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Encyclopedia > Australian Army
Australian Army

Components
Regular Force
Army Reserve
List of current regiments
List of Australian Army Corps
Current structure
Equipment
Weaponry and equipment
History
History of the Australian Army
Australian Imperial Force
Personnel
List of senior officers
Officer rank insignia
Enlisted rank insignia

The Australian Army is Australia's military land force. It is part of the Australian Defence Force (ADF) along with the Royal Australian Navy and the Royal Australian Air Force. The Army is commanded by the Chief of the Army (CA), who is responsible to the Chief of the Defence Force (CDF). Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... The following is a list of regiments and corps of the Australian Army, as of 2005. ... The following is a list of Corps of the Australian Army, ordered according to the traditional seniority of all the Corps. ... The Australian Army, as with many other armies of nations that were formerly part of the British Empire, is structured in a similar way to the British Army, with divisions and brigades as the main formations, subdivided into regiments and battalions. ... A soldier armed with a F88 AuSteyr fitted with a grenade launcher A Bushmaster (left) and ASLAV (right) in Iraq Soldiers and a M113 M198 Howitzers firing during an exercise From left to right, a Chinook, Blackhawk and Tiger helicopter Australian soldiers and an ASLAV in Iraq A MH-90... // The Two Armies: Militia and Permanent forces 1870–1947 For more than 80 years after the first British settlement, the only professional soldiers in Australia were members of British Army garrisons. ... The Australian Imperial Force (AIF) was the name given to two all-volunteer Australian Army forces dispatched to fight overseas during World War I and World War II. First Australian Imperial Force (1914-18) Second Australian Imperial Force (1939-45) Following the Federation of Australia in 1901, Australia had a... Chief of the Army in reverse chronological order Lieutenant General Peter Leahy, 28 June 2002 to present Lieutenant General Peter Cosgrove, July 2000 to 28 June 2002 Lieutenant General Frank Hickling, June 1998 to July 2000 Lieutenant General John Sanderson, June 1995 to June 1998 Chief of the General Staff... Australian Army Officers receive a commission that is personally signed by the Governor-General of Australia, acting for the Queen. ... Like the British Army, the Australian Army does not use the term enlisted to describe its non-commissioned ranks. ... The Australian Defence Force (ADF) is the military organisation responsible for the defence of Australia. ... The Royal Australian Navy (RAN) is the naval branch of the Australian Defence Force. ... The Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF) is the Air Force branch of the Australian Defence Force. ...


Australian soldiers have been involved in a number of minor and major conflicts throughout its history, but only in World War II did Australian territory come under direct attack. Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000...

Contents

Mission

Australian Government websites state that the Army's mission is to provide a potent, versatile and modern Army to promote the security of Australia and protect its people and interests. [2] [3] [4] Further, the Army's key doctrine publication, The Fundamentals of Land Warfare, states that "the Army’s mission is to win the land battle".[1]


History

See main article: History of the Australian Army

The history of the Australian Army can be divided into two periods: // The Two Armies: Militia and Permanent forces 1870–1947 For more than 80 years after the first British settlement, the only professional soldiers in Australia were members of British Army garrisons. ...

  • 1901-47, when limits were set on the size of the Regular Army, the vast majority of peacetime soldiers were in the Reserve Army units of the Australian Citizens Military Force (also known as the CMF or Militia), and Australian Imperial Forces were formed to serve overseas, and
  • post-1947, when a standing peacetime infantry force was formed and the CMF (known as the Army Reserve after 1980) began to decline in importance.

