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Encyclopedia > August 10, 2006 alleged transatlantic aircraft terrorist plot
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2006 transatlantic airline plot
Timeline
Suspects
Security Reaction
Police at the scene of one of the raids, on Forest Road, Walthamstow, London.
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Police at the scene of one of the raids, on Forest Road, Walthamstow, London.

The 2006 transatlantic aircraft plot was an alleged terrorist plot to detonate liquid explosives carried on board several airliners travelling from the United Kingdom to the United States.[1] Security measures were immediately put in place, and still largely remain, to ban the carriage of liquids substances of any kind onto planes, resulting in chaos and delayed flights for days. Image File history File links Unbalanced_scales. ... According to British and American authorities, the 2006 transatlantic aircraft plot was a terrorist plot to detonate liquid explosives carried on board several airliners travelling from the United Kingdom to the United States. ... Walthamstow is a town in the London Borough of Waltham Forest. ... This article is becoming very long. ... Preparing C-4 explosive This article is concerned solely with chemical explosives. ...


Of the approximately twenty-five suspects who were arrested in and around London, eleven were charged with terrorism offences on 21 August, two on 25 August (subsequently discharged on 1 November), and a further three on August 30.

Contents

Characterization of the plot

Targeted flights

The Deputy Commissioner of the Metropolitan Police, Paul Stephenson, said that the plot aimed to destroy as many as ten aircraft in mid-flight from the United Kingdom to the United States, using explosives brought on board in the suspects' carry-on luggage.[2] News media reported that planned targets included American Airlines, British Airways, Continental Airlines, and United Airlines flights from Heathrow and Gatwick airports to Chicago; Los Angeles, California; Miami, Florida; Newark, New Jersey; New York City; San Francisco, California; and Washington, D.C.[3] BBC security correspondent Gordon Corera[4] said the plot involved a series of simultaneous attacks, targeting three planes each time.[2] Reports vary regarding the number of planes involved, ranging from three to twelve.[4][5] In a press release, the United States Secretary of Homeland Security, Michael Chertoff, said "multiple commercial aircraft" were targeted.[6] Some reports say the attacks were planned for August 16, but police say no evidence specifying the date has been found.[7][8] British officials have since stated that the estimate of ten aircraft was "speculative and exaggerated."[9] The Deputy Commissioner of Police of the Metropolis (usually just called the Deputy Commissioner) is the second-in-command of the London Metropolitan Police, ranking below the Commissioner and above the Assistant Commissioners. ... The Metropolitan Police Service (MPS) is the Home Office police force responsible for Greater London, with the exception of the square mile of the City of London. ... Paul Stephenson QPM is the Deputy Commissioner of the London Metropolitan Police, and as such is second-in-command. ... An Airbus A380, currently the worlds largest airliner An aircraft is any vehicle or craft capable of atmospheric flight. ... American Airlines and American Eagle aircraft at San Juan American Airlines (AA) is the largest airline in the world in terms of total passengers transported and fleet size, and the second-largest airline in the world (behind Air France-KLM) in terms of total operating revenues. ... British Airways (LSE: BAY, NYSE: BAB) is the largest airline of the United Kingdom and the third largest in Europe (behind Air France-KLM and Lufthansa), with more flights from Europe across the Atlantic than any other operator. ... Continental Airlines (IATA: CO, ICAO: COA, and Callsign: Continental) (NYSE: CAL) is an airline of the United States. ... Uniteds logo as seen at United hub Denver International Airport. ... London Heathrow Airport (IATA: LHR, ICAO: EGLL), often referred to as Heathrow, is the third busiest airport in the world, after Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport and Chicago OHare. ... Gatwick Airport (IATA: LGW, ICAO: EGKK) is Londons second largest airport and the second busiest airport in the UK after Heathrow. ... Nickname: The Windy City, The Second City, Chi Town, The City of Big Shoulders Motto: Urbs In Horto (Latin: City in a Garden), I Will Location in Chicagoland and Illinois Coordinates: Country United States State Illinois County Cook Incorporated March 4, 1837 Mayor Richard M. Daley (D) Area    - City 606. ... Nickname: City of Angels Location within Los Angeles County in the state of California Coordinates: State California County Los Angeles County Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa Area    - City 1,290. ... Nickname: The Magic City Location in Miami-Dade County and the state of Florida. ... Nickname: The Brick City Map of Newark in Essex County Coordinates: County Essex Founded/Incorporated 1666/1836 Mayor Cory Booker, term of office 2006–2010 Area    - City 67. ... Nickname: Big Apple; City that never Sleeps; Gotham Location in the state of New York Coordinates: Country United States State New York Boroughs Bronx (The Bronx) New York (Manhattan) Queens (Queens) Kings (Brooklyn) Richmond (Staten Island) Mayor Michael Bloomberg (R) Area    - City 1,214. ... Nickname: The City by the Bay; Fog City Location of the City and County of San Francisco, California Coordinates: Country United States of America State California City-County San Francisco Mayor Gavin Newsom Area    - City 122 km²  (47 sq mi)  - Land 121. ... Nickname: DC, The District Motto: Justitia Omnibus (Justice for All) Location of Washington, D.C., in relation to the states Maryland and Virginia. ... The British Broadcasting Corporation, invariably known as the BBC (and also informally known as the Beeb or Auntie) is the largest broadcasting corporation in the world, employing 26,000 staff in the UK alone and with a budget of £4 billion. ... The United States Secretary of Homeland Security is the head of the United States Department of Homeland Security, the body concerned with protecting the American homeland and the safety of American citizens. ... Michael Chertoff Michael Chertoff (born November 28, 1953) is the current United States Secretary of Homeland Security. ... August 16 is the 228th day of the year (229th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ...


