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Encyclopedia > Australasia ecozone
The Australasia Ecozone
The Australasia Ecozone

The Australasian ecozone – is an ecological region that is coincident, but not synonymous (by some definitions), with the geographic region of Australasia. The ecozon e includes Australia, the island of New Guinea (including Papua New Guinea and the Indonesian province of Papua), and the eastern part of the Indonesia n archipelago, including the island of Sulawesi, the Moluccan islands (the Indonesian provinces of Maluku and North M aluku) and islands of Lombok, Sumbawa, Sumba, Flores, and Timor, often known as the Lesser Sundas. The Australasian ecozone also includes several Pacific island gr oups, including the Bismarck Archipelago, Vanuatu, the Solomon Islands, and New Caledonia. New Zealand and its surrounding islands are a distinctive sub-region of the Australa sian ecozone. The rest of Indonesia is part of the Indomalayan ecozone. i love to ride kangaroos to skool From a biological point of view, Australasia is a distinct region with a common evolutionary history and a great many unique plants and animals, some of them common to the entire area, others specific to particular parts but sharing a common ancestry. The long isolation of Australasia from other continents allowed it to evolve relatively independently, and makes it home to many unique families of plants and animals. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1096x744, 47 KB)Australasia ecozone re-drawn from French wiki by MPF Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1096x744, 47 KB)Australasia ecozone re-drawn from French wiki by MPF Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1. ... Ecozones are global divisions which have their own characteristic interplay of climatic factors, morphodynamics, soil-forming processes, living conditions for plants and animals, and production potentials for agriculture and forestry. ... Region can be used to mean either: any more or less well-defined geographical area of a country or continent, defined by geography, culture or history in political geography, an administrative subdivision of a country or of the European Union. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Oceania. ... Sulawesi (formerly Celebes ) is a large island in Indonesia. ... This page is about the geography and history of the island group in Indonesia — for the political entities encompassing the islands, see Maluku (Indonesian province) and North Maluku. ... Satellite photograph of Lombok, showing its volcano. ... Sumbawa is an Indonesian island, located in the middle of the Lesser Sunda Islands chain, with Lombok to the west, Flores to the east, and Sumba further to the southeast. ... Sumba NASA Earthview Sumba is an Indonesian island. ... Map of Flores Island Flores (Portuguese for flowers) is one of the Lesser Sunda Islands, an island arc with an estimated area of 14,300 km² extending east from the Java island of Indonesia. ... Map of Timor Timor Island from space, November 1989 (North is to the bottom of the image). ... The Bismarck Archipelago is a group of islands off the coast of New Guinea in the southwestern Pacific Ocean, named in honour of the German chancellor Otto von Bismarck and belonging to Papua New Guinea. ... The Indomalaya Ecozone was previously called the Oriental region. ...