The army has been involved in many peacekeeping operations, usually under the auspices of the United Nations. The largest one began in 1999 in East Timor. Other notable operations include peacekeeping on Bougainville and in the Solomon Islands, which are still ongoing to this day. Humanitarian relief after 2004 Indian Ocean earthquake in Aceh Province, Indonesia, Operation Sumatra Assist, ended on 24 March 2005. Following the federation of Australia in 1901, the six colonial militias were merged to form a national reserve army. ... The Australian Imperial Force (AIF) was the name given to two all-volunteer Australian Army forces dispatched to fight overseas during World War I and World War II. First Australian Imperial Force (1914-18) Second Australian Imperial Force (1939-45) Following the Federation of Australia in 1901, Australia had a... Infantry of the Royal Irish Rifles during the Battle of the Somme in World War I Infantry or footmen are very highly disciplined and trained soldiers who fight primarily with small arms(rifles), but are trained to use everything from their bare hands to missle systems in order to neutralize... UN and U.N. redirect here. ... For other uses of Bougainville, see Bougainville. ... The 2004 Indian Ocean earthquake, known by the scientific community as the Sumatra-Andaman earthquake,[1] was a great undersea earthquake that occurred at 00:58:53 UTC (07:58:53 local time) December 26, 2004 with an epicentre off the west coast of Sumatra, Indonesia. ... Aceh (IPA pronunciation: , pronounced approximately Ah-Cèh, but with [e], not [ei] at the end) is a special territory (daerah istimewa) of Indonesia, located on the northern tip of the island of Sumatra. ... Australian and Indonesian military personel work together to unload an Australian C-130 Hercules at Banda Aceh Operation Sumatra Assist was the Australian Defence Forces (ADFs) contribution to disaster relief in Indonesia following the 2004 Indian Ocean earthquake. ... is the 83rd day of the year (84th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Current deployments

Main article: Current Australian Defence Force deployments

The Australian Army currently has significant forces deployed on four major operations [5]: ADF deployments as at June 2007. ...

  • Operation Catalyst - Australia's commitment to the Coalition forces in Iraq. The army's contribution includes:
    • Overwatch Battle Group (West); this is a battlegroup consisting of a headquarters, infantry company, armoured squadron and training team, with a total of 450 personnel. This has two tasks:
      • Provide support to local Iraqi security forces
      • Assist in the training of local Iraqi Army units so that they are able to take over the internal and external defence of their country
    • Australian Army Training Team; this encompasses 55 personnel providing logistic training to the new Iraqi Army.
    • Embassy security detachment; this provides security protection and escort for staff at the Australian Embassy in Baghdad, and consists of 100 personnel.
  • Operation Slipper - Australia's commitment to the War on Terror. The army contribution is primarily concentrated in Afghanistan:
  • Operation Astute - Australia's commitment to Timor-Leste. This constitutes the largest overseas deployment of Australian forces, with around 925 troops deployed. These are primarily formed into a single battlegroup:
    • ANZAC Battle Group; this is an infantry heavy battle group supported by engineers, armoured vehicles and combat support elements. Integrated into its structure is a company from the Royal New Zealand Infantry Regiment.
  • Operation Anode - Australia's commitment to the Regional Assistance Mission Solomon Islands. The contribution numbers approximately 140 personnel, primarily consisting of a company from 1st Battalion, Royal Australian Regiment, plus support elements. Also under Australian command is a company from 2/1st Battalion, Royal New Zealand Infantry Regiment.
  • In addition to these, small numbers of personnel are deployed on various peacekeeping operations around the world, including the Multinational Force and Observers and to the United Nations.
  • Operation Mazurka - Australia's commitment to Multinational Force and Observers (MFO). From 1982-1986, the RAAF provided rotory wing aviation support. Since 1994 the Australian Army has maintained a presence within the organisation. Currently 25 personnel rotate twice a year, being employed in key HQ, operations and logistics positions.
  • Operation Paladin - is the Army's longest ongoing operation, where Australian personnel have served since 1956. Operation Paladin is Australia's contribution to the UN Truce Supervision Organisation that was established in 1948 to supervise the truce agreed at the conclusion of the first Arab/Israeli War.

Australian ASLAVs en-route to OBG(W)s base at Tallil Overwatch Battle Group (West) is an Australian Army battlegroup and represents Australias largest contribution to to the Multinational force in Iraq. ... The battlegroup is the basic building block of an armys fighting formation. ... The Iraqi Regular Army is a component of the Iraqi Security Forces tasked with assuming responsibility for all Iraqi land-based military operations following the 2003 Invasion of Iraq. ... Baghdad (Arabic: ) is the capital of Iraq and of Baghdad Governorate. ... Operation Slipper is the Australian Defence Force (ADF)contribution to the International Coalition against Terrorism. ... This article is about U.S. actions, and those of other states, after September 11, 2001. ... A Provincial Reconstruction Team (PRT) is an administrative unit of international aid to Afghanistan, consisting of a small operating base from which a group of sixty to more than one hundred civilians and military specialists work to perform small reconstruction projects or provide security for others involved in aid work. ... Oruzgan is one of the thirty-four provinces of Afghanistan. ... It has been suggested that Timeline of Operation Astute be merged into this article or section. ... The ANZAC Battle Group is an Australian-led battle group deployed to Timor Leste as part of Operation Astute. ... The Royal New Zealand Infantry Regiment (1 NZIR) is the main unit in the regular army of New Zealand. ... Map of the Solomon Islands Operation Helpem Fren, also known as the Regional Assistance Mission to the Solomon Islands (RAMSI), was created in 2003 in response to a request for international aid by the Governor General of the Solomon Islands. ... Soldiers from 1 RAR arive in the Solomon Islands in December 2004 Members of 1RAR undergoing a training exercise. ... The Multinational Force and Observers (MFO) is an international peacekeeping force. ... Operation Paladin is Australias contribution to the UN Truce Supervision Organisation (UNTSO) that was established in 1948 to supervise the truce agreed at the conclusion of the first Arab/Israeli War. ...