Liquid explosives

According to several news sources, the plotters planned to use liquid explosives.[2] The New York Times reported that the plotters planned to use Lucozade bottles to contain these explosives.[9] The plotters planned to leave the top of the bottle sealed and filled with the original beverage, but add a false bottom containing a liquid or gel explosive dyed red to match the sports drink in the top of the container.[10] Preparing C-4 explosive This article is concerned solely with chemical explosives. ... Lucozade logo Lucozade logo Lucozade is an energy drink containing glucose syrup and caffeine, produced by GlaxoSmithKline plc. ...


It has been widely reported that the plotters planned to use peroxide-based explosives. One report suggests the plotters would use liquid explosives.[11][12] United States authorities, the FBI and Department of Homeland Security, named two peroxide-based liquid explosives that could be used: triacetone triperoxide (TATP) and hexamethylene triperoxide diamine (HMTD). These peroxide-based liquid explosives "are sensitive to heat, shock, and friction, can be initiated simply with fire or electrical charge, and can also be used to produce improvised detonators."[13][14] According to The Guardian, police sources have confirmed that the plot involved TATP.[15] According to the New York Times, the plotters wanted to use HMTD.[9] The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) is a Federal police force which is the principal investigative arm of the United States Department of Justice (DOJ). ... The United States Department of Homeland Security (DHS) is a Cabinet department of the federal government of the United States that is concerned with protecting the American homeland and the safety of American citizens. ... ... The Guardian is a British newspaper owned by the Guardian Media Group. ... ... The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ...


Investigation and arrests

On 10 August British police arrested 25 suspects. 19 of the suspects had their finances frozen. 17 of the suspects were later charged with conspiracy to murder and commit acts of terrorism or failing to disclose information about acts of terrorism. Eight of the suspects were released without charge. Another seven suspects were arrested in Pakistan on charges related to the alleged plot. August 10 is the 222nd day of the year (223rd in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ...


The ongoing police investigation into the alleged plot has been named Operation Overt.


Police said they had been observing this plot for months, and that the "investigation reached a critical point [on 9 August 2006] when the decision was made to take urgent action in order to disrupt what we believe was being planned."[16] An undercover British agent had infiltrated the group, according to American government sources.[17] United States Department of Homeland Security According to Franco Frattini, the European Commissioner for Justice, Freedom and Security, "the plotters received a very short message to 'Go now'."[9] August 9 is the 221st day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (222nd in leap years), with 144 days remaining. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The United States Department of Homeland Security (DHS), commonly known as Homeland Security, is a Cabinet department of the Federal Government of the United States with the responsibility of protecting the territory of the United States from terrorist attacks and responding to natural disasters. ... Franco Frattini. ...


The arrests were made in London, Birmingham, and High Wycombe in Buckinghamshire in an overnight operation. Two of the arrests were made in the Birmingham area, where firearms officers were not involved, and five were made in High Wycombe.[18] The key suspects are reported to be British-born Muslims, some of Pakistani descent.[19][20][2] Three of the suspects are recent converts to Islam.[21] full of cockneys. ... The city from above Centenary Square. ... High Wycombe in the UK High Wycombe, (previously Chepping Wycombe or Chipping Wycombe as late as 1911[1]) South Buckinghamshire, is 29 miles (46. ... Buckinghamshire (abbreviated Bucks) is one of the home counties in South East England. ... Religious conversion is the adoption of new religious beliefs that differ from the converts previous beliefs; in some cultures (e. ... Islam (Arabic:  ) is a monotheistic religion based upon the Quran, its principal scripture, whose followers, known as Muslims (مسلم), believe God (Arabic: الله ) sent through revelations to Muhammad. ...


In a press conference, the United Kingdom's Home Secretary John Reid stated that he believed the key suspects in the plot were in custody, but did not rule out additional arrests.[22] British police said they are searching for two additional people in connection with the investigation.[8] The DHS believes that there could have been as many as 50 people involved.[23] The Secretary of State for the Home Department, commonly known as the Home Secretary, is the minister in charge of the United Kingdom Home Office and is responsible for internal affairs in England and Wales, and for immigration and citizenship for the whole United Kingdom (including Scotland and Northern Ireland). ... John Reid (born 8 May 1947) is a British politician who is Home Secretary and Member of Parliament for the Scottish constituency of Airdrie and Shotts. ...


Paul Beaver, a British terrorism expert, has said that it appears possible that the militant Islamic organisation al-Qaeda was behind the plot, which comes only weeks after the group threatened to attack British aviation.[24] DHS Secretary Chertoff stated the plot was "getting close to the execution phase", and that it was "suggestive of an al-Qaeda plot".[25] It was not clear from press releases when these attacks were to have been launched, and the New York Times has since reported that the plans were at an earlier stage than was initially stated.[9] Terrorist redirects here. ... The word militant has come to refer to any individual or party engaged in aggressive physical or verbal combat, normally for a cause. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Islamism. ... Al-Qaeda (Arabic: القاعدة, the foundation or the base) is the name given to a worldwide network of militant Islamist organizations under the leadership of Osama bin Laden. ... The United States Department of Homeland Security (DHS) is a Cabinet department of the federal government of the United States that is concerned with protecting the American homeland and the safety of American citizens. ... Michael Chertoff Michael Chertoff (born November 28, 1953) is the current United States Secretary of Homeland Security. ...


