian culture. ... Map of the world indicating the nations where Australian rules football was most played in 2005. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Aussie_rules_game. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Aussie_rules_game. ... Carrara Stadium or Carrara Sports Complex is a sporting venue on the Gold Coast in Queensland, Australia, located in the suburb of Carrara. ... “Gold Coast” redirects here. ... The Adelaide Football Club, nicknamed the Crows, is an Australian rules football club playing in the Australian Football League, based in Adelaide, South Australia. ... Melbourne Football Club, nicknamed The Demons, is an Australian rules football club playing in the Australian Football League, based in Melbourne, Victoria. ... A aerial view of the Melbourne Cricket Ground during the 1992 Cricket World Cup final packed with 90,000 people. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... A noontime scene from the Philippines on a day when the Sun is almost directly overhead. ... A wet season or rainy season is a season in which the average rainfall in a region is significantly increased. ... The term southern Australia is generally considered to include the Australian states and territories of New South Wales, Victoria, South Australia, Tasmania and the Australian Capital Territory. ...


The AFL is recognized by the Australian Sports Commission as being the National Sporting Organisation for Australian rules football. There are also seven state/territory-based organisations in Australia, most of which are now either owned by or affiliated to the AFL. Most of these hold annual semi-professional club competitions while the others oversee more than one league. Local semi-professional or amateur organizations and competitions are often affiliated to their state organisations. Front of the AIS, Sports Visitor Centre on the left, AIS arena at the back right The Australian Sports Commission (ASC) is the Australian Government body that coordinates the Australian Government’s commitment and contribution to sport. ...


The AFL is also the de facto world governing body for Australian rules football. There are also a number of organisations governing amateur clubs and competitions around the world. De facto is a Latin expression that means in fact or in practice. It is commonly used as opposed to de jure (meaning by law) when referring to matters of law or governance or technique (such as standards), that are found in the common experience as created or developed without... This is a list of Australian rules football leagues outside of Australia. ...


Unlike most soccer competitions there are usually no separate "league" and "cup" trophies. The team finishing first on the ladder is often referred to as a 'minor premier', although this bears little or no significance. This is called the McClelland Trophy in the AFL and is considered a consolation prize. For almost all Australian rules competitions the focus is almost always on winning the premiership. The team which finishes at the bottom of the ladder at the end of the season is said to get 'the wooden spoon'. A player (wearing the red kit) has penetrated the defence (in the white kit) and is taking a shot at goal. ... The McClelland Trophy is an Australian rules football Trophy. ... A wooden spoon is a mock or real award, usually given to an individual or team which has come last in a competition, but sometimes also to runners-up. ...


The premiership is always decided by a finals series. The teams that occupy the highest positions play off in a "semi-knockout" finals series (The AFL finals system differs from many amateur competitions in that it gives some teams a double chance). The two successful teams meet in the Grand Final to contest the Premiership. The current AFL finals system was devised by the Australian Football League in 2000 as its end-of-season championship play-off tournament. ... A Grand Final is the culmination of a series of final matches played between a number of sporting teams to decide the premier team. ...


Rules of the game

The playing field, which may be 135-185m long and 110-155m wide. The centre square is 40x40. The curved fifty metre line is 50m away from the goal line. Adjacent goal posts are 6.4 metres apart.
The playing field, which may be 135-185m long and 110-155m wide. The centre square is 40x40. The curved fifty metre line is 50m away from the goal line. Adjacent goal posts are 6.4 metres apart.

Both the ball and the field of play are oval in shape. No more than 18 players of each team are permitted to be on the field at any time. Up to four interchange (reserve) players may be swapped for those on the field at any time during the game. There is no offside rule nor are there set positions in the rules; unlike many other forms of football, players from both teams disperse across the whole field before the start of play. However, only four players from each team are allowed within the 50m centre square before every centre bounce, which occurs at the commencement of each quarter, and to restart the game after a goal is scored. There are also other rules pertaining to allowed player positions during set plays (i.e., after a mark or free kick) and during kick-ins following the scoring of a behind. A ruck contest in Australian rules. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (675x719, 441 KB) An Australian rules football playing field. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (675x719, 441 KB) An Australian rules football playing field. ... 3D rendering of an ellipsoid In mathematics, an ellipsoid is a type of quadric that is a higher dimensional analogue of an ellipse. ... An offside (formerly off-side) rule is a part of many field sports, including most versions of football and ice hockey. ...


A game consists of four quarters. The length of the quarters can vary from 15 to 25 minutes in different leagues. In the AFL, quarters are 20 minutes, but the clock is stopped when the ball is out of play, meaning that an average quarter could last for 27 to 31 minutes. At the end of each quarter, teams change their scoring end.


Games are officiated by umpires. Unlike other forms of football, Australian football begins similarly to basketball. After the first siren, the umpire bounces the ball on the ground (or throws it into the air if the condition of the ground is poor), and the two ruckmen (typically the tallest man from each team), battle for the ball in the air on its way back down. A goal umpire signalling a goal with two white flags, and a field umpire. ... This article is about the sport. ... It has been suggested that Fire siren be merged into this article or section. ... A goal umpire signalling a goal with two white flags, and a field umpire. ... A ball-up in Australian rules football describes a method of restarting play after a stoppage within the field of play. ... General ruck play in Australian an Australian Football League game. ...


The ball can be propelled in any direction by way of a foot, clenched fist (called a handball or handpass) or open-hand tap (unlike rugby football there is no knock-on rule) but it cannot be thrown under any circumstances. Throwing is defined in the rules quite broadly but is essentially any open hand disposal that causes the ball to move upward in the air. A handball is a method of disposal in the sport of Australian rules football. ...

An Australian football. The Sherrin brand is used for all official AFL matches. A red ball like this is used for day matches and a yellow ball is used for night matches.
An Australian football. The Sherrin brand is used for all official AFL matches. A red ball like this is used for day matches and a yellow ball is used for night matches.

A player may run with the ball but it must be bounced or touched on the ground at least once every 15 metres. Opposition players may bump or tackle the player to obtain the ball and, when tackled, the player must dispose of the ball cleanly or risk being penalised for holding the ball. The ball carrier may only be tackled between the shoulders and knees. If the opposition player touches a player in the back whilst performing a tackle, the opposition player will be penalised for a push in the back. If the opposition tackles the player with possession below the knees, it is ruled as a low tackle or a trip, and the team with possession of the football gets a free kick. Image File history File links Sherrin AFL football (non-transparent) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Sherrin AFL football (non-transparent) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... A football is a ball that is round. ... An Australian football. ... The following forms of football feature moves described a bump : Aussie Rules players applying a bump or hip and shoulder. ... Most forms of football have a move known as a tackle. ...


If a player takes possession of the ball that has traveled more than 15 metres from another player's kick, by way of a catch, it is claimed as a mark and that player may then have a free kick (meaning that the game stops while he prepares to kick from the point at which he marked). Alternatively, he may choose to "play on:" forfeiting the set shot in the hope of pressing an advantage for his team (rather than allowing the opposition to reposition while he prepares for the free kick). Once a player has chosen to play on, normal play resumes and the player who took the mark is again able to be tackled. A mark is a skill in Australian Rules Football where a player cleanly catches a kicked ball that has travelled more than 15 metres without anyone else touching it. ...


