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Encyclopedia > Australian Labor Party
Australian Labor Party
Leader Kevin Rudd
Deputy Leader Julia Gillard
Party President John Faulkner
Founded 1891
Office Centenary House
19 National Circuit
Barton ACT 2600
Political Ideology Democratic socialism,
Social democracy,
Third Way
Political Position Centre-Left
Website www.alp.org.au

The Australian Labor Party (ALP) (see Etymology) is an Australian political party. ALP may mean: a popular Turkish boy name (Alp) ALP (automobile) The Australian Labor Party, a political party Average Labor Productivity (see Exogenous growth model) Alien Loves Predator (aLp), a web comic written by Bernie Hou Alkaline phosphatase, an enzyme responsible for removing phosphate groups from molecules, often measured in... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Kevin Michael Rudd (born 21 September 1957), is the leader of the federal Australian Labor Party and Leader of the Opposition in the Australian Parliament. ... Julia Eileen Gillard (born 29 September 1961) is the Australian Deputy Prime Minister-elect and deputy leader of the federal Australian Labor Party (ALP). ... John Philip Faulkner (born 12 April 1954), has been an Australian Labor Party member of the Australian Senate since April 1989, representing the state of New South Wales. ... Year 1891 (MDCCCXCI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Centenary House, Canberra Centenary House is a building in Canberra, Australia. ... For other uses, see Canberra (disambiguation). ... Capital Canberra Government Constitutional monarchy Administrator none Chief Minister Jon Stanhope (ALP) Federal representation  - House seats 2  - Senate seats 2 Gross Territorial Product (2006)  - Product ($m)  $19,167 (6th)  - Product per capita  $57,303/person (1st) Population (End of November 2006)  - Population  333,667 (7th)  - Density  137. ... Democratic socialism advocates socialism as a basis for the economy and democracy as a governing principle. ... Social democracy is a political ideology emerging in the late 19th and early 20th centuries from supporters of Marxism who believed that the transition to a socialist society could be achieved through democratic evolutionary rather than revolutionary means. ... Bill Clinton and Tony Blair, adherents of the Third Way The Third Way, or Radical center, is a centrist political philosophy of governance that embraces a mix of market and interventionist philosophies. ... In politics, the term centre-left is commonly used to describe and denote political parties or organisations that stretch from the centre to the left or are moderately left-wing, as opposed to extreme left wing beliefs such as communism. ... ALP redirects here. ... Political parties in Australia lists political parties in Australia. ...


Founded in 1891 by the emerging labour movement in Australia, it is the country's oldest federally active political party, having contested seats at the 1901 federal election following the federation of Australia. The party currently competes with the Liberal/National coalition for political office, particularly at the federal and state level. Labor has formed the federal opposition since 1996 after holding government since 1983. Labor has held government in all six states and both mainland territories since 6 March 2002, one month after the 2002 South Australian election. Eight-hour day banner, Melbourne, 1856 University of Melbourne site where Stonemasons won the 8 hour day in 1856 The history of the Australian labour movement reaches back to the 19th century and the movement has a long tradition of organised unions of workers and links to political activity. ... Federal elections for the inaugural Parliament of Australia were held in Australia on March 29 and March 30, 1901 following Federation and the establishment of the Commonwealth of Australia. ... The federation of Australia was the process by which the six separate British colonies of New South Wales, Queensland, South Australia, Tasmania, Victoria and Western Australia formed a federation. ... The Liberal Party of Australia is an Australian political party. ... The National Party of Australia is an Australian political party. ... The Coalition in Australian politics refers to the grouping of two political parties that has existed in the form of a coalition agreement since 1922, with only brief breaks (e. ... The Opposition in Australia fulfils the same function as the official opposition in other Commonwealth of Nations monarchies. ... Federal elections were held in Australia on 2 March 1996. ... Federal elections were held in Australia on 5 March 1983. ... Legislative elections for State Parliament were held in South Australia on 9 February 2002. ...


Labor won the 2007 federal election on Saturday 24 November; Kevin Rudd will become the new Prime Minister of Australia. For the first time in its history, Labor will govern at all levels of parliamentary government in Australia simultaneously. This will be the first time in Australian history that a single party has done this. The only other time a comparable feat was achieved was between 26 May 1969 and 2 June 1970, by the Liberal and National coalition parties. The 2007 election for the federal Parliament of Australia is currently taking place on Saturday 24 November. ... is the 328th day of the year (329th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Kevin Michael Rudd (born 21 September 1957), is the leader of the federal Australian Labor Party and Leader of the Opposition in the Australian Parliament. ... Judicial High Court Lower Courts Constitution State and territory governments Executive Governors and Administrators Premiers and Chief Ministers Legislative Parliaments and Assemblies State electoral systems ACT - NSW - NT - Qld. ... The Liberal Party of Australia is an Australian political party. ... The National Party of Australia is an Australian political party. ...

Contents

Policy

Kevin Rudd (right) and Julia Gillard (left) at their first press conference as Leader and Deputy Leader of the Australian Labor Party, 4 December 2006
Chris Watson, first Federal Labour Party leader 1901–07 (held the balance of power) and Prime Minister of Australia in 1904
Chris Watson, first Federal Labour Party leader 1901–07 (held the balance of power) and Prime Minister of Australia in 1904
Andrew Fisher, Labor Prime Minister of Australia 1908–09, 1910–13, 1914–15
Andrew Fisher, Labor Prime Minister of Australia 1908–09, 1910–13, 1914–15
Billy Hughes, Labor Prime Minister of Australia 1915-16
Billy Hughes, Labor Prime Minister of Australia 1915-16
James Scullin, Labor Prime Minister of Australia 1929–32
James Scullin, Labor Prime Minister of Australia 1929–32
John Curtin, Labor Prime Minister of Australia 1941–45
Ben Chifley, Labor Prime Minister of Australia 1945–49
Gough Whitlam, Labor Prime Minister of Australia 1972–75
Bob Hawke, Labor Prime Minister of Australia 1983–91
Paul Keating, Labor Prime Minister of Australia 1991–96

