FACTOID # 9: The bookmobile capital of America is Kentucky.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Augustus FitzRoy, 3rd Duke of Grafton
The Duke of Grafton
Prime Minister of Great Britain
Periods in Office: 14 October 176828 January 1770
Predecessors: The Earl of Chatham
Successors: Lord North
Date of Birth: 28 September 1735
Date of Death: 14 March 1811
Place of Birth:
Place of Death: Euston Hall, Suffolk
Political Party: Whig

The Most Noble Augustus Henry FitzRoy, 3rd Duke of Grafton, KG, PC (28 September 173514 March 1811) was a British Whig statesman of the Georgian era. He was one of a handful of dukes that served as Prime Minister. Download high resolution version (739x959, 70 KB) This work is copyrighted. ... October 14 is the 287th day of the year (288th in Leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1768 was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... January 28 is the 28th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1770 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... The Right Honourable William Pitt, 1st Earl of Chatham (15 November 1708–11 May 1778) was a British Whig statesman who achieved his greatest fame as war minister during the Seven Years War (aka French and Indian War) and who was later Prime Minister of Great Britain. ... Frederick North, 2nd Earl of Guilford (April 13, 1732–August 5, 1792), more often known by his earlier title, Lord North, was Prime Minister of Great Britain from 1770 to 1782, and a major actor in the American Revolution. ... September 28 is the 271st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (272nd in leap years). ... Events April 16 - The London premiere of Alcina by George Frideric Handel, his first the first Italian opera for the Royal Opera House at Covent Garden. ... March 14 is the 73rd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (74th in Leap years) with 292 days remaining in the year. ... 1811 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Euston Hall from Morriss County Seats (1880). ... Suffolk (pronounced suffuk) is a large traditional and administrative county in the East Anglia region of eastern England. ... While the Whigs (along with the Tories) are often described as one of the two political parties in late 17th to mid 19th century Great Britain, it is more accurate to describe them as loose political groupings or tendencies. ... The prefix The Most Noble is a title of quality attached to the names of dukes and duchesses in the United Kingdom. ... A garter is one of the Orders most recognisable insignia. ... Her Majestys Most Honourable Privy Council is a body of advisors to the British Sovereign. ... September 28 is the 271st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (272nd in leap years). ... Events April 16 - The London premiere of Alcina by George Frideric Handel, his first the first Italian opera for the Royal Opera House at Covent Garden. ... March 14 is the 73rd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (74th in Leap years) with 292 days remaining in the year. ... 1811 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... While the Whigs (along with the Tories) are often described as one of the two political parties in late 17th to mid 19th century Great Britain, it is more accurate to describe them as loose political groupings or tendencies. ... The term statesman is a respectful term used to refer to diplomats, politicians, and other notable figures of state. ... The Georgian era is a period of British history, normally defined as including the reigns of the kings George I, George II, George III and George IV, i. ... The term duke is a title of nobility which refers to the sovereign male ruler of a Continental European duchy, to a nobleman of the highest grade of the British peerage, or to the highest rank of nobility in various other European countries, including Portugal, Spain and France (in Italy... In the United Kingdom, the Prime Minister is the head of government, exercising many of the executive functions nominally vested in the Sovereign, who is head of state. ...


He was a son of Lord Augustus FitzRoy and Elizabeth Cosby, daughter of Colonel William Cosby, who served as a colonial Governor of New York. His father was the third son of Charles FitzRoy, 2nd Duke of Grafton and Lady Henrietta Somerset, which made FitzRoy a great-grandson of both Henry FitzRoy, 1st Duke of Grafton and the Charles Somerset, Marquess of Worcester. He was notably a fourth-generation descendant of King Charles II and Barbara Palmer, 1st Duchess of Cleveland. His younger brother was Charles FitzRoy, 1st Baron Southampton. From the death of his uncle in 1747 he was styled Earl of Euston as his grandfather's heir apparent. This is a list of the Governors of New York. ... Charles FitzRoy, 2nd Duke of Grafton (25 October 1683 - 6 May 1757) was an Irish and English politician. ... Henry FitzRoy, 1st Duke of Grafton (1663 - 1690) was the natural son of King Charles II by Barbara Villiers, Countess of Castlemaine and later Duchess of Cleveland. ... Charles Somerset (ca. ... Charles II (29 May 1630–6 February 1685) was the King of England, King of Scots, and King of Ireland from 30 January 1649 (retrospectively de jure) or 29 May 1660 (de facto) until his death. ... Barbara Villiers, Countess of Castlemaine Barbara Villiers (November 1640 - October 9, 1709), Duchess of Cleveland, was one of the most notorious of Charles IIs mistresses. ... // Events January 31 - The first venereal diseases clinic opens at London Dock Hospital April 9 - The Scottish Jacobite Lord Lovat was beheaded by axe on Tower Hill, London, for high treason; he was the last man to be executed in this way in Britain May 14 - First battle of Cape...


