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Encyclopedia > Australian Green Tree Frog
Wikipedia:How to read a taxobox
White's tree frog

Conservation status
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Amphibia
Order: Anura
Family: Hylidae
Genus: Litoria
Species: L. caerulea
Binomial name
Litoria caerulea
(White, 1790)

The Australian Green Tree Frog, simply Green Tree Frog in Australia, White's Tree Frog, or Dumpy Tree Frog (Litoria caerulea) is a species of tree frog native to Australia and New Guinea, with introduced populations in New Zealand and the United States. The species belongs to the genus Litoria. It is physiologically similar to some species of the genus, particularly the Magnificent Tree Frog (Litoria splendida) and the Giant Tree Frog (Litoria infrafrenata). Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1812x1194, 749 KB) Licensing I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... The conservation status of a species is an indicator of the likelihood of that species continuing to survive either in the present day or the future. ... Image File history File links Status_iucn3. ... Least Concern (LC) is an IUCN category assigned to extant species or lower taxa which have been evaluated but do not qualify for any other category. ... Scientific classification or biological classification is a method by which biologists group and categorize species of organisms. ... “Animalia” redirects here. ... Typical Classes See below Chordates (phylum Chordata) are a group of animals that includes the vertebrates, together with several closely related invertebrates. ... Subclasses and Orders    Order Temnospondyli - extinct Subclass Lepospondyli - extinct Subclass Lissamphibia    Order Anura    Order Caudata    Order Gymnophiona Amphibians (class Amphibia; from Greek αμφις both and βιος life) are a taxon of animals that include all living tetrapods (four-legged vertebrates) that do not have amniotic eggs, are ectothermic (term for the animals... Suborders Archaeobatrachia Mesobatrachia Neobatrachia The Anura is the order of animals in the class Amphibia that includes frogs and toads. ... Genera see Text Tree frog, in zoology, any individual of the family Hylidae. ... Species See text Litoria is a genus of tree frog native to: Australia, Bismarck Archipelago, Lesser Sunda Islands, Moluccan Islands, New Guinea, Solomon Islands and Timor. ... In biology, binomial nomenclature is the formal method of naming species. ... John White (c1756 - 1832) was an English surgeon and botanical collector. ... In biology, a species is one of the basic units of biodiversity. ... Distribution of Hylidae and Rhacophoridae (in black) Genera See text. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into invasive species. ... For other uses of the word, please see Genus (disambiguation). ... Species See text Litoria is a genus of tree frog native to: Australia, Bismarck Archipelago, Lesser Sunda Islands, Moluccan Islands, New Guinea, Solomon Islands and Timor. ... [[{{{diversity_link}}}|Diversity]] {{{diversity}}} Binomial name Litoria splendida Tyler, Davies & Martin, 1977 Trinomial name {{{trinomial}}} Type Species {{{type_species}}} {{{subdivision_ranks}}} [[Image:{{{range_map}}}|{{{range_map_width}}}|]] Synonyms {{{synonyms}}} The magnificent tree frog (Litoria splendida) is a tree frog species that was first described in 1977. ... [[{{{diversity_link}}}|Diversity]] {{{diversity}}} Binomial name Litoria infrafrenata Günther, 1876 Trinomial name {{{trinomial}}} Type Species {{{type_species}}} {{{subdivision_ranks}}} [[Image:{{{range_map}}}|{{{range_map_width}}}|]] Synonyms {{{synonyms}}} The giant tree frog (Litoria infrafrenata), also comonly known as the white-lipped tree frog, is the largest species of tree frog on earth. ...


The Green Tree Frog is a large species compared with most Australian frogs, reaching 10 centimetres in length. The average lifespan of the frog in captivity, about sixteen years, is long in comparison with most frogs. Green Tree Frogs are docile and well suited to living near human dwellings. They are often found on windows or inside houses, eating insects drawn by the light. Distribution of frogs (in black) Suborders Archaeobatrachia Mesobatrachia Neobatrachia - List of Anuran families The frogness babe is an amphibian in the order Anura (meaning tail-less from Greek an-, without + oura, tail), formerly referred to as Salientia (Latin saltare, to jump). ...