Current organisation

The Australian Army's structure in early 2007 (click to enlarge)
The Australian Army's structure in early 2007 (click to enlarge)
Further information: Structure of the Australian Army

The Australian Army is currently organised around two Divisional headquarters. The Deployable Joint Force Headquarters/1st Division has responsibility for the majority of the regular army, while 2nd Division is the main home defence formation, containing Army Reserve units. Only the 1st Division's headquarters is deployable, however, as the 2nd Division's headquarters only performs administrative functions. The Australian Army has not deployed a divisional sized formation since 1945 and does not expect to do so in the future.[2] Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 498 pixelsFull resolution (3017 × 1878 pixel, file size: 259 KB, MIME type: image/png) The structure of the Australian Land Forces (including Special Forces Command), made by myself noclador File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 498 pixelsFull resolution (3017 × 1878 pixel, file size: 259 KB, MIME type: image/png) The structure of the Australian Land Forces (including Special Forces Command), made by myself noclador File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete... The Australian Army, as with many other armies of nations that were formerly part of the British Empire, is structured in a similar way to the British Army, with divisions and brigades as the main formations, subdivided into regiments and battalions. ... // The Australian 2nd Division was formed from reinforcements training in Egypt on July 10, 1915 as part of the Australian Imperial Force to fight in World War I. It fought at Gallipoli during the latter stages of the campaign and then moved to the Western Front in France where it...


Expansion plans announced in 2006 will see the Australian Army expand by 2008, resulting in a primary force that is organised around eight battalions of the Royal Australian Regiment - three of these are to be standard light infantry, two mechanised, and two are to be motorised. The final battalion is a specialised commando unit which is part of Special Operations Command. The Royal Australian Armoured Corps presently has four regular regiments, one of main battle tanks and two light cavalry (formation reconnaissance). The fourth consists of a single squadron and is used on the armoured personnel carrier/light armoured role. These forces, together with the associated combat support (artillery, engineers, signals) and combat service support (logistics, maintenance etc) are based around two deployable brigades, 1 Brigade, which is primarily a mechanised formation, and 3 Brigade, which is a light, air deployable formation. 7 Brigade is an integrated Regular/Reserve formation that would primarily be used in conjunction with DJFHQ were it ever to be deployed overseas. The Royal Australian Regiment (RAR) is the parent regiment for regular infantry battalions of the Australian Army, making up the majority of the Royal Australian Infantry Corps. ... SOCOMD Badge Wyvern with Acies Acuta Soldiers from Special Operations Command during a demonstration held for the Media in May 2003 The Special Operations Command (SOC) is the newest branch of the Australian Defence Force (ADF). ... The Royal Australian Armoured Corps (RAAC) is the overall umbrella grouping of Regular Army and Army Reserve regiments equipped with armoured vehicles in the Australian Army. ... 1 Brigade is a formation of the Australian Army intended as its primary mechanised unit. ... The Australian 3rd Brigade is an infantry brigade. ... 7th Brigade is a brigade of the Australian Army. ...


'Hardened and Networked Army'

A Bushmaster (left) and ASLAV (right) in Iraq

In 2006, then Australian Minister for Defence, Senator Robert Hill announced that the Australian Army would be restructured and redeveloped in an updated version of the Army’s ‘Hardened Networked Army’ concept. The policy of creating a ‘Hardened and Networked' Army will see a major reorganisation of both the regular Army and Army Reserve. The overriding rationale for this is to bring about "A reduction in singular capabilities that can not be rotated, hence an 'Army of twos'".[3] This will involve the army being organised so that it can deploy a number of battlegroups, consisting of infantry, armour, artillery etc in the correct proportions relevant to each type of mission. Image File history File linksMetadata Bushmaster_ASLAV.jpg Summary Australian Department of Defence 20050725adf8243116_262 Sourced from: http://www. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Bushmaster_ASLAV.jpg Summary Australian Department of Defence 20050725adf8243116_262 Sourced from: http://www. ... Senator Robert Hill Robert Murray Hill (born 25 September 1946), Australian politician, was a Liberal member of the Australian Senate from July 1981 to January 2006, representing South Australia. ...