Lord Euston was educated at Westminster School, made the Grand Tour and obtained a degree at Peterhouse, Cambridge. In 1756, he married the Honourable Anne Liddell, daughter of Henry Liddell, 1st Baron Ravensworth. Later that year, he entered Parliament as MP for Boroughbridge, a pocket borough; several months later, he switched constituencies to Bury St Edmunds, which was controlled by his family. However, a year later, his grandfather died and he succeeded as 3rd Duke of Grafton, which elevated him to the House of Lords. Motto: Dat Deus Incrementum The Royal College of St. ... In the 18th century, the Grand Tour was a kind of education for wealthy British noblemen. ... Full name Peterhouse Motto - Named after St Peter Previous names The Scholars of the Bishop of Ely St Peters College Established 1284 Sister College(s) Merton College Master The Lord Wilson of Tillyorn Location Trumpington Street Undergraduates 270 Postgraduates 125 Homepage Boatclub The chapel cloisters, through which Old Court... The University of Cambridge is the second-oldest university in the English-speaking world, with one of the most selective sets of entry requirements in the United Kingdom. ... 1756 was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... The Parliament of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is the supreme legislative institution in the United Kingdom and British overseas territories (it alone has parliamentary sovereignty). ... A Member of Parliament, or MP, is a representative elected by the voters of an electoral district to a parliament; in the Westminster system, specifically to the lower house. ... Map sources for Boroughbridge at grid reference SE3966 Boroughbridge is a small town 13 miles northwest of York in North Yorkshire in England. ... The term rotten borough (or pocket borough, as they were seen as being in the pocket of a patron) refers to a parliamentary borough or constituency in the Kingdom of England (pre-1707), the Kingdom of Great Britain (1707-1801), the Kingdom of Ireland (1536-1801) and the United Kingdom... Map sources for Bury St Edmunds at grid reference TL8564 Bury St Edmunds is a town in the county of Suffolk, England. ... This article is about the British House of Lords. ...


He first became known in politics as an opponent of Lord Bute, a favourite of King George III. Grafton allied with the Duke of Newcastle against Lord Bute, whose term as Prime Minister was short-lived. In 1765, Grafton was appointed a Privy Counsellor, then, following discussions with William Pitt the Elder, he was appointed Northern Secretary in Lord Rockingham's first government. However, he retired the following year, and Pitt (by then Lord Chatham) formed a ministry in which Grafton was First Lord of the Treasury but not Prime Minister. John Stuart, 3rd Earl of Bute (May 25, 1713 - March 10, 1792), was a Scottish nobleman who served as Prime Minister of Great Britain (1762-1763) under George III. A close relative of the Campbell clan (his mother was a daughter of the First Duke of Argyll), Bute succeeded to... George III (George William Frederick) (4 June 1738 – 29 January 1820) was King of Great Britain, and King of Ireland from 25 October 1760 until 1 January 1801, and thereafter King of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland until his death. ... Thomas Pelham-Holles, 1st Duke of Newcastle-upon-Tyne and 1st Duke of Newcastle-under-Lyme (July 21, 1693 - November 17, 1768) was a Whig statesman, whose official life extended throughout the Whig supremacy of the 18th century. ... 1765 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Her Majestys Most Honourable Privy Council is a body of advisors to the British Sovereign. ... The Right Honourable William Pitt, 1st Earl of Chatham (15 November 1708–11 May 1778) was a British Whig statesman who achieved his greatest fame as war minister during the Seven Years War (aka French and Indian War) and who was later Prime Minister of Great Britain. ... The Secretary of State for the Northern Department was a position in the Cabinet of the government of the Kingdom of Great Britain up to 1782. ... Charles Watson-Wentworth, 2nd Marquess of Rockingham (May 13, 1730 – July 1, 1782) was a British Whig statesman, most notable for his two terms as Whig Prime Minister of Great Britain. ... The First Lord of the Treasury is the head of the commission exercising the ancient office of Lord High Treasurer in the United Kingdom, usually but not always the Prime Minister. ...