Australia and New Guinea are distinguished by their large population of Marsupial mammals, including kangaroos, possums, and wombats. The last remaining Monotreme mammals, the echidnas and the platypus, are endemic to Australasia. Prior to the arrival of humans about 50,000 years ago, only about one-third of Australasian mammal species were placental. Orders Didelphimorphia Paucituberculata Microbiotheria Dasyuromorphia Peramelemorphia Notoryctemorphia Diprotodontia Marsupials are mammals in which the female typically has a pouch (called the marsupium, from which the name Marsupial derives) in which it rears its young through early infancy. ... Orders Subclass Multituberculata (extinct) Plagiaulacida Cimolodonta Subclass Palaeoryctoides (extinct) Subclass Triconodonta (extinct) Subclass Eutheria (includes extinct ancestors)/Placentalia (excludes extinct ancestors) Afrosoricida Artiodactyla Carnivora Cetacea Chiroptera Cimolesta (extinct) Creodonta (extinct) Condylarthra (extinct) Dermoptera Desmostylia (extinct) Dinocerata (extinct) Embrithopoda (extinct) Hyracoidea Insectivora Lagomorpha Litopterna (extinct) Macroscelidea Mesonychia (extinct) Notoungulata (extinct) Perissodactyla... Species Macropus rufus Macropus giganteus Macropus fuliginosus A kangaroo is any of several large macropods (the marsupial family that also includes the wallabies, tree-kangaroos, wallaroos, pademelons and the Quokka: 65 species in all). ... Superfamilies and Families Phalangeroidea Burramyidae Phalangeridae Petauroida Pseudocheiridae Petauridae Tarsipedidae Acrobatidae A possum is any of about 63 small to medium-sized arboreal marsupials native to Australia. ... Genera and Species Vombatus Vombatus ursinus Lasiorhinus Lasiorhinus latifrons Lasiorhinus krefftii †Rhizophascolomus †Phascolonus †Warendja †Ramasayia Wombats are Australian marsupials; they are short-legged, muscular quadrupeds, approximately one metre (3 feet) in length and with a very short tail. ... Families Kollikodontidae(extinct) Ornithorhynchidae- Platypus Tachyglossidae- Echidnas Steropodontidae(extinct) Monotremes (monos, single + trema, hole; refers to the cloaca) are mammals that lay eggs, instead of giving birth to live young like marsupials (Metatheria) and placental mammals (Eutheria). ... Species Genus Tachyglossus    T. aculeatus Genus Zaglossus    Z. attenboroughi    Z. bruijnii    Z. bartoni    Z. hacketti(extinct)    Z. robustus(extinct) Echidnas, sometimes also referred to as spiny anteaters, are the only surviving monotremes apart from the Platypus. ... Binomial name Ornithorhynchus anatinus (Shaw, 1799) The Platypus (Ornithorhynchus anatinus) is a small, half-aquatic mammal endemic to the eastern part of Australia, and one of the three extant species of monotremes, the only mammals that lay eggs instead of giving birth to live young (the other two are echidnas). ... In biology and ecology endemic means exclusively native to a place or biota, in contrast to cosmopolitan or introduced. ... Orders Afrosoricida Macroscelidea Tubulidentata Hyracoidea Proboscidea Sirenia Xenarthra Dermoptera: Scandentia Primates Rodentia Lagomorpha Insectivora Chiroptera Pholidota Carnivora Perissodactyla Artiodactyla Cetacea Placentalia and Eutheria are terms used to describe major groupings within the animal class of Mammalia. ...


The boundary between Australasia and Indomalaya follows the Wallace Line, named after the naturalist Alfred Russel Wallace who noted the differences in mammal and bird fauna between the islands either side of the line. The Islands to the west of the line, including Java, Bali, Borneo, and the Philippines share a similar fauna with East Asia, including tigers, rhinoceros, and apes. During the ice ages, sea levels were lower, exposing the continental shelf that links these islands to one another and to Asia, and allowed Asian land animals to inhabit these islands. Similarly, Australia and New Guinea are linked by a shallow continental shelf, and were linked by a land bridge during the ice ages. A group of Australasian islands east of the Wallace line, including Sulawesi, Halmahera, Lombok, Flores, Sumba, Sumbawa, and Timor, is separated by deep water from both the southeast Asian continental shelf and the Australia-New Guinea continental shelf. These islands are called Wallacea, and contain relatively few Australian or Asian mammals. While most land mammals found it difficult to cross the Wallace Line, many plant, bird, and reptile species were better able to make the crossing. Wallaces hypothetical line between Australasian and Southeast Asian fauna. ... Alfred Russel Wallace for the Cornish painter see Alfred Wallis Alfred Russel Wallace, OM , FRS (January 8, 1823 – November 7, 1913) was a British naturalist, geographer, anthropologist and biologist. ... Java (Indonesian, Javanese, and Sundanese: Jawa) is an island of Indonesia, and the site of its capital city, Jakarta. ... Bali is an Indonesian island located at , , one of the Lesser Sunda Islands. ... Borneo and Sulawesi. ... Binomial name Panthera tigris (Linnaeus, 1758) Tigers (Panthera tigris) are mammals of the Felidae family and one of four big cats in the panthera genus. ... Genera Ceratotherium Dicerorhinus Diceros Rhinoceros Coelodonta (extinct)Elasmotherium (extinct) A rhinoceros (commonly called a rhino for short) is any of five surviving species of odd-toed ungulate in the family Rhinocerotidae. ... Families Hylobatidae Hominidae Apes are the members of the Hominoidea superfamily of primates, including humans. ... Variations in CO2, temperature and dust from the Vostok ice core over the last 400 000 years For the animated movie, see Ice Age (movie). ... Wallacea is a biogeographical designation for a group of Indonesian islands separated by deep water from the Asian and Australian continental shelves. ...