There are different styles of kicking depending on how the ball is held in the hand. The most common style of kicking seen in today's game, due principally to its superior accuracy, is the drop punt (the ball is dropped from the hands down, almost to the ground, to be kicked so that the ball rotates in a reverse end over end motion as it travels through the air). Other commonly used kicks are the torpedo punt (also known as the spiral or screw punt; the ball is held at an angle and kicked, which makes the ball spiral in the air, resulting in extra distance) and the checkside punt or "snap", used to curve the ball towards targets that are on an angle. Forms of kicking which have now disappeared from the game include the drop kick (similar to the drop punt except that the ball is allowed to make contact with the ground momentarily before being struck with the foot) and place kick (where the ball is first placed on the ground when shooting for goal, similar to the place kick used in rugby union). In Australian Rules Football, there are several different styles of kicking the ball. ... A drop punt is a kicking technique used in Australian Rules Football in which the ball spins end over end. ... The torpedo punt, similar to a punt in American Football, is a kicking technique implemented in Australian rules football, rugby union and rugby league to enhance the distance the ball is kicked. ... Also known as a banana kick, the checkside punt is a kicking style used in Australian Rules and rugby league football. ... A drop kick is someones dropping a ball and then kicking it when it bounces off the ground. ... A drop punt is a kicking technique used in Australian Rules Football in which the ball spins end over end. ... For other uses, see Rugby (disambiguation). ...


Apart from free kicks or when the ball is in the possession of an umpire for a ball up or throw in, the ball is always in dispute and any player from either side can take possession of the ball.


Scoring

Australian rules football goal posts - the two tall central posts are the goal posts, and the two shorter outer posts are the behind posts.
Australian rules football goal posts - the two tall central posts are the goal posts, and the two shorter outer posts are the behind posts.

At each end of the field are four vertical posts. The middle two are the goal posts and the two on either side, which are shorter, are the behind posts, or point posts. Image File history File links Scoring_in_aussie_rules. ... Image File history File links Goalposts. ... Image File history File links Goalposts. ...


A goal is scored when the football is propelled through the goal posts at any height (including above the height of the posts) by way of a kick from the attacking team. It may fly through on the full or bounce through and must not be touched, on the way, by any player from either team. A goal cannot be scored from the foot of an opposition (defending) player.


A behind is scored when the ball passes between a goal post and a behind post at any height, or if the ball hits a goal post, or if an attacking player sends the ball between the goal posts by touching it with any part of the body other than a foot. A behind is also awarded to the attacking team if the ball touches any part of an opposition player, including his foot, before passing between the goal posts. When an opposition player deliberately scores a behind for the attacking team (generally as a last resort, due to the risk of their scoring a goal) this is termed a rushed behind.


If the ball hits one of the behind posts, the ball is considered out of bounds and no score is awarded.


A goal is worth 6 points whereas a behind is worth 1 point. The Goal Umpire signals a goal with two hands raised at elbow height, a behind with one hand, and then confirms the signal with the other goal umpire by waving flags above his head. An umpire is an official in the sport of Australian rules football. ...


The team that has scored the most points at the end of play wins the game. If the scores are level on points at the end of play, then the game is a draw.


As an example of a score report, consider a match between St. Kilda and the Sydney Swans. St. Kilda's score of 15 goals and 11 behinds equates to 101 points. Sydney's score of eight goals and ten behinds equates to a 58 point tally. St. Kilda wins the match by a margin of 43 points. Such a result would be written as: The St. ... Sydney Swans is an Australian Football League (AFL) club based in Sydney, New South Wales. ...

St. Kilda 15.11 (101) defeated Sydney Swans 8.10 (58);

and said, The St. ... Sydney Swans is an Australian Football League (AFL) club based in Sydney, New South Wales. ...

"St. Kilda fifteen eleven one hundred and one defeated Sydney Swans eight ten fifty-eight."

History

Further information: History of Australian rules football

The history of Australian rules football began in Melbourne in 1858, with a call by Tom Wills to develop a local code of football and the formation of the Melbourne Football Club. ...

Origins of the Game

Tom Wills is widely credited with devising Australian rules in Melbourne in 1858. A letter by Wills was published in Bell's Life in Victoria & Sporting Chronicle on 10 July 1858, calling for a "foot-ball club" with a "code of laws" to keep cricketers fit during winter.[2] His letter attracted other football players, and an experimental match, played by Wills and others, at the Richmond Paddock (later known as Yarra Park next to the MCG) on 31 July, 1858, was probably the first game of Australian football. Unfortunately however, few details of the match have survived. Thomas Wentworth Wills was an Australian sportsman who is credited along with Henry Harrison as one of the inventors of Australian rules football. ... This article is about the Australian city; the name may also refer to City of Melbourne or Melbourne city centre. ... is the 191st day of the year (192nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1858 (MDCCCLVIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Yarra Park has become the premier sporting precinct of Melbourne, Victoria, Australia, with the iconic Melbourne Cricket Ground (MCG) and numerous sporting fields and ovals, including the associated sporting complexes of Melbourne Park and Olympic Park. ... “MCG” redirects here. ... is the 212th day of the year (213th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1858 (MDCCCLVIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ...


On 7 August 1858, two significant events in the development of the game occurred. The Melbourne Football Club, one of the world's first football clubs in any code, was informally founded, and a famous match between Melbourne Grammar School and Scotch College began, umpired by Wills. A second day of play took place on 21 August and a third, and final, day on 4 September.[3] The two schools have competed annually ever since. is the 219th day of the year (220th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1858 (MDCCCLVIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Melbourne Football Club, nicknamed The Demons, is an Australian rules football club playing in the Australian Football League, based in Melbourne, Victoria. ... The title of the worlds oldest football club, or the oldest club in a particular country, is often disputed, or is claimed by several different clubs, across several codes of football. ... Melbourne Grammar School, also known as MGS or Melbourne Boys, is an independent school in Melbourne, Victoria, Australia, founded in 1858. ... For other schools named Scotch College, see Scotch College. ...

A game at the Richmond Paddock in the 1860s. A pavilion at the MCG is on the left in the background. (A wood engraving made by Robert Bruce on July 27, 1866.)
A game at the Richmond Paddock in the 1860s. A pavilion at the MCG is on the left in the background. (A wood engraving made by Robert Bruce on July 27, 1866.)

The Melbourne Football Club rules of 1859 are the oldest surviving set of laws for Australian football. They were drawn up at the Parade Hotel, East Melbourne, on 17 May, by Wills, W. J. Hammersley, J. B. Thompson and Thomas Smith (some sources include H. C. A. Harrison).[3] The influence of English public school and university football codes, while undetermined, was clearly substantial. All members of the committee had experience of English or Irish games. Tom Wills, it is claimed, wanted to introduce Rugby School rules but the other three men felt Rugby School’s rough play and offside rules would not suit players older than schoolboys or the drier Australian conditions.[4] They did look at the Rugby School Rules but also those of Eton, Winchester and Harrow. Download high resolution version (1000x698, 198 KB)An Australian rules football match at the Richmond Paddock, Melbourne, in about 1866. ... Download high resolution version (1000x698, 198 KB)An Australian rules football match at the Richmond Paddock, Melbourne, in about 1866. ... Yarra Park has become the premier sporting precinct of Melbourne, Victoria, Australia, with the iconic Melbourne Cricket Ground (MCG) and numerous sporting fields and ovals, including the associated sporting complexes of Melbourne Park and Olympic Park. ... // The First Transcontinental Railroad in the USA was built in the six year period between 1863 and 1869. ... “MCG” redirects here. ... Thomas Bewick. ... East Melbourne is a suburb of Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. ... is the 137th day of the year (138th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Representation of a university class, 1350s. ... A view of Rugby School from The Close, the playing field where according to legend Rugby was invented Rugby School, located in the town of Rugby, Warwickshire, is one of the oldest public schools in England and is one of the major co-educational boarding schools in the country. ... The Kings College of Our Lady of Eton beside Windsor, commonly known as Eton College or just Eton, is a public school (privately funded and independent) for boys, founded in 1440 by King Henry VI. It is located in Eton, near Windsor in England, north of Windsor Castle, and... Winchester College is a public school situated in the city of Winchester in Hampshire, in the south of England. ... Harrow School, (originally: The Free Grammar School of John Lyon; generally: Harrow), is an independent school for boys (aged 13-18), and is located in Harrow on the Hill in the London Borough of Harrow. ...


