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Encyclopedia > Aureolus
Aureolus
Usurper of the Roman Empire
Reign 268 (against Gallienus)
Full name Manius Acilius Aureolus
Died 268

Manius Acilius Aureolus (d. 268) was a military commander and usurper who rebelled against Emperor Gallienus and supported the Gallic Emperor Postumus. Usurpers were a common feature of the late Roman Empire, especially from the so-called crisis of the third century onwards, when political instability became the rule. ... For other uses, see Roman Empire (disambiguation). ... Events The Alamanni invade Italy. ... Emperor Gallienus Gallienus depicted on a lead seal Publius Licinius Egnatius Gallienus (218-268) ruled the Roman Empire as co-emperor with his father Valerian from 253 to 260, and then as the sole Roman Emperor from 260 to 268. ... Events The Alamanni invade Italy. ... Events The Alamanni invade Italy. ... Usurpers were a common feature of the late Roman Empire, especially from the so-called crisis of the third century onwards, when political instability became the rule. ... Roman Emperor is the term historians use to refer to rulers of the Roman Empire, after the epoch conventionally named the Roman Republic. ... Emperor Gallienus Gallienus depicted on a lead seal Publius Licinius Egnatius Gallienus (218-268) ruled the Roman Empire as co-emperor with his father Valerian from 253 to 260, and then as the sole Roman Emperor from 260 to 268. ... The Gallic Empire (in Latin, imperium Galliarum) is the modern name for the independent realm that lived a brief existence during the Roman Empires Crisis of the Third Century, from 260 to 274. ... Marcus Cassianius Latinius Postumus was emperor of the Gallic Empire from AD 259 to 268. ...


Against Macriani and Postumus

Aureolus was a Roman cavalry commander under Emperor Gallienus. In 261 he had defeated in Thrace the army of the usurpers Macrianus Major and Macrianus Minor, who had rebelled against Gallienus. For other uses, see Roman Empire (disambiguation). ... Soldiers or warriors who fought mounted on horseback in combat are commonly known as cavalry (from French cavalerie). ... Thrace (Bulgarian: , Greek: , Latin: , Turkish: ) is a historical and geographic area in southeast Europe. ... Fulvius Macrianus (died 261), also known as Macrianus Major to distinguish him from his son Macrianus Minor, was disqualified from the imperial office because of his lameness, but with support from Ballista, Roman emperor Valerians praefect, he had his two sons Macrianus Minor and Quietus elevated to the throne. ... Roman emperor Titus Fulvius Iunius Macrianus (died 261), also known as Macrianus Minor to distinguish him from his father, was the son of Fulvius Macrianus. ...


In 265, he was sent to dispose of the rebellion of Postumus in Gaul, who had carved the Gallic Empire for himself out of the northern Roman provinces, but his carelessness allowed the usurper to flee. Map of Gaul circa 58 BC Gaul (Latin: ) was the name given, in ancient times, to the region of Western Europe comprising present-day northern Italy, France, Belgium, western Switzerland and the parts of the Netherlands and Germany on the west bank of the Rhine river. ... The Gallic Empire (in Latin, imperium Galliarum) is the modern name for the independent realm that lived a brief existence during the Roman Empires Crisis of the Third Century, from 260 to 274. ...


Zosimus (1.41) reports that Aureolus and other two officers conspired against Gallienus, but that all of them were punished and submitted, except Aureolus, who retained his anger against the emperor. For the pope of this name see Pope Zosimus Zosimus, Greek historical writer, nourished at Constantinople during the second half of the 5th century A.D. According to Photius, he was a count, and held the office of advocate of the imperial treasury. ...


Rebellion against Gallienus and death

By 268, Aureolus had succeeded to recover Raetia to the central empire (Aurelius Victor, 33.17). In that same year, he was in Mediolanum, where he rebelled against Gallienus, supporting Postumus and minting coins in his name. He sent letters to Postumus, asking the Gallic emperor to come and invade Italy, but Postumus refused, and left Aureolus to his fate. The Roman Empire ca. ... Sextus Aurelius Victor, prefect of Pannonia about 360 ( xxi. ... Arcadius solidus, from Mediolanum mint, 400s. ...


Gallienus left his Scythian war, and returned to Italy to siege Aureolus in Mediolanum, but was killed by his own soldiers. After the death of the emperor, Aureolus claimed the purple with the support of his troops, but then surrendered to Emperor Claudius Gothicus. He was killed by the Praetorian Guard, who still remembered his treachery (Zosimus 1.41; Zonaras 26.1f). Marcus Aurelius Claudius Gothicus (May 10, 213/214 - January, 270) , more often referred to as Claudius II, ruled the Roman Empire for less than two years (268 - 270), but during that brief time, he was so successful and beloved by the people of Rome that he attained divine status. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... For the pope of this name see Pope Zosimus Zosimus, Greek historical writer, nourished at Constantinople during the second half of the 5th century A.D. According to Photius, he was a count, and held the office of advocate of the imperial treasury. ... Joannes (John) Zonaras, Byzantine chronicler and theologian, flourished at Constantinople in the 12th century. ...


The author(s) of the Historia Augusta lists him among the Thirty Tyrants. The Augustan History (Lat. ... The Thirty Tyrants, or Thirty Pretenders (Latin: Tyranni Triginta) were a group of thirty men and two women declared by the author of the notoriously unreliable Historia Augusta, writing under the name Trebellius Pollio, to have been pretenders to the throne of the Roman Empire in the time of the...


References


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