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Encyclopedia > Aunt Jemima


Aunt Jemima is a trademark for pancake flour, syrup, and other breakfast foods. The trademark dates to 1893, although Aunt Jemima pancake mix debuted in 1889. The phrase "Aunt Jemima" is sometimes used as a female version of "Uncle Tom" to refer to a black woman who is perceived as obsequiously servile or acting in, or protective of, the interests of whites.[1] Two pancakes with maple syrup. ... For other uses, see Flour (disambiguation). ... In cooking, a syrup (from Arabic شراب sharab, beverage, via Latin siropus) is a thick, viscous liquid, containing a large amount of dissolved sugars, but showing little tendency to deposit crystals. ... Breakfast is a meal, typically smaller than lunch or dinner, usually eaten in the morning. ... Year 1893 (MDCCCXCIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1889 (MDCCCLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... This article is about the racial term. ... “Whites” redirects here. ...


The 1950s television show, Beulah, came under fire for depicting a "mammy"-like black maid and cook who was somewhat reminiscent of Aunt Jemima. Today, "Beulah" and "Aunt Jemima" are regarded as more or less interchangeable as terms of disparagement.[citation needed] The name "Jemima" is biblical in nature and is an anglicized version of the feminine Hebrew name Yamimah, the second of Job's daughters born to him at the end of his self-titled book of the Bible. The 1950s decade refers to the years 1950 to 1959 inclusive. ... A television program is the content of television broadcasting. ... Beulah was a popular radio show of the 1940s that later became the first television sitcom to star an African American. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Terms of disparagement are pejorative words and phrases which are either intended to be or are often regarded as insulting, impolite or unkind. ... The word Hebrew most likely means to cross over, referring to the Semitic people crossing over the Euphrates River. ... William Blakes imagining of Satan inflicting boils on Job. ... The Book of Job (איוב) is one of the books of the Hebrew Bible. ... This Gutenberg Bible is displayed by the United States Library. ...

Contents

History

The direct inspiration for Aunt Jemima originates from a minstrelsy/vaudeville song of the same name. Chris L. Rutt of the Pearl Milling Company saw the song being sung by blackface performers Baker & Farrell wearing an apron and kerchief, and appropriated the character.[2] The minstrel show, or minstrelsy, is an indigenous form of American entertainment consisting of comic skits, variety acts, dancing, and music, usually performed by white people in blackface. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This reproduction of a 1900 minstrel show poster, originally published by the Strobridge Litho Co. ... This article is about the garment. ... A woman wears a bandanna on her head. ...


Aunt Jemima is depicted as a plump, smiling, bright-eyed, black woman, originally wearing a kerchief over her hair. She was represented as a slave and was the most commonplace representation of the stereotypical "mammy" character. This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


The character of Aunt Jemima also appeared in vaudeville, played by comedienne-singer Tess Gardella (a white actress, who performed the role in blackface).[3] This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Tess Gardella (1897 - January 3, 1950) was a white Italian-American who is best known for her stage persona of Aunt Jemima. She performed on both stage and screen and always in blackface. ...


The woman whose likeness was painted for the logo was Anna Short Harrington. Nancy Green, born a slave in Montgomery County, Kentucky, was hired by R.T. Davis Milling Company to play the Jemima character from 1890 to her death on September 24, 1923. Green (as Jemima), operated a pancake-cooking display at the World's Columbian Exposition in Chicago, Illinois during 1893, beside the "world's largest flour barrel." Harriette Widmer also portrayed the character on radio. There is also speculation that Ohio woman Rosie Riles (19011969) modelled for the first conception of the Aunt Jemima character. This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Portrait of Nancy Green as Aunt Jemima by A. B. Frost Nancy Green (November 17, 1834 - September 23, 1923) was a storyteller, cook, activist, and one of the first African-American models hired to promote a corporate trademark as Aunt Jemima.[1] Green was born into slavery in 1834 in... Montgomery County is a county located in the state of Kentucky. ... Year 1890 (MDCCCXC) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar). ... is the 267th day of the year (268th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1923 (MCMXXIII) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... One-third scale replica of Daniel Chester Frenchs Republic, which stood in the great basin at the exposition, Chicago, 2004 The Worlds Columbian Exposition (also called The Chicago Worlds Fair), a Worlds Fair, was held in Chicago in 1893, to celebrate the 400th anniversary of Christopher... Flag Seal Nickname: The Windy City Motto: Urbs In Horto (Latin: City in a Garden), I Will Location Location in Chicagoland and northern Illinois Coordinates , Government Country State Counties United States Illinois Cook, DuPage Mayor Richard M. Daley (D) Geographical characteristics Area     City 606. ... Year 1893 (MDCCCXCIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Official language(s) English de facto Capital Columbus Largest city Columbus Largest metro area Cleveland Area  Ranked 34th  - Total 44,825 sq mi (116,096 km²)  - Width 220 miles (355 km)  - Length 220 miles (355 km)  - % water 8. ... Year 1901 (MCMI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday [1] of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Also: 1969 (Stargate SG-1) episode. ...