Due to its physical and behavioural traits, the Green Tree Frog has become one of the most recognisable frogs in its region, and is a popular exotic pet throughout the world. The skin secretions of the frog have antibacterial and antiviral properties that may prove useful in pharmaceutical preparations. Capuchin monkeys are among the primates kept as exotic pets An exotic pet is a rare or unusual creature kept as a pet, or a creature kept as a pet which is not commonly thought of as a pet. ... An antiseptic solution of iodine applied to a cut Antiseptics (Greek αντί, against, and σηπτικός, putrefactive) are antimicrobial substances that are applied to living tissue/skin to reduce the possibility of infection, sepsis, or putrefaction. ... Antiviral drugs are a class of medication used specifically for treating viral infections. ... Pharmacology (in Greek: pharmakos (φάρμακον) meaning drug, and logos (λόγος) meaning science) is the study of how substances interact with living organisms to produce a change in function. ...

Contents

Anatomy and morphology

The Green Tree Frog can grow up to 10 centimetres (4 inches) in length. Its colour depends on the temperature and colour of the environment, ranging from brown to green; the ventral surface is white. The frog occasionally has small, white, irregularly shaped spots on its back, up to five millimetres in diameter, which increase in number with age. The frog has large discs at the end of its toes, of about five;millimetres in diameter at maturity. These help the frogs grip while climbing and allow them to climb vertically on glass. The eyes are golden and have horizontal irises, typical of the Litoria genus. The fingers are about one-third webbed, and the toes nearly three-quarters webbed. The tympanum (a skin membrane similar to an eardrum) is visible. Fig. ... The human iris The iris is the green/grey/brown area. ... The tympanic membrane, colloquially known as the eardrum, is a thin membrane that separates the external ear from the middle ear. ...


The tadpole's appearance changes throughout its development. The length of the species' tadpoles ranges from 8.1 millimetres (once hatched) to 44 millimetres. They are initially mottled with brown, which increases in pigmentation (to green or brown) during development. The underside begins dark and then lightens, eventually to white in adults. The eggs are brown, in a clear jelly and are 1.1–1.4 millimetres in diameter.


Although frogs have lungs, they absorb oxygen through their skin, and for this to occur efficiently, the skin must be moist. A disadvantage of moist skin is that pathogens can thrive on it, increasing the chance of infection. To counteract this, frogs secrete peptides that destroy these pathogens. The skin secretion from the Green Tree Frog contains caerins, a group of peptides with antibacterial and antiviral properties. It also contains caerulins, which have the same physiological effects as CCK-8, a digestive hormone and hunger suppressant.[2] Several peptides from the skin secretions of the Green Tree Frog have been found to destroy HIV without harming healthy T-cells.[3] Human respiratory system The lungs flank the heart and great vessels in the chest cavity. ... General Name, Symbol, Number oxygen, O, 8 Chemical series nonmetals, chalcogens Group, Period, Block 16, 2, p Appearance colorless (gas) very pale blue (liquid) Standard atomic weight 15. ... A pathogen or infectious agent is a biological agent that causes disease or illness to its host. ... Peptides (from the Greek πεπτος, digestible), are the family of short molecules formed from the linking, in a defined order, of various α-amino acids. ... Secretion is the process of segregating, elaborating, and releasing chemicals from a cell, or a secreted chemical substance or amount of substance. ... Cholecystokinin (from Greek chole, bile; cysto, sac; kinin, move; hence, move the bile-sac (gall bladder)) is a peptide hormone of the gastrointestinal system responsible for stimulating the digestion of fat and protein. ... Species Human immunodeficiency virus 1 Human immunodeficiency virus 2 Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is a retrovirus that causes acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS, a condition in humans in which the immune system begins to fail, leading to life-threatening opportunistic infections). ... T cells belong to a group of white blood cells known as lymphocytes and play a central role in cell-mediated immunity. ...

The left frog is the White-lipped Tree Frog, note the white stripe along the jaw. The center is the Green Tree Frog. The right is the Magnificent Tree Frog, note the large parotoid glands present above the tympanum.

Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 203 pixel Image in higher resolution (1400 × 355 pixel, file size: 114 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Australian Green Tree... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 203 pixel Image in higher resolution (1400 × 355 pixel, file size: 114 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Australian Green Tree... Binomial name Litoria infrafrenata Günther, 1876 The White-lipped Tree Frog (Litoria infrafrenata), also known as the Giant Tree Frog, is the worlds largest tree frog. ... [[{{{diversity_link}}}|Diversity]] {{{diversity}}} Binomial name Litoria splendida Tyler, Davies & Martin, 1977 Trinomial name {{{trinomial}}} Type Species {{{type_species}}} {{{subdivision_ranks}}} [[Image:{{{range_map}}}|{{{range_map_width}}}|]] Synonyms {{{synonyms}}} The magnificent tree frog (Litoria splendida) is a tree frog species that was first described in 1977. ...

Distribution

Distribution of Litoria caerulea (in black) on the Australian continent.

The Green Tree Frog is native to northern and eastern regions of Australia and to southern New Guinea. Distribution is limited mostly to areas with a warm, wet tropical climate. Eastern Australia, although cool in winter, species. It is found in the southern Australian state of Victoria, but the frog cannot survive southern Victoria's cold winters and is therefore restricted to the north. In New Guinea, the Green Tree Frog is restricted to the drier, southern region. Its range spans from Irian Jaya to Port Moresby, and is most abundant on Daru Island. There have been isolated records in northern New Guinea, however this is thought to have been through introduction by humans. Image File history File links Caerulea_Distribution. ... Image File history File links Caerulea_Distribution. ... A noontime scene from the Philippines on a day when the sun is almost directly overhead. ... Capital Melbourne Government Constitutional monarchy Governor David de Kretser Premier Steve Bracks (ALP) Federal representation  - House seats 37  - Senate seats 12 Gross State Product (2004-05)  - Product ($m)  $222,022 (2nd)  - Product per capita  $44,443/person (5th) Population (End of September 2006)  - Population  5,110,500 (2nd)  - Density  22. ... Map showing Papua province in Indonesia Papua is a province of Indonesia comprising part of the western half of the island of New Guinea and nearby islands. ... Port Moresby town Port Moresby, (), population 255,000 (2000), is the capital of Papua New Guinea. ... Daru Island, as seen from space. ...


The species has been introduced to both the United States and New Zealand. In the United States, it is restricted to two regions within Florida, where it was possibly introduced through the pet trade. Only small populations have been found in Florida, and it is unknown whether they have caused any ecological damage as an invasive species. In New Zealand, a population was once present; however, there have been no sightings since the 1950s.[4] Official language(s) English Capital Tallahassee Largest city Jacksonville Largest metro area Miami Area  Ranked 22nd  - Total 65,795[1] sq mi (170,304[1] km²)  - Width 361 miles (582 km)  - Length 447 miles (721 km)  - % water 17. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Lantana invasion of abandoned citrus plantation; Moshav Sdey Hemed, Israel The term invasive species refers to a subset of introduced species or non-indigenous species that are rapidly expanding outside of their native range. ...


Ecology, behaviour and life history

A Green Tree Frog caught in a spider's web after eating the spider. The frog survived.

Green Tree Frogs are very docile. They are nocturnal and come out in early evenings to call (in spring and summer) and hunt at night. During the day they find cool, dark, and moist areas to sleep. During winter, Green Tree Frogs do not call and are not usually seen. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (862x1458, 134 KB) Summary Litoria caerulea caught in a spider web, after catching a spider. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (862x1458, 134 KB) Summary Litoria caerulea caught in a spider web, after catching a spider. ... A nocturnal animal is one that sleeps during the day and is active at night - the opposite of the human (diurnal) schedule. ...


Depending on their location, Green Tree Frogs occupy various habitats. Typically, they are found in the canopy of trees near a still-water source. However, they can survive in swamps (among the reeds) or in grasslands in cooler climates. Green Tree Frogs are well known for inhabiting water sources inside houses, such as sinks or toilets. They can also be found on windows eating insects. They will occupy tanks (cisterns), downpipes (downspouts), and gutters, as these have a high humidity and are usually cooler than the external environment. The frogs are drawn to downpipes and tanks during mating season, as the fixtures amplify their call. species Pragmites australis Reed is a generic term used to describe numerous plants including: Common Reed (Phragmites australis Cav. ... // Getting water out of a cistern A cistern (Middle English cisterne, from Latin cisterna, from cista, box, from Greek kistê, basket) is a receptacle for holding liquids, usually water. ...