Australia, New Zealand, and New Caledonia are all portions of the ancient supercontinent of Gondwana, which started to break into smaller continents in the Cretaceous era, 130-65 million years ago. New Zealand broke away first, more than 80 million years ago, and Australia finally broke free from Antarctica about 45 million years ago. All the Australasian lands are home to the Antarctic flora, descended from the flora of southern Gondwana, including the coniferous podocarps and Araucaria pines, and the broadleafed southern beech (Nothofagus), and proteas (Proteaceae). Pangaea was formed by the merging of two continents, Laurasia and Gondwana East African and Kuungan Orogens 550 Ma reconstruction showing final stages of assembly The southern supercontinent Gondwana (originally Gondwanaland) included most of the landmasses which make up todays continents of the southern hemisphere, including Antarctica, South America... Cretaceous period is one of the major divisions of the geologic timescale, reaching from the end of the Jurassic period, about 146 million years ago (Ma), to the beginning of the Paleocene epoch of the Tertiary period (65. ... Minke whale Minke whale Minke whale Minke whale Minke whale Minke whale Minke whale Minke whale Minke whale Minke whale Minke whale Minke whale Minke whale Minke whale Minke whale Minke whale Minke whale Minke whale Minke whale Minke whale Minke whale Minke whale Minke whale Minke whale Minke whale... Orders & Families Cordaitales † Pinales   Pinaceae - Pine family   Araucariaceae - Araucaria family   Podocarpaceae - Yellow-wood family   Sciadopityaceae - Umbrella-pine family   Cupressaceae - Cypress family   Cephalotaxaceae - Plum-yew family   Taxaceae - Yew family Vojnovskyales † Voltziales † The conifers, division Pinophyta, are one of 13 or 14 division level taxa within the Kingdom Plantae. ... Genera Acmopyle Afrocarpus Dacrycarpus Dacrydium Falcatifolium Halocarpus Lagarostrobos Lepidothamnus Manoao Microcachrys Microstrobos Nageia Parasitaxus Phyllocladus Podocarpus Prumnopitys Retrophyllum Saxegothaea Sundacarpus A large family of mainly Southern Hemisphere conifers, with 18-19 genera and about 170-200 species of evergreen trees and shrubs. ... Species See text Araucaria is a genus of coniferous trees in the family Araucariaceae. ... Species   Nothofagus alpina - Rauli Beech   Nothofagus antarctica - Antarctic Beech   Nothofagus betuloides - Magallanes Beech   Nothofagus cunninghamii - Myrtle Beech   Nothofagus dombeyi - Coigüe Beech   Nothofagus fusca - Red Beech   Nothofagus gunnii - Tanglefoot Beech   Nothofagus menziesii - Silver Beech   Nothofagus moorei - Negrohead Beech   Nothofagus obliqua - Roble Beech   Nothofagus pumilio - Lenga Beech   Nothofagus solanderi - Black Beech... Genera See text The Proteaceae are a large family of flowering plants, which includes 75-80 genera and 1500 species of evergreen trees, shrubs, and herbs. ...


As Australia moved north into the desert latitudes, the continent became hotter and drier, and the soils poorer and leached of nutrients, causing the old Antarctic flora to retreat to the humid corners of the continent in favor new drought and fire tolerant flora, dominated by the Eucalyptus, Casuarina, and Acacia trees, and by grasses and scrub where the rainfall was too scarce to support trees. Presently Australia is the smallest continent, and also the driest continent and the flattest (lowest in elevation) continent. Species About 700; see the List of Eucalyptus species Wikispecies has information related to: Eucalyptus Eucalyptus is a diverse genus of trees (rarely shrubs), the members of which dominate the tree flora of Australia. ... Genera Allocasuarina Casuarina Gymnostoma Casuarinaceae is a family of dicotyledonous flowering plants placed in the order Fagales, consisting of 3 or 4 genera and approximately 70 species of trees and shrubs native to the Old World tropics (Indo-Malaysia), Australia, and the Pacific islands. ... Species About 1,300; see List of Acacia species Acacia is a genus of shrubs and trees of Gondwanian origin belonging to the subfamily Mimosoideae of the Pea Family Fabaceae, first described from Africa by Linnaeus in 1773. ...