Aunt Jemima was not the only depiction of a black person to be used in early advertising. Black caricatures were often featured prominently as trademarks of several products. Most commonly, such images were used to sell food, cleaning agents, agricultural produce, and products that were black or brown, such as coffee, ink, and chocolate. Examples include Cream of Wheat, featuring a cook named "Rastus," Fairbank's Gold Dust, a powdered laundry detergent, featuring "Goldie" and "Dusty," the "Gold Dust Twins," J & P Coat's Threads, featuring "Topsy" and "Mammy" cookie jars. Objections to the depiction of Aunt Jemima and other black advertising date back to the 1920s.[citation needed] According to Slave in a Box by M.M. Manring, one black professional polled in 1928 responded, "I positively hate this illustration." Original icon design from 1895 Box design of Cream of Wheat until it was sold to B&G Foods Cream of Wheat is a hot breakfast cereal invented in 1893 by wheat millers in Grand Forks, North Dakota[1]. The cereal is currently manufactured and sold by B&G Foods. ... Rastus appearing in an advertisement for Cream of Wheat Rastus is a given name associated with African Americans in the United States. ... Simon Legree menaces Uncle Tom Uncle Toms Cabin (ISBN 0553212184) is a novel by American novelist Harriet Beecher Stowe which treats slavery as a central theme. ... The 1920s is a decade that is sometimes referred to as the Jazz Age or the Roaring Twenties, usually applied to America. ... Year 1928 (MCMXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


The actress Aubrey Andreozzi recently depicted her in a Thursday morning television program, entitled Breakfast at the Firepit. She had chosen to be a "white Jemima," wearing only the apron and bandana, but it worked well.


The Aunt Jemima trademark has been modified several times over the years. She has been made younger and more physically attractive, and her kerchief has been eliminated for a more modern hairstyle and pearls. This new look remains with the products to this day. For other things called pearl, see pearl (disambiguation). ...


Quaker Oats bought the brand in 1926.[4] Aunt Jemima frozen foods were licensed out to Aurora Foods in 1996 and in 2004 absorbed into Pinnacle Foods Corporation. Quaker Oats Company makes many types and flavors of oatmeal. ... Year 1926 (MCMXXVI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Frozen food is food preserved under the process of freezing. ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ... Pinnacle Foods Corporation is one of North Americas largest packaged food companies. ...

  • 1964: Aunt Jemima receives Key to the City of Albion on January 25, 1964. She visited Albion many times for fundraisers. [5]

Also Nintendo emulator: 1964 (emulator). ...

References

  1. ^ Green, Jonathon. The Cassell Dictionary of Slang, 1998. p. 36.
  2. ^ http://www.prmuseum.com/kendrix/trinity.html
  3. ^ Slide, Anthony. The Encyclopedia of Vaudeville. Westport, Connecticut, Greenwood Press, 1994. p. 15–6.
  4. ^ http://www.auntjemima.com/aj_history/
  5. ^ http://www.albionmich.com/history/histor_notebook/070107.shtml

Further reading

  • Goings, Kenneth. Mammy and Uncle Mose: Black Collectibles and American Stereotyping. 1994. Bloomington: Indiana University Press ISBN 0-253-32592-7
  • Manning, M.M. Slave in a Box: The Strange Career of Aunt Jemima. 1998. Charlottesville, University of Virginia Press ISBN 0-8139-1811-1

External links

  • Quaker Oats Aunt Jemima website
  • Pinnacle Foods Aunt Jemima website
  • Grave of Rosie Riles
  • Rosa Washington Riles
  • Radio Talk Show Host Calls Rice an "Aunt Jemima"
  • The Women Who Have Portrayed Aunt Jemima
  • Nutrition facts

  Results from FactBites:
 
Aunt Jemima - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (622 words)
Aunt Jemima is depicted as a plump, smiling, bright-eyed fl woman, originally wearing a kerchief over her hair.
Aunt Jemima was characteristic of most advertising with fl women as a reminder that their place was in the kitchen, and the majority of advertising was associated with food.
The phrase "Aunt Jemima" is sometimes used as a female version of Uncle Tom to refer to a fl woman who is perceived as obsequiously servile or acting in, or protective of, the interests of whites.
On "Aunt Jemima of the Ocean Waves" (1208 words)
By then out of her costume and role as Aunt Jemima, the woman, "her blue-rinsed hair / without the red bandana now," asks the narrator for a light, and soon explains that she spoke to him because he reminded her of a "friend" she once had.
The idea of the "deformed" or monstrous reappears in "Aunt Jemima of the Ocean Waves." The central concern in the poem is protest against racial stereotypes--those directed especially against the fl woman.
As the Zulu king and the Sambo stereotypes erroneously define the fl man, so does the Aunt Jemima stereotype erroneously define the fl woman, a characterization that reveals she is likewise an avatar of the fl mammy stereotypes symbol of the antebellum surrogate mother whom Stephen Vincent Benét so accurately described in John Browm's Body.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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