The policy of the Australian Labor Party is contained in its National Platform, which is approved by delegates to Labor's National Conference, held every three years. According to the Labor Party's website, "The Platform is the result of a rigorous and constructive process of consultation, spanning the nation and including the cooperation and input of state and territory policy committees, local branches, unions, state and territory governments, and individual Party members. The Platform provides the policy foundation from which we can continue to work towards the election of a federal Labor Government."[1] The platform gives a general indication of the policy direction which a future Labor government would follow, but does not commit the party to specific policies. It maintains that "Labor's traditional values will remain a constant on which all Australians can rely." While making it clear that Labor is fully committed to a market economy, it says that: "Labor believes in a strong role for national government — the one institution all Australians truly own and control through our right to vote." Labor "will not allow the benefits of change to be concentrated in fewer and fewer hands, or located only in privileged communities. The benefits must be shared by all Australians and all our regions." The Platform and Labor "believe that all people are created equal in their entitlement to dignity and respect, and should have an equal chance to achieve their potential." For Labor, "government has a critical role in ensuring fairness by: ensuring equal opportunity; removing unjustifiable discrimination; and achieving a more equitable distribution of wealth, income and status." Further sections of the Platform stress Labor's support for Equality, Human Rights, Labour Rights and Democracy. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (861x558, 107 KB) Photo by User:Adam Carr, 4 December 2006 I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (861x558, 107 KB) Photo by User:Adam Carr, 4 December 2006 I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Kevin Michael Rudd (born 21 September 1957), is the leader of the federal Australian Labor Party and Leader of the Opposition in the Australian Parliament. ... Julia Eileen Gillard (born 29 September 1961) is the Australian Deputy Prime Minister-elect and deputy leader of the federal Australian Labor Party (ALP). ... Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ... For other uses, see Chris Watson (musician). ... Balance of power refers to the division, distribution, or separation of powers within a national political system. ... Andrew Fisher This image is in the public domain in the United States and possibly other jurisdictions. ... Andrew Fisher This image is in the public domain in the United States and possibly other jurisdictions. ... Andrew Fisher at the naming of Canberra ceremony, 1913 Andrew Fisher (29 August 1862 - 22 October 1928), Australianpolitician and fifth Prime Minister of Australia, was born in Crosshouse, a mining village near Kilmarnock, East Ayrshire, Scotland. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... For other persons named Billy Hughes, see Billy Hughes (disambiguation). ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... James Henry Scullin (September 18, 1876 – January 28, 1953), Australian Labor politician and ninth Prime Minister of Australia. ... John Curtin This work is copyrighted. ... John Curtin This work is copyrighted. ... This article is about the Australian Prime Minister. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Joseph Benedict Chifley (22 September 1885 – 13 June 1951), Australian politician and 16th Prime Minister of Australia, was one of Australias most influential Prime Ministers. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Edward Gough Whitlam, AC, QC (born 11 July 1916), known as Gough Whitlam (, pronounced Goff), is an Australian former politician and 21st Prime Minister of Australia. ... Image File history File links Bob. ... Image File history File links Bob. ... Robert James Lee (Bob) Hawke, AC (born 9 December 1929) was the 23rd Prime Minister of Australia after previously being an Australian trade union leader. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... For other persons named Paul Keating, see Paul Keating (disambiguation). ...


In practice, the Platform provides only general policy guidelines to Labor's federal, state and territory parliamentary leaderships. The policy Labor takes into an election campaign is determined by the Cabinet (if the party is in office) or the Shadow Cabinet (if it is in opposition), in consultation with key interest groups within the party, and is contained in the parliamentary Leader's policy speech delivered during the election campaign. When Labor is in office, the policies it implements are determined by the Cabinet, subject to the Platform. Generally, it is accepted that while the Platform binds Labor governments, how and when it is implemented remains the prerogative of the parliamentary caucus. It is now rare for the Platform to conflict with government policy, as the content of the Platform is usually developed in close collaboration with the party's parliamentary leadership as well as the factions. However, where there is a direct contradiction with the Platform, Labor governments have sought to change the Platform as a prerequisite for a change in policy. For example, privatisation legislation under the Hawke government occurred only after holding a special national conference to debate changing the Platform.


Early ideology

The Labor Party is commonly described as a social democratic party, but its constitution stipulates that it is a democratic socialist party. The light on the hill is a phrase used to describe the objective of the Australian Labor Party. The phrase was coined in a 1949 conference speech by then Prime Minister Ben Chifley. The party was created by, and has always been influenced to some extent by trade unionists, and its policy at any given time has been the policy of the broader labour movement. Thus at the first federal election 1901 Labor's platform called for a White Australia (a view held by all federal MPs at the time bar Bruce Smith, a Free Trader), a citizen army and compulsory arbitration of industrial disputes. [2] Labor has at various times supported high tariffs and low tariffs, conscription and pacifism, White Australia and multiculturalism, nationalisation and privatisation, isolationism and internationalism, as has the conservative side of Australian politics. Social democracy is a political ideology emerging in the late 19th and early 20th centuries from supporters of Marxism who believed that the transition to a socialist society could be achieved through democratic evolutionary rather than revolutionary means. ... Democratic socialism advocates socialism as a basis for the economy and democracy as a governing principle. ... The light on the hill is a phrase used to describe the objective of the Australian Labor Party. ... Joseph Benedict Chifley (22 September 1885 – 13 June 1951), Australian politician and 16th Prime Minister of Australia, was one of Australias most influential Prime Ministers. ... This badge from 1906 shows the use of the expression White Australia at that time The White Australia policy is a generic term used to describe a collection of historical legislation and policies, intended to restrict non-white immigration to Australia, and to promote European immigration, from 1901 to 1973. ... Bruce Smith Bruce Arthur Smith KC (28 June 1851 - 14 August 1937) was a long serving Australian politician and leading political opponent of the White Australia policy. ... The Free Trade Party was a political party in Australia from the 1880s until 1909. ... Tax rates around the world Tax revenue as % of GDP Economic policy Monetary policy Central bank   Money supply Fiscal policy Spending   Deficit   Debt Trade policy Tariff   Trade agreement Finance Financial market Financial market participants Corporate   Personal Public   Banking   Regulation        For other uses of this word, see tariff (disambiguation). ... Pacifism is the opposition to war or violence as a means of settling disputes or gaining advantage. ... This badge from 1906 shows the use of the expression White Australia at that time The White Australia Policy, the policy of excluding all non white people from the Australian continent, was the official policy of all governments and all mainstream political parties in Australia from the 1890s to the... The term multiculturalism generally refers to a state of both cultural and ethnic diversity within the demographics of a particular social space. ... Nationalization is the act of taking assets into state ownership. ... Privatization (sometimes privatisation, denationalization, or — especially in India — disinvestment) is the process of transferring property, from public ownership to private ownership. ... Isolationism is a foreign policy which combines a non-interventionist military policy and a political policy of economic nationalism (protectionism). ...


Although Labor has never officially been a socialist party, it has always had a section of socialists in the party. In the aftermath of World War I and the Russian Revolution, support for socialism grew in trade union ranks, and at the 1921 All-Australian Trades Union Congress a resolution was passed calling for "the socialisation of industry, production, distribution and exchange." As a result, Labor's Federal Conference in 1922 adopted a similarly worded "socialist objective," which remained official policy for many years. The resolution was immediately qualified, however, by the "Blackburn amendment," which said that "socialisation" was desirable only when was necessary to "eliminate exploitation and other anti-social features." [3] In practice the socialist objective was a dead letter. Only once has a federal Labor government attempted to nationalise any industry (Ben Chifley's bank nationalisation of 1947), and that was held by the High Court to be unconstitutional. “The Great War ” redirects here. ... The Russian Revolution of 1917 was a series of political and social upheavals in Russia, involving first the overthrow of the tsarist autocracy, and then the overthrow of the liberal and moderate-socialist Provisional Government, resulting in the establishment of Soviet power under the control of the Bolshevik party. ... Maurice McCrae Blackburn was a controversial, long serving Australian politician. ... Joseph Benedict Chifley (22 September 1885 – 13 June 1951), Australian politician and 16th Prime Minister of Australia, was one of Australias most influential Prime Ministers. ... High Court entrance The High Court of Australia is the final court of appeal in Australia, the highest court in the Australian court hierarchy. ...


