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Encyclopedia > Augusta, Maine
Augusta, Maine
Augusta, Maine, taken from the bridge
Augusta, Maine, taken from the bridge
Official flag of Augusta, Maine
Flag

Seal
Location in Kennebec County, Maine
Coordinates: 44°18′38″N 69°46′48″W / 44.31056, -69.78
County Kennebec County
Established 1754
Government
 - Mayor Roger J. Katz
Area
 - City 150.9 km²  (58.3 sq mi)
 - Land 143.4 km² (55.4 sq mi)
 - Water 7.5 km² (2.9 sq mi)  4.98%
Elevation 20 m (68 ft)
Population (2000)
 - City 24,260
 - Density 129.4/km² (335.1/sq mi)
Time zone Eastern (UTC-5)
 - Summer (DST) Eastern (UTC-4)
Website: www.ci.augusta.me.us

Augusta is the capital of the U.S. state of Maine, county seat of Kennebec County, and center of population for Maine [1]. The city's population is 18,560 (July 2006 est.). Located on the Kennebec River at the head of tide, it is home to the University of Maine at Augusta. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1280 × 960 pixel, file size: 179 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links Seal of Augusta, Maine This image depicts a seal, an emblem, a coat of arms or a crest. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1170x800, 139 KB) Summary Made using US Census Bureau Data. ... Kennebec County is a county located in the U.S. state of Maine. ... United States of America, showing states, divided into counties. ... Kennebec County is a county located in the U.S. state of Maine. ... 1754 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... A mayor (from the Latin māior, meaning larger, greater) is the modern title of the highest ranking municipal officer. ... This article is about the physical quantity. ... Square kilometre (U.S. spelling: square kilometer), symbol km², is a decimal multiple of SI unit of surface area square metre, one of the SI derived units. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... Elevation histogram of the surface of the Earth – approximately 71% of the Earths surface is covered with water. ... This article is about the unit of length. ... A foot (plural: feet or foot;[1] symbol or abbreviation: ft or, sometimes, ′ – a prime) is a unit of length, in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full 2000 Gregorian calendar). ... Population density per square kilometre by country, 2006 Population density map of the world in 1994. ... Timezone and TimeZone redirect here. ... Metronome, a public art installation showing the time in New York City The Eastern Time Zone (ET) of the Western Hemisphere falls mostly along the east coast of Northern America and the west coast of South America. ... -12 | -11 | -10 | -9:30 | -9 | -8 | -7 | -6 | -5 | -4 | -3:30 | -3 | -2:30 | -2 | -1 | -0:25 | UTC (0) | +0:20 | +0:30 | +1 | +2 | +3 | +3:30 | +4 | +4:30 | +4:51 | +5 | +5:30 | +5:40 | +5:45 | +6 | +6:30 | +7 | +7:20 | +7... Though DST is common in Europe and North America, most of the worlds people do not use it. ... −12 | −11 | −10 | −9:30 | −9 | −8 | −7 | −6 | −5 | −4 | −3:30 | −3 | −2:30 | −2 | −1 | −0:25 | UTC (0) | +0:20 | +0:30 | +1 | +2 | +3 | +3:30 | +4 | +4:30 | +4:51 | +5 | +5:30 | +5:40 | +5:45 | +6 | +6:30 | +7 | +7:20 | +7... Not to be confused with capitol. ... Motto: (Out Of Many, One) (traditional) In God We Trust (1956 to date) Anthem: The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington D.C. Largest city New York City None at federal level (English de facto) Government Federal constitutional republic  - President George Walker Bush (R)  - Vice President Dick Cheney (R) Independence from... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      A U.S. state is any one of the fifty subnational entities of... Official language(s) None (English and French de facto) Capital Augusta Largest city Portland Area  Ranked 39th  - Total 33,414 sq mi (86,542 km²)  - Width 210 miles (338 km)  - Length 320 miles (515 km)  - % water 13. ... A county seat is a term for an administrative center for a county, primarily used in the United States. ... Kennebec County is a county located in the U.S. state of Maine. ... Center of population is a subject of study in the field of demographics. ... The course of the Kennebec River The Kennebec River is a river, 150 mi (240 km) long, in the state of Maine in the northeastern United States. ... Head of tide is the farthest point upstream where a river is affected by tidal fluctuations. ... The University of Maine at Augusta, established in 1965 as a member of the University of Maine system, is the largest university in the system of eight Maine colleges. ...