The species' call is a low, slow crawk-crawk-crawk, repeated many times. For most of the year, they call from high positions, such as trees and gutters. During mating season the frogs descend, although remaining slightly elevated, and call close to still-water sources, whether temporary or permanent. Like many frogs, Green Tree Frogs call not only to attract a mate. They have been observed calling to advertise their location outside the mating season, usually after rain, for reasons that are uncertain to researchers. They will emit a stress call whenever they are in danger, such as when predators are close or when a person steps on a log in which a frog resides.


The species' diet consists mainly of insects and spiders, but can include smaller frogs and even small mammals. Frog teeth are not suited to cutting up prey, so the prey must fit inside the mouth of the frog. Many frogs propel their sticky tongues at prey. The prey sticks, and is consumed. Green Tree Frog will use this technique for smaller prey; however for larger prey, it pounces, then forces the prey into its mouth with its hands. {{Taxobox | color = pink | name = Insects | fossil_range = Carboniferous - Recent | image = European honey bee extracts nectar. ... Diversity 111 families, 40,000 species Suborders Mesothelae Mygalomorphae Araneomorphae  See table of families Closeup image of a Wolf Spider Wikispecies has information related to: Spiders Spiders are predatory invertebrate animals that have two body segments, eight legs, no chewing mouth parts and no wings. ... Subclasses Subclass Allotheria* Order Docodonta (extinct) Order Multituberculata (extinct) Order Palaeoryctoides (extinct) Order Triconodonta (extinct) Order Volaticotheria (extinct) Subclass Prototheria Order Monotremata Subclass Theria Infraclass Trituberculata (extinct) Infraclass Metatheria Infraclass Eutheria Mammals are a class of vertebrate animals characterized by the production of milk in females for the nourishment of... // About 400 million years ago, some members of the sarcopterygian group of fish moved onto land. ...


The frog has few native predators, among them snakes and a few species of lizards and birds. Since the European settlement of Australia, non-native predators have been introduced, primarily dogs and cats. The species has an average life expectancy in captivity of sixteen years, but some have been known to live for over twenty years,[5] which is long for a frog. The average life expectancy in the wild is lower than in captivity, due to predation. blue: sea snakes, black: land snakes Superfamilies and Families Henophidia Aniliidae Anomochilidae Boidae Bolyeriidae Cylindrophiidae Loxocemidae Pythonidae Tropidophiidae Uropeltidae Xenopeltidae Typhlopoidea Anomalepididae Leptotyphlopidae Typhlopidae Xenophidia Acrochordidae Atractaspididae Colubridae Elapidae Hydrophiidae Viperidae A snake is a scaly, limbless, elongate reptile from the order Squamata. ... Families Many, see text. ... “Aves” redirects here. ...


Life history

A brown and green Green Tree Frog.

Prior to the mating season in late spring to summer, the male Green Tree Frog develops a black nuptial pad on the inner surface of the thumb. This aids amplexus by allowing the male to continue a grip on its mate for the duration of amplexus. The male calls (individually) to attract a female, and the two typically meet at a still-water source. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1206x1086, 167 KB) Summary A brown-green colour morph of (Litoria caerulea), the Whites Tree Frog, from western Sydney. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1206x1086, 167 KB) Summary A brown-green colour morph of (Litoria caerulea), the Whites Tree Frog, from western Sydney. ... Estrus (also spelled œstrus) or heat in female mammals is the period of greatest female sexual responsiveness usually coinciding with ovulation. ... Amplexus is the process when the male frog grasps the female while she lays her eggs. ...


During amplexus, the male mounts the female. The female then expels her eggs at such a speed that the sperm is forced into the egg. A large spawn of about 200 to 300 eggs is left in the water, approximately a half metre from the frogs. The eggs sink and attach themselves to submerged objects. The two frogs can remain in amplexus for about two days, during which the process is repeated many times, resulting in the laying of an average of 2000 to 3000 eggs. An egg hatches three days after its laying. The water must be 28–38 degrees Celsius and 5–50 centimetres deep for the eggs and tadpoles to survive. Metamorphosis takes between two and three months, and sexual maturation about two years. In most birds and reptiles, an egg (Latin ovum) is the zygote, resulting from fertilization of the ovum. ... Different types of sperm cells: A) spermatozoon (motile), B) spermatium (non-motile), C) fertilization tube with sperm nuclei For other uses, see Sperm (disambiguation). ... A Pieris rapae larva An older Pieris rapae larva A Pieris rapae pupa A Pieris rapae adult Metamorphosis is a process in biology by which an individual physically develops after birth or hatching, and involves significant change in form as well as growth and differentiation. ...