When the reorganisation is complete it is planned that the Army will be able to form battlegroups based around the following formations:

By the end of this process in approximately 2015, 1 Brigade will be the army's major mechanised formation. In addition, 1st Division/DJHQ will be reduced to three brigades, with 11 Brigade, a wholly Army Reserve formation, being transferred to the 2nd Division. The armoured units of the Army Reserve in 2nd Division will be restructured, with four becoming pure light cavalry and the fifth being utilised in the armoured lift role. Soldiers from 1 RAR arive in the Solomon Islands in December 2004 Members of 1RAR undergoing a training exercise. ... 2nd Battalion, Royal Australian Regiment (2 RAR) is an Australian light infantry battalion. ... Soldiers from 3 RAR during an exercise in 2004. ... The 5th Battalion, Royal Australian Regiment (5 RAR) was a regular infantry battalion of the Australian Army. ... 6th Battalion, Royal Australian Regiment (6 RAR) is part of the Australian Army. ... The 7th Battalion, Royal Australian Regiment (7 RAR) was a regular infantry battalion of the Australian Army. ... The 8th/9th Battalion Royal Australian Regiment (8/9 RAR) was an Australian Army infantry battalion. ... A Leopard AS1 MBT of the 1st Armoured Regiment during an exercise in Queensland; June 25, 2005. ... An ASLAV from 2nd Cavalry Regiment with Australian soldiers in East Timor in 1999. ... 2/14 LHR ASLAVs in Iraq in 2006 The 2nd/14th Light Horse Regiment (Queensland Mounted Infantry) is a regiment of the Australian Army, part of the Royal Australian Armoured Corps. ... A Tiger ARH in 2005 The Australian 1st Aviation Regiment is an Australian Army aviation unit and part of the 16th (Aviation) Brigade. ...


Colours, standards and guidons

Governor-General Sir William Deane presents the new Army Banner to the Regimental Sergeant Major of the Army in 2001
Governor-General Sir William Deane presents the new Army Banner to the Regimental Sergeant Major of the Army in 2001
All colours of the Army were on parade for the centenary of the Army, 10 March 2001
All colours of the Army were on parade for the centenary of the Army, 10 March 2001

Infantry, and some other combat units of the Australian Army carry flags called the Queen's colour and the Regimental Colour, known as 'the Colours'. Armoured units carry Guidons - flags smaller than Colours traditionally carried by Cavalry, Lancer, Light Horse and Mounted Infantry units. Artillery units' Guns are considered to be their Colours, and on parade are provided with the same respect. Non-combat units (combat service support corps) do not have Colours, as Colours are battle flags and so are only available to combat units. As a substitute, many have Standards or Banners.[4] // Origins The practice of carrying standards, to act both as a rallying point for troops, and to mark the location of the commander, is thought to have originated in Egypt some 5,000 years ago. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ...


Units awarded battle honours have them emblazoned on their Colours, Standards and Guidons. They are a link to the Unit's past and a memorial to the fallen. Artillery do not have Battle Honours. Their single Honour is "Ubique" which means "Everywhere". The custom has been to award, to those units who took part, the right to display the name of a particular battle, campaign or war. ...


The Army is the guardian of the National Flag and as such, unlike the Royal Australian Air Force, does not have a flag or Colours. The Army, instead, has a banner, known as the Army Banner. To commemorate the centenary of the Army, the Governor General Sir William Deane, presented the Army with a new Banner at a parade in front of the Australian War Memorial on 10 March 2001. The Banner was presented to the Regimental Sergeant Major of the Army, WO1 Peter Rosemond. National flag and state ensign. ... The Australian War Memorial is Australias national memorial to the members of all its armed forces and supporting organisations who have died or participated in the wars of the Commonwealth of Australia. ...