Contents

History

State House in 1906
State House in 1906

The area was first explored by members of the ill-fated Popham Colony in September 1607. It was first inhabited by English settlers from the Plymouth Colony in 1625 as a trading post on the Kennebec River. Their settlement was known by its Indian name -- Cushnoc (or Coussinoc or Koussinoc), meaning "head of tide." Fur trading was profitable, but the area would be abandoned by King Philip's War and into the French and Indian Wars. Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... The site of the 1607 Popham Colony in present-day Maine is shown by Po on the map. ... Year 1607 (MDCVII) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 10-day slower Julian calendar). ... This article is about the English as a nation. ... Seal of Plymouth Colony Map of Plymouth Colony showing town locations Capital Plymouth Language(s) English Religion Puritan, Separatist Government Monarchy Legislature General Court History  - Established 1620  - First Thanksgiving 1621  - Pequot War 1637  - King Philips War 1675–1676  - Part of the Dominion of New England 1686–1688  - Disestablished 1691... Events March 27 - Prince Charles Stuart becomes King Charles I of England, Scotland and Ireland. ... A trading post is a place where trading of goods takes place. ... The fur trade was a huge part in the early economic development of North America. ... Attack King Philips War, sometimes called Metacoms War or Metacoms Rebellion,[1] was an armed conflict between Indian inhabitants of present-day southern New England and English colonists and their Indian allies from 1675–1676. ... The French and Indian Wars is a name used in the United States for a series of conflicts in North America that represented the actions there that accompanied the European dynastic wars. ...


Peace returned following the Treaty of Portsmouth in 1713. But in 1722 the Abenaki Indians upriver at Norridgewock were again at war. Fort Richmond (now Richmond) was attacked and Brunswick destroyed. In response, Norridgewock was sacked in 1724 during Dummer's War, when English forces gained tentative control of the Kennebec. In 1754, a blockhouse named Fort Western (now the oldest wooden fort in America), was built at Cushnoc on the eastern bank. It was intended as a supply depot for Fort Halifax upriver, as well as to protect its own region.[1] In 1775, Benedict Arnold and his 1100 troops would use Fort Western as a staging area before continuing their journey up the Kennebec to the Battle of Quebec. This article is about the 1713 treaty. ... The Abenaki (also Wabanuok or Wabanaki) are a tribe of Native Americans/First Nations belonging to the Algonquian peoples of northeastern North America. ... The Norridgewock were a People of the Dawn, an Eastern tribe of the United States. ... Richmond is a town in Sagadahoc County, Maine, United States. ... Brunswick is a town located in Cumberland County, Maine. ... Dummers War (c. ... A 19th-century-era block house in Fort York, Toronto In military science, a blockhouse is a small, isolated fort in the form of a single building. ... Fort Western was a colonial outpost at the head of navigation on the Kennebec River at modern Augusta, Maine. ... Fort Halifax was a U.S. colonial outpost on the Kennebec River at modern Winslow, Maine. ... For other persons named Benedict Arnold, see Benedict Arnold (disambiguation). ... Combatants United States Britain Commanders Richard Montgomery † Benedict Arnold James Livingston (American Revolution) Guy Carleton Strength 1,200 Continentals 1,200 British Regulars and Militia Casualties 60 dead or wounded, 426 captured 6 dead, 19 wounded Canadian theater, 1775–1776 Ticonderoga – Crown Point – Longue-Pointe – Fort St. ...


Cushnoc was incorporated as part of Hallowell in 1771. Known as "the Fort," it was set off and incorporated by the Massachusetts General Court in February 1797 as Harrington. In August, however, the name changed to Augusta after Augusta Dearborn, daughter of Henry Dearborn. In 1799, it became county seat for newly created Kennebec County.[1] Maine became a state in 1820, and Augusta was designated its capital in 1827. The Maine State Legislature continued meeting in Portland, however, until completion in 1832 of the new Maine State House designed by Charles Bulfinch. Augusta was chartered as a city in 1849. Hallowell is a city located in Kennebec County, Maine. ... The Massachusetts General Court is the state legislature of the U.S. state of Massachusetts. ... Henry Dearborn (February 23, 1751 – June 6, 1829) was an American physician, statesman and veteran of both the American Revolutionary War and the War of 1812. ... The Maine Legislature is the state legislature of the U.S. state of Maine. ... Nickname: Motto: Resurgam (Latin for I will rise again) Country State County Cumberland Settled 1632 Incorporated 1786 Government  - Mayor Nicholas M. Mavodones, Jr Area  - City  52. ... The Maine State House, located in Augusta, Maine, was completed in 1832, one year after Augusta became the capital of Maine. ... The Massachusetts State House, designed by Charles Bulfinch and completed in 1798. ...