The New York Times has reported that seven martyrdom tapes made by six suspects were recovered.[9]


British authorities have carried out a total of 69 searches of residences, businesses, vehicles and open spaces, which have netted bomb-making equipment and chemicals such as hydrogen peroxide, Deputy Assistant Commissioner Peter Clarke said on 21 August. "As well as the bomb-making equipment, we have found more than 400 computers, 200 mobile telephones and 8,000 items of removable storage media such as memory sticks, CDs and DVDs," he said. "So far, from the computers alone, we have removed some 6,000 gigabytes of data." It will take "many months" for investigators to analyze all of the data, he said.[26] August 21 is the 233rd day of the year (234th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ...


The prosecutor, Colin Gibbs, has said that the trial would not realistically start until at least January 2008 and would last between five and eight months.[27] January is the first month of the year and one of seven Gregorian months with the length of 31 days. ... 2008 (MMVIII) will be a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Disagreement over timing of arrests

NBC News reported disagreement between the United States and Britain over when to make the arrests. According to NBC News, a senior British official contended that an attack was not imminent, noting that the suspects had not yet purchased airline tickets and some did not even have passports; he urged that the investigation continue to collect more evidence. The report noted that this official's statement was contrary to statements by other British officials previously reported in the press. The same source also told NBC News that the United States had threatened to use extraordinary rendition upon suspected ringleader Rashid Rauf in Pakistan, or to pressure the Pakistan government to arrest him, if he were not immediately taken into custody. According to the same report, a United States official acknowledged this disagreement over the timing of arrests and that a British official believed that an attack was not imminent. However, Frances Townsend, Assistant to the President for Homeland Security, denied the report of a dispute: "There was no disagreement between US and UK officials."[28] Extraordinary rendition is an American extra-judicial procedure which involves the sending of untried criminal suspects, suspected terrorists or alleged supporters of groups which the US Government considers to be terrorist organizations, to countries other than the United States for imprisonment and interrogation. ... Frances Townsend Frances Fragos Townsend (born December 28, 1961) in Mineola, New York and raised in Wantagh, Long Island,[1] is the current Homeland Security Advisor to United States President George W. Bush. ...


Pakistan's role in the terror plot

Initial reactions praised Pakistan's assistance in stopping the plot before its execution. However, later press reports have questioned Pakistan's claimed commitment to the War on Terrorism. Combatants Participants in Operations: United States United Kingdom Turkey South Korea Canada Israel Spain Portugal Pakistan Afghanistan Australia New Zealand Italy Netherlands Denmark France Germany Norway Slovakia Romania Philippines Poland Ukraine Georgia Jordan Saudi Arabia NATO New Iraqi Army and others Targets of Operations: al-Qaeda Taliban Baathist Iraq...


Other press reports that the alleged bombers were funded by "charities" intended to help victims of the 2005 Kashmir earthquake.[29] The FBI and Scotland Yard are investigating links to Kashmir terrorists and the flow of money to the conspirators.[30] Pakistan and international press also reported that Rashid Rauf, the key player in the plot, had links with the Jaish-e-Mohammed, a kashmir terrorist outfit banned by several countries.[31] Media reports state that he has close family ties to Maulana Masood Azhar,[32] one of the most wanted criminals in India. The Kashmir earthquake (also known as the South Asia earthquake or Pakistan earthquake) of 2005 was a major earthquake whose epicenter was the Pakistan-administered disputed region of Kashmir. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Mohammads Army. ... Maulana Masood Azhar is a former clergyman from Bahawalpur, Pakistan. ...


In Pakistan, law enforcement authorities continued to interrogate Rashid Rauf, a Briton of Pakistani descent, over his alleged key role in the plot, officials told The Associated Press August 22. Pakistani Interior Minister Aftab Khan Sherpao said British police were conducting inquiries in Pakistan but were not involved in questioning Rauf.[26] The UK Foreign Office is seeking Rauf's extradition from Pakistan, and it has been reported that Pakistan plans to accept the request.[33]


Sceptics' responses to the arrests

Several commentators expressed scepticism over the allegations.[34][35][36][37] Many mentioned the Forest Gate raid, the shooting of Jean Charles de Menezes and the Iraq War, all based on intelligence that turned out to be wrong, as reasons for their doubts.[38][39] Muslim sections of the British population were also reportedly sceptical that the plot was carried out by other Muslims.[40] In ordinary usage, skepticism or scepticism (Greek: skeptomai, to look about, to consider) refers to an attitude of doubt or a disposition to incredulity either in general or toward a particular object, the doctrine that true knowledge or knowledge in a particular area is uncertain, or the method of suspended... The 2 June 2006 Forest Gate raid saw the arrest of two men at their east London homes in Forest Gate by police acting on intelligence that they might be terrorists in possession of a chemical bomb. ... Jean Charles de Menezes (7 January 1978–22 July 2005) was a Brazilian electrician living in the Tulse Hill area of south London. ... For other uses, see Iraq war (disambiguation). ... Intelligence (abbreviated or ) is the process and the result of gathering information and analyzing it to answer questions or obtain advance warnings needed to plan for the future. ...


Former UK ambassador to Uzbekistan Craig Murray was sceptical of the account of the plot. He based his criticism on the assumptions that "None of the alleged terrorists had made a bomb. None had bought a plane ticket. Many did not have passports." He also suggested that suspected ringleader Rashid Rauf invented the plot under torture in Pakistan.[41] Craig Murray (born October, 1958)[1] is a writer and broadcaster[1] and was the United Kingdoms Ambassador to Uzbekistan. ...