Finally eleven simple Melbourne Football Club Rules were laid out, printed and, most significantly, widely publicised. As other Clubs began, including the Geelong Football Club, there were some rival rules which eventually gave way to an acceptance of the Melbourne Rules. The rules did not include the requirement to bounce the ball while running which was introduced in 1866. [5] The Geelong Football Club, nicknamed The Cats, is an Australian rules football club in the Australian Football League with a rich history. ...


It is also often said that Wills was partly inspired by the ball games of the local Aboriginal people in western Victoria. Marn Grook, a sport that used a ball made out of possum hide, featured jumping to catch the ball for the equivalent of a free kick. This appears to have resembled the high marking in Australian football. The original recorded size of the Aboriginal playing field varies with records, but most records state that the playing field was about 1.6 km (1 mile) long.[citation needed] There were no goal posts, but teams played until there was a single winner, sometimes the side with the player who had the most possessions or the side that kicked the ball the most and the furthest. Wills was raised in Victoria's western districts and is said to have played with local Aboriginal children on his father's property, Lexington, near Ararat.[6] Languages Several hundred indigenous Australian languages (many extinct or nearly so), Australian English, Australian Aboriginal English, Torres Strait Creole, Kriol Religions Primarily Christian, with minorities of other religions including various forms of Traditional belief systems based around the Dreamtime Related ethnic groups see List of Indigenous Australian group names Indigenous... Marn Grook (also spelt marngrook) is an Australian Aboriginal ball game, which is claimed to have had an influence on the modern game of Australian rules football, most notably in the spectacular jumping and high marking exhibited by the players of both games. ... For other uses, see Possum (disambiguation). ... A specky (also called a screamer, or a hanger) is a slang term for a type of mark in Australian rules football. ...


While it is clear even to casual observers that Australian rules football is similar to Gaelic football, the exact relationship is unclear, as Gaelic football was not codified by the Gaelic Athletic Association (GAA) until 1887. Long before either code existed, traditional Irish football games, known collectively as caid, were being played. Historian B. W. O'Dwyer points out that Australian football has always been differentiated from rugby football by having no limitation on ball or player movement (that is, no offside rule). The need to bounce or toe-kick the ball while running, and tapping the ball with one hand rather than throwing it, are also elements of modern Gaelic football. O'Dwyer suggests that some of these elements may be attributed to the common influence of older Irish games.[7] A Comparison of Australian rules football and Gaelic football is possible due to the games similarities and the presence of International Rules Football, a hybrid code developed to allow players from both codes to participate in tests. ... Gaelic football (Irish: Peil or Caid ), commonly referred to as football, Gaelic or GAA (gah), is a form of football played mainly in Ireland. ... For other uses, see GAA (disambiguation). ... Caid was the name used for a collection of various ancient and traditional Irish football games. ... For other uses, see Rugby (disambiguation). ...


Major clubs and competitions

In 1877, the game's first league, the Victorian Football Association (VFA) was formed. Gradually the game – known at first as "Melbourne Rules", "Victorian Rules" or sometimes as "Australasian Rules" – began to spread from Victoria into other Australian colonies in the 1860s, beginning with Tasmania (1864), Queensland (1866) and South Australia (1873). The game began to be played in New South Wales in 1877, in Western Australia in 1881 and the Australian Capital Territory in 1911. By 1916, the game was first played in the Northern Territory, establishing a permanent presence in all Australian states and mainland territories. In Newcastle, New South Wales the Black Diamond league was founded by Victorian gold miners and the Black Diamond Challenge Cup remains Australia's oldest sporting trophy.[8] Australian rules football in Australia is a popular spectator and team sport which originated in Melbourne and has become an important part of Australian culture. ... See also Australian Football League. ... Tasmanian State of Origin guernsey. ... 1864 (MDCCCLXIV) was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a leap year starting on Sunday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ... Australian rules football in Queensland has a history which dates back to the 1860s. ... 1866 (MDCCCLXVI) is a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ... South Australia State of Origin guernsey. ... 1873 (MDCCCLXXIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... Australian rules football in New South Wales has been played since the 1870s, however it has a troubled history in the state, suffering heavily from sporting politics and currently lags in popularity behind rugby league, rugby union and soccer. ... 1877 (MDCCCLXXVII) was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... West Australian State of Origin guernsey. ... Year 1881 (MDCCCLXXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar). ... Australian Rules football is a popular team and spectator sport played in the Australian state of the Australian Capital Territory, Australia. ... Year 1911 (MCMXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... 1916 (MCMXVI) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar). ... Editing Australian rules football in the Northern Territory has a history dating back to the 1910s and is the most popular sport in the state. ... The Australian States and Territories comprise the Commonwealth of Australia under a federal system of government. ... Disambiguation: This article is about the metropolitan area in Australia. ... Few realise that Australian Football was played in Newcastle way back in 1883 and owes its origins, in part, to the Duguid Brothers: Jim, John and George, former gold miners from the large mines of Ballarat in Victoria. ...


The precursors of the South Australian National Football League (SANFL) and the West Australian Football League (WAFL) were strong, separate competitions by the 1890s. However, factors such as interstate rivalries and the denial of access to grounds in Sydney caused the code to struggle in New South Wales and Queensland. A rift in the VFA led to the formation of the Victorian Football League (VFL), which commenced play in 1897 as an eight-team breakaway of the stronger clubs in the VFA competition. By 1925, the VFL consisted of 12 teams, and had become the most prominent league in the game. The South Australian National Football League (SANFL) is the premier league and governing body for the sport of Australian rules football in the state of South Australia. ... The West Australian Football League (WAFL) (pronounced waffle) is the premier state based Australian rules football league in Western Australia. ... Australian regional rivalries refers to the rivalries between Australian cities or regions, the most prominent of them being between Melbourne and Sydney. ... VFL/AFL is the term used to refer to the competition established in 1897, which was originally known as the Victorian Football League. ...

Players contest a mark at the 1933 Australian Football Carnival, at the Sydney Cricket Ground. The teams are Victoria and Tasmania. (Photographer: Sam Hood.)
Players contest a mark at the 1933 Australian Football Carnival, at the Sydney Cricket Ground. The teams are Victoria and Tasmania. (Photographer: Sam Hood.)

The first intercolonial match had been played between Victoria and South Australia in 1879. For most of the 20th century, the absence of a national club competition — and the inability of players to compete internationally — meant that matches between state representative teams were regarded with great importance. Because VFL clubs increasingly recruited the best players in other states, Victoria dominated these games. State of origin rules were introduced in 1977, and saw Western Australia and South Australia begin to win many of their games against Victoria. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Australian rules football matches between teams representing Australian colonies/states and territories have been held since 1879. ... The Sydney Cricket Ground (SCG) (, ) is a cricket stadium in Sydney. ... Australian rules football matches between teams representing Australian colonies/states and territories have been held since 1879. ... Australian rules football matches between teams representing Australian colonies/states and territories have been held since 1879. ... State of Origin is the name used in Australia for sporting events or other competitions which involve teams from different States or Territories. ...