Modern Labor

The Bob Hawke and Paul Keating governments from 1983 to 1996 pursued many economic policies associated with economic rationalism, such as floating the Australian Dollar in 1983, reductions in trade tariffs, taxation reforms, changing from centralised wage-fixing to enterprise bargaining, the privatisation of Qantas and Commonwealth Bank, and deregulating the banking system. Keating also proposed a GST in 1985, however due to its unpopularity amongst Labor as well as the electorate, was scrapped. The party also desisted from other reforms, such as wholesale labour market deregulation (eg WorkChoices), the eventual GST, and welfare reform including "work for the dole", which John Howard and the Liberal Party of Australia were to initiate since they won office in 1996. Robert James Lee (Bob) Hawke, AC (born 9 December 1929) was the 23rd Prime Minister of Australia after previously being an Australian trade union leader. ... For other persons named Paul Keating, see Paul Keating (disambiguation). ... Economic rationalism is an Australian term in discussion of microeconomic policy, applicable to the economic policy of many governments around the world, in particular during the 1980s and 1990s. ... A floating currency is a currency that uses a floating exchange rate as its exchange rate regime. ... ISO 4217 Code AUD User(s) Australia, Kiribati, Nauru, Tuvalu, Christmas Island, Cocos (Keeling) Islands, and Norfolk Island Inflation 1. ... Tax rates around the world Tax revenue as % of GDP Economic policy Monetary policy Central bank   Money supply Fiscal policy Spending   Deficit   Debt Trade policy Tariff   Trade agreement Finance Financial market Financial market participants Corporate   Personal Public   Banking   Regulation        For other uses of this word, see tariff (disambiguation). ... An Enterprise Bargaining Agreement (EBA) is the name for a statutory agreement made under the Workplace Relations Act, and then properly registered with the Australian Industrial Relations Commission, that is made between an employer and a group of workers who work for that employer with two additional optional parties being... Qantas Airways Limited (IPA: ) is the national airline of Australia. ... The Commonwealth Bank of Australia (ASX: CBA) is one of the largest financial institutions in Australia, founded in 1911 by the Australian Government. ... The GST (Goods and Services Tax) is a value added tax of 10% on most goods and services sold in Australia. ... WorkChoices, or the Workplace Relations Act 1996 as amended by the Workplace Relations Amendment (Workchoices) Act 2005, came into effect in March 2006. ... The GST (Goods and Services Tax) is a value added tax of 10% on most goods and services sold in Australia. ... Welfare reform is the name for a policy change in countries with a state-administered social welfare system to reduce dependence on welfare, as demanded by political conservatives. ... Work for the Dole is an Australian federal government programme that provides work experience to job seekers. ... John Winston Howard (born 26 July 1939) is an Australian politician and the 25th Prime Minister of Australia. ... The Liberal Party of Australia is an Australian political party. ...


The Whitlam government was first to use the term economic rationalism.[4] The Gough Whitlam Labor government from 1972 to 1975 changed from a democratic socialist platform to a social democratic one, a precursor to the party's current third way policies. Under the Whitlam government, tariffs across the board were cut by 25 percent after 23 years of Labor being in opposition.[5] Economic rationalism is an Australian term in discussion of microeconomic policy, applicable to the economic policy of many governments around the world, in particular during the 1980s and 1990s. ... Edward Gough Whitlam, AC, QC (born 11 July 1916), known as Gough Whitlam (, pronounced Goff), is an Australian former politician and 21st Prime Minister of Australia. ... Democratic socialism advocates socialism as a basis for the economy and democracy as a governing principle. ... Social democracy is a political ideology emerging in the late 19th and early 20th centuries from supporters of Marxism who believed that the transition to a socialist society could be achieved through democratic evolutionary rather than revolutionary means. ... Bill Clinton and Tony Blair, adherents of the Third Way The Third Way, or Radical center, is a centrist political philosophy of governance that embraces a mix of market and interventionist philosophies. ... Tax rates around the world Tax revenue as % of GDP Economic policy Monetary policy Central bank   Money supply Fiscal policy Spending   Deficit   Debt Trade policy Tariff   Trade agreement Finance Financial market Financial market participants Corporate   Personal Public   Banking   Regulation        For other uses of this word, see tariff (disambiguation). ...


Current Labor leader Kevin Rudd's first speech to parliament in 1998 stated: Kevin Michael Rudd (born 21 September 1957), is the leader of the federal Australian Labor Party and Leader of the Opposition in the Australian Parliament. ...

Competitive markets are massive and generally efficient generators of economic wealth. They must therefore have a central place in the management of the economy. But markets sometimes fail, requiring direct government intervention through instruments such as industry policy. There are also areas where the public good dictates that there should be no market at all.[6]

In the same speech, he praised Third Way/ordoliberal politics as "a new formulation of the nation's economic and social imperatives" and "a repudiation of Thatcherism and its Australian derivatives." Rudd is critical of free market economists such as Friedrich Hayek,[7] although Rudd describes himself as "basically a conservative when it comes to questions of public financial management", pointing to his slashing of public service jobs as a Queensland governmental advisor.[8] This article is about political philosophy of Ordoliberalism. ... Margaret Thatcher Thatcherism is the system of political thought attributed to the governments of Margaret Thatcher, British Prime Minister from 1979 to 1990. ... Friedrich August von Hayek, CH (May 8, 1899 in Vienna – March 23, 1992 in Freiburg) was an Austrian-born British economist and political philosopher known for his defense of liberal democracy and free-market capitalism against socialist and collectivist thought in the mid-20th century. ...


Since 2004 Labor has laid particular stress on resisting Howard's liberalisation of the labour market through industrial relations legislation known as WorkChoices after the first Senate majority since the 1977 election was gained. Labor leaders Kim Beazley and Kevin Rudd have campaigned very strongly on the issue. Rudd announced in April 2007 that a Labor government would return to collective bargaining but retain many of the restrictions on industrial activism introduced by the Howard Coalition Government such as secret ballots of workers and a ban on strikes except during collective bargaining negotiations.[9] WorkChoices, or the Workplace Relations Act 1996 as amended by the Workplace Relations Amendment (Workchoices) Act 2005, came into effect in March 2006. ... Federal elections were held in Australia on 10 December 1977. ... For Kim Beazleys father, Kim Beazley senior, see Kim Edward Beazley. ... Kevin Michael Rudd (born 21 September 1957), is the leader of the federal Australian Labor Party and Leader of the Opposition in the Australian Parliament. ... The Fourth Howard Ministry is the sixty-fourth Australian Commonwealth ministry, and began 22nd October 2004. ...


History

Party mythology says the first Labor branch was founded at a meeting of striking pastoral workers under a ghost gum tree (the "Tree of Knowledge") in Barcaldine, Queensland in 1891. The Balmain, New South Wales branch of the party also claims to be the oldest in Australia. The party as a serious electoral force dates from 1891 in New South Wales, 1893 in Queensland, and later in the other colonies. Hartley, NSW was the first parliamentary seat to be won by Labour (as Labor was spelt at the time - see Etymology) the candidate being Joseph Cook. In 1899, Anderson Dawson formed a minority Labour government in Queensland, the first in the world, which lasted one week. The Tree of Knowledge is a tree in Barcaldine, Queensland, in Australia that is regarded as the birthplace of the Australian Labor Party (ALP). ... Barcaldine is a small town located in Western Queensland, Australia, approximately 520 kilometres by road west of the city of Rockhampton. ... Balmain is a suburb in the inner-west of Sydney, in the state of New South Wales, Australia. ... Hartley was an electoral district of the Legislative Assembly in the Australian state of New South Wales, originally created in 1859 in the Lithgow area and named after Hartley. ... ALP redirects here. ... For the actor Joe Cook see Joe Cook (actor). ... Andrew Dawson (usually known as Anderson Dawson) (1863-1910), was Premier of Australia for one week in 1899, this was the first Labor Party government anywhere in the world. ... Slogan or Nickname: Sunshine State, Smart State Motto(s): Audax at Fidelis (Bold but Faithful) Other Australian states and territories Capital Brisbane Government Constitutional monarchy Governor Quentin Bryce Premier Anna Bligh (ALP) Federal representation  - House seats 28  - Senate seats 12 Gross State Product (2004-05)  - Product ($m)  $158,506 (3rd...