The Army banner bears the Australian Coat of Arms on the obverse, with the dates "1901-2001" in gold in the upper hoist. The reverse bears the 'rising sun' badge of the Australian Army, flanked by seven campaign honors on small gold-edged scrolls: South Africa, World War I, World War II, Korea, Malaya-Borneo, South Vietnam, and Peacekeeping. The banner is trimmed with gold fringe, has gold and crimson cords and tassels, and is mounted on a pike with the usual British royal crest finial.[5] Australian Coat of Arms (since 1912) The Coat of Arms of Australia is the official symbol of Australia. ... The custom has been to award, to those units who took part, the right to display the name of a particular battle, campaign or war. ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ... Combatants United Nations:  Republic of Korea,  Australia,  Belgium,  Luxembourg,  Canada,  Colombia,  Ethiopia,  France,  Greece,  Luxembourg,  Netherlands,  New Zealand,  Philippines,  South Africa,  Thailand,  Turkey,  United Kingdom,  United States Medical staff:  Denmark,  Australia,  Italy,  Norway,  Sweden Communist states:  Democratic People’s Republic of Korea,  Peoples Republic of China,  Soviet Union Commanders... Combatants United Kingdom Australia New Zealand British colonies Federation of Malaya Rhodesia Fiji various British East African colonies Malayan Communist Party Malayan Races Liberation Army Commanders Harold Briggs Henry Gurney † Gerald Templer Henry Wells Chin Peng Strength 250,000 Malayan Home Guard troops 40,000 regular Commonwealth personnel 37,000... Combatants Republic of Vietnam United States Republic of Korea Thailand Australia New Zealand The Philippines National Front for the Liberation of South Vietnam Democratic Republic of Vietnam People’s Republic of China Democratic Peoples Republic of Korea Strength US 1,000,000 South Korea 300,000 Australia 48,000...


Personnel

During the 2005-06 financial year the Army had an average strength of 25,241 permanent Personnel and 15,579 reservists.[6]


Rank and insignia

The ranks of the Australian Army are based on the ranks of the British Army, and carry mostly the same actual insignia. For officers the ranks are identical except for the shoulder title "Australia". The Non-Commissioned Officer insignia are the same up until Warrant Officer ranks, where they are stylised for Australia (e.g. using the Australian, rather than the British coat of arms). The British Army is the land armed forces branch of the British Armed Forces. ... Australian Army Officers receive a commission that is personally signed by the Governor-General of Australia, acting for the Queen. ... An officer is a member of a military, naval, or if applicable, other uniformed services who holds a position of responsibility. ... A non-commissioned officer (sometimes noncommissioned officer), also known as an NCO or Noncom, is an enlisted member of an armed force who has been given authority by a commissioned officer. ... Like the British Army, the Australian Army does not use the term enlisted to describe its non-commissioned ranks. ... For Warrant Officers in the United States military, see Warrant Officer (United States). ...

  • Australian Army officer rank insignia
  • Australian Army enlisted rank insignia

Current recruiting Issues

An infantryman training with a Leopard 1 tank in 2001
An infantryman training with a Leopard 1 tank in 2001

On 24 August 2006 the Prime Minister announced a requirement for an extra 2600 soldiers for the Australian Army. Recent remarks of low morale in the Army, a high desire to leave the armed forces for civilian careers amongst serving soldiers, low unemployment figures for school-leavers and university graduates, as well as general opposition for Australian soldiers serving in Iraq have resulted in the Army falling short of its recruiting expectations. This new campaign, which will call for the raising of two new infantry battalions ready for overseas deployment by 2010, will reportedly cost $A10 billion. The first of these new battalions, to be operational by 2008, will be formed by the de-amalgamation of 5/7 RAR into the reformed 5th Battalion and 7th Battalion, Royal Australian Regiment. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... The Leopard is the primary post-WWII German tank design, a design that has been in use as the primary main battle tank for most European countries in various versions since the early 1960s. ... is the 236th day of the year (237th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Judicial High Court Lower Courts Constitution State and territory governments Executive Governors and Administrators Premiers and Chief Ministers Legislative Parliaments and Assemblies State electoral systems ACT - NSW - NT - Qld. ... 2008 (MMVIII) will be a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (common) era, in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... The 5th Battalion, Royal Australian Regiment (5 RAR) was a regular infantry battalion of the Australian Army. ... The 7th Battalion, Royal Australian Regiment (7 RAR) was a regular infantry battalion of the Australian Army. ...


Prime Minister John Howard cited causes for this requirement as the threat of unstable, possibly terrorist harbouring states in Australia’s immediate region:

I mean look at what happened in East Timor. Look at what happened in the Solomon Islands. Think back a few years to Fiji. Think of Vanuatu. Think of the inherently unstable situation in Papua New Guinea.