In 1982, in a move which heralded big changes within the sport, one of the original VFL clubs, South Melbourne, relocated to the rugby league stronghold of Sydney and became known as the Sydney Swans. In the late 1980s, strong interstate interest in the VFL led to a more national competition; two more non-Victorian clubs, the West Coast Eagles and the Brisbane Bears began playing in 1987. The league changed its name to the Australian Football League (AFL) following the 1989 season. In 1991, it gained its first South Australian team, Adelaide. During the next five years, two more non-Victorian teams, Fremantle and Port Adelaide, joined the league. The AFL, currently with 16 member clubs, is the sport's elite competition and the most powerful body in the world of Australian rules football. Wally Lewis passing the ball in Rugby League State of Origin. ... This article is about the metropolitan area in Australia. ... Sydney Swans is an Australian Football League (AFL) club based in Sydney, New South Wales. ... West Coast Eagles Football Club is an Australian rules football club competing in the Australian Football League. ... The Brisbane Bears Football Club was the first Queensland-based club in the Victorian Football League. ... This article is about the national league in Australian rules football. ... The Adelaide Football Club, nicknamed the Crows, is an Australian rules football club playing in the Australian Football League, based in Adelaide, South Australia. ... Fremantle Football Club, nicknamed The Dockers and known informally as Freo, is one of 16 teams in the Australian Football League. ... This article is about the Australian Football League. ...


Following the emergence of the Australian Football League, the SANFL, WAFL and other state leagues rapidly declined to a secondary status. Apart from these there are many semi-professional and amateur leagues around Australia, where they play a very important role in the community, and particularly so in rural areas. The VFA, still in existence a century after the original schism, merged with the former VFL reserves competition in 1998. The new entity adopted the VFL name and remained a primarily state based competition. State of origin games declined in importance, especially after an increasing number of withdrawals by AFL players, and Australian football State of Origin matches ceased in 1999. The second-tier state and territorial leagues still contest interstate matches.


Australian football internationally

Action from a 1999 Aussie Rules match in Nauru at the Linkbelt Oval
Action from a 1999 Aussie Rules match in Nauru at the Linkbelt Oval
Japan's national team, the Samurai vs Melbourne Vietnam from 2006 tour of Australia.

Aussie Rules is played at amateur level in countries around the world. About 16,000 people play in structured competitions outside of Australia and at least 20 leagues that are recognised by the game's governing body, exist outside of Australia.[9] In contrast, there are over 600,000 players in Australia and overseas players make up less than 2% of the total players worldwide. Although semi-professional players have come from outside of Australia, and there have been several players in the VFL/AFL who have were born outside Australia, no player to learn the game overseas has yet played a game in the Australian Football League. Image File history File links Linkbelt1999-Finalspiel. ... Image File history File links Linkbelt1999-Finalspiel. ... Linkbelt Oval is a stadium on the island Nauru in Aiwo. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2165x965, 1715 KB) Action from Japan Samurai vs Melbourne Vietnam match at Windy Hill is there anymore pictures of the game ? wow thats sweet, are they any good? Is there footy in the Philippines? yes, but mainly expat aussies [1] I... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2165x965, 1715 KB) Action from Japan Samurai vs Melbourne Vietnam match at Windy Hill is there anymore pictures of the game ? wow thats sweet, are they any good? Is there footy in the Philippines? yes, but mainly expat aussies [1] I... Samurai guernsey from the 2005 International Cup The Japanese national Australian rules football team represent Japan in Australian rules football. ... Map of the world indicating the nations where Australian rules football was most played in 2005. ... This is a list of Australian Football League (previously known as VFL) players not born in Australia, sorted by country of birth. ...


The growth of Australian rules in the 19th Century and early 20th Century was rapid, but it went into rapid decline following World War I. After World War II, the sport experienced a small amount of growth in the Pacific region, particularly in Nauru, Papua New Guinea and New Zealand. Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ... (19th century - 20th century - 21st century - more centuries) Decades: 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s As a means of recording the passage of time, the 20th century was that century which lasted from 1901–2000 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar (1900–1999... “The Great War ” redirects here. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... For other meanings of Pacific, see Pacific (disambiguation). ...


Australian rules football is emerging as an international sport much later than other forms of football such as soccer or rugby, but has grown substantially as an amateur sport in some countries since the 1980s. Initially the sport has grown with the Australian diaspora, aided by multiculturalism and assisted by exhibition matches and players who have converted to and from other football codes. In Papua New Guinea, New Zealand, South Africa and the United States there are many thousands of players. Canada, Japan, Denmark and Sweden have also shown strong potential in the sport amongst local players in the lead up to the 2008 Australian Football International Cup. Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... This is a list of Australian Football League (previously known as VFL) players not born in Australia, sorted by country of birth. ... Australian rules football has been introduced to a wide range of places around Australia and the world since the codes inception in 1848. ... There are many players who have converted one football code to another or even changed from other sports at a professional or representational level. ... The Australian Football International Cup is an international Australian rules football competition planned for 2008 (as part of the 150th year celebrations of Australian Football), with up to 20 nations competing in Melbourne, Australia. ...


The AFL became the defacto governing body when it pushed for the closure of the International Australian Football Council in 2005. The International Australian Football Council (IAFC) was a body established in 1995 to govern the sport of Australian rules football internationally. ...


Australian rules football is played professionally only by men in Australia and is major spectator sport only in Australia and Nauru with the exception of occasional exhibition games staged in other countries and carnival type events overseas. A spectator sport is one that is characterized by the presence of spectators, or watchers, at its matches. ... Australian rules football has been introduced to a wide range of places around Australia and the world since the codes inception in 1848. ...


International Rules Football

Since 1967 there have been many matches between Australian and Irish teams, under various sets of hybrid, compromise rules known as International rules football. In 1984, the first official representative matches of International Rules were played, and these were played annually each October between the AFL and the Gaelic Athletic Association between 1998 and 2006 as part of the official International Rules Series which have attracted large crowds and media interest in both Ireland and Australia. International Rules Football match at the Telstra Dome - Australia vs Ireland. ... International Rules Football match at the Telstra Dome - Australia vs Ireland. ... For other uses, see GAA (disambiguation). ... International Rules Football match at the Telstra Dome - Australia vs Ireland. ...


Traditions of the game

Before the start of each AFL games, players run through a banner constructed by supporters.
Before the start of each AFL games, players run through a banner constructed by supporters.

Australian Rules is a sport rich in tradition and Australian cultural references, especially surrounding the rituals of gameday for players, officials and supporters. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2816x2120, 1468 KB) Léquipe des Fremantle Dockers arrivant dans le stade de subiaco (match: Fremantle/Melbourne en 2004) --Scruffy 16:54, 14 Apr 2005 (UTC) File links The following pages link to this file: Fremantle Football Club ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2816x2120, 1468 KB) Léquipe des Fremantle Dockers arrivant dans le stade de subiaco (match: Fremantle/Melbourne en 2004) --Scruffy 16:54, 14 Apr 2005 (UTC) File links The following pages link to this file: Fremantle Football Club ... The original culture of Australia can only be surmised: cultural patterns among the remote descendants of the first Australians cannot be assumed to be unchanged after 53,000 years of human habitation of the continent. ...