Etymology and taxonomic history

Original print of the Green Tree Frog, published in John White's "A Journal of a Voyage to New South Wales". Artist: S. Stone

The common name of the species, "White's Tree Frog", is in honour of the first person to describe the species, John White. The Green Tree Frog was the first Australian frog scientifically classified. The species was originally called the "blue frog" (Rana caerulea); although the Green Tree Frog is green, the original specimens White sent to England were damaged by the preservative and appeared blue. This is because the colour of the frog is caused by blue and green pigments covered in a yellow layer. The preservative destroyed the yellow layer and left the frog with a blue appearance. The specific epithet, caerulea, which is Latin for blue, has remained the same. The frog is also known more simply as the "Green Tree Frog." However, that name is often given to the most common large green tree frog in a region, for example, the American green tree frog (Hyla cinerea). Image File history File links Size of this preview: 769 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (790 × 616 pixel, file size: 100 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) (All user names refer to en. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 769 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (790 × 616 pixel, file size: 100 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) (All user names refer to en. ... John White (c1756 - 1832) was an English surgeon and botanical collector. ... Motto (French) God and my right Anthem God Save the King (Queen) England() – on the European continent() – in the United Kingdom() Capital (and largest city) London (de facto) Official languages English (de facto) Unified  -  by Athelstan 967 AD  Area  -  Total 130,395 km²  50,346 sq mi  Population  -  2006 estimate... Natural Ultramarine pigment in powdered form. ... It has been suggested that Pet frog be merged into this article or section. ...


The Green Tree Frog is sometimes confused with the Magnificent Tree Frog (Litoria splendida), which inhabits only north-western Australia and can be distinguished by the presence of large parotoids and rostral glands on the head. The Giant Tree Frog (Litoria infrafrenata) is also sometimes confused with the Green Tree Frog. The main difference is a distinct white stripe along the edge of the lower jaw of the Giant Tree Frog, which is not present in the Green Tree Frog. The largest parotoid gland can be seen just behind the ear of this Cane Toad, although all warts on the toad are also parotoid glands. ... Human jaw front view Human jaw left view Human jaw top view The jaw is either of the two opposable structures forming, or near the entrance to, the mouth. ...


Importance to humans

As a pet

The Green Tree Frog is one of the most popular pet frogs throughout the world. Its docile nature, often cartoon-like appearance, and long life expectancy make it an attractive choice for exotic-pet owners. It is also one of the easier frogs to care for: their diet is broad and they have a strong resistance to disease. One problem commonly associated with keeping this species as a pet is overfeeding; Green Tree Frogs tend to become obese if overfed. In the wild, exertion of energy is required for a frog to capture its prey. However, in captivity they are usually given live feed in a confined space. This lessens the activity needed for feeding, resulting in weight gain. An overweight member of the species will deposit fat layers over the top of the head and body, giving it a "dumpy" appearance. Thus the name, "Dumpy Tree Frog." Capuchin monkeys are among the primates kept as exotic pets An exotic pet is a rare or unusual creature kept as a pet, or a creature kept as a pet which is not commonly thought of as a pet. ...


Conservation

Australian law gives protected status to the Green Tree Frog—along with all Australian fauna—under the federal Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999.[6] Much of the Green Tree Frog's natural habitat has been destroyed. Also, some of the frogs have been found infected with chytrid fungus (causing chytridiomycosis). These two factors associated with the general decline in frog populations in Australia threaten to reduce the population of the Green Tree Frog. However, because of the long life expectancy of this species, any effects of a reduced reproduction rate will take longer to spot than they would in a species with a shorter life expectancy. The Red Kangaroo is the largest macropod and is one of Australias heraldic animals, appearing with the Emu on the Coat of Arms of Australia. ... Orders Chytridiales Spizellomycetales Blastocladiales Monoblepharidales Neocallimasticales Chytridiomycota is a division of the Fungi kingdom and contains only one class, Chytridiomycetes. ... Chytridiomycosis is a fatal infectious disease that affects amphibians, caused by the chytrid fungus - Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis to be more specific. ... Since about 1950, the populations of many species of amphibians (caecilians, frogs, toads, salamanders and newts) throughout the world have declined markedly; some species have become extinct. ...


