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Encyclopedia > Augmented fifth
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An augmented fifth is one of three musical intervals that span five diatonic scale degrees. The prefix 'augmented' identifies it as being the largest of the three intervals; the others being the perfect fifth and diminished fifth, which are one and two semitones smaller, respectively. Its inversion is the diminished fourth, and its enharmonic equivalent is the minor sixth. In music theory, an interval is the difference (a ratio or logarithmic measure) in pitch between two notes and often refers to those two notes themselves (otherwise known as a dyad). ... Jump to: navigation, search In music theory, a diatonic scale (from the Greek diatonikos, to stretch out) is a seven-note musical scale comprising five whole-tone and two half-tone steps, in which the half tones are maximally separated. ... Jump to: navigation, search The perfect fifth or diapente is one of three musical intervals that span five diatonic scale degrees; the others being the diminished fifth, which is one semitone smaller, and the augmented fifth, which is one semitone larger. ... This article is about the musical interval. ... The musical interval of a half step, semitone, or minor second is the relationship between the leading tone and the first note (the root or tonic) in a major scale. ... Inversion has different meanings in different fields of knowledge: Something that is inverted or the process by which an inverse is obtained. ... In music, an enharmonic is a note which is the equivalent of some other note, but spelled differently. ... The musical interval of a minor sixth is the relationship between the first note (the root or tonic) and the sixth note in a minor scale. ...


The augmented fifth has no 'natural' diatonic occurrence, and only began to make an appearance, at the beginning of the common practice period of music, as a consequence of composers seeking to strengthen the normally weak seventh degree when composing music in minor modes. In Music theory, the diatonic major scale (also known as the Guido scale), from the Greek diatonikos or to stretch out, is a fundamental building block of the European-influenced musical tradition. ... In music the common practice period is a long period in western musical history spanning from before the classical era proper to today, dated, on the outside, as 1600-1900. ... A minor scale in musical theory is a diatonic scale whose third scale degree is an interval of a minor third above the tonic. ...


This was achieved by chromatically raising the seventh degree (or subtonic) to match that of the more dynamic seventh degree (or leading note) of the major mode - (an increasingly widespread practice that led to the creation of a modified version of the minor scale known as the harmonic minor scale. In music, chromatic indicates the inclusion of notes not in the prevailing scale and is also used for those notes themselves (Shir-Cliff et al 1965, p. ... In music, the subtonic is the lowered seventh degree of the scale, as opposed to the leading tone. ... In music theory, a leading-tone (called the leading-note outside the US) is a note or pitch which is resolves or leads to a note one semitone higher or lower, being an lower and upper leading-tone, respectively. ... In music theory, the major scale (or major mode) is one of the diatonic scales. ... A minor scale in musical theory is a diatonic scale whose third scale degree is an interval of a minor third above the tonic. ...


A consequence of this was that the interval between the minor mode's already lowered third degree (mediant) and the newly raised seventh degree, (previously a perfect fifth), had now been 'augmented' by a chromatic semitone. This resulted in the first diatonic use of the augmented fifth interval. For mediant in mathematics, see Mediant (mathematics) In music, the mediant is the third degree of the diatonic scale. ...


Another result of this practice was the appearance of the first augmented triads, built on the same degree, in place of the naturally occuring major chord. In general, an augmented chord is any chord which contains an augmented interval. ...


As music became increasingly chromatic, the augmented fifth was used with correspondingly greater freedom and also became a common component of jazz chords. Jump to: navigation, search Jazz master Louis Armstrong remains one of the most loved and best known of all jazz musicians. ...


In an equal tempered tuning, an augmented fifth is equal to eight semitones, a ratio of 1:28/12 (approximately 1.587), or 800 cents.


The augmented fifth is a context dependent dissonance. That is, when heard in certain contexts, such as that described above, the interval will sound dissonant. Without context, however, or in certain other contexts, the same eight semitone interval will simply be heard as its consonant enharmonic equivalent, the minor sixth. In music, a consonance (Latin consonare, sounding together) is a harmony, chord, or interval considered stable, as opposed to a dissonance, which is considered unstable. ... In music, a consonance (Latin consonare, sounding together) is a harmony, chord, or interval considered stable, as opposed to a dissonance, which is considered unstable. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Augmented fifth - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (349 words)
The prefix 'augmented' identifies it as being the largest of the three intervals; the others being the perfect fifth and diminished fifth, which are one and two chromatic semitones smaller, respectively.
Its inversion is the diminished fourth, and its enharmonic equivalent in equal temperament is the minor sixth.
In an equal tempered tuning, an augmented fifth is equal to eight semitones, a ratio of 1:28/12 (approximately 1.587), or 800 cents.
Augmented Sixth Chords (2293 words)
More precisely, augmented sixth chords are leading tone or chromatic preparations of V. However, since the interval of the augmented 6th (unlike the tritone), does not determine any particular key, the chord of resolution does not sound like a tonic.
The Italian Sixth is the simplest of the augmented sixth chords.
The note determining the functional identity of the chord is the seventh of the dominant 7th and the "root" of the German 6/5 (the note that usually appears in the soprano and forms the interval of the augmented sixth with the bass).
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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