Sections of state Labour and the Australian labour movement were mixed in their support for the Federation of Australia. Some labour representatives argued against the proposed constitution, claiming the Senate as proposed was much too powerful, similar to the anti-reformist Colonial upper houses such as the House of Lords. They feared federation would distract attention from the need of social and industrial reform, and further entrench the power of the conservative forces. The first Labour leader and Prime Minister, Chris Watson, was a supporter of federation but not it's implementation. Eight-hour day banner, Melbourne, 1856 University of Melbourne site where Stonemasons won the 8 hour day in 1856 The history of the Australian labour movement reaches back to the 19th century and the movement has a long tradition of organised unions of workers and links to political activity. ... The federation of Australia was the process by which the six separate British colonies of New South Wales, Queensland, South Australia, Tasmania, Victoria and Western Australia formed a federation. ... This article is about the British House of Lords. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Ths article deals with conservatism as a political philosophy. ... For other uses, see Chris Watson (musician). ...


After Federation, the Federal Parliamentary Labour Party (informally known as the Caucus) first met on the 8 May 1901 at Parliament House, Melbourne, the meeting place of the first Federal Parliament.[10] This is now taken as the founding date of the federal Labor Party, but it was some years before there was any significant structure or organisation at a national level. The Federation of Australia was the process by which the six separate British colonies of New South Wales, Queensland, South Australia, Tasmania, Victoria and Western Australia federated on 1 January 1901, to form the Commonwealth of Australia, of which they became component states. ... A caucus is most generally defined as being a meeting of supporters or members of a political party or movement. ... Parliament House, Melbourne Parliament House, Melbourne, has been the seat of the Parliament of Victoria, Australia, since 1855, except for the years 1901 to 1928, when it was occupied by the Parliament of Australia. ...


The ALP during its early years was distinguished by its rapid growth and success at a national level, first forming a minority national government under Chris Watson in April 1904, and forming its first majority government under Andrew Fisher in 1910.[11] Watson was the first Labour/Labor Prime Minister in the world, while Fisher was the leader of the first Labour/Labor Party majority government in the world. The state branches were also successful, except in Victoria, where the strength of Deakinite liberalism inhibited the party's growth. The first majority Labor state governments were formed in New South Wales and South Australia in 1910, in Western Australia in 1911 and in Queensland in 1915. Such success eluded equivalent social democratic and labour parties in other countries for many years. One of the party's early innovations was the establishment of a federal arbitration system for the resolution of industrial disputes, which formed the basis of the industrial relations system for many decades. For other uses, see Chris Watson (musician). ... Andrew Fisher at the naming of Canberra ceremony, 1913 Andrew Fisher (29 August 1862 - 22 October 1928), Australianpolitician and fifth Prime Minister of Australia, was born in Crosshouse, a mining village near Kilmarnock, East Ayrshire, Scotland. ... VIC redirects here. ... Alfred William Deakin (3 August 1856 – 7 October 1919), Australian politician, was a leader of the movement for Australian federation and later second Prime Minister of Australia. ... Liberalism is an ideology, philosophical view, and political tradition which holds that liberty is the primary political value. ... NSW redirects here. ... Capital Adelaide Government Constitutional monarchy Governor Marjorie Jackson-Nelson Premier Mike Rann (ALP) Federal representation  - House seats 11  - Senate seats 12 Gross State Product (2004-05)  - Product ($m)  $59,819 (5th)  - Product per capita  $38,838/person (7th) Population (End of September 2006)  - Population  1,558,200 (5th)  - Density  1. ... Slogan or Nickname: Wildflower State or the Golden State Other Australian states and territories Capital Perth Government Constitutional monarchy Governor Ken Michael Premier Alan Carpenter (ALP) Federal representation  - House seats 15  - Senate seats 12 Gross State Product (2005-06)  - Product ($m)  $107,910 (4th)  - Product per capita  $53,134/person... Slogan or Nickname: Sunshine State, Smart State Motto(s): Audax at Fidelis (Bold but Faithful) Other Australian states and territories Capital Brisbane Government Constitutional monarchy Governor Quentin Bryce Premier Anna Bligh (ALP) Federal representation  - House seats 28  - Senate seats 12 Gross State Product (2004-05)  - Product ($m)  $158,506 (3rd... Arbitration is a legal technique for the resolution of disputes outside the courts, wherein the parties to a dispute refer it to one or more persons (the arbitrators or arbitral tribunal), by whose decision (the award) they agree to be bound. ...


Through its membership of the Socialist International, the ALP is affiliated with democratic socialist, social democratic and labour parties in many countries. The party was historically committed to socialist economic policies, but this term was never clearly defined, and no Labor government ever attempted to implement "socialism" in any serious sense. Labor supported national wage fixing and a strong welfare system, it did not nationalise private enterprise. The single exception to this was Ben Chifley's attempt to nationalise the private banks in the 1940s, but this was ruled unconstitutional by the High Court of Australia.[12] The commitment to nationalisation was dropped by Gough Whitlam. The official symbol of Socialist International. ... Socialism is a social and economic system (or the political philosophy advocating such a system) in which the economic means of production are owned and controlled collectively by the people. ... Nationalization is the act of taking assets into state ownership. ... Joseph Benedict Chifley (22 September 1885 – 13 June 1951), Australian politician and 16th Prime Minister of Australia, was one of Australias most influential Prime Ministers. ... High Court entrance The High Court of Australia is the final court of appeal in Australia, the highest court in the Australian court hierarchy. ... Edward Gough Whitlam, AC, QC (born 11 July 1916), known as Gough Whitlam (, pronounced Goff), is an Australian former politician and 21st Prime Minister of Australia. ...


From its formation until the 1950s Labor and its affiliated unions were the strongest defenders of the White Australia Policy, which banned all non-European migration to Australia. This policy was partly motivated by 19th-century theories about "racial purity" (shared by most Australians at this time), and partly by fears of economic competition from low-wage labour. In practice the party opposed all migration, on the grounds that immigrants competed with Australian workers and drove down wages, until after World War II, when the Chifley government launched a major immigration program. The party's opposition to non-European immigration did not change until after the retirement of Arthur Calwell as leader in 1967. Subsequently Labor has become an advocate of multiculturalism, although some of its trade union base and some of its members continue to oppose high immigration levels. This badge from 1906 shows the use of the expression White Australia at that time The White Australia policy is a generic term used to describe a collection of historical legislation and policies, intended to restrict non-white immigration to Australia, and to promote European immigration, from 1901 to 1973. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... Joseph Benedict Chifley (22 September 1885 – 13 June 1951), Australian politician and 16th Prime Minister of Australia, was one of Australias most influential Prime Ministers. ... Rt Hon Arthur Calwell (with young migrant, 1949) Arthur Augustus Calwell (August 28, 1896 - July 8, 1973) Australian politician, was Leader of the Australian Labor Party from 1960 to 1967. ... Year 1967 (MCMLXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the 1967 Gregorian calendar. ... The term multiculturalism generally refers to a state of both cultural and ethnic diversity within the demographics of a particular social space. ...


Etymology

The ALP adopted the formal name Australian Labour Party in 1908, but changed to the American spelling of Labor from 1912. While it is standard practice in Australian English to spell the word labour with a u, the Party has spelt it without since Labor cabinet minister King O'Malley thought he would "modernise" the name;[13] at the time, it seemed likely that Australia would move to American spellings.[citation needed] Australian English (AuE, AusE, en-AU) is the form of the English language used in Australia. ... King OMalley King OMalley (July 1858 - 20 December 1953), Australian politician, was one of the more colourful characters of the early federal period of Australian political history. ...