Chatham's illness at the end of 1767 resulted in Grafton becoming the Government's effective leader (he is credited with entering the office of Prime Minister in 1768), but political differences and the attacks of "Junius" led to his resignation in January 1770. Also in 1768 Grafton became Chancellor of Cambridge University. He became Lord Privy Seal in Lord North's ministry (1771) but resigned in 1775, being in favour of conciliatory action towards the American colonists. In the second Rockingham ministry of 1782 he was again Lord Privy Seal. In later years he was a prominent Unitarian. 1767 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... 1768 was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Junius, the pseudonym of a writer who contributed a series of letters to the London Public Advertiser, from January 21, 1769 to January 21, 1772. ... 1770 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... The Lord Privy Seal or Lord Keeper of the Privy Seal is one of the traditional sinecure offices in the British Cabinet. ... Frederick North, 2nd Earl of Guilford (April 13, 1732–August 5, 1792), more often known by his earlier title, Lord North, was Prime Minister of Great Britain from 1770 to 1782, and a major actor in the American Revolution. ... 1771 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... 1775 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Betsy Ross purportedly sewed the first American flag with 13 stars and 13 stripes representing each of the 13 colonies. ... 1782 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Historic Unitarianism believed in the oneness of God as opposed to traditional Christian belief in the Trinity (Father, Son, and Holy Spirit). ...


Besides his successor, the 4th Duke (1760–1844) and numerous other children, Grafton was the father of General Lord Charles FitzRoy (1764–1829), whose sons Sir Charles FitzRoy (1796–1858), governor of New South Wales, and Robert FitzRoy, the hydrographer, were notable for their achievements. Sir Charles Augustus FitzRoy (born on 10 June 1796 in England) was a British military officer and member of the aristocracy, who held governerships in several British colonies during the 19th century. ... Motto: Orta Recens Quam Pura Nites (Newly Risen, How Brightly You Shine) Nickname: First State, Premier State Other Australian states and territories Capital Sydney Government Governor Premier Const. ... Robert FitzRoy Vice Admiral Robert FitzRoy (July 5, 1805 - April 30, 1865) achieved lasting fame as the captain of HMS Beagle and as a pioneering meteorologist who invented weather forecasts, also proving an able surveyor and hydrographer as well as Governor of New Zealand. ...


Grafton County, New Hampshire, in the United States, is named in his honour. Grafton County is a county located in the state of New Hampshire. ...