Contents


Geology

The present distribution of Australasian plants and animals is partially a result of the geologic history of its land masses. Several of the land masses in the ecoregion are fragments of the ancient continent of Gondwana, while a number of smaller islands are of more recent volcanic or tectonic origin, and were never part of Gondwana. Pangaea was formed by the merging of two continents, Laurasia and Gondwana East African and Kuungan Orogens 550 Ma reconstruction showing final stages of assembly The southern supercontinent Gondwana (originally Gondwanaland) included most of the landmasses which make up todays continents of the southern hemisphere, including Antarctica, South America...


New Guinea, Australia, and Tasmania, collectively known as Australia-New Guinea, Sahul, or Meganesia, are connected by a shallow continental shelf, and together form the largest fragment of Gondwana. The shallow continental shelf that presently separates the islands has served as a land bridge when sea levels were lower, most recently during the last ice age. New Guinea shares many families of birds and marsupial mammals with Australia. As the Indo-Australian Plate, which contains India, Australia, and the Indian Ocean floor in between, moved north, it collided with the Eurasian Plate, and the collision of the two plates pushed up the Himalayas, the Indonesian islands, and New Guinea's Central Range. The Central Range is much younger and higher than the mountains of Australia, so high that it is home to rare equatorial glaciers. New Guinea and Wallacea are part of the humid tropics, and many Indomalayan rainforest plants spread across the narrow straits from Asia, mixing together with the old Australian and Antarctic floras. Some botanists consider New Guinea and Wallacea to be part of the floristic province of Malesia, together with the other Indonesian islands and the Malay Peninsula, although Malesia is now mostly used to refer to only the Indomalayan side of the Wallace Line. Australia-New Guinea, also called Sahul or Meganesia, is made up of the continent of Australia and the islands of New Guinea and Tasmania. ... Pangaea was formed by the merging of two continents, Laurasia and Gondwana East African and Kuungan Orogens 550 Ma reconstruction showing final stages of assembly The southern supercontinent Gondwana (originally Gondwanaland) included most of the landmasses which make up todays continents of the southern hemisphere, including Antarctica, South America... Variations in CO2, temperature and dust from the Vostok ice core over the last 400 000 years For the animated movie, see Ice Age (movie). ... The Indo-Australian plate is shown in dull orange on this map. ...  The Eurasian plate, shown in green The Eurasian Plate is a tectonic plate covering Eurasia (a landmass consisting of the continents Europe and Asia) except that it does not cover the Indian subcontinent, the Arabian subcontinent, and the area east of the Verkhoyansk Range in East Siberia. ... Perspective view of the Himalaya and Mount Everest as seen from space looking south-south-east from over the Tibetan Plateau. ... Aletsch glacier, Switzerland A glacier is a large, long-lasting river of ice that is formed on land and moves in response to gravity. ... A floristic province is a geographic area with a relatively uniform composition of plant species. ... Malesia is a biogeographical region straddling the boundary of the Indomalaya and Australasia ecozones. ... The Malay Peninsula (Malay: Semenanjung Tanah Melayu) is a major peninsula located in Southeast Asia. ...


New Zealand and New Caledonia are the other former fragments of Gondwana in the region.