Leaders

See also: List of ALP federal leaders by time served

Kevin Michael Rudd (born 21 September 1957), is the leader of the federal Australian Labor Party and Leader of the Opposition in the Australian Parliament. ... For Kim Beazleys father, Kim Beazley senior, see Kim Edward Beazley. ... Mark William Latham (born 28 February 1961), a former Australian politician, was leader of the Federal Parliamentary Australian Labor Party and Leader of the Opposition from December 2003 to January 2005. ... Simon Findlay Crean (born 26 February 1949) an Australian politician, was leader of the Australian Labor Party and Leader of the Opposition at the Federal level, from November 2001 to 2 December 2003. ... For Kim Beazleys father, Kim Beazley senior, see Kim Edward Beazley. ... For other persons named Paul Keating, see Paul Keating (disambiguation). ... Robert James Lee (Bob) Hawke, AC (born 9 December 1929) was the 23rd Prime Minister of Australia after previously being an Australian trade union leader. ... William George Hayden AC (born 23 January 1933), Australian politician and 21st Governor-General of Australia, was born in Brisbane, Queensland, the son of an American-born sailor of Irish descent. ... Edward Gough Whitlam, AC, QC (born 11 July 1916), known as Gough Whitlam (, pronounced Goff), is an Australian former politician and 21st Prime Minister of Australia. ... Rt Hon Arthur Calwell (with young migrant, 1949) Arthur Augustus Calwell (August 28, 1896 - July 8, 1973) Australian politician, was Leader of the Australian Labor Party from 1960 to 1967. ... Rt Hon Dr H.V. Evatt Dr Herbert Vere Evatt (April 30, 1894 - November 2, 1965), Australian jurist, politician and writer (generally known in his lifetime as Dr H.V. Evatt and popularly known as Doc) was born in Maitland, New South Wales, to a working-class family of Anglo... Joseph Benedict Chifley (22 September 1885 – 13 June 1951), Australian politician and 16th Prime Minister of Australia, was one of Australias most influential Prime Ministers. ... Francis Michael Forde (18 July 1890 – 28 January 1983) was an Australian politician and the 15th Prime Minister of Australia. ... This article is about the Australian Prime Minister. ... James Henry Scullin (September 18, 1876 – January 28, 1953), Australian Labor politician and ninth Prime Minister of Australia. ... This article is being considered for deletion in accordance with Wikipedias deletion policy. ... Hon Frank Tudor Frank Gwynne Tudor (27 January 1866 - 10 January 1922), Australian Labor politician, was born in Melbourne, Victoria, the son of working-class immigrants from Wales. ... For other persons named Billy Hughes, see Billy Hughes (disambiguation). ... The National Labor Party was the name used by the Australian Prime Minister Billy Hughes for himself and his followers after they were expelled from the Australian Labor Party in November 1916 over the issue of conscription for World War I. In February 1917 the National Labor group merged with... Andrew Fisher at the naming of Canberra ceremony, 1913 Andrew Fisher (29 August 1862 - 22 October 1928), Australianpolitician and fifth Prime Minister of Australia, was born in Crosshouse, a mining village near Kilmarnock, East Ayrshire, Scotland. ... For other uses, see Chris Watson (musician). ... ALP, as used on this page, refers to the Australian Labor Party. ...

Labor splits

The Labor Party has suffered three major splits:

  • In 1915 over the issue of conscription during the First World War. Labor Prime Minister Billy Hughes supported the introduction of conscription, while the majority of his colleagues in the ALP and trade union movement opposed it. After failing to gain majority support for conscription in two national plebiscites which bitterly divided the country in the process, Hughes and his followers were expelled from the Labor Party. He formed the Nationalist Party of Australia in alliance with the conservatives and remained Prime Minister until 1923.
  • In 1931 over economic issues revolving around how best to handle the Great Depression. The ALP was essentially split three ways, between those who believed in radical policies such as NSW Premier Jack Lang, who wanted to repudiate Australia's debt to British bondholders; proto-Keynesians such as federal Treasurer Ted Theodore; and believers in orthodox finance such as Prime Minister James Scullin and a senior minister in his government, Joseph Lyons. In 1931 Lyons left the party and joined the conservatives, forming the United Australia Party as successors to the Nationalists and becoming Prime Minister in 1932.
  • The 1954 split on communism. During the 1950s the issue of communism and support for communist causes or governments caused great internal conflict in the Labor party and the trade union movement in general. During the 1950s, staunchly anti-Communist Roman Catholic members (Catholics being an important traditional support base) became suspicious of communist infiltration of unions and formed Industrial Groups to gain control of them, fostering intense internal conflict. After Labor's loss of the 1954 election, federal leader Dr H.V. Evatt blamed subversive activities of the "Groupers" for the defeat. After bitter public dispute many Groupers were expelled from the ALP and formed the Democratic Labor Party (DLP) whose intellectual leader was B.A. Santamaria. The DLP was heavily influenced by Catholic social teaching and had the support of the Catholic Archbishop of Melbourne, Daniel Mannix. The DLP's preferences (see Australian electoral system) helped the Liberal Party of Australia remain in power for over two decades but it was successfully undermined by the Whitlam Labor Government during the 1970s and ceased to exist as a federal parliamentary party after the 1974 election.

The Labor Party served as a development ground for several conservative leaders. Conservative Prime Ministers Joseph Cook, Billy Hughes and Joseph Lyons were all ex-members of the Labor Party, with both Hughes and Lyons holding very senior positions in the party (Prime Minister and Premier respectively). Non-Labor premiers such as William Holman also began their careers in the Labor Party. “The Great War ” redirects here. ... For other persons named Billy Hughes, see Billy Hughes (disambiguation). ... A referendum (plural: referendums or referenda) or plebiscite is a direct vote in which an entire electorate is asked to either accept or reject a particular proposal. ... The Nationalist Party of Australia was an Australian political party formed in 1917 from a merger of pro-conscription members of the Labor Party (who had been operating under the banner National Labor after their earlier split with the Labor party) with the Commonwealth Liberal Party. ... For other uses, see The Great Depression (disambiguation). ... John Thomas Lang (December 21, 1876 - September 27, 1975) was a prominent Australian politician during the early twentieth century. ... Keynesian economics (pronounced kainzian, IPA ), also called Keynesianism, or Keynesian Theory, is an economic theory based on the ideas of the 20th-century British economist John Maynard Keynes. ... Hon Ted Theodore Edward Granville Theodore (29 December 1884 - 28 February 1950), Australian politician, was born in Adelaide, South Australia, the second son of a Romanian immigrant called Basil Teodorescu. ... James Henry Scullin (September 18, 1876 – January 28, 1953), Australian Labor politician and ninth Prime Minister of Australia. ... Joseph Aloysius Lyons (15 September 1879 – 7 April 1939), Australian politician, tenth Prime Minister of Australia. ... The United Australia Party or UAP was an Australian political party that was the political successor to the Nationalist Party of Australia. ... This article is about the form of society and political movement. ... Anti-communism is opposition to communist ideology, organization, or government, on either a theoretical or practical level. ... Catholic Church redirects here. ... The Industrial Groups were groups formed by the Australian Labor Party in the late 1940s, to combat Communist Party influence in the trade unions [1]. In 1941 B.A. Santamaria founded the Catholic Social Studies Movement, generally known simply as the Movement. The Movement quickly gained a large influence in... Rt Hon Dr H.V. Evatt Dr Herbert Vere Evatt (April 30, 1894 - November 2, 1965), Australian jurist, politician and writer (generally known in his lifetime as Dr H.V. Evatt and popularly known as Doc) was born in Maitland, New South Wales, to a working-class family of Anglo... B. A. Santamaria This article is about the Democratic Labor Party of 1955-78. ... Bartholomew Augustine Santamaria (14 August 1915 - 25 February 1998), (known in public as B.A. Santamaria and in private as Bob), Australian political activist and journalist, was one of the most influential political figures in recent Australian history, but never held public office or joined a political party. ... Catholic social teaching comprises those aspects of Catholic doctrine which relate to matters dealing with the collective aspect of humanity. ... This article is about the Australian city; the name may also refer to City of Melbourne or Melbourne city centre. ... Statue of Daniel Mannix outside St Patricks Cathedral, Melbourne For other people called Daniel Mannix, see Daniel Mannix (disambiguation) Daniel Patrick Mannix (March 4, 1864 - November 2, 1963), Irish-born Australian Catholic clergyman, Archbishop of Melbourne for 46 years, was one of the most influential public figures in 20th... This article deals with elections to the Australian Parliament. ... The Liberal Party of Australia is an Australian political party. ... Edward Gough Whitlam, AC, QC (born 11 July 1916), known as Gough Whitlam (, pronounced Goff), is an Australian former politician and 21st Prime Minister of Australia. ... For the actor Joe Cook see Joe Cook (actor). ... For other persons named Billy Hughes, see Billy Hughes (disambiguation). ... Joseph Aloysius Lyons (15 September 1879 – 7 April 1939), Australian politician, tenth Prime Minister of Australia. ... William Arthur Holman (Born Clapham, London August 4, 1871; Died Gordon, June 6, 1934) was an Australian Labor Party Premier of New South Wales, Australia, who split with the party on the conscription issue in 1916 during World War 1, and immediately became Premier of a conservative Nationalist Party Government. ...