As part of their uniform, players wear shirts called guernseys, a word possibly derived from the Irish (Gaelic) word "geansaí" meaning "sweater". Guernseys are similar to basketball shirts, but of a more robust design, often referred to in Australia as "jumpers". In the early period of the game's development players often wore sleeveless lace-up tops which gradually disappeared between the 1960s and early 1980s. A few players choose to wear a long sleeved variation of the modern guernsey design. Players wore full length pants, before adopting shorts in the 1920s. Tight-fitting shorts were a notable fashion trend in most leagues in the 1980s and some players began to wear hamstring warmers. A brief experiment with lycra by the AFL in the State of Origin series was quickly abandoned for more traditional wear. Padding is rare, but some ruckmen wear shin pads and thigh pads and players with head injuries sometimes wear soft helmets. Long socks (football socks) are compulsory, and mouthguards are worn by most players. Boots with moulded cleats or studs for gripping the ground are worn (screw-ins have been banned from most leagues since the 1990s). This article is about the sport. ... The 1960s decade refers to the years from January 1, 1960 to December 31, 1969, inclusive. ... The 1980s refers to the years from 1980 to 1989. ... The 1920s is a decade that is sometimes referred to as the Jazz Age or the Roaring Twenties, usually applied to America. ... In human anatomy, a hamstring refers to one of the tendons that makes up the borders of the space behind the knee. ... Lycra is INVISTAs trademark for a synthetic polyurethane-based elastane textile with elastic properties of the sort known generically as spandex. As with other spandex materials, Lycra is commonly used in athletic or active clothing, such as clothes for cycling, swimwear, leotards and dancewear, as well as in underclothes. ...


Traditionally, umpires have worn white. However, in the AFL, umpires now wear bright colours chosen not to clash with the guernseys of the competing teams. AFL goal umpires now wear t-shirts and caps, rather than the traditional white coat and broad brimmed hat which was similar to what was worn by many cricket umpires. This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...


Australian rules is often referred to as the people's game due to its ability to transcend class and racial boundaries, unify supporters and attract crowds.[10]


Fans barrack for their team rather than support or root for (in Australia, 'root' is slang for sexual intercourse). The term barrack is believed to derive from early matches between soldiers stationed in army barracks near the MCG. One of the first things many Melburnians will ask when meeting someone new is which football team they 'barrack' or 'go' for. It has been suggested that Duration of sexual intercourse be merged into this article or section. ...

Cheersquads at Australian rules football matches behind the goals wave giant Pom-pons or floggers to signify a goal
Cheersquads at Australian rules football matches behind the goals wave giant Pom-pons or floggers to signify a goal

Typical supporter wear includes the team scarf and sometimes beanie (particularly in cooler climates) in the colours of the team. Team guernseys are also worn by supporters. Team flags are sometimes flown by supporters, and official club cheersquads behind the goals will sometimes wave enormous coloured pompoms known as floggers after the umpire has signalled a goal. Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 544 pixelsFull resolution (2248 × 1530 pixel, file size: 308 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Richmond Cheer Squad Rd 21 2006 beau beattie I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 544 pixelsFull resolution (2248 × 1530 pixel, file size: 308 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Richmond Cheer Squad Rd 21 2006 beau beattie I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... A scarf is a piece of fabric worn on or near the head or around the neck for warmth, cleanliness, fashion or for religious reasons. ... A beanie is the name for two distinct types of cap or hat. ... Pom-pons Pom-Pon: A prop of sorts used in the sport of Cheerleading for a variety of reasons including attracting the attention of a crowd, accentuating movements, distracting an opposing team (though in very limited fashion and never in an unsportsmanlike manner), and adding an element of sparkle to...


Meat pies and beer are popular consumables (sometimes noted as a tradition) for supporters at Australian rules matches. At AFL matches mobile vendors walk around the ground selling such pies, yelling out the well-known call of "hot pies, cold drinks!" A typical Australian Meat pie with Tomato Sauce An Australian meat pie is a hand-sized pie containing largely minced meat and gravy and often consumed as a takeaway food snack. ... For other uses, see Beer (disambiguation). ...


At the end of the match, it is traditional for a pitch invasion to occur. Supporters run onto the field to celebrate the game and play games of kick-to-kick with their families. In many suburban and country games, this also happens during quarter and half-time breaks. In the AFL in recent years, this tradition has been more strictly controlled with security guards to ensure that players and officials can safely leave the ground. At the largest AFL grounds, this tradition has been banned completely, to protect the surface, much to the discontent of fans. But smaller grounds (Skilled Stadium, for example) still allow fans onto the field after the game. Sometimes a mid-game pitch invasion is expected for various highly anticipated landmark achievements (such as a player kicking a record number of goals). A pitch invasion occurs when a crowd of people who are watching a sports game run onto the field, to celebrate or protest about an incident, for example in games of football or cricket. ... Kick-to-kick is a pastime and well-known tradition of Australian rules football fans, and a recognised Australian slang term for kick and catch type games. ... A security guard is a private person who is employed to protect property and people. ...


Popularity

See also: Australian rules football in Australia
Australian rules football is popular amongst indigenous communities.

Australian rules football has attracted more overall interest among Australians than any other football code, and is second in all sports only to cricket [11] [12]. Australian rules football in Australia is a popular spectator and team sport which originated in Melbourne and has become an important part of Australian culture. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Aboriginal_football. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Aboriginal_football. ... Bowler Shaun Pollock bowls to batsman Michael Hussey. ...


It is the most popular form of football in the Northern Territory, South Australia, Tasmania, Victoria and Western Australia. It is less popular in New South Wales and Queensland, although there has traditionally been strong support for the code in regions within those states, such as parts of southern New South Wales including the Riverina and parts of Queensland such as Cairns and the Gold Coast. The AFL teams from Brisbane and Sydney have attracted a strong increase in crowds, television audiences participation when they both recently won premierships. Demographic and migration trends have affected all football codes in recent years, but most significantly Australian football in Queensland. Slogan or Nickname: The Territory, The NT, The Top End Motto(s): none Other Australian states and territories Capital Darwin Government Constitutional monarchy Administrator Ted Egan Chief Minister Clare Martin (ALP) Federal representation  - House seats 2  - Senate seats 2 Gross Territorial Product (2004-05)  - Product ($m)  $10,418 (8th)  - Product... Capital Adelaide Government Constitutional monarchy Governor Marjorie Jackson-Nelson Premier Mike Rann (ALP) Federal representation  - House seats 11  - Senate seats 12 Gross State Product (2004-05)  - Product ($m)  $59,819 (5th)  - Product per capita  $38,838/person (7th) Population (End of September 2006)  - Population  1,558,200 (5th)  - Density  1. ... Slogan or Nickname: The Apple Isle; Holiday Isle Motto(s): Ubertas et Fidelitas (Fertility and Faithfulness) Other Australian states and territories Capital Hobart Government Constitutional monarchy Governor William Cox Premier Paul Lennon (ALP) Federal representation  - House seats 5  - Senate seats 12 Gross State Product (2004-05)  - Product ($m)  $16,114... “VIC” redirects here. ... Slogan or Nickname: Wildflower State or the Golden State Other Australian states and territories Capital Perth Government Constitutional monarchy Governor Ken Michael Premier Alan Carpenter (ALP) Federal representation  - House seats 15  - Senate seats 12 Gross State Product (2004-05)  - Product ($m)  $100,900 (4th)  - Product per capita  $50,355/person... “NSW” redirects here. ... Slogan or Nickname: Sunshine State, Smart State Motto(s): Audax at Fidelis (Bold but Faithful) Other Australian states and territories Capital Brisbane Government Constitutional monarchy Governor Quentin Bryce Premier Peter Beattie retiring as of 13. ... The Riverina is a prosperous agricultural region of south-western New South Wales (NSW), Australia. ... Cairns is a regional city located in far north Queensland, Australia. ... “Gold Coast” redirects here. ...