Excellent soil provided for agriculture, and water power from streams provided for industry. In 1837, a dam was built across the Kennebec where the falls drop 15 feet at the head of tide, and by 1838 10 sawmills were contracted. With the arrival of the Kennebec & Portland Railroad in 1851, Augusta became a mill town. In 1883, the property of A. & W. Spague Company was purchased by the Edwards Manufacturing Company, which erected extensive brick mills for manufacturing cotton textiles. Other Augusta firms produced lumber, sash, doors, shutters, broom handles, stone cutters' tools, shoes, cemetery monuments, ice and furniture. The city developed as a publishing and shipping center. Today, government and post-secondary education are important businesses. Hydropower (or waterpower) harnesses the energy of moving or falling water. ... This article is about structures for water impoundment. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... For the 1922 film starring Oliver Hardy, see The Sawmill. ... Amoskeag Canal, 1948, by Charles Sheeler A mill town is a community that grew up around one or more mills or factories, usually on a river that was used as a source of power in the days before electricity. ... For other uses, see Cotton (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Textile (disambiguation). ... Timber in storage for later processing at a sawmill Lumber or Timber is a term used to describe wood, either standing or that has been processed for use—from the time trees are felled, to its end product as a material suitable for industrial use—as structural material for construction... A Georgian house in England with sash windows A sash window or hung sash window is made of one or more movable panels or sashes that form a frame to hold panes of glass which are often separated from other panes (or lights) by narrow muntin bars. ... This article is about the architectural feature. ... A window shutter panel is a solid, firm, erect, stable, strong, window covering usually consisting of side stiles, top and bottom rails, and louvers. ... broom A broom is a cleaning tool consisting of stiff fibres attached to, and roughly parallel to, a cylindrical handle, the broomstick. ... Shoemaking is a traditional handicraft profession, which has now been largely superseded by industrial manufacture of footwear. ... “Tombstone” redirects here. ... Snowflakes by Wilson Bentley, 1902 Ice is the name given to any one of the 14 known solid phases of water. ... For the UK band, see Furniture (band). ... “Publisher” redirects here. ... Damaged package The Panama canal. ...

Notable residents

State House in 1965
State House in 1965

Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1500x2000, 1286 KB) Maine State House, State & Capitol Streets, Augusta, Kennebec County, ME Main (South) elevation August 1965 Photographer Jack E. Boucher Original file 17MB TIFF file, corrected, cropped, denoised, converted to JPEG File links The following pages link to this... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1500x2000, 1286 KB) Maine State House, State & Capitol Streets, Augusta, Kennebec County, ME Main (South) elevation August 1965 Photographer Jack E. Boucher Original file 17MB TIFF file, corrected, cropped, denoised, converted to JPEG File links The following pages link to this... James G. Blaine James Gillespie Blaine (January 31, 1830 – January 27, 1893) was a U.S. Representative, U.S. Senator from Maine and a two-time United States Secretary of State. ... Commodore Horatio Bridge (1806–1893) was a United States Naval officer. ... Richard Dysart (b. ... Melville Weston Fuller (February 11, 1833 – July 4, 1910) was the Chief Justice of the United States between 1888 and 1910. ... John Fremont Hill (1855-1912) was an American capitalist and public official, born at Eliot, Me. ... George Huntington Hartford (1833-1917) founded The Great Atlantic and Pacific Tea Company in 1859 with George Gilman. ... Eastman Johnson (1824 - 1906) was a U.S. painter. ... George Washington Ladd (September 28, 1818 - January 30, 1892) was a U.S. Representative from Maine. ... Dorianne Laux, a poet, was born in Augusta, Maine, in 1952. ... Rachel Nichols in Dumb & Dumberer: When Harry Met Lloyd Rachel Emily Nichols (born January 8, 1980) is an American actress, currently known for her film work and for her portrayal of CIA agent Rachel Gibson on the ABC television series Alias. ... Frederick George Payne (July 24, 1904 - June 15, 1978) was a Republican politician from the U.S. state of Maine. ... David Peoples (born January 9, 1960) is an American professional golfer. ... John Fox Potter nicknamed Bowie Knife Potter (May 11, 1817 – May 18, 1899) was a nineteenth century politician, lawyer and judge from Wisconsin. ... Luther Severance was a United States Representative from Maine. ... Olympia Jean Snowe (born February 21, 1947) is a Republican politician currently serving as the senior United States senator from Maine. ... Manchester Haynes Wheeler (born March 2, 1939) was an American football player. ... Reuel Williams (June 2, 1783–July 25, 1862) was a U.S. Senator from Maine. ... Willard Gordon Wyman was a United States Army four star general who served as Commanding General, U.S. Continental Army Command (CG CONARC) from 1956 to 1958. ...