Structure

The Australian Labor Party is a democratic and federal party, which consists of both individual members and affiliated trade unions, who between them decide the party's policies, elect its governing bodies and choose its candidates for public office. The majority of trade unions in Australia are affiliated to the party, and their affiliation fees, based on the size of their memberships, makes up a large part of the party's income. The party consists of six state and two territory branches, each of which consists of local branches which any Australian resident can join, plus affiliated trade unions. Individual members pay a membership fee, which is graduated according to income. Members are generally expected to attend at least one meeting of their local branch each year, although there are differences in the rules from state to state. In practice only a dedicated minority regularly attend meetings. Many members only become active during election campaigns. The party has about 50,000 individual members, although this figure tends to fluctuate along with the party's electoral fortunes.


The members and unions elect delegates to state and territory conferences (usually held annually, although more frequent conferences are often held). These conferences decide policy, and elect state or territory executives, a state or territory president (an honorary position usually held for a one-year term), and a state or territory secretary (a full-time professional position). The larger branches also have full-time assistant secretaries and organisers. In the past the ratio of conference delegates coming from the branches and affiliated unions has varied from state to state, however under recent national reforms at least 50% of delegates at all state and territory conferences must be elected by branches.


The party holds a National Conference every three years, which consists of delegates representing the state and territory branches (many coming from affiliated trade unions, although there is no formal requirement for unions to be represented at the National Conference). The National Conference approves the party's Platform and policies, elects the National Executive, and appoints office-bearers such as the National Secretary, who also serves as national campaign director during elections. The current National Secretary is Tim Gartrell. The most recent National Conference was held in April 2007. Tim Gartrell is the current National Secretary of the Australian Labor Party. ...


The national Leader of the Labor Party is elected by the Labor members of the national Parliament (the Caucus), not by the conference. Until recently the national conference elected the party's National President, a largely honorary position, but since 2003 the position has rotated among people directly elected by the party's individual members. The current National President is Senator John Faulkner, a former Cabinet minister, who assumed the post in January 2007. The two Vice-Presidents are South Australian Premier Mike Rann and New South Wales MP Linda Burney. A caucus is most generally defined as being a meeting of supporters or members of a political party or movement. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... John Philip Faulkner (born 12 April 1954), has been an Australian Labor Party member of the Australian Senate since April 1989, representing the state of New South Wales. ... Michael David Rann (born 1953), Australian politician, is the 44th Premier of South Australia. ... Linda Burney is an Australian politician, elected as a member of the New South Wales Legislative Assembly. ...


The Labor Party contests national, state and territory elections. In some states it also contests local government elections: in others it does not, preferring to allow its members to run as non-endorsed candidates. The process of choosing candidates is called pre-selection. Candidates are pre-selected by different methods in the various states and territories. In some they are chosen by ballots of all party members, in others by panels or committees elected by the state conference, in still others by a combination of these two. Labor candidates are required to sign a pledge that if elected they will always vote in Parliament in accordance with the Platform and decisions made by a vote of the Caucus. They are also sometimes required to donate a portion of their salary to the party, although this practice has declined with the introduction of public funding for political parties.


The Labor Party has always had a left wing and a right wing, but since the 1970s it has been organised into formal factions, to which many party members belong and often pay an additional membership fee. The two largest factions are Labor Unity (on the right) and the Socialist Left. Labor Unity generally supports free-market policies and the US Alliance and tends to be conservative on some social issues. The National Left, although it seldom openly espouses socialism, favours more state intervention in the economy, is generally less enthusiastic about the U.S. Alliance and is often more libertarian on social issues. The factions are themselves divided into sub-factions, and there is a constantly changing pattern of factional and sub-factional alliances around particular policy issues or around particular pre-selection disputes. Frequently these alliances and disputes reflect power struggles between or within trade unions. The Labor Right is the organised faction of the Australian Labor Party (the Right) that makes up the more economically liberal and socially conservative members of the ALP. The Right claims to represent the social democratic (as opposed to socialist) element within the party. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Socialism is a broad array of ideologies and political movements with the goal of a socio-economic system in which property and the distribution of wealth are subject to control by the community for the purposes of increasing social and economic equality and cooperation. ...


The trade unions are also factionally aligned. The largest unions supporting the right are the Australian Workers Union (AWU), the National Union of Workers (NUW) and the Shop, Distributive and Allied Employees' Association (SDA). Important unions supporting the left include the Australian Manufacturing Workers Union (AMWU), the Liquor, Hospitality and Miscellaneous Union (LHMU), the Construction, Forestry, Mining and Energy Union (CFMEU), the Australian Services Union (ASU) and the Maritime Union of Australia (MUA). But these affiliations are seldom unconditional or permanent. The AWU and the NUW, for example, are bitter rivals and the NUW sometimes aligns itself with the left to further its conflict with the AWU. Moreover, in some cases different branches may have different factional alignment. On some issues, such as opposition to the Howard government's industrial relations policy, all the unions are in agreement and work as a bloc within the party. The Australian Workers Union (AWU) is one of Australias largest and oldest trade unions. ... The National Union of Workers is a large Australian trade union. ... The Shop Distributive and Allied Employees Association (SDA) is the largest trade union in Australia with more than 230,000 members and branches in every state and one in the Newcastle, Hunter Valley and Central Coast region. ... The Australian Manufacturing Workers Union, or more fully, the Automotive Food Metals Engineering Printing and Kindred Industries Union (AMWU) is an Australian trade union that is registered with the Australian Industrial Relations Commission and is affiliated with the Australian Council of Trade Unions. ... The Australian Liquor, Hospitality and Miscellaneous Union (LHMU) (the Missos) is one of Australias largest unions, with around 130,000 members. ... The Construction, Forestry, Mining and Energy Union (CFMEU) is Australias main trade union in construction, forestry and furnishing products, mining and energy production. ... The Australian Municipal, Administrative, Clerical and Services Union, which operates under the trading name of the Australian Services Union or ASU, is a trade union that represents members in a variety of industries. ... The Maritime Union of Australia covers waterside workers, seamen, port workers, professional divers, and office workers associated with Australian ports. ...