Along with this announcement, many claim that a need for more and better equipment is required, possibly meaning an increase in the numbers of M113 APCs, Bushmaster IMV and M1A1 Abrams tanks being ordered. The plan also may result in an overall reduction in the fitness, medical and age restrictions placed on applicants, in order to ‘Modernize’ the restrictions and also assist in boosting numbers. However, these moves have come against opposition within Veteran’s Organisations. Opposition from the Papua New Guinean Prime Minister, Sir Michael Somare came on 25 August 2006, saying an expansion of the Australian Army would actually be in response to its forces already deployed in the Middle East, and not for the possibility of threat from its Pacific neighbours. The Bushmaster Infantry Mobility Vehicle is an Australian built wheeled armoured vehicle designed by Perry Engineering in Adelaide with some technical support from Irish company Timoney Technology Ltd. ... The M1 Abrams main battle tank is the principal combat tank of the United States Army. ... The Right Honourable Sir Michael Thomas Somare (born 9 April 1936) was Prime Minister of Papua New Guinea from independence in 1975 until 1980, from 1982 until 1985, and again since 2002. ... is the 237th day of the year (238th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


On 15 October 2006 the Defence minister Brendan Nelson announced that the Army will be implementing a new 'try before you buy' recruitment system, reducing the Initial Minimum Period of Service (IMPS) from four years to one year for enlisted soldiers. Aimed at school leavers, this system is designed to reduce the impact of joining the army for recruits entering the work force, making the option of military service more attractive. This is known as the "ADF Gap Year", playing on the term of "gap" where school-leavers take a year off before going to University to study. is the 288th day of the year (289th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Dr. Brendan John Nelson (born 19 August 1958), Australian politician, has been a Liberal Party of Australia member of the Australian House of Representatives since March 1996, representing the Division of Bradfield, New South Wales. ...


After an extensive multi-million dollar advertising campaign seeking recruits [7] there is now a reversal of the situation with high enlistment numbers (exceeding the governments target by 1004 persons) but due to the lack of available and adequate training facilities and personnel more than 85 percent of applicants wait for between 35 days and 6 months to start their training, resulting in dropouts in recruits during this period. There are plans to create a second recruit-training battalion but that may take years. [8]


Equipment

Further information: Weaponry of the Australian Army
Small arms F88 Austeyr (service rifle), M4 carbine (special forces), Heckler & Koch USP (special forces), FN Minimi (support weapon), Browning Hi-Power (sidearm)
Main Battle Tanks 59 M1A1 Abrams A.I.M.
Infantry fighting vehicles 257 ASLAV
Armoured Personnel Carriers 700 M113 (350 being upgraded to M113AS3/4 standard, balance to be mothballed and used to support upgrade program)
Infantry Mobility Vehicles 681 Bushmaster IMVs ordered[9]
Land Rovers 5000 FFRs 5000 GS
Artillery 112 L118/L119 105mm Hamel Guns, 120 M2A2 105mm Howitzer, 36 RBS-70 ground to air missile launchers, and 36 M198 155mm Howitzer[10]
Aircraft
Aircraft Origin Type Versions In service[11] Notes
Beechcraft Super King Air Flag of the United States United States Utility B300 3
UH-1 Iroquois Flag of the United States United States Utility helicopter UH-1H 16 No longer in use; to be replaced with 12 Flag of Europe European Union NH90.
OH-58 Kiowa Flag of the United States United States
Flag of Australia Australia
OH-58A Scout helicopter 206B 42 Built under licence in Australia by Commonwealth Aircraft Corporation.
Boeing CH-47 Chinook Flag of the United States United States Transport helicopter CH-47D 6
Eurocopter Tiger Flag of Europe European Union Attack helicopter Tiger ARH 6 Total of 22 to be delivered.
Sikorsky S-70 Blackhawk Flag of the United States United States Utility helicopter S-70A-9 35