Geography

Augusta is located at 44°19′25″N, 69°45′55″W (44.323535° N 69.765261° W)GR1, making it the easternmost state capital in the United States. According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 150.9 km² (58.3 mi²). 143.4 km² (55.4 mi²) of it is land and 7.5 km² (2.9 mi²) of it (4.98%) is water. Augusta is drained by Bond's Brook, Woromontogus Stream and the Kennebec River. The United States Census Bureau (officially Bureau of the Census as defined in Title ) is a part of the United States Department of Commerce. ... Square kilometre (U.S. spelling: square kilometer), symbol km², is a decimal multiple of SI unit of surface area square metre, one of the SI derived units. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... The course of the Kennebec River The Kennebec River is a river, 150 mi (240 km) long, in the state of Maine in the northeastern United States. ...


Demographics

Governor John Fremont Hill residence in c. 1910
Governor John Fremont Hill residence in c. 1910

As of the censusGR2 of 2000, there were 24,260 people, 8,565 households, and 4,607 families residing in the city. The population density was 129.4/km² (335.1/mi²). There were 9,480 housing units at an average density of 66.1/km² (171.2/mi²). The racial makeup of the city was 95.21% White, 0.50% Black or African American, 0.48% Native American, 0.35% Asian, 0.01% Pacific Islander, 0.16% from other races, and 3.0 from two or more races. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image:1870 census Lindauer Weber 01. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... It has been suggested that Ethnicity (United States Census) be merged into this article or section. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... It has been suggested that Ethnicity (United States Census) be merged into this article or section. ...


There were 8,565 households out of which 24.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 39.1% were married couples living together, 10.9% had a female householder with no husband present, and 46.2% were non-families. 38.3% of all households were made up of individuals and 14.2% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.10 and the average family size was 2.77. Marriage is an interpersonal relationship with governmental, social, or religious recognition, usually intimate and sexual, and often created as a contract, or through civil process. ...

Monument Park in c. 1915
Monument Park in c. 1915

In the city the population was spread out with 20.5% under the age of 18, 8.7% from 18 to 24, 28.3% from 25 to 44, 24.8% from 45 to 64, and 17.7% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 40 years. For every 100 females there were 89.9 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 87.5 males. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ...


The median income for a household in the city was $25,921, and the median income for a family was $42,230. Males had a median income of $31,209 versus $22,548 for females. The per capita income for the city was $14,145. About 14.4% of families and 19.0% of the population were below the poverty line, including 26.2% of those under age 18 and 11.8% of those age 65 or over. The per capita income for a group of people may be defined as their total personal income, divided by the total population. ... Map of countries showing percentage of population who have an income below the national poverty line The poverty line is the level of income below which one cannot afford to purchase all the resources one requires to live. ...


Of the most affluent residents, most choose to reside in the prominent Sand Hill area, on the north side of the city. Close proximity to I-95, shopping, and luxury appartments make it an attractive area. Some of the more notable residents of this area, such as Eugene Whipple, will frequent local establishments such as P.J.'s on Water Street.


Sites of interest

Hallowell is a city located in Kennebec County, Maine. ... Farmingdale is a town located in Kennebec County, Maine. ... Gardiner is a city in Kennebec County, Maine, United States. ... The Maine State House, located in Augusta, Maine, was completed in 1832, one year after Augusta became the capital of Maine. ... The Pine Tree State Arboretum (224 acres) is a botanical garden and arboretum located at 153 Hospital Street, Augusta, Maine, USA, with 5 miles of trails, open year round without charge. ...

References

  • The Forgotten Inhabitants of Cushnoc
  • History of Augusta, Maine
  1. ^ a b Maine League of Historical Societies and Museums (1970). in Doris A. Isaacson: Maine: A Guide 'Down East'. Rockland, Me: Courier-Gazette, Inc., 148-152. 

External links

  • City of Augusta, Maine
  • Lithgow Public Library
  • University of Maine at Augusta
  • Maps and aerial photos for 44°19′25″N 69°45′55″W / 44.323535, -69.765261Coordinates: 44°19′25″N 69°45′55″W / 44.323535, -69.765261
    • Maps from WikiMapia, Google Maps, Live Search Maps, Yahoo! Maps, or MapQuest
    • Topographic maps from TopoZone or TerraServer-USA

  Results from FactBites:
 
Augusta, Maine - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (639 words)
Augusta is the capital of the state of Maine in the United States.
Augusta was officially designated the state capital in 1827, however, the Maine State Legislature continued to meet in Portland until completion of the new capitol building in 1832.
Augusta was chartered as a city in 1849.
Encyclopedia: Augusta, Maine (937 words)
The capital of Maine is Augusta and its governor is John Baldacci (Democrat).
Maine is the northernmost state in the New England region and the easternmost state in the country (the easternmost city in the United States is Eastport, Maine), bordered on the west by New Hampshire.
Maine is the most sparsely populated state east of the Mississippi River, owing in part to its huge relative size—its land mass exceeds that of all other New England states combined.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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