Pre-selections are usually conducted along factional lines, although sometimes a non-factional candidate will be given preferential treatment (this happened with Cheryl Kernot in 1998 and again with Peter Garrett in 2004). Deals between the factions to divide up the safe seats between them are also common. Pre-selections, particularly for safe Labor seats, are often bitterly contested, and have often involved practices such as branch stacking (signing up large numbers of nominal party members to vote in pre-selection ballots), personation, multiple voting and, on occasions, fraudulent electoral enrolment. Trade unions were in the past accused of giving inflated membership figures to increase their influence over pre-selections, but party rules changes have stamped out this practice. Pre-selection results are frequently challenged, and the National Executive is sometimes called on to arbitrate these disputes. Cheryl Kernot (Pronounced Ker-no) (born December 5, 1948) is a former Australian politician. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... Peter Garrett campaigning in Melbourne for the 9 October 2004 Australian election Peter Garrett AM MP (born 16 April 1953), is an Australian musician and politician. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... In Australian politics, branch stacking is the act of enrolling persons to a party by offering inducement, or enrolling persons for the principal purpose of influencing the outcome of internal pre-selections of candidates for public office. ... Look up personate in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


Current ALP State and Territory Parliamentary Leaders

Clare Majella Martin (born June 15, 1952) is an Australian politician. ... In Australia, a Chief Minister is the head of government of a self-governing territory, while the head of government of a state is a Premier. ... A general election was held in the Northern Territory, Australia, on August 18, 2001. ... For the 18th century British politician, see John Stanhope. ... The Chief Minister of the Australian Capital Territory is the head of government of the Australian Capital Territory. ... Michael David Rann (born 1953), Australian politician, is the 44th Premier of South Australia. ... This is a list of Premiers of South Australia. ... Legislative elections for Parliament of South Australia were held in South Australia on 9 February 2002. ... Paul Anthony Lennon (born 8 October 1955), Australian politician, has been Premier of Tasmania since 21 March 2004. ... Before the 1890s there was no formal party system in Tasmania. ... Morris Iemma (pronounced Yemma), born 21 July 1961, is an Australian politician and the Premier of New South Wales. ... Before the 1890s, there was no formal party system in New South Wales. ... Alan Carpenter Alan Carpenter (born January 4, 1957), Australian politician, is the 28th Premier of Western Australia. ... The Premier of Western Australia is the head of the executive government in the Australian State of Western Australia. ... John Mansfield Brumby (born 21 April 1953), Australian politician, is the 45th Premier and outgoing Treasurer of Victoria. ... List of Premiers of Victoria Before the 1890s there was no formal party system in Victoria. ... Anna Maria Bligh (born 14 July 1960) is an Australian politician and the current Premier of Queensland. ... Before the 1890s, there was no developed party system in Queensland. ...

Past ALP State Premiers and Territory Chief Ministers

Australian Capital Territory

  • Rosemary Follett (1989, 1991–95, first female head of government of an Australian state or territory)

New South Wales Rosemary Follett, Australian politician, was the first woman to become the head of government in an Australian state or territory. ...

Queensland For other persons named Bob Carr, see Bob Carr (disambiguation). ... Barrie Unsworth (born Dubbo, 16 April 1934), is an Australian politician. ... Neville Kenneth Wran AC QC (born October 11, 1926) was the Premier of New South Wales from 1976 until 1986. ... John Brophy (Jack) Renshaw was Labor Premier of New South Wales from 30 April 1964 to 13 May 1965, a period of 1 year and 14 days. ... Robert James Heffron (Born, Thames, New Zealand September 10, 1890; Died, Sydney, July 27, 1978) was the Labor Premier of New South Wales from October 28, 1959 to April 30, 1964. ... (John) Joseph Joe Cahill (21 January 1891–22 October 1959) was Premier of New South Wales from 1952 to 1959. ... цJames McGirr was born in Parkes on 6 February 1890, and was the Labor Premier of New South Wales 6 February 1947 - 3 April 1952. ... Sir William McKell William John McKell (26 September 1891 - 11 January 1985), twelfth Governor-General of Australia, was born in Pambula New South Wales, the son of a butcher. ... John Thomas Lang (December 21, 1876 - September 27, 1975) was a prominent Australian politician during the early twentieth century. ... James Thomas Dooley (26 April 1877 - 2 January 1950) served twice, briefly, as Premier of New South Wales during the early 1920s. ... John Storey (May 15, 1869–October 5, 1921) was Premier of New South Wales from April 12, 1920 until his sudden death in Sydney. ... William Arthur Holman (Born Clapham, London August 4, 1871; Died Gordon, June 6, 1934) was an Australian Labor Party Premier of New South Wales, Australia, who split with the party on the conscription issue in 1916 during World War 1, and immediately became Premier of a conservative Nationalist Party Government. ... James Sinclair Taylor McGowen (August 16, 1855 – April 7, 1922) was an Australian politician and Premier of New South Wales from October 21, 1910 to June 30, 1913. ...

South Australia Peter Douglas Beattie (born 18 November 1952), Australian politician, was the 36th Premier of the Australian state of Queensland for nine years and leader of the Australian Labor Party in that state for eleven and a half. ... Wayne Keith Goss (b. ... Vincent Clair Gair (25 February 1901 – 11 November 1980) was an Australian politician. ... Edward Michael Ned Hanlon (1887-1952), was Premier of Queensland from 1946 to 1952. ... Frank Arthur Cooper (1872-1949) was Premier of Queensland from 1942 to 1946 for the Australian Labor Party. ... William Forgan Smith (1887-1953), was Premier of Queensland from 1932 to 1942. ... William McCormack (1879-1947), was Premier of Queensland, Australia, from 1925 to 1929. ... William Neil Gillies (1868-1928 was Premier of Queensland from 26 February to 22 October 1925 for the Australian Labor Party. ... Hon Ted Theodore Edward Granville Theodore (29 December 1884 - 28 February 1950), Australian politician, was born in Adelaide, South Australia, the second son of a Romanian immigrant called Basil Teodorescu. ... T J Ryan, Labor Premier of Queensland 1915-1919 Statue of Thomas Ryan in Queens Gardens, Brisbane Thomas Joseph Ryan was Premier of Queensland, Australia from May 1915 until October 1919 when he resigned to enter Federal politics. ... Andrew Dawson (usually known as Anderson Dawson) (1863-1910), was Premier of Australia for one week in 1899, this was the first Labor Party government anywhere in the world. ...

Tasmania Dr Lynn Maurice Ferguson Arnold, former Australian politician, was the Labor Premier of South Australia between September 4, 1992 and December 14, 1993 and currently serves as the Asia Pacific Vice President of World Vision. ... Categories: Stub | 1943 births | Australian Labor Party politicians | Premiers of South Australia ... James Desmond Des Corcoran (1929 - 3 January 2004), Australian politician, was Premier of South Australia between February 15, 1979 and September 18, 1979. ... Donald Allan Dunstan AC QC (21 September 1926 – 6 February 1999) was an Australian politician. ... Hon. ... Robert Richards Hon. ... Lionel Hill Lionel Laughton Hill (14 May 1881 – 19 March 1963) was the thirtieth Premier of South Australia. ... The Gunn Ministry. ... Crawford Vaughan (1874 – 1947), was Premier of South Australia between April 3 1915 and July 14 1917. ... John Verran (July 9, 1856— died June 7, 1932) was the trade union leader for the Amalgamated Miners Association (1895 – 1913) and twenty-sixth premier of South Australia (1910 – 1912). ... Thomas Price (born January 19, 1852 in Brymbo, Denbighshire, Wales – died May 31, 1909 in Hawthorn, South Australia) was a mason and lay preacher who became the first Labour premier of South Australia. ...