The Register ran a story on the practicalities of producing TATP on board an airplane from constituent liquids and concluded that, while theoretically possible, the chances of success would be extremely low. [42] Current logo of The Register. ... ...


On September 18, Lieutenant-Colonel (ret.) Nigel Wylde, a former senior British Army Intelligence Officer with decades of anti-terror and explosives experience, declared the plot to be 'fiction'. He said the explosives in question could not possibly have been produced on the plane. "So who came up with the idea that a bomb could be made on board? Not Al Qaeda for sure. It would not work. Bin Laden is interested in success not deterrence by failure," Wylde stated. He further suggested that the plot was an invention of the UK security services in order to justify wide-ranging new security measures that threaten to permanently curtail civil liberties and to suspend sections of the United Kingdom's Human Rights Act of 1998.[43] Due to the mountain of evidence, including forensic material, he expected the men to face "a very long trial of (between) five and eight months."


Political reaction

Prior to the arrests, the plot was discussed at a high level of government, with Prime Minister Tony Blair knowing about it for months, and alerting President George Bush to the investigation on Sunday 6 August.[44] The Prime Minister is in practice the most important political office in the United Kingdom. ... Anthony Charles Lynton Blair (born 6 May 1953)[1] is the Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, First Lord of the Treasury, Minister for the Civil Service, Leader of the UK Labour Party, and Member of the UK Parliament for the constituency of Sedgefield in North East England. ... The presidential seal was used by President Hayes in 1880 and last modified in 1959 by adding the 50th star for Hawaii. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the 43rd and current President of the United States, inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ... August 6 is the 218th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (219th in leap years), with 147 days remaining. ...


On 9 August, hours before the arrests, the Home Secretary John Reid gave a major speech to Demos (a British think-tank) hinting at a new round of anti-terror legislation and claiming that the country was facing "probably the most sustained period of severe threat since the end of the second world war".[45] The following day Reid broke the news along with Douglas Alexander, the Transport Secretary.[46] August 9 is the 221st day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (222nd in leap years), with 144 days remaining. ... The Secretary of State for the Home Department, commonly known as the Home Secretary, is the minister in charge of the United Kingdom Home Office and is responsible for internal affairs in England and Wales, and for immigration and citizenship for the whole United Kingdom (including Scotland and Northern Ireland). ... John Reid (born 8 May 1947) is a British politician who is Home Secretary and Member of Parliament for the Scottish constituency of Airdrie and Shotts. ... Demos is an influential think tank based in the United Kingdom. ... A think tank is a research institute or informal group providing advice and ideas on any aspect of future planning and strategy - for example issues of policy, commerce, and military interest - and are often associated with military laboratories, corporations, academia, or other institutions. ... Douglas Garven Alexander (born October 26, 1967) is a British politician who is Secretary of State for Transport and Secretary of State for Scotland He is the Member of Parliament for the Scottish constituency of Paisley and Renfrewshire South representing the Labour Party. ...


In the United States, the announcement was made during a joint press conference by the head of the Department of Homeland Security Michael Chertoff, the Attorney General Alberto Gonzales, and the Director of the FBI Robert Mueller. Chertoff refused to be drawn on questions about the design of the devices or whether any bombs had actually been built.[6] The United States Department of Homeland Security (DHS) is a Cabinet department of the federal government of the United States that is concerned with protecting the American homeland and the safety of American citizens. ... Michael Chertoff Michael Chertoff (born November 28, 1953) is the current United States Secretary of Homeland Security. ... In most common law jurisdictions, the Attorney General is the main legal adviser to the government, and in some jurisdictions may in addition have executive responsibility for law enforcement or responsibility for public prosecutions. ... Alberto R. Gonzales (born August 4, 1955) is the 80th and current Attorney General of the United States, becoming the first Hispanic to serve in the position. ... The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) is a Federal police force which is the principal investigative arm of the United States Department of Justice (DOJ). ... Robert Swan Mueller III (born August 7, 1944) is the current Director of the United States Federal Bureau of Investigation. ...


On the same day, President George Bush commented upon arrival in Wisconsin: "The recent arrests that our fellow citizens are now learning about are a stark reminder that this nation is at war with Islamic fascists who will use any means to destroy those of us who love freedom, to hurt our nation."[46] George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the 43rd and current President of the United States, inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... Islamofascism is a neologism and political epithet suggesting an association of the ideological or operational characteristics of certain modern Islamist movements with European fascist movements of the early 20th century, neofascist movements, or totalitarianism. ...


On 12 August, British Muslim groups sent an open letter to the Prime Minister, stating that "current British government policy risks putting civilians at increased risk both in the UK and abroad."[47] Many such groups and even certain sectors of UK government[48] have suggested that (among other factors) the foreign policy position of the United Kingdom in places such as Palestine, Lebanon, Afghanistan and Iraq is to a large extent responsible for the increasing radicalisation of young Muslims in the UK, thus promoting the possibility of actions like the July 7th London bombings. The letter also states "Attacking civilians is never justified", and encourages the UK to reassess its foreign policy in order to maintain the safety of individuals both in the UK and abroad. In interviews with the BBC, John Reid described the letter as "a dreadful misjudgement", and former Conservative leader Michael Howard described it as "a form of blackmail".[49] August 12 is the 224th day of the year (225th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... The 7 July 2005 London bombings were a series of coordinated suicide bombings that struck Londons public transport system during the morning rush hour. ... The Conservative Party (officially the Conservative & Unionist Party) is currently the second largest political party in the United Kingdom in terms of sitting Members of Parliament (MPs), and the largest in terms of public membership. ... The Rt Hon. ...