The island groups north and east of New Guinea and New Caledonia, including Bismarck Archipelago, Admiralty Islands, Solomon Islands and Vanuatu, were pushed up by the collision of the Australian plate with other oceanic plates. These islands, collectively known as the East Melanesian Islands, were colonized by plants and some animals from New Guinea and New Caledonia, and are considered part of the Australasian ecozone based on those affinities. Further north and east are the Pacific island groups of Micronesia, Fiji, and Polynesia, which are also of relatively recent volcanic origin, and constitute the separate Oceania ecozone, although they share many ecological affinities with Australasia. The Bismarck Archipelago is a group of islands off the coast of New Guinea in the southwestern Pacific Ocean, named in honour of the German chancellor Otto von Bismarck and belonging to Papua New Guinea. ... The Admiralty Islands are a group of 18 islands in the Bismarck Archipelago. ... The East Melanesian Islands is a biodiversity hotspot defined by Conservation International (CI). ... Polynesia is generally defined as the islands within the triangle Polynesia (from Greek: πολύς many, νῆσος island) is a large grouping of over 1,000 islands scattered over the central and southern Pacific Ocean. ... Oceania is the smallest of the worlds terrestrial ecozones, and unique in not including any continental land mass. ...


Fauna

Bats were the only mammals of New Zealand until the arrival of humans. Birds adapted to ecological niches, such as grazers, insectivores, and large predators that have elsewhere been taken by mammals. New Zealand remained in the cool and humid latitudes, and lost many plant and animal families that were intolerant of its cool climate, including the araucarias and most proteas, as well as crocodiles and turtles. Genera Crocodylus Osteolaemus Tomistoma See full taxonomy. ... Suborders Cryptodira Pleurodira See text for families. ...


Large reptiles, including crocodiles and huge monitor lizards (family Varanidae), like the Komodo Dragon (Varanus komodoensis), are ecologically important predators in Australia, New Guinea, and Wallacea. Orders  Crocodilia - Crocodilians scary crocodiles. ... Genera Crocodylus Osteolaemus Tomistoma See full taxonomy. ... Species Many, see text. ... Binomial name Varanus komodoensis Ouwens, 1912 The Komodo Dragon (Varanus komodoensis) is the largest living lizard in the world, growing to an average length of 2-3 meters (10 feet). ...


There are 13 endemic bird families, including emus, cassowaries, kiwi, kagu, cockatoos, birds of paradise, and honeyeaters Orders Many - see section below. ... Species Dromaius novaehollandiae Dromaius baudinianus(extinct) Dromaius ater(extinct) Synonyms Dromiceius novaehollandiae disambiguation page The Emu (pronounced , or (primarily American) ) (Dromaius novaehollandiae, Latin for fast-footed New Hollander. ... Species Casuarius casuarius Casuarius unappendiculatus Casuarius bennetti Cassowaries (genus Casuarius) are very large flightless birds native to the tropical forests of New Guinea and northeastern Australia. ... {Kiwi}- The bestfriend of Ricey. ... Binomial name Rhynochetos jubatus Verreaux & DesMurs, 1860 The Kagu (Rhynochetos jubatus) is a long-legged greyish bird found in the dense mountain forests of New Caledonia. ... Genera Probosciger Calyptorhynchus Callocephalon Eolophus Cacatua Nymphicus A cockatoo is any of the 21 bird species belonging to the family Cacatuidae. ... For the flowering plant of this name, see Strelitzia Genera Cicinnurus Diphyllodes Epimachus Lophorina Manucodia Paradisaea Parotia Ptiloris Seleucidis Lesser Bird of Paradise Paradisaea minor (c)Roderick Eime The birds of paradise are members of the family Paradisaeidae of the order Passeriformes, found in Oceania. ... Genera Anthochaera Acanthagenys Plectorhyncha Philemon Xanthornyzma Entomyzon Manorina Xanthotis Meliphaga Lichenostomus Melithreptus Notiomystis Glycichaera Lichmera Trichodere Grantiella Phylidonyris Ramsayornis Conopophila Acanthorhynchus Certhionyx Myzomela Anthornis Prosthemadera Epthianura Ashbyia The honeyeaters are a large and diverse family of small to medium sized birds most common in Australia and New Guinea, but also...