Victoria James Alexander Bacon AC (May 15, 1950 - June 20, 2004) was Premier of Tasmania from 1998 to 2004. ... The Hon. ... Harold Norman Holgate (Born Maitland, December 5, 1933; Died March 16, 1997) was Premier of Tasmania December 11, 1981 to May 26, 1982. ... Douglas Ackley Lowe (Born Hobart, May 15, 1942) was Premier of Tasmania December 1, 1977 to November 11, 1981. ... William Arthur Bill Neilson (Born Hobart August 27, 1925; Died November 9, 1989) was Premier of Tasmania March 31, 1975 to December 1, 1977. ... Eric Elliott Reece (Born Mathinna, Tasmania, July 6, 1909; Died October 29, 1999) was Premier of Tasmania on two occasions from August 26, 1958 to May 26, 1969 and May 3, 1972 to March 31, 1975 Categories: Australian politician stubs | 1909 births | 1999 deaths | Australian Labor Party politicians | Premiers of... Hon Edward Brooker (Born London January 4, 1891; Died June 18, 1948) was Premier of Tasmania December 18, 1947 - February 25, 1948 Categories: | | | ... Hon Sir Robert Cosgrove (Born Tea Tree, Adelaide December 28, 1844; Died August 25, 1969). ... Hon Edmund Dwyer-Gray (Born Dublin, April 2, 1870; Died Hobart December 6, 1945). ... Hon Albert George Ogilvie (Born Hobart, March 10, 1890; Died June 10, 1939, Warburton). ... Joseph Aloysius Lyons (15 September 1879 – 7 April 1939), Australian politician, tenth Prime Minister of Australia. ... John Earle (1865 - 1932) was an Australian politician. ...

Western Australia Stephen Philip Bracks (better known as Steve Bracks) (born 15 October 1954), Australian politician, was the 44th Premier of Victoria, holding the position for eight years, from 1999 to 2007. ... Joan Kirner Joan Elizabeth Kirner (born 20 June 1938), Australian politician, was the first female Premier of Victoria. ... John Cain (born 26 April 1931), Australian politician, was Labor Premier of the state of Victoria from 1982 to 1990. ... John Cain (19 January 1882 - 4 August 1957), Australian politician, was the 33rd Premier of Victoria, and was the first Australian Labor Party Leader to win a majority in the Victorian Legislative Assembly. ... Ned Hogan Edmond John Ned Hogan (12 December 1883 - 23 August 1964), Australian politician, was the 30th Premier of Victoria. ... George Prendergast in 1894 George Michael Prendergast (6 May 1854 - 28 August 1937), Australian politician, was the 28th Premier of Victoria. ... George Elmslie George Alexander Elmslie (21 February 1861 - 11 May 1918), Australian politician, was the 25th Premier of Victoria, and the first Labor Premier. ...

Professor Geoffrey Ian Gallop (born 27 September 1951), Australian academic and former politician, was the Premier of Western Australia from 2001 to 2006. ... The Hon. ... Peter MCallum Dowding SC (born October 6, 1943 in Melbourne) was the 24th Premier of Western Australia, serving from February 25, 1988 until his resignation on February 12, 1990 after an internal party dispute. ... Brian Thomas Burke (born in Perth, February 25, 1947) was premier of Western Australia from 25 February 1983 until his resignation on 25 February 1988. ... John Trezise Tonkin (b. ... Bert Hawke Albert (Bert) Redvers George Hawke (December 3, 1900 in Kapunda, South Australia - 1989) was Premier of Western Australia from 1953 to 1959. ... Frank Wise Frank Joseph Scott Wise (?, in Queensland - ?) was a Labor Party politician and the twentieth Premier of Western Australia, taking office on 31 July 1945 in the closing stages of the Second World War following the resignation of his predecessor due to ill health. ... John Willcock John Collings Willcock (9 August 1879–7 June 1956) was Premier of Western Australia for nearly nine years. ... Philip Collier Philip Collier (21 April 1873–18 October 1948) was Premier of Western Australia for nine years, the longest ever term for an Australian Labor Party premier. ... John Scaddan, from the Western Australian Government Photographer Collection Hon. ... Henry Daglish, from the Western Australian Government Photographer Collection The Hon. ...

Other past Labor politicians

See Category:Australian Labor Party politicians


For current ALP federal politicians, see:

The 2004-2007 composition of the House. ... This is a list of members of the Australian Senate from 1 July 2002 to 30 June 2005. ...

See also

Judicial High Court Lower Courts Constitution State and territory governments Executive Governors and Administrators Premiers and Chief Ministers Legislative Parliaments and Assemblies State electoral systems ACT - NSW - NT - Qld. ... The Premiers of the Australian states are the heads of the executive governments in the six states of the Commonwealth of Australia. ... Political parties in Australia lists political parties in Australia. ... Australian Young Labor is the youth wing of the Australian Labor Party. ...

References

  1. ^ Australian Labor Party website
  2. ^ Brian McKinlay, The ALP: A Short History of the Australian Labor Party, Drummond 1981, p19
  3. ^ McKinlay, p53
  4. ^ http://www.uq.edu.au/economics/johnquiggin/JournalArticles97/Econrat97.html
  5. ^ http://www.whitlam.org/collection/1973/19730718_Tariff_Reduction/
  6. ^ Rudd, Kevin (11 November 1998). First Speech to Parliament. Parliament of Australia. Retrieved on 2006-12-09.
  7. ^ Rudd, Kevin (16 November 2006). What's Wrong with the Right. Retrieved on 2006-12-09.; Hartcher, Peter (14 October 2006). Howard's warriors sweep all before them. Sydney Morning Herald. Retrieved on 2006-12-04.
  8. ^ New Labor Leader Outlines Plan. The 7.30 Report (4 December 2006). Retrieved on 2006-12-05.; Labor elects new leader. The 7.30 Report (4 December 2006). Retrieved on 2006-12-05.
  9. ^ "Labor unveils new IR plan", The Sydney Morning Herald, April 12 2007. Retrieved on 2007-04-17. 
  10. ^ John Faulkner & Stuart Macintyre,True Believers - The story of the Federal Parliamentary Labor Party, Allen&Unwin 2001, p. 3
  11. ^ John Faulkner & Stuart Macintyre,True Believers - The story of the Federal Parliamentary Labor Party, Allen&Unwin 2001, pp. 33, 38–39
  12. ^ John Faulkner & Stuart Macintyre,True Believers – The story of the Federal Parliamentary Labor Party, Allen&Unwin 2001, p. 87
  13. ^ Australian Labor Party Website

is the 315th day of the year (316th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... Type Bicameral Houses House of Representatives Senate Speaker of the House of Representatives David Hawker, Liberal Party since 16 November 2004 President of the Senate Alan Ferguson, Liberal Party since 14 August 2007 Members 226 (150 Representatives, 76 Senators) Political groups Liberal Party ALP National Party Country Liberal Party Greens... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 343rd day of the year (344th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 320th day of the year (321st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 343rd day of the year (344th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 287th day of the year (288th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 338th day of the year (339th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The 7:30 Report is an Australian nightly television current affairs program, shown on ABC TV at 7. ... is the 338th day of the year (339th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 339th day of the year (340th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The 7:30 Report is an Australian nightly television current affairs program, shown on ABC TV at 7. ... is the 338th day of the year (339th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 339th day of the year (340th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 107th day of the year (108th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

  • Australian Labor Party website
  • Kevin07.com - Kevin Rudd's 2007 online campaign page

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