On 13 August, Michael O'Leary, the chief executive of Ryanair, claimed that the chaos at airports meant that the terrorists were achieving their aims.[50] On 25 August, O'Leary announced plans to sue the British Government over the disruption to his business.[51] August 13 is the 225th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (226th in leap years), with 140 days remaining. ...


Security reaction

In the immediate aftermath of the first arrests, passenger rules were amended for flights between the United States and the UK to make all liquids (apart from baby milk) forbidden, including beverages, hair gels, toothpaste, lipstick, sunscreen, and hand lotions, due to the suspicion that liquids were planned to be used in the attacks. Since passengers may purchase beverages after passing regular airport checkpoints, gate checkpoints were also implemented at many American airports, such as Boston Logan.[52] In addition, all non-essential hand luggage was banned on all flights from the UK.[53] The control tower at London (Heathrow) Airport, seen from Terminal 1. ... The control tower at London (Heathrow) Airport, seen from Terminal 1. ... London Heathrow Airport (IATA: LHR, ICAO: EGLL), often referred to as Heathrow, is the third busiest airport in the world, after Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport and Chicago OHare. ... The word drink is primarily a verb, meaning to ingest liquids, see Drinking. ... Hair gel is a hairstyling product that is used to stiffen hair into a particular hairstyle. ... Modern toothpaste gel Toothpaste is a paste or gel used to clean and improve the aesthetic appearance and health of teeth. ... Lipstick is a cosmetic product containing pigments, oils, waxes, and emollients that applies color and texture to the lips. ... Sunscreen (also known as sunblock, suncream, suntan lotion) is a lotion, spray or other topical product that helps protect the skin from the suns ultraviolet radiation, and which reduces sunburn and other skin damage, ultimately leading to a lower risk of skin cancer. ... A lotion is a low- to medium-viscosity medicated or non-medicated topical preparation intended for application to unbroken skin. ... Logan International Airport with aircraft taking off over harbor Bostons Logan International Airport from the airside lounge of Terminal E, illustrating how the airport is largely surrounded by water. ...


United Kingdom

Following the raids, the terror alert level was raised by Britain's Joint Terrorist Analysis Centre from 'severe' to 'critical', signalling an attack was believed to be imminent, although this was only done after the raid.[3] On 14 August 2006 the threat level was reduced from 'Critical' to 'Severe'.[54] The Joint Terrorist Analysis Centre (JTAC) advises the United Kingdom government on terrorist threat levels and related security considerations. ... August 14 is the 226th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (227th in leap years), with 139 days remaining. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


In the immediate aftermath of the raids, no hand luggage (carry-on luggage) was allowed except for a very few essentials such as travel documents and wallets. Hand baggage was reintroduced at some smaller airports on 14 August, but was not permitted at Heathrow and Gatwick Airports until 15 August. The restriction of baggage size was rextricted to 45cm x 35cm x 16cm but this was changed to 56cm x 45cm x 25cm as of September 22, 2006.[55] August 14 is the 226th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (227th in leap years), with 139 days remaining. ... August 15 is the 227th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (228th in leap years), with 138 days remaining. ... September 22 is the 265th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (266th in leap years). ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


United States

Following the operation, United States Homeland Security banned all liquids and gels except baby formula and prescription medications in the name of the ticket holder in carry-on luggage on all flights.[56] The DHS level in the United States was raised to 'severe' (red) for all flights from the UK. The terror level for all other domestic or non-British international flights in the United States was raised to High (orange). In the United States, the Homeland Security Advisory System is a color-coded terrorism threat advisory scale. ...


As of 13 August 2006, airline passengers in the United States can take up to four ounces of non-prescription medicine, glucose gel for diabetics, solid lipstick, and baby food aboard flights. All aerosols are prohibited and the TSA now demands that passengers remove their shoes so they may be X-rayed before boarding. August 13 is the 225th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (226th in leap years), with 140 days remaining. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Other countries

The heightened security levels affected many other countries across the world, both directly and indirectly.


Impact

Overall, an estimated 400,000 passengers were affected because of the alerts. It has been estimated that the first day of delays cost the airlines over £175 million.[citation needed]


As many as 20,000 bags are believed to have been misplaced at Heathrow.[57]


Flight cancellations on the 10th August

Some inbound flights to London Heathrow Airport were cancelled on the day of the arrests, most notably the Thursday short-haul flights of British Airways. Some flights to and from London Gatwick Airport were also suspended,[58] although US Airways flights continued flying normally from Gatwick according to the airline's helpline. London Heathrow Airport (IATA: LHR, ICAO: EGLL), often referred to as Heathrow, is the third busiest airport in the world, after Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport and Chicago OHare. ... Gatwick Airport (IATA: LGW, ICAO: EGKK) is Londons second largest airport and the second busiest airport in the UK after Heathrow. ... US Airways is an airline based in Tempe, Arizona, owned by US Airways Group, Inc. ...