Human impact

The arrival of humans to Australia and New Guinea 50-60,000 years ago brought dogs (dingos) to Australia, and dogs and pigs to New Guinea. Pigs and rats arrived on New Zealand with the first Polynesian settlers 800 years ago. The arrival of the first humans coincided with the extinction of much of the native megafauna (see Holocene extinction event). The arrival of Europeans brought a whole host of new animals and plants, including sheep, goats, rabbits and foxes, to Australasia, which have further disrupted the native ecologies; a great many Australasian plants and animals are presently endangered. Trinomial name Canis lupus familiaris (Linnaeus, 1758) The dog is a mammal in the order Carnivora. ... Trinomial name Canis lupus dingo (Meyer, 1793) Breed standards (external link) ANKC The dingo (Canis lupus dingo) is a type of wild dog, probably descended from the Indian Wolf (Canis lupus pallipes). ... Species Sus barbatus Sus bucculentus Sus cebifrons Sus celebensis Sus domesticus Sus heureni Sus philippensis Sus salvanius Sus scrofa Sus timoriensis Sus verrucosus Pigs are ungulates native to Eurasia collectively grouped under the genus Sus within the Suidae family. ... Species 50 species; see text *Several subfamilies of Muroids include animals called rats. ... Polynesia is generally defined as the islands within the triangle Polynesia (from Greek: πολύς many, νῆσος island) is a large grouping of over 1,000 islands scattered over the central and southern Pacific Ocean. ... Megafauna are large animals of any particular region or time. ... The Holocene extinction event is a name customarily given to the widespread, ongoing extinction of species during the modern Holocene epoch. ... Species See text. ... Species See Species and subspecies The goat is a mammal in the genus Capra, which consists of nine species: the Ibex, the West Caucasian Tur, the East Caucasian Tur, the Markhor, and the Wild Goat. ... Genera Pentalagus Bunolagus Nesolagus Romerolagus Brachylagus Sylvilagus Oryctolagus Poelagus Rabbits are small mammals in the family Leporidae, found in many parts of the world. ... A Red Fox (Vulpes vulpes) A fox is a member of any of 27 species of small omnivorous caniness. ...