It is particularly popular amongst indigenous Australian communities. Indigenous Australians are well represented in professional AFL players: while only 2.4% of the population is of indigenous origin, 10% of AFL players identify themselves this way. Australian Aborigines are the indigenous peoples of Australia. ...


Australian rules is the national sport of Nauru and is popular in Papua New Guinea, which are both former Australian dependencies.


Audience

Attendance

Australian rules football is the most highly attended spectator sport in Australia: government figures show that more than 2.5 million people (16.8% of the population) attended games in 1999.[13] In 2007, a cumulative 6,475,251 people attended Australian Football League premiership matches, a record for the competition.[14] In 2005, a further 307,181 attended NAB Cup pre-season matches and 117,552 attended Regional Challenge pre-season practice matches around the country.[15] This article is about the national league in Australian rules football. ... The NAB Cup is the pre-season/night series Australian rules football competition of the Australian Football League, sponsored by National Australia Bank. ...


As of 2005 the AFL is one of only five professional sports leagues in the world with an average attendance above thirty thousand (the others are the NFL in the United States and Major League Baseball in the U.S. and Canada, and the top division soccer leagues in Germany and England). In 2007, the average of 36,791 was less than 1,000 behind the German Bundesliga and over 2,000 more per game than the average attendance of the English Premier League. // This article lists the attendances at many sports competitions around the world. ... NFL logo For other uses of the abbreviation NFL, see NFL (disambiguation). ... MLB and Major Leagues redirect here. ... For the Scottish equivalent see Scottish Premier League The FA Premier League (often referred to as the Barclays Premiership in England and the Barclays English Premier League or just simply The EPL internationally) is a league competition for football clubs located at the top of the English football league system...


As well as attendances for the national AFL competition, some semi-professional local competitions also draw crowds. Although crowds for state leagues have suffered in recent years, they continue to draw support, particularly for finals matches. The South Australian SANFL drew an attendance of 309,874 in 2006 and the Western Australian WAFL drew an official attendance of 207,154. Other leagues, such as the Victorian VFL (including a Tasmanian side, the Devils), Northern Territory Football League and the popular country league Ovens & Murray also charge admission and draw notable crowds (but with no available attendance figures). The South Australian National Football League (SANFL) is the premier league and governing body for the sport of Australian rules football in the state of South Australia. ... The West Australian Football League (WAFL) (pronounced waffle) is the premier state based Australian rules football league in Western Australia. ... For other uses, see VFL (disambiguation). ... The Tasmanian Devils Football Club is an Australian rules football team, in the Victorian Football League in Australia. ... The NTFL is a 7 team Australian rules football semi-professional league operating in Darwin in the Northern Territory. ... The Ovens and Murray Football League, often locally referred to as simply the O&M, is an Australian Rules Football league based around ten clubs in the north-eastern Victoria, Australia and southern New South Wales, Australia, and is affiliated with the Victorian Country Football League. ...


Outside of Australia, the game has drawn notable attendances only for occasional carnival type events, such as International tests and exhibition matches. Australian rules football has been introduced to a wide range of places around Australia and the world since the codes inception in 1848. ...


Television

See also: Australian Football League on Television
See also: Australian rules football on Television in Australia

The national AFL is the main league which is shown on television in Australia and around the world. The Australian Football League (AFL), formerly known as the Victorian Football League, and sometimes known as the VFL/AFL, is the elite Australian national competition in the sport of Australian rules football. ... Australian rules football in Australia is a popular spectator and team sport which originated in Melbourne and has become an important part of Australian culture. ...


The 2005 AFL Grand Final was watched by a record television audience of more than 3.3 million people across Australia's five most populous cities — the five mainland state capitals — including 1.2 million in Melbourne and 991,000 in Sydney.[16] In 2006, the national audience was 3.145 million, including 1.182 million in Melbourne and 759,000 in Sydney.[17] Part of the pre-match entertainment at the 2006 AFL Grand Final at the Melbourne Cricket Ground. ... Australia, having a federal system of government, is divided into states and territories. ... This article is about the Australian city; the name may also refer to City of Melbourne or Melbourne city centre. ... This article is about the metropolitan area in Australia. ...


According to OzTAM, in recent years, the AFL Grand Final has reached the top five programs across the five biggest cities in 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005 and 2006. Australian rules football has achieved a #1 rating in the sports category in both 2004 and 2005. OzTAM is an Australian television ratings research firm that collects and markets television viewership data. ... The following is a list of Australian television ratings for the year 2002. ... The following is a list of Australian television ratings for the year 2003. ... The following is a list of Australian television ratings for the year 2004. ... The following is a list of Australian television ratings for the year 2005. ... The following is a list of Australian television ratings for the year 2006 (Metro Areas). ... The following is a list of Australian television ratings for the year 2004. ... The following is a list of Australian television ratings for the year 2005. ...


Some of the more popular regional leagues in Australia have the "match of the week" televised locally and free-to-air on ABC Television's respective state networks. Some of these leagues also attract a national audience through free-to-air broadcasting on television networks such as ABC2. OzTAM began measuring these audiences in 2006. ABC Television is a service of the Australian Broadcasting Corporation which began in 1956. ... This article is about the Australian television channel. ...


Australian rules also has a nominal but growing international audience. According to polls conducted in 2005 by Roy Morgan Polls, 7,496,000 North Americans watch Australian Rules Football at least occasionally on television.[18] This number is twice as many as watch the sport on television in Australia. Since 2005, some AFL matches have been shown in the pacific rim region for the first time through the Australia Network. The AFL Grand Final is broadcast to many countries and attracts many million viewers worldwide. This audience has grown to around 30 million in recent years. North America North America is a continent[1] in the Earths northern hemisphere and (chiefly) western hemisphere. ... Australia Network (formerly ABC Asia Pacific TV, and Australia Television) is an Australian free-to-air international satellite television service operated by the Australian Broadcasting Corporation. ...


New Media

The AFL website was the #1 most popular Hitwise Australian sports website in 2004, increasing in market share by 9.86% over that year.[19] In 2006, other consistently high traffic websites in the Australian Top 20 included AFL Dream Team, (Trading Post) AFL Footy Tipping, BigFooty.com and Bomberland.[20] In 2006, the search term 'afl' represented the highest number of search terms (2.48%) that delivered users to Hitwise sports category listed websites.[21] Statistics show that Victorians consist of 43% of all visits to the AFL football category.[22] Hitwise provides insights into the performance of websites within the selected industry. ...


Participation

See also: Australian rules football around the world

With more than 450,000 participants aged 15 years and over, football is the 4th most-played team sport in Australia, behind netball, soccer and cricket.[23] Image File history File linksMetadata Women's_marking_contest_mark. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Women's_marking_contest_mark. ... Melbourne University Mugars player jostles for best position in a overhead Marking contest while tackled Darebin Falcons player lies down. ... Melbourne University Mugars player jostles for best position in a marking contest. ... Please wikify (format) this article or section as suggested in the Guide to layout and the Manual of Style. ... Australian rules football in Australia is a popular spectator and team sport which originated in Melbourne and has become an important part of Australian culture. ... Map of the world indicating the nations where Australian rules football was most played in 2005. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... A player (wearing the red kit) has penetrated the defence (in the white kit) and is taking a shot at goal. ... Bowler Shaun Pollock bowls to batsman Michael Hussey. ...