Bibliography

  • Bruin, T.. ADW: Litoria caerulea: Information. Retrieved on 2005-06-12.
  • Cogger, H.G. (1979). Reptiles & Amphibians of Australia. A. H. & A.W. REED PTY LTS. ISBN 0-589-50108-9. 
  • Tyler, M. J. (1994). Australian Frogs A Natural History. Reed Books. ISBN 0-7301-0468-0. 
  • Vincent, L.. Litoria caerulea. Retrieved on 2005-06-12.
  • Tyler, M.J. & Davies, M.. Fauna of Australia, 8. Family Hylidae. Retrieved on 2005-06-12.
  • Menzies, J.I. (1976). Handbook of Common New Guinea Frogs. Wau Ecology Institute. 

2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... June 12 is the 163rd day of the year (164th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... June 12 is the 163rd day of the year (164th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... June 12 is the 163rd day of the year (164th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

References

  1. ^ Hero et al (2004). Litoria caerulea. 2006 IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. IUCN 2006. Retrieved on 11 May 2006. Database entry includes a range map and justification for why this species is of least concern
  2. ^ Salmon, A.L.; et al. (2000). "Isolation, Structural Characterization, and Bioactivity of a Novel Neuromedin U Analog from the Defensive Skin Secretion of the Australasian Tree Frog, Litoria caerulea". Journal of Biological Chemistry 275: 4549–4554. 
  3. ^ Frog secretions block HIV. Retrieved on 2005-12-12.
  4. ^ NAS - Species FactSheet. Retrieved on 2006-03-03.
  5. ^ White's Tree Frog Fact Sheet - National Zoo. Retrieved on 2005-12-12.
  6. ^ Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999. Retrieved on 2005-12-12.

The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species (also known as the IUCN Red List and Red Data List), created in 1963, is the worlds most comprehensive inventory of the global conservation status of plant and animal species and can be found here. ... The World Conservation Union or International Union for the Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources (IUCN) is an international organization dedicated to natural resource conservation. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 12 is the 346th day (347th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, with 19 days remaining. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... March 3 is the 62nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (63rd in leap years). ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 12 is the 346th day (347th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, with 19 days remaining. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 12 is the 346th day (347th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, with 19 days remaining. ...

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Litoria caerulea
Wikispecies has information related to:

Image File history File links White's_Tree_Frog. ... Image File history File links Sound-icon. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... August 20 is the 232nd day of the year (233rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Image File history File links Sound-icon. ... Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... The Wikimedia Commons (also called Wikicommons) is a repository of free content images, sound and other multimedia files. ... GFDL Wikispecies logo File links The following pages link to this file: Solanaceae Species Asterias Homo (genus) Human Wikipedia:Template messages/Links Wikipedia:Template messages/All Homo floresiensis User talk:Tuneguru Template:Wikispecies Categories: GFDL images ... Wikispecies is a sister project supported by the Wikimedia Foundation that anybody can edit with a great potential use to students and researchers. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
White-tree-frog - Animal-Visual.com (715 words)
The Australian Green Tree Frog, simply Green Tree Frog in Australia, White's Tree Frog, or Dumpy Tree Frog (Litoria caerulea) is a species of tree frog native to Australia and New Guinea, with introduced populations in New Zealand and the United States.
The colour of the frog is caused by blue and green pigments covered in a yellow layer; the preservative destroyed the yellow layer and left the frog with a blue appearance.
The frog is also known more simply as the "Green Tree Frog." However, that name is often given to the most common large green tree frog in a region, for example, the American green tree frog (Hyla cinerea).
Frog Garden (1054 words)
Marsh Frogs are prolific breeders and they call just about every night and the sound varies in intensity between a tennis match (the "toc" "toc" sounds like a tennis ball being hit) and Chinese New year (firecrackers) It's a coincidence that the bowl at the side has the same markings as the frog.
The frogs pictured are residents of our garden, the common name is the Graceful treefrog or Dainty Green treefrog (Litoria gracilenta) We very rarely see them until heavy rain arrives and then they are everywhere and they call all night long.
The second shot is two Green tree frogs, I'm not sure if they are an item and live in the same pot or not.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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