Australasia terrestrial ecoregions

Australasia Tropical and subtropical moist broadleaf forests edit
Admiralty Islands lowland rain forests Papua New Guinea
Banda Sea Islands moist deciduous forests Indonesia
Biak-Numfoor rain forests Indonesia
Buru rain forests Indonesia
Central Range montane rain forests Indonesia, Papua New Guinea
Halmahera rain forests Indonesia
Huon Peninsula montane rain forests Papua New Guinea
Japen rain forests Indonesia
Lord Howe Island subtropical forests Australia
Louisiade Archipelago rain forests Papua New Guinea
New Britain-New Ireland lowland rain forests Papua New Guinea
New Britain-New Ireland montane rain forests Papua New Guinea
New Caledonia rain forests New Caledonia
Norfolk Island subtropical forests Australia
Northern New Guinea lowland rain and freshwater swamp forests Indonesia, Papua New Guinea
Northern New Guinea montane rain forests Indonesia, Papua New Guinea
Queensland tropical rain forests Australia
Seram rain forests Indonesia
Solomon Islands rain forests Papua New Guinea, Solomon Islands
Southeastern Papuan rain forests Papua New Guinea
Southern New Guinea freshwater swamp forests Indonesia, Papua New Guinea
Southern New Guinea lowland rain forests Indonesia, Papua New Guinea
Sulawesi lowland rain forests Indonesia
Sulawesi montane rain forests Indonesia
Trobriand Islands rain forests Papua New Guinea
Vanuatu rain forests Solomon Islands, Vanuatu
Vogelkop montane rain forests Indonesia
Vogelkop-Aru lowland rain forests Indonesia
Australasia Tropical and subtropical dry broadleaf forests edit
Lesser Sundas deciduous forests Indonesia
New Caledonia dry forests New Caledonia
Sumba deciduous forests Indonesia
Timor and Wetar deciduous forests Indonesia
Australasia Temperate broadleaf and mixed forests edit
Chatham Islands temperate forests New Zealand
Eastern Australian temperate forests Australia
Fiordland temperate forests New Zealand
Nelson Coast temperate forests New Zealand
Northland temperate forests New Zealand
Northland temperate kauri forests New Zealand
Stewart Island/Rakiura temperate forests New Zealand
Richmond temperate forests New Zealand
Southeast Australia temperate forests Australia
Southland temperate forests New Zealand
Tasmanian Central Highland forests Australia
Tasmanian temperate forests Australia
Tasmanian temperate rain forests Australia
Westland temperate forests New Zealand
Australasia Temperate coniferous forests edit
Australasian mixed temperate rain forests New Zealand, Tasmania, southeast Australia
Australasia Tropical and subtropical grasslands, savannas, and shrublands edit
Arnhem Land tropical savanna Australia
Brigalow tropical savanna Australia
Cape York tropical savanna Australia
Carpentaria tropical savanna Australia
Einasleigh upland savanna Australia
Kimberly tropical savanna Australia
Mitchell grass downs Australia
Trans Fly savanna and grasslands Indonesia, Papua New Guinea
Victoria Plains tropical savanna Australia
Australasia Temperate grasslands, savannas, and shrublands edit
Canterbury-Otago tussock grasslands New Zealand
Eastern Australia mulga shrublands Australia
Southeast Australia temperate savanna Australia
Australasia Montane grasslands and shrublands edit
Australian Alps montane grasslands Australia
Central Range sub-alpine grasslands Indonesia, Papua New Guinea
Southland montane grasslands New Zealand
Australasia Tundra edit
Antipodes Subantarctic Islands tundra Australia, New Zealand
Australasia Mediterranean forests, woodlands, and shrub edit
Coolgardie woodlands Australia
Esperance mallee Australia
Eyre and York mallee Australia
Jarrah-Karri forest and shrublands Australia
Kwongan heathlands Australia
Mount Lofty woodlands Australia
Murray-Darling woodlands and mallee Australia
Naracoorte woodlands Australia
Southwest Australia savanna Australia
Southwest Australia woodlands Australia
Australasia Deserts and xeric shrublands edit
Carnarvon xeric shrublands Australia
Central Ranges xeric scrub Australia
Gibson Desert Australia
Great Sandy-Tanami Desert Australia
Great Victoria Desert Australia
Nullarbor Plain xeric shrublands Australia
Pilbara shrublands Australia
Simpson Desert Australia
Tirari-Sturt's Stony Desert Australia
Western Australian mulga shrublands Australia
Australasia Mangrove edit
New Guinea mangroves Indonesia
Australian mangroves Australia
New Zealand mangroves New Zealand