A total of 615,549 registered participants played football in 2006. Participation rose 5.97% between 2006-07 and 7.84% between 2005-06. 6.7 per cent of all participants are from non-English speaking origin. The Australian Sports Commission statistics show a 42% increase in the total number of participants over the 4 year period between 2001-2005.[24] Front of the AIS, Sports Visitor Centre on the left, AIS arena at the back right The Australian Sports Commission (ASC) is the Australian Government body that coordinates the Australian Government’s commitment and contribution to sport. ...


Australian rules football is fast growing as an amateur sport in more than 20 countries around the world. In 2004, there were a total of over 25,000 participants outside of Australia.[25]


Many related games have emerged from football, mainly with variations of contact to encourage greater participation. These include Kick-to-kick (and its variants such as 'Marks Up'), Auskick, Rec Footy, Women's Australian rules football, 9-a-side Footy, Masters Australian Football, handball and longest-kick competitions. Players outside of Australia sometimes engage in related games on the fields available, like Metro Footy (played on gridiron fields) and Samoa Rules (played on rugby fields). Kick-to-kick is a pastime and well-known tradition of Australian rules football fans, and a recognised Australian slang term for kick and catch type games. ... NAB AFL Auskick logo. ... Recreational Football. ... Melbourne University Mugars player jostles for best position in a overhead Marking contest while tackled Darebin Falcons player lies down. ... 9-a-side Footy is a sport based on Australian rules football played informally by Aussie Rules clubs but not yet an official sport in its own right. ... Masters Australian Football (also known as Superules) is a sport based on the game of Australian rules football for players 30 years and over. ... Metro Footy (or Metro Rules Footy) - a modified version of Australian rules football rules played on gridiron football fields in North American cities (such as Los Angeles, Detroit, Chicago and New York) where there arent grounds large enough to hold true Australian Rules matches. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Australian rules football in Samoa. ...


Australian rules in popular culture

For many years, the game of Australian rules football captured the imagination of Australian film, music, television and literature. Australian rules football in popular Australian culture has captured the imagination of Australian film, music, television and literature. ...


Many songs inspired by the game have become anthems of the game, none more so than the 1979 hit Up There Cazaly, by Mike Brady. Brady followed the hit up with One Day in September in 1987. Both are frequently used in Grand Final celebrations. Up There Cazaly is a song recorded and composed by Mike Brady. ... Mike Brady (born 28 February 1947 -) is an Australian musician most commonly associated with the Australian rules football anthems Up There Cazaly, referring to 1920s and 30s St Kilda player Roy Cazaly and One Day in September. Up There Cazaly topped the Australian singles charts in September 1979 and was... One Day in September is a song written and performed by Australian musician Mike Brady. ... Year 1987 (MCMLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link displays 1987 Gregorian calendar). ...


In a 1988 episode of the Canadian teenage soap opera Degrassi Junior High, a character Derek Wheeler can be seen wearing a Footscray Bulldogs (VFL) Aussie Rules supporter jumper. The sport also makes a cameo appearance on the American sci-fi series 'Dark Angel' titled 'Flushed' (Season One, Episode Four) first screened in 2000. Set in the year 2019 in a United States when the country is barely more than a Third World nation, the episode shows characters watching Australian rules on a television set (a suggestion by the program's creators that imported sports would eventually increase in popularity and American sports would have declined). For Philippine soap opera, see Teleserye. ... Degrassi Junior High is a Canadian television teen drama series that was produced from 1987-1989 as part of the Degrassi series. ... Derek Wheeler, aka Wheels, is a fictional character on the Degrassi series played by Neil Hope. ... The Western Bulldogs, formerly known as the Footscray Football Club or The Bulldogs is an Australian Football League (AFL) club based at the Whitten Oval in western suburban Melbourne, Australia, drawing its supporter base from this traditionally poor, industrial, and less leafy part of Melbourne. ... Dark Angel is an American cyberpunk science fiction television program, created by James Cameron and Charles H. Eglee, which ran from 2000 to 2002 on the FOX network. ... For the Jamaican reggae band, see Third World (band). ...


Australian Football Hall of Fame

Main article: Australian Football Hall of Fame.

For the centenary of the VFL/AFL in 1996, the Australian Football Hall of Fame was established. That year 136 identities were inducted, including 100 players, 10 coaches, 10 umpires, 10 administrators and 6 media representatives. The Australian Football Hall of Fame was established in 1996, the Centenary year of the Australian Football League, to help recognise the contributions made to the sport of Australian rules football by players, umpires, media personalities, coaches and administrators. ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ...


The selections have caused some controversy, partly because of the predominance of VFL players at the expense of those who played in other leagues, in the years before there was a national competition.


The elite Legend status was bestowed on 12 members of the Hall of Fame in 1996: Ron Barassi, Haydn Bunton Senior, Roy Cazaly, John Coleman, Jack Dyer, Polly Farmer, Leigh Matthews, John Nicholls, Bob Pratt, Dick Reynolds, Bob Skilton and Ted Whitten (see above list for further details). Ronald Dale Barassi, Jr (born 27 February 1936) was an Australian rules football player and coach. ... Haydn Bunton Senior (1911-1955) was an Australian rules football player regarded by some observers as the games greatest ever player. ... Roy Cazaly was an Australian rules football player famous his high marks, and for giving rise to the phrase Up there Cazaly. Cazaly was born in Albert Park, a suburb of Melbourne on January 13, 1893. ... John Coleman David John Coleman (November 28, 1928 - April 5, 1973) was a player (1949 to 1954) and coach (1961 to 1967) for Essendon in the Victorian Football League (now the AFL). ... John Raymond Dyer senior (November 15, 1913 - August 23, 2003), always known as Jack Dyer, was one of the colossal figures of Australian rules football during two distinct careers, firstly as an outstanding player and coach of the Richmond Football Club in the VFL between 1931 and 1952, and later... Graham Polly Farmer (born March 10, 1935) is a retired Australian rules football player and coach. ... Leigh R. Matthews (born March 1, 1952) is widely regarded as one of the greatest Australian Rules footballers of all time, playing for Hawthorn in the VFL from 1969 to 1985. ... John Nicholls (born August 13, 1939) is a former champion Australian rules footballer who played for Carlton Football Club in the 1960s and 1970s. ... Bob Pratt (August 31, 1912–January 6, 2001) is a former Australian rules footballer. ... Big Dick Reynolds (born June 20, 1915, died September 2, 2002) was an Australian Rules player and coach. ... Bob Skilton (born 1938) was an Australian Rules football player who played as a rover for South Melbourne and Victoria between 1956 and 1971. ... Edward James Ted Whitten (born July 27, 1933, died August 17, 1995) was an Australian rules football player, considered by many as being one of the greatest players of all time: in 1966, he was the first inductee to the Australian Football Hall of Fame and given Legend status. ...


The following nine members have been promoted to the status of "Legend" since 1996: Ian Stewart (1997), Gordon Coventry (1998), Peter Hudson (1999), Kevin Bartlett (2000), Barrie Robran (2001), Bill Hutchison (2003), Jock McHale (2005), Darrel Baldock (2006) and Norm Smith (2007). Ian H. Stewart (born July 30, 1943) is a former Australian rules footballer. ... Gordon Coventry was an Australian Rules Football player who played the full-forward position for the Collingwood Football Club in the great Collingwood teams of the 1920s and 1930s. ... Peter Hudson (born February 19, 1946) is arguably the greatest Australian rules full-forward in the games history. ... For the Australian touring car racing driver, see Kevin Bartlett (race driver). ... Barrie Charles Robran MBE is a former Australian rules footballer in the SANFL, widely acknowledged as a champion in his sport. ... Bill Hutchison (April 28, 1923–June 18, 1982) was a Australian rules footballer. ... James Jock McHale, (December 12, 1882 - 4 October 1953) was an Australian rules player and coach for the Collingwood Football Club in the Victorian Football League. ... Darrel John Baldock (born September 29, 1938 in Devonport, Tasmania). ... Norman Norm Smith (born November 21, 1915, died July 29, 1973) was a legendary Australian rules footballer and coach. ...