Service resumption

Tents on the car park in front of terminal 4. Heathrow, 14 August
Enlarge
Tents on the car park in front of terminal 4. Heathrow, 14 August

A few hours after the beginning of the confusion, aircraft began to fly out of London Heathrow, although not at the usual level of more than one per minute. The situation remained chaotic with huge queues of passengers waiting to check-in and get through the strengthened security procedures, and reports of some aircraft leaving Heathrow airport with only transit passengers aboard. August 14 is the 226th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (227th in leap years), with 139 days remaining. ...


On Sunday 13 August 30% of flights out of Heathrow were cancelled to reduce pressure on the screeners.[59] By 15 August flight cancellations had fallen to 47 flights at Heathrow, and 8 Ryanair flights from Stansted. It was reported by BA that 10,000 items of baggage belonging to their passengers had gone missing. It was anticipated that cancellations would reduce on 16 August, with 90% of flights expected to depart as scheduled.[60] August 13 is the 225th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (226th in leap years), with 140 days remaining. ... August 15 is the 227th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (228th in leap years), with 138 days remaining. ... August 16 is the 228th day of the year (229th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ...


Controversy over the alert

On 12 August a public argument broke out between BAA, the operator of Heathrow and other airports, and British Airways, with Willie Walsh, BA's Chief Executive, accusing BAA of not being able to cope with the increased security and baggage checks. Ryanair also called on the British government to employ police and military reservists to speed up the full body searches which were now mandated.[citation needed] August 12 is the 224th day of the year (225th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... BAA plc is the owner and operator of seven major United Kingdom airports and operator of several airports worldwide, making the company one of the largest transport companies in the world. ... British Airways (LSE: BAY, NYSE: BAB) is the largest airline of the United Kingdom and the third largest in Europe (behind Air France-KLM and Lufthansa), with more flights from Europe across the Atlantic than any other operator. ... Willie Walsh is an airline executive and is the current Chief Executive of British Airways. ... Ryanair (ISEQ: RYA, LSE: RYA, NASDAQ: RYAAY) is an Irish airline headquartered in Dublin. ...


On 18 August Ryanair's O'Leary delivered an ultimatum to the British government demanding the resumption of normal hand baggage dimensions and hand screening one passenger in four instead of one in two within one week, otherwise Ryanair would sue the Government for compensation under section 93 of the Transport Act 2000. The government responded that the actions were taken under the Aviation Security Act 1982, and no compensation was payable.[61] August 18 is the 230th day of the year (231st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Transport Act 2000 is a current United Kingdom Act of Parliament External Links Transport Act 2002 Category: ...


Carolyn Evans, head of flight safety at the British Airline Pilots Association, said that "the procedures put in place are not sustainable long term, and unless the passengers are treated more reasonably we will not have an industry left".[62]


Economic effects

The Times commented the day after the arrests, that the economic effects were minor and that the FTSE 100 index showed only "mild signs of strain", suggesting that terror was already priced into assets, that the market impact will be contained, and that "what is lost on the swings may be gained on the roundabouts". It observed that the real commercial risk is that "people's behaviour is altered... change may come so subtly and subconsciously that it is hard to see, let alone measure... people may stop travelling for example, not because they are scared of being blown up, but because they are tired of complying with necessary security measures."[63] The Times is a national newspaper published daily in the United Kingdom since 1785, and under its current name since 1788. ... The Financial Times Stock Exchange Index of 100 Leading Shares, or FTSE 100 Index (pronounced footsie), is a share index of the 100 largest companies listed on the London Stock Exchange. ...


Estimates have also been made of the cost to airlines of their disrupted business. British Airways had to cancel 1280 flights, at a cost of £40 million.[64] Ryanair had to cancel 500 flights,[citation needed] and are suing the UK government for the £3.3 million the cancellations cost them.[65] Easyjet had to cancel 469 flights, at a cost of about £4 million.[66] BAA says the alert cost them £13 million.[67]


BA is considering making a claim for compensation against BAA, which operates Heathrow, for its failure to provide adequate security services and shortages of personnel during the crisis.[citation needed]


Air passengers also switched to other means of travel, including Sea France ferries operating from Dover to Calais,[68] and Eurostar.[69]


In November 2006, BA claimed the increased security measures since August had cost it £100 million.[70]


Other responses

  • British Prime Minister Tony Blair was on holiday during these events, but decided not to return to Britain. Blair had been notified of the raid prior to its occurrence, and kept in constant contact with officials. He briefed President George W. Bush about the raid overnight.[71]
  • Britain's Deputy Prime Minister, John Prescott, nominally running the UK government during Tony Blair's holiday, paid tribute to the way the UK reacted to what he called an "extraordinary past 36 hours ... in the efforts to protect this country". He expressed his "deepest appreciation" to the "real dedication" shown by security services, police, transport staff and aviation companies and praised Home Secretary Dr John Reid and Transport Secretary Douglas Alexander. Prescott added that the British public had acted "calmly, sensitively and with great patience."[72]

A prime minister is the most senior minister of a cabinet in the executive branch of government in a parliamentary system. ... Anthony Charles Lynton Blair (born 6 May 1953)[1] is the Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, First Lord of the Treasury, Minister for the Civil Service, Leader of the UK Labour Party, and Member of the UK Parliament for the constituency of Sedgefield in North East England. ... Abraham Lincoln, 16th President of the United States (1861-1865) The majority of this article is about heads of states. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the 43rd and current President of the United States, inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ... The office of Deputy Prime Minister is one that has only existed occasionally in the history of the United Kingdom. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article may require cleanup. ... The Secretary of State for the Home Department, commonly known as the Home Secretary, is the minister in charge of the United Kingdom Home Office and is responsible for internal affairs in England and Wales, and for immigration and citizenship for the whole United Kingdom (including Scotland and Northern Ireland). ... John Reid (born 8 May 1947) is a British politician who is Home Secretary and Member of Parliament for the Scottish constituency of Airdrie and Shotts. ... The Secretary of State for Transport is the member of the cabinet responsible for the British Department for Transport. ... Douglas Garven Alexander (born October 26, 1967) is a British politician who is Secretary of State for Transport and Secretary of State for Scotland He is the Member of Parliament for the Scottish constituency of Paisley and Renfrewshire South representing the Labour Party. ...