The Duke of Grafton's Government

Arms of the Duke of Grafton
Enlarge
Arms of the Duke of Grafton

Image File history File links Augustus-FitzRoy-arms. ... Image File history File links Augustus-FitzRoy-arms. ... In the United Kingdom, the Prime Minister is the head of government, exercising many of the executive functions nominally vested in the Sovereign, who is head of state. ... The First Lord of the Treasury is the head of the commission exercising the ancient office of Lord High Treasurer in the United Kingdom, usually but not always the Prime Minister. ... Leader of the House of Lords is a function in the British government that is always held in combination with a formal Cabinet position, most often Lord President of the Council, Lord Privy Seal or Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster. ... The Lord High Chancellor of Great Britain, or Lord Chancellor and in former times Chancellor of England, is one of the most senior and important functionaries in the government of the United Kingdom. ... Charles Pratt, 1st Earl Camden (1714-18 April 1794), Lord Chancellor of Great Britain, was a leading proponent of civil liberties in eighteenth century England. ... The Office of Lord President of the Council is a British cabinet position, the holder of which acts as presiding officer of the Privy Council. ... Granville Leveson-Gower, 1st Marquess of Stafford, 2nd Earl Gower (4 August 1721 - 26 October 1803) was a British politician. ... The Lord Privy Seal or Lord Keeper of the Privy Seal is one of the traditional sinecure offices in the British Cabinet. ... George William Hervey, 2nd Earl of Bristol (August 31, 1721 - March 18? or 20?, 1775), the eldest son of The Lord Hervey of Ickworth, by his marriage with Mary (1700-1768), daughter of Nicholas Lepell. ... The Rt. ... The Leader of the House of Commons is a member of the Cabinet of the United Kingdom who is responsible for arranging government business in the House of Commons. ... Frederick North, 2nd Earl of Guilford (April 13, 1732–August 5, 1792), more often known by his earlier title, Lord North, was Prime Minister of Great Britain from 1770 to 1782, and a major actor in the American Revolution. ... The Secretary of State for the Northern Department was a position in the Cabinet of the government of the Kingdom of Great Britain up to 1782. ... The Rt Hon. ... 1766 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... 1768 was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Thomas Thynne, 1st Marquess of Bath, 3rd Viscount Weymouth (1734-1796), English politician, was the elder son of Thomas Thynne, 2nd Viscount Weymouth (1710—1751), and the great-grandnephew of Thomas Thynne (c. ... 1768 was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... William Henry Nassau de Zuylestein, 4th Earl of Rochford (1717-28 September 1781), was a British diplomatist and statesman. ... 1768 was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... 1770 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... The Secretary of State for the Southern Department was a position in the cabinet of the government of United Kingdom up to 1782. ... William Petty Fitzmaurice, 1st Marquess of Lansdowne (2 May 1737–7 May 1805), also known as the Earl of Shelburne (1761–1784), was a British statesman. ... 1766 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... 1768 was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Thomas Thynne, 1st Marquess of Bath, 3rd Viscount Weymouth (1734-1796), English politician, was the elder son of Thomas Thynne, 2nd Viscount Weymouth (1710—1751), and the great-grandnephew of Thomas Thynne (c. ... 1768 was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... 1770 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... The Secretary of State for the Colonies or Colonial Secretary was the British Cabinet official in charge of managing the various British colonies. ... Wills Hill, 1st Marquess of Downshire (30 May 1718 - 7 October 1793), was a British politician of the Georgian era. ... The Master-General of the Ordnance (MGO) was an important British military position before 1855, when its duties were largely abolished. ... John Manners, Marquess of Granby (1721 - October 18, 1770), British soldier, was the eldest son of the 3rd Duke of Rutland. ... The First Lord of the Admiralty was a British government position in charge of the Admiralty. ... Edward Hawke, 1st Baron Hawke, (February 21, 1705 - October 16, 1781) was an admiral in the Royal Navy. ...

External links

  • The Third Duke of Grafton
Preceded by:
The Earl of Sandwich
Secretary of State for the Northern Department
1765–1766
Succeeded by:
Henry Seymour Conway
Preceded by:
The Marquess of Rockingham
First Lord of the Treasury
1766–1770
Succeeded by:
Lord North
Leader of the House of Lords
1766–1770
Succeeded by:
Uncertain
Preceded by:
The Earl of Chatham
Prime Minister
1768–1770
Succeeded by:
Lord North
Preceded by:
The Earl of Suffolk and Berkshire
Lord Privy Seal
1771–1775
Succeeded by:
The Earl of Dartmouth
Preceded by:
The Earl of Dartmouth
Lord Privy Seal
1782–1783
Succeeded by:
The Earl of Carlisle
Preceded by:
Charles FitzRoy
Duke of Grafton
1757–1811
Succeeded by:
George FitzRoy