A soldier armed with a F88 AuSteyr fitted with a grenade launcher A Bushmaster (left) and ASLAV (right) in Iraq Soldiers and a M113 M198 Howitzers firing during an exercise From left to right, a Chinook, Blackhawk and Tiger helicopter Australian soldiers and an ASLAV in Iraq A MH-90... Small arms captured in Fallujah, Iraq by the US Marine Corps in 2004 The term small arms generally describes any number of smaller infantry weapons, such as firearms that an individual soldier can carry. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... The service rifle (also known as standard-issue rifle) of a given army or armed force is that which it issues as standard to its soldiers. ... M4A1 redirects here. ... For other uses, see Special forces (disambiguation). ... The Heckler & Koch USP (Universale Selbstladepistole, or Universal Self-loading Pistol) is a semi-automatic pistol designed by the German arms manufacturer Heckler & Koch. ... For other uses, see Special forces (disambiguation). ... The FN Minimi is a squad automatic weapon — the name coming from Mini-mitrailleuse (French: mini-machine gun. It is a 5. ... A squad automatic weapon (SAW) is a light or general-purpose machine gun, usually equipped with a bipod and firing a 7. ... The Browning Hi-Power is a semi-automatic, single-action, 9 mm pistol. ... A service pistol is any handgun (revolver, or semi-automatic) issued to military personnel, or in some contexts, law enforcement officers. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... The M1 Abrams main battle tank is the principal combat tank of the United States Army, the United States Marine Corps and the Australian Army, with three main versions being deployed starting in 1980: the M1, M1A1, and M1A2. ... An M2 Bradley Infantry fighting vehicle. ... Phase 3 ASLAV before hand-over to Defence by GDLS-A. The Australian Light Armoured Vehicle (ASLAV), is an Australian version of the Mowag Piranha. ... Armoured personnel carriers (APCs) are armoured fighting vehicles developed to transport infantry on the battlefield. ... The M113 is an armored personnel carrier family of vehicles in use with the US military and many other nations. ... Motorised infantry is infantry which is transported by trucks or other motor vehicles. ... The Bushmaster Infantry Mobility Vehicle is an Australian built wheeled armoured vehicle designed by Perry Engineering in Adelaide with some technical support from Irish company Timoney Technology Ltd. ... Land Rover was the name of one of the first British civilian all-terrain utility vehicles, first produced by Rover in 1947. ... For other uses, see Artillery (disambiguation). ... M119A1 The L118 Light Gun is a 105mm towed howitzer, originally produced for the British Army in the 1970s and widely exported since, including to the United States, where it was modified to fire US ammunition and is known as the M119A1. ... M119A1 The L118 Light Gun is a 105mm towed howitzer, originally produced for the British Army in the 1970s and widely exported since, including to the United States, where it was modified to fire US ammunition and is known as the M119A1. ... The 105 mm Howitzer M2A1(M101) was the standard medium field howitzer for the U.S. in World War II, seeing action in both European and Pacific theatres. ... A winter firing of the RBS 70 during an exercise in Boden, Sweden in March 2001. ... The M198 Howitzer during the Persian Gulf War The M198 howitzer is a medium-sized, towed artillery piece. ... Flying machine redirects here. ... It has been suggested that this article be split into articles entitled Beechcraft King Air and Beechcraft Super King Air, accessible from a disambiguation page. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... This article is about the military versions of the Bell 204 and 205 models. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... The NHI NH90 is a medium sized, twin-engine, multi-role military helicopter manufactured by NHIndustries, a company established by Agusta, Eurocopter and Stork Fokker Aerospace. ... The OH-58 Kiowa is a family of single-engine, single-rotor, observation and light attack helicopters manufactured by Bell Helicopter Textron and originally based on the companys Bell 206A JetRanger helicopter. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Wirraway aircraft under construction at a CAC factory in 1940 (AWM 000626/06) CAC Boomerang The prototype CAC CA-15 Kangaroo Mirage III, the engines for which were built by CAC The Commonwealth Aircraft Corporation (CAC) was an Australian aircraft manufacturer. ... The Boeing CH-47 Chinook is a versatile, twin-engine, tandem rotor heavy-lift helicopter. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... The Eurocopter Tiger is an attack helicopter manufactured by the Eurocopter Group. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... The Sikorsky S-70 is a medium-lift military helicopter family manufactured by Sikorsky. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ...