See also

Oplan Bojinka (also known as Operation Bojinka, Project Bojinka, Bojinka Plot, Bojinga, possibly from Arabic: بجنكة – slang in many dialects for explosion and pronounced Bo-JIN-ka, except in Egyptian where it is Bo-GIN-ka) was a planned large-scale attack on airliners in 1995, and was a precursor to... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article may require cleanup. ... Philippine Airlines Flight 434 was the route designator of a flight that flew on a Ninoy Aquino International Airport near Manila, Philippines - Mactan-Cebu International Airport, Cebu - New Tokyo International Airport (Now Narita International Airport), Narita, Japan near Tokyo route. ... The following is a list of terrorist incidents in the United Kingdom, including incidents where people were arrested under the terrorist laws and later released without charge. ... A sequential look at United Flight 175 crashing into the south tower of the World Trade Center The September 11, 2001 attacks (often referred to as 9/11—pronounced nine eleven or nine one one) consisted of a series of coordinated terrorist[1] suicide attacks upon the United States, predominantly... Matt Lauer with the crew of Flight 63, the Shoebomber flight. ... Pan Am Flight 103 was Pan American World Airways third daily scheduled transatlantic flight from Londons Heathrow International Airport to New Yorks John F. Kennedy International Airport. ... Air India Flight 182 was a Boeing 747 that exploded on June 23, 1985 while at an altitude of 31,000 feet (9500 m) above the Atlantic Ocean, south of Ireland; all 329 on board were killed, of whom eighty two were children and 280 were Canadian citizens. ... China Northern flight 6136 (CBF6136, CJ6136) was a flight from Capital airport, Beijing to Zhoushuizi airport, Dalian, a coastal city in Liaoning province of China. ... Korean Air Flight 858 was a flight that flew from Abu Dhabi International Airport in Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates to Gimpo Airport near Seoul, South Korea via Bangkok International Airport in Bangkok. ...