This article incorporates text from the 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica, a publication in the public domain. John Montagu, 4th Earl of Sandwich, 1783, by Sir Thomas Gainsborough John Montagu, 4th Earl of Sandwich (3 November 1718 – 3 April 1792) succeeded his grandfather, Edward, the 3rd Earl, in the earldom in 1729. ... The Secretary of State for the Northern Department was a position in the Cabinet of the government of the Kingdom of Great Britain up to 1782. ... The Rt Hon. ... Charles Watson-Wentworth, 2nd Marquess of Rockingham (May 13, 1730 – July 1, 1782) was a British Whig statesman, most notable for his two terms as Whig Prime Minister of Great Britain. ... The First Lord of the Treasury is the head of the commission exercising the ancient office of Lord High Treasurer in the United Kingdom, usually but not always the Prime Minister. ... Frederick North, 2nd Earl of Guilford (April 13, 1732–August 5, 1792), more often known by his earlier title, Lord North, was Prime Minister of Great Britain from 1770 to 1782, and a major actor in the American Revolution. ... Leader of the House of Lords is a function in the British government that is always held in combination with a formal Cabinet position, most often Lord President of the Council, Lord Privy Seal or Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster. ... The Right Honourable William Pitt, 1st Earl of Chatham (15 November 1708–11 May 1778) was a British Whig statesman who achieved his greatest fame as war minister during the Seven Years War (aka French and Indian War) and who was later Prime Minister of Great Britain. ... In the United Kingdom, the Prime Minister is the head of government, exercising many of the executive functions nominally vested in the Sovereign, who is head of state. ... Frederick North, 2nd Earl of Guilford (April 13, 1732–August 5, 1792), more often known by his earlier title, Lord North, was Prime Minister of Great Britain from 1770 to 1782, and a major actor in the American Revolution. ... Henry Howard, 12th Earl of Suffolk, 5th Earl of Berkshire (1739-1779) was a British politician who served as Secretary of State for the Northern Department under Lord North from 1771 to 1779. ... The Lord Privy Seal or Lord Keeper of the Privy Seal is one of the traditional sinecure offices in the British Cabinet. ... William Legge, 2nd Earl of Dartmouth (June 20, 1731 - July 7, 1801) was a British statesman who is most remembered for his part in the government before and during the American Revolution. ... William Legge, 2nd Earl of Dartmouth (June 20, 1731 - July 7, 1801) was a British statesman who is most remembered for his part in the government before and during the American Revolution. ... The Lord Privy Seal or Lord Keeper of the Privy Seal is one of the traditional sinecure offices in the British Cabinet. ... Frederick Howard, 5th Earl of Carlisle (May 28, 1748 - September 4, 1825), was an English diplomat and the son of Henry Howard, 4th Earl of Carlisle. ... Charles FitzRoy, 2nd Duke of Grafton (25 October 1683 - 6 May 1757) was an Irish and English politician. ... The title of Duke of Grafton was created in 1675 by Charles II of England for his 2nd illegitimate son by the Duchess of Cleveland, Henry FitzRoy. ... George Henry FitzRoy, 4th Duke of Grafton (January 14, 1760–September 28, 1844) was the son of Augustus Fitzroy, 3rd Duke of Grafton. ... Supporters contend that the Eleventh Edition of the Encyclopædia Britannica (1910-1911) represents the sum of human knowledge at the beginning of the 20th century; indeed, it was advertised as such. ... The public domain comprises the body of all creative works and other knowledge—writing, artwork, music, science, inventions, and others—in which no person or organization has any proprietary interest. ...

Prime Ministers of the United Kingdom 10 Downing Street
Walpole | Wilmington | Pelham | Newcastle | Devonshire | Bute | Grenville | Rockingham | Chatham | Grafton | North | Shelburne | Portland | Pitt the Younger | Sidmouth | Grenville | Perceval | Liverpool | Canning | Goderich | Wellington | Grey | Melbourne | Peel | Russell | Derby | Aberdeen | Palmerston | Disraeli | Gladstone | Salisbury | Rosebery | Balfour | Campbell-Bannerman | Asquith | Lloyd George | Bonar Law | Baldwin | MacDonald | Chamberlain | Churchill | Attlee | Eden | Macmillan | Douglas-Home | Wilson | Heath | Callaghan | Thatcher | Major | Blair

  Results from FactBites:
 
Dukes of Grafton - LoveToKnow 1911 (388 words)
GRAFTON The English dukes of Grafton are descended from Henry Fitzroy (1663-1690), the natural son of Charles II.
Augustus Henry Fitzroy, 3rd duke of Grafton (1735-1811), one of the leading politicians of his time, was the grandson of the 2nd duke, and was educated at Westminster and Cambridge.
Besides his successor, the 4th duke (1760-1844), and numerous other children, he was the father of General Lord Charles Fitzroy (1764-1829), whose sons Sir Charles Fitzroy (1798-1858), governor of New South Wales, and Robert Fitzroy, the hydrographer, were notable men.
Augustus FitzRoy, 3rd Duke of Grafton at AllExperts (679 words)
Augustus Henry FitzRoy, 3rd Duke of Grafton, KG, PC (28 September 1735–14 March 1811) was a British Whig statesman of the Georgian era.
His father was the third son of Charles FitzRoy, 2nd Duke of Grafton and Lady Henrietta Somerset, which made FitzRoy a great-grandson of both Henry FitzRoy, 1st Duke of Grafton and Charles Somerset, Marquess of Worcester.
Grafton allied with the Duke of Newcastle against Lord Bute, whose term as Prime Minister was short-lived.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m