Army bases

The Army's operational headquarters, Land Command, is located at Victoria Barracks in Sydney. The Australian Army's three regular brigades are based at Robertson Barracks near Darwin, Lavarack Barracks in Townsville, Queensland and Gallipoli Barracks in Brisbane, Queensland. The Deployable Joint Force Headquarters is also located at Gallipoli Barracks. Other important Army bases include the Army Aviation Centre near Oakey, Queensland, Holsworthy Barracks near Sydney, and Woodside Barracks near Adelaide, South Australia. The SASR is based at Campbell Barracks Swanbourne, a suburb of Perth, Western Australia. Further barracks include Steele barracks in Sydney, Keswick Barracks in Adelaide, and Karakatta in Perth. Dozens of Army Reserve depots are located across Australia. Victoria Barracks is an army base in Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. ... Robertson Barracks is a major Australian Army base located in Darwin, Northern Territory. ... Lavarack Barracks is a major Australian Army base located in Townsville, Queensland. ... ‎ The Strand CBD from Museum of Tropical Queensland, features Castle Hill in background Townsville (Postcodes: 4810-4819) is an urban centre on the north-eastern coast of Australia, in the state of Queensland. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article is about the Australian city. ... Oakey Army Aviation Centre (IATA: OKY, ICAO: YBOK) is situated approximately 3 km from the town centre of Oakey in Queensland, Australia. ... Oakey (, postcode 4401) is a rural town situated in the Darling Downs region of Queensland, Australia. ... Holsworthy Barracks is located in the outer south-western suburbs of Sydney. ... For other uses, see Adelaide (disambiguation). ... The Special Air Service Regiment (SASR) is a Special Forces regiment modelled on the original British SAS and also drawing on the traditions of the Australian World War II Z Special Force commando unit, as well as the Independent Companies which were active in the South Pacific during the same... Campbell Barracks is an Australian Army base located in the coastal suburb of Swanborne in Perth, Western Australia. ... Swanbourne is a suburb of Perth, Western Australia, Australia, situated 10km from the Perth GPO. Swanbourne is part of the Local Government Area of the City of Nedlands Swanbourne is named after Swanbourne in Buckinghamshire, England. ... Location of Perth within Australia This article is about the metropolitan area of Perth, Western Australia. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ...


Notes

  1. ^ Australian Army. The Fundamentals of Land Warfare. Retrieved on 2007-04-11.
  2. ^ David Horner (2001). Making the Australian Defence Force. Oxford University Press, Melbourne. ISBN 0195541170. Page 195.
  3. ^ Hardened and Networked Army
  4. ^ National Flags, Military Flags, & Queens and Regimental Colours. Digger History. Retrieved on 2007-04-03.
  5. ^ Army Flags (Australia). Flags of the World. Retrieved on 2007-04-03.
  6. ^ Australian Department of Defence (2006) Defence Annual Report 2005-06. Page 218.
  7. ^ Australian Army Rise Up Recruitment. duncans.tv. Retrieved on 2007-04-10.
  8. ^ Diggers in hole as boom recruits go untrained. news.com.au. Retrieved on 2007-05-23.
  9. ^ Press release issued by the Minister for Defence Bushmaster Bonanza for Bendigo, 18 August 2007.
  10. ^ [1].
  11. ^ "World Military Aircraft Inventory", Aerospace Source Book 2007, Aviation Week & Space Technology, January 15, 2007.

Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 101st day of the year (102nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... David Horner is an Australian military historian and academic. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 93rd day of the year (94th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 93rd day of the year (94th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 100th day of the year (101st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 143rd day of the year (144th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Aviation Week & Space Technology (often abbreviated as Aviation Week or AW&ST) is a weekly magazine. ... is the 15th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ...

References

See also


  Results from FactBites:
 
Australian Army - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1646 words)
Australian soldiers have been involved in a number of minor and major conflicts throughout its history, but only in World War II did Australian territory come under direct attack.
Recent remarks of low morale in the Army, a high desire to leave the armed forces for civilian careers amongst serving soldiers, low unemployment figures for school-leavers and university graduates, as well as general opposition for Australian soldiers serving in Iraq have resulting in the Army falling short of its recruiting expectations.
The ranks of the Australian Army are based on the ranks of the British Army, and carry mostly the same actual insignia.
Fourays - The Australian Army Aviation Association Inc (9372 words)
When Australian Army troops found themselves in difficulty requiring helicopter support, the RAAF helicopter squadron commander was placed in the invidious position of trying to meet the legitimate demands of local Army commanders without compromising his orders from the Air Staff.
Army officers often cite instances where, at the end of a day’s training in the field, RAAF pilots would fly to a motel for the night rather than stay in an Army tent.
Australian experience with the command and control of battlefield helicopters has not been a happy one, marked by bitter inter-service disputes that detracted from the ability of helicopters to achieve their full level of operational capability.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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