References

  1. ^ Bob Sherwood and Stephen Fidler. MI5 tracked group for a year. Financial Times. Retrieved on August 11, 2006.
  2. ^ a b c d BBC News UK. 'Airlines terror plot' disrupted. BBC News UK. Retrieved on August 10, 2006.
  3. ^ a b MSNBC. U.K.: Plot to bomb US-bound planes foiled. MSNBC. Retrieved on August 10, 2006.
  4. ^ nytimes.com. British Authorities Arrest 21; U.S. Raises Threat Level. NY Times. Retrieved on August 10, 2006.
  5. ^ 'A Plot to commit Murder on an Unimaginable Scale' - The Guardian. August 10, 2006
  6. ^ a b DHS.gov. Press Conference Remarks. DHS. Retrieved on August 10, 2006.
  7. ^ Day of terror strikes was planned for August 16. Daily Mail. Retrieved on August 11, 2006.
  8. ^ a b Times Online. Focus: Terror in the skies. Times Online. Retrieved on August 13, 2006.
  9. ^ a b c d e f Van Natta Jr., Don, Elaine Sciolino, Stephen Grey. "In Tapes, Receipts and a Diary, Details of the British Terror Case", New York Times, 2006-08-27. Retrieved on 2006-10-12.
  10. ^ Richard Esposito. Explosive Gel Was to Be Concealed in Sports Drink. ABC News. Retrieved on August 10, 2006.
  11. ^ usnews.com. Terror suspects planned to use liquid explosives to blow up planes. U.S.News. Retrieved on August 10, 2006.
  12. ^ Jennifer Quinn Esposito. Terror plotters hoped to use peroxide explosive to blow up jets. San Diego Union Tribune. Retrieved on August 10, 2006.
  13. ^ time.com
  14. ^ Electronpusher: Practical Chemistry
  15. ^ Laville, Sandra. "Five key questions for anti-terror investigation", Guardian, 19 August 2006. Retrieved on 2006-10-13.
  16. ^
  17. ^ CNN.com. Agent infiltrated terror cell, U.S. says. CNN. Retrieved on August 10, 2006.
  18. ^ BBC News. Night-time swoops on suspects. BBC News. Retrieved on August 10, 2006.
  19. ^ Times Online. A Plan 'to commit unimaginable mass murder'. Times Online. Retrieved on August 12, 2006.
  20. ^ The New York Times. British Authorities Say Plot to Blow Up Airliners Was Foiled. The New York Times. Retrieved on August 10, 2006.
  21. ^ BBC News. Who are the terror plot suspects?. BBC News. Retrieved on August 11, 2006.
  22. ^ BBC.com. Police probe flights terror plot. BBC. Retrieved on August 10, 2006.
  23. ^ CNN (US TV)
  24. ^ Reuters UK. Police say foil plot to bomb aircraft. Reuters UK. Retrieved on August 10, 2006.
  25. ^ CNN.com. Security chief: Airline terror plot 'close to execution'. CNN. Retrieved on August 10, 2006.
  26. ^ a b Air plot suspects appear in court CNN
  27. ^ IOL. Eight in Court over 'plot'. IOL. Retrieved on September 4, 2006.
  28. ^ http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/14320452/ MSNBC, U.S., UK at odds over timing of arrests
  29. ^ QUAKE AID RIPPED OFF Sunday Mail
  30. ^ Quake relief funneled?
  31. ^ Airline plot suspect linked with Jaish - Dawn (newspaper), 'Plane plot' man linked to Islamic militant group
  32. ^ Exclusive: A Kashmiri Tie to the Terror Plot - TIME
  33. ^ [1]
  34. ^ Five key questions for anti-terror investigation, Guardian, 19 August 2006.
  35. ^ Why we must pray this man is telling us the truth, The Daily Mail, 16 August 2006.
  36. ^ London Terror Plot: Skepticism Surrounding Handling of the Crisis, Voice of America, 18 August 2006.
  37. ^ Bomb Plot Evidence 'Immense,' British Say, Los Angeles Times, 22 August 2006.
  38. ^ Scepticism is needed, The Guardian, 14 August 2006.
  39. ^ Past blunders put pressure on police to make case stick, Times Online, 12 August 2006
  40. ^ Muslims skeptical of airline terror plot - MSN, 11 August 2006.
  41. ^ Be skeptical about UK's terror alert, says former ambassador, IRNA, 08/18/06
  42. ^ Mass murder in the skies: was the plot feasible? Thomas C Greene (link) The Register | August 17 2006
  43. ^ Sources: August terror plot is a 'fiction' underscoring police failures, Nafeez Ahmed, (link), The Raw Story, September 18, 2006
  44. ^ guardian. Blair forewarned. guardian. Retrieved on August 11, 2006.
  45. ^ DHS.gov. Anti-terror critics just don't get it. guardian. Retrieved on August 11, 2006.
  46. ^ a b BBC. Reid statement. BBC. Retrieved on August 12, 2006.
  47. ^ BBC. Full text: Muslim groups' letter. BBC. Retrieved on August 12, 2006.
  48. ^ Mark Townsend. Official: Iraq war led to July bombings. guardian.co.uk. Retrieved on August 12, 2006.
  49. ^ BBC. Muslim letter 'misjudged' - Reid. BBC. Retrieved on August 13, 2006.
  50. ^ Airlines accuse BA of failing to cope. Independent. Retrieved on August 15, 2006.
  51. ^ [2]
  52. ^ Fox News (U.S. TV)
  53. ^ http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk/4790555.stm
  54. ^ MI5 Threat Level as of August 14, 2006, 00:35
  55. ^ ews.bbc.co.uk
  56. ^ CNN News. 'Police: Plot to blow up aircraft foiled. CNN News. Retrieved on August 10, 2006.
  57. ^ BBC News UK. BA back to normal in 48 hours. BBC News UK. Retrieved on August 22, 2006.
  58. ^ BBC News UK. Travel chaos grips UK's airports. BBC News UK. Retrieved on August 10, 2006.
  59. ^ Nick Mathiason, Oliver Morgan and Rob Sharp. BA criticises Heathrow as travel mayhem grows. The Observer. Retrieved on August 13, 2006.
  60. ^ BBC. Bags misplaced at Airports. BBC News Online. Retrieved on August 15, 2006.
  61. ^ BBC. Ryanair issues luggage ultimatum. BBC News Online. Retrieved on August 18, 2006.
  62. ^ Are we really at risk from snacks on a plane?, Sunday Herald, 20 August 2006
  63. ^ The Times paper edition August 11, 2006, p.45, terror may already be priced into values
  64. ^ http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/business/5316920.stm
  65. ^ http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/business/5285102.stm
  66. ^ http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/business/5323082.stm
  67. ^ http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/business/5338080.stm
  68. ^ [3]
  69. ^ passengers switching to other means of travel. Independent. Retrieved on August 15, 2006.
  70. ^ http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/business/6112252.stm
  71. ^ 10 Downing Street. PM pays tribute to police and security services. 10 Downing Street. Retrieved on August 10, 2006.
  72. ^ BBC News. UK threat level remains critical. BBC News. Retrieved on August 11, 2006.

August 11 is the 223rd day of the year (224th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... August 10 is the 222nd day of the year (223rd in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... August 10 is the 222nd day of the year (223rd in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... August 10 is the 222nd day of the year (223rd in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Guardian is a British newspaper owned by the Guardian Media Group. ... August 10 is the 222nd day of the year (223rd in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 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External links

Wikinews
Wikinews has information related to this article:

Police in Britain uncover suspected terrorist plot Image File history File links Wikinews-logo. ... Wikinews is a free-content news source and a project of the Wikimedia Foundation. ...

Press coverage

UK

Current logo of The Register. ...

International

  • UK police foil terrorist plot to bomb aircraft (from Reuters)
  • Police: Plot to blow up aircraft foiled (CNN)
  • British police thwart alleged major terrorist plot (USA Today)
  • British Arrest 21 in Airline Terror Plot (From Associated Press)
  • RTÉ News

Official government sources

United Kingdom

August 10 is the 222nd day of the year (223rd in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... August 10 is the 222nd day of the year (223rd in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... August 10 is the 222nd day of the year (223rd in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... August 10 is the 222nd day of the year (223rd in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

United States

  • Department of Homeland Security statement, downloaded 10 August 2006.
  • Transportation Security Administration page with specific information on banned carry-on items.

 
 

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