Tropical and subtropical moist broadleaf forests, also known as tropical rain forests or tropical wet forests, are a tropical and subtropical biome. ... The Admiralty Islands are a group of 18 islands in the Bismarck Archipelago. ... Buru Island (Operational Navigation Chart, 1967) Not for navigational use Buru is an island in the Maluku (Indonesian province) province of Indonesia. ... Halmahera (also Jilolo or Gilolo) is the largest island in the Maluku Islands. ... Lord Howe Island showing Mts Lidgbird and Gower. ... Moving westward from eastern end of the chain are the islands of Rossel and Tagula. ... The New Caledonia rain forests are a terrestrial ecoregion, located in New Caledonia in the South Pacific. ... The Queensland tropical rain forests are a terrestrial ecoregion located in northeastern Australia. ... Seram (formerly Ceram, also called Seran or Serang) is an island in the Maluku province of Indonesia. ... The Solomon Islands rain forests are a terrestrial ecoregion which includes most of the Solomon Islands (except the Santa Cruz Islands) and the islands of Bougainville and Buka, which are part of Papua New Guinea. ... The Trobriand Islands are a 170 mi² archipelago of coral atolls off the eastern coast of New Guinea. ... The Vanuatu rain forests are a terrestrial ecoregion that includes the islands of Vanuatu, as well as the Santa Cruz Islands group of the neighboring Solomon Islands. ... The tropical and subtropical dry broadleaf forest biome is located at tropical and subtropical latitudes. ... Sumba NASA Earthview Sumba is an Indonesian island. ... Temperate broadleaf and mixed forests are a temperate and humid biome. ... The Chatham Islands from space. ... Stewart Island/Rakiura is the third largest island of New Zealand. ... The Tasmanian temperate rain forests are an ecoregion of western Tasmania. ... Temperate coniferous forests are a terrestrial biome found in temperate regions of the world with warm summers and cool winters and adequate rainfall to sustain a forest. ... Temperate rain forest in the Mount Hood Wilderness, Oregon, United States. ... Emblems: Flora Tasmanian Blue Gum Fauna none Motto: Ubertas et Fidelitas (Fertility and Faithfulness) Slogan or Nickname: The Apple Isle Other Australian states and territories Capital Hobart Government Governor Premier Const. ... Tropical and subtropical grasslands, savannas, and shrublands are a grassland biome located in semi-arid to semi-humid climate regions of subtropical and tropical latitudes. ... Temperate grasslands, savannas, and shrublands is a group of biomes in which the climate is temperate to semi-arid. ... Montane grasslands and shrublands is biome defined by the World Wildlife Fund. ... The subalpine region of Australia is restricted to the montane regions of south-eastern Australia above 1300 metres (the upper altitudinal limit of Eucalyptus pauciflora). ... In physical geography, tundra is an area where the tree growth is hindered by low temperatures and short growing seasons. ... The Antipodes Subantarctic Islands tundra is a tundra ecoregion that includes five islands or island groups in the Southern Ocean: the Bounty Islands, Auckland Islands, Antipodes Islands, and Campbell Island of New Zealand, and Macquarie Island of Australia. ... Bush Mediterranean forests, woodlands, and shrub is a temperate biome, characterized by hot-dry summers and mild and rainy winters. ... Deserts and xeric shrublands is a biome characterized by a dry climate. ... The Carnarvon xeric shrublands or Carnarvon bioregion is a deserts and xeric shrublands ecoregion of Western Australia. ... A four wheel drive in the Gibson Desert The Gibson Desert is a largely unspoilt Western Australian desert made up of sandhills and dry grass. ... This article is about the Australian desert. ... The Tanami Desert is a desert in northern Australia. ... The Great Victoria Desert is a barren, arid and sparsely populated desert ecoregion in southern Australia. ... NASA - Visible Earth, Nullarbor. ... The Simpson Desert is a desert covering nearly 100,000 square kilometres in central Australia, occupying an area bounded on the west by the Finke River and the Mabel Range, the Adam Range to the north, the Georgina River and the Diamantina River to the east, and Lake Eyre to... Shaelah is the coolest person ever!!!!! ... Binomial name Avicennia marina (Forsk. ...

See also

It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Oceania. ...

External link

  • Map of the ecozones
Terrestrial biomes
Tropical and subtropical moist broadleaf forests · Tropical and subtropical dry broadleaf forests · Tropical and subtropical coniferous forests · Temperate broadleaf and mixed forests · Temperate coniferous forests · Boreal forests/taiga ·Tropical and subtropical grasslands, savannas, and shrublands · Temperate grasslands, savannas, and shrublands · Flooded grasslands and savannas · Montane grasslands and shrublands · Tundra ·Mediterranean forests, woodlands, and shrub · Deserts and xeric shrublands · Mangrove
Ecozones
Afrotropic · Antarctic · Australasia · Indomalaya · Nearctic · Neotropic · Oceania · Palearctic

  Results from FactBites:
 
Australasia ecozone (119 words)
The Australasian ecozone is Australia, Papua New Guinea and Indonesia east of Java, Bali and Borneo.
The division from the Indomalayan ecozone is the Wallace Line, named after the naturalist Alfred Russel Wallace who identified the differences between the islands either side of the line.
From a biological point of view, Australasia is a distinct region with a common evolutionary history and a great many unique plants and animals, some of them common to the entire area, others specific to particular parts but sharing a common ancestory.
Ecozone - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (581 words)
Ecozones are global divisions which have their own characteristic interplay of climatic factors, morphodynamics, soil-forming processes, living conditions for plants and animals, and production potentials for agriculture and forestry.
A few of the ecozones are subdivided into comparatively independent subregions or ecoregions, such as the Polar subpolar zone, which is divided into the glacier-covered regions (ice deserts), the frost debris regions and the tundras.
These ecozones occur in bands, often fragmentated because of the distribution of the continents and oceans, from the poles to the equator.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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