References

  1. ^ Rule 5.1 Official AFL PLayers Association Laws of the Game. Under Rule 5.2 "a Controlling Body may reduce below 14 or increase above 22 the number of Players (including Interchange Players) who may participate in a Match."
  2. ^ Letter from Tom Wills. MCG website. Retrieved on 2006-07-14.
  3. ^ a b Ken Piesse (1995). The Complete Guide to Australian Football. Pan Macmillan Australia. ISBN 0-330-35712-3.  p303.
  4. ^ Sydney Mail 25 August 1883 p. 363 W.J. Hammersley, Reminiscences of Cricket and Other Sports
  5. ^ G.M. Hibbins Sport and Racing in Colonial Melbourne: The Cousisn and Me - Colden Harrison, Tom Wills and William Hammersley Lynedoch 2007 chs 8,9
  6. ^ Minister opens show exhibition celebrating Aussie Rules' Koorie Heritage, Government Media Release accessed 4 June 2007
  7. ^ B. W. O'Dwyer, March 1989, "The Shaping of Victorian Rules Football", Victorian Historical Journal, v.60, no.1.
  8. ^ http://www.bdafl.com.au/about.php
  9. ^ AFL International Development
  10. ^ "A grand day for the people's game", The Age, September 27, 2003. 
  11. ^ Media Release, Sweeney Sport report for 2006-07
  12. ^ "If you can kick it, Australia will watch it", The Sydney Morning Herald, 22 May, 2003. 
  13. ^ Sports Attendance, Australian Bureau of Statistics, April 1999.
  14. ^ "AFL sets all-time crowd record", News Limited, 2 September, 2007. 
  15. ^ http://www.google.com/search?q=cache:QSxF-7E66dcJ:afl.com.au/default.asp%3Fpg%3Dwizardcup%26spg%3Ddisplay%26articleid%3D190187
  16. ^ Top 20 Programs - Ranking Report (E) 18-24 September, OzTam.
  17. ^ Top 20 Programs - Ranking Report (E) 24th September - 30th September 2006
  18. ^ Globalisation of Sport Report 2005
  19. ^ Most Popular Australian websites for 2004 revealed from Hitwise
  20. ^ Fast Mover - Kellogg's Nutri-Grain Dream Team
  21. ^ Search Terms - Industry Search Term Report for Sports
  22. ^ Victorians Still AFL's Biggest Fans Online
  23. ^ Participation in exercise, recreation and sport, Australian Sports Commission Annual Report 2004.
  24. ^ http://www.ausport.gov.au/scorsresearch/ERASS2005/ERASS2005_findings.pdf Participation in Exercise, Recreation and Sport Survey 2005 Annual Report
  25. ^ http://www.worldfootynews.com/article.php?story=20050301074107992 World Footy Census

Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 195th day of the year (196th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Ken Piesse is a Melbourne-based Australian sports journalist. ... June 4 is the 155th day of the year (156th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ...

See also

Australian rules football Portal

Image File history File links Portal. ... This article is about the national league in Australian rules football. ... A ruck contest in Australian rules. ... Australian rules football in Australia is a popular spectator and team sport which originated in Melbourne and has become an important part of Australian culture. ... While Australian rules football is a major spectator sport only in Australia (except for occasional exhibition games staged in other countries), in the late 1980s small amateur competitions were attempted in countries such as New Zealand, Ireland, United Kingdom, Denmark, Sweden, France, the USA, Canada, Germany, Japan, Papua New Guinea... Australian Rules Football attendance records See Also Sports attendances // Single Matches Australia state by state Victoria - 121,696 (1970). ... In the sport of Australian rules football, each of the eighteen players in a team are assigned to a particular named position on the field of play. ... Map of the world indicating the nations where Australian rules football was most played in 2005. ... Front of the AIS, Sports Visitor Centre on the left, AIS arena at the back right The Australian Sports Commission (ASC) is the Australian Government body that coordinates the Australian Government’s commitment and contribution to sport. ... The Anti-Football League logo // The AFL[1] was created in response to a remark made by journalist, Douglas Wilkie in the offices of The Sun News-Pictorial, on Sunday 16th April 1967. ... 2005 International Cup logo The Australian Football International Cup is an international Australian rules football competition hosted by the Australian Football League. ... Aussie Rules International Logo // Mission The role of Aussie Rules International is to promote and develop the sport of Australian Rules Football internationally. ... Best and Fairest is the phrase given to players in the Australian Football League (formerly the VFL) that are adjudged to have played the best during the season without being suspended. ... The following is a list of all official computer games released in the sport of Australian rules football: (name, publisher, date of release, platforms, original format) Australian Rules Football (Alternative Software, 1989) ZX Spectrum/Amiga/Atari ST/Amstrad/Commodore 64, Cassette & Disk Aussie Rules Footy (Mattel, 1991) NES, cartridge AFL... Kick-to-kick is a pastime and well-known tradition of Australian rules football fans, and a recognised Australian slang term for kick and catch type games. ... Marn Grook (also spelt marngrook) is an Australian Aboriginal ball game, which is claimed to have had an influence on the modern game of Australian rules football, most notably in the spectacular jumping and high marking exhibited by the players of both games. ... Womens Aussie Rules is a fast growing sport played in Australia, United States, Papua New Guinea and Japan. ... Melbourne University Mugars player jostles for best position in a overhead Marking contest while tackled Darebin Falcons player lies down. ... Recreational Football. ... Metro Footy (or Metro Rules Footy) - a modified version of Australian rules football rules played on gridiron football fields in North American cities (such as Los Angeles, Detroit, Chicago and New York) where there arent grounds large enough to hold true Australian Rules matches. ... Masters Australian Football (also known as Superules) is a sport based on the game of Australian rules football for players 30 years and over. ... This is a list of clubs that play Australian Rules Football at the senior level. ...

External links

  • Laws of Australian Football 2007
  • Australian Football explained in 17 languages - a publication from AFL.com.au
Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Australian rules football

Image File history File links Commons-logo. ...

Official sites

Video

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  • Footy explained

History-related sites

  • Footypedia - Covers local footy history
  • Full Points Footy - comprehensive history site

  Results from FactBites:
 
AFL Football Australia - Australian Rules Footy Site - Aussie Rules - Talking Football (1101 words)
Talking Football has been designed to offer a friendly forum for all footy followers to have their say.
Every week during the Aussie Rules season, millions of dollars are wagered on the outcome of eight games of AFL footy.
Talking Football is not responsible for the availability or content of these external sites, nor do we endorse or guarantee the products, apparel, services or information described by these sites unless specified by us.
Article about "Australian Rules Football" in the English Wikipedia on 24-Apr-2004 (2066 words)
Australian rules football (also known as Aussie Rules) is a game played between two teams of 18 players, generally played on cricket ovals during the winter months.
The Melbourne Football Club rules of 1859 are the oldest surviving set of laws for Australian Rules.
Meanwhile, a rift in the Victorian Football Association (VFA) led to the formation of the Victorian Football League (VFL), which commenced play in 1897 as an eight-team breakaway of the stronger clubs in the VFA competition: Carlton, Collingwood, Essendon, Fitzroy, Geelong, Melbourne, St Kilda and South Melbourne.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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