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Encyclopedia > Aubin Codex
 Depiction of the departure from Aztlán, from the Boturini Codex.
Depiction of the departure from Aztlán, from the Boturini Codex.

Aztec codices (singular codex) are books written by pre-Columbian and Spanish colonial era Aztecs. These codices provide some of the best primary sources for Aztec and Nahuatl culture. ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (800x800, 378 KB) The Mexica depart from Aztlán. ... ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (800x800, 378 KB) The Mexica depart from Aztlán. ... first page of the Codex Argenteus A codex (Latin for block of wood, book; plural codices) is a handwritten book, in general one produced from Late Antiquity through the Middle Ages. ... Wiktionary has related dictionary definitions, such as: book A book is a collection of sheets of paper, parchment or other material, bound together along one edge within covers. ... The term Pre-Columbian is used to refer to the cultures of the New World in the era before significant European influence. ... The Aztecs were a Pre-Columbian Mesoamerican people of central México in the 14th, 15th and 16th centuries. ... Nahuatl is a native language of central Mexico. ...


These codices, particularly the pre-Coumbian codices, differ from European codices in that they are largely pictorial.

The graphic systems of communication in Pre-Columbian Mexico never intended to communicate speech. European alphabetic texts preserve the words, sentences, and paragraphs of a spoken language. In contrast, the Pre-Columbian texts in central Mexico bypass spoken language and preserve meaning visually and within its own pictorial conventions. . . . As with a musical score or mathematical notation, one can read a pictorial document without constructing a verbal narrative.
Elizabeth Hill Boone, "Pictorial Documents and Visual Thinking in Postconquest Mexico". p. 158.

Contents


Boturini Codex

The Boturini Codex was painted by an unknown Aztec author some time between 1530 and 1541, roughly a decade the Spanish conquest of Mexico. Pictorial in nature, it tells the story of the legendary Aztec journey from Aztlán to the Valley of Mexico. The Spanish conquest of Mexico was one of the most important campaigns in the Spanish colonization of the Americas. ... Aztlán (, from Nahuatl Aztlan ) is the legendary ancestral home of the Nahua peoples, one of the main cultural groups in Mesoamerica. ... Anahuac is a plateau in Central Mexico, at a mean elevation of 7580 ft. ...


Rather than employing separate pages, the author used one long sheet of amatl, or fig bark, accordion-folded into 21½ pages. There is a rip in the middle of the 22nd page, and it is unclear whether the author intended the manuscript to end at that point or not. Unlike many other Aztec codices, the drawings are not colored, but rather merely outlined with black ink.


Also known as “Tira de la Peregrinación” ("The Strip Showing the Travels"), it is named after one of its first European owners, Lorenzo Boturini Benaducci (1702 – 1751).

Aztec warriors as shown in the Florentine Codex.
Aztec warriors as shown in the Florentine Codex.

Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1009x457, 229 KB) Summary Copy of painting from Florentine Codex, page IX, F, 5v; see article for further info Licensing The two-dimensional work of art depicted in this image is in the public domain in the United States and in... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1009x457, 229 KB) Summary Copy of painting from Florentine Codex, page IX, F, 5v; see article for further info Licensing The two-dimensional work of art depicted in this image is in the public domain in the United States and in...

Florentine Codex

The Florentine Codex is the name given to the 4-volume 12-part document created under the supervision of Bernardino de Sahagún between perhaps 1540 and 1585. It was originally written in Nahuatl but this version has been lost, perhaps destroyed by the Spanish authorities who confiscated Sahagún's manuscripts. The oldest extant version, the Codex Matritense, is a Spanish language summary of the Nahuatl version, and the term "Florentine Codex" usually refers to Sahagún's later revised version from 1585. Bernardino de Sahagún (1499-1590) was a Franciscan missionary to the Aztec (Náhua) people of Mexico. ... Nahuatl is a native language of central Mexico. ...


It is also known as Historia general de las cosas de Nueva España (literally "General History of the Things of New Spain") and is kept at Laurentian Library in Florence. It has been suggested that Biblioteca Mediceo Lauenziana be merged into this article or section. ...


Aubin Codex

The Aubin Codex is a pictorial history of the Aztecs from their departure from Aztlán through the Spanish conquest to the early Spanish colonial period, ending in 1607. Most likely begun in 1576, it is possible that Fray Diego Durán supervised its preparation, since it was published in 1867 as Historia de las Indias de Nueva-España y isles de Tierra Firme, listing Durán as the author. The Spanish conquest of Mexico was one of the most important campaigns in the Spanish colonization of the Americas. ... Diego Durán (c. ...


Among other topics, the Aubin Codex has a native description of the massacre at the temple in Tenochtitlanin 1520. The Massacre in the Main Temple of the Aztec capital Tenochtitlán is an episode in the conquest of Mexico by Spain. ...


Also called "Manuscrito de 1576" (“The Manuscript of 1576”), this codex is held by the Bibliothèque National in France.

Middle section of page 34 of Codex Osuna showing the pictorial symbols for Texcoco, Tenochtitlan, and Tlacopán.
Enlarge
Middle section of page 34 of Codex Osuna showing the pictorial symbols for Texcoco, Tenochtitlan, and Tlacopán.

Codex Osuna

Codex Osuna is a set of seven separate documents created in early 1565 to present evidence against the government of Viceroy Luis de Velasco during the 1563-66 inquiry by Jerónimo de Valderrama. In this codex, indigenous leaders claim non-payment for various goods and for various services performed by their people, including building construction and domestic help. Luis de Velasco (b. ...


The Codex was originally pictorial in nature. Nahuatl descriptions and details were then entered onto the documents during its review by Spanish authorities, and a Spanish translation of the Nahuatl was added.


See also

  • Codex Mendoza
  • Ramirez Codex
  • Unos Anales Históricos de la Nación Mexicana
  • Durán Codex
  • Codex Borgia, a pre-Columbian manuscript with many colorful images. This may be a Mixtec, rather than an Aztec, work.
  • Codex Vaticanus B, like the Codex Borgia, this is a pre-Columbian manuscript that may be a Mixtec, rather than an Aztec, work.
  • Codex Borbonicus, a pre-Columbian manuscript
  • Codex Cozcatzin
  • Codex Azcatitlan
  • Huexotzinco Codex, a non-Aztec colonial era codex
  • Codex Ríos

The Codex Mendoza is a painted document from the 1540s. ... This article or section contains information that has not been verified and thus might not be reliable. ... Unos Anales Históricos de la Nación Mexicana (Some Historical Annals of the Mexican Nation) is a manuscript written in language, using Latin characters, by anonymous Aztec authors in 1528 in Tlatelolco, only seven years after the fall of the Aztec Empire. ... Diego Durán (c. ... Codex Zouche-Nuttall, a pre-Columbian piece of Mixtec writing, now in the British Museum The Mixtec (or Mixteca) are a Native American people centered in the Mexican state of Oaxaca. ... Codex Zouche-Nuttall, a pre-Columbian piece of Mixtec writing, now in the British Museum The Mixtec (or Mixteca) are a Native American people centered in the Mexican state of Oaxaca. ... Panel 1 of the Codex; the panel contains an image of the Virgin and Child and symbolic representations of tribute paid to the administrators The Huexotzinco Codex or Huejotzingo Codex is an eight-sheet document on amatl, a pre-European paper made in Mesoamerica. ...

References

  • Boone, Elizabeth Hill. "Pictorial Documents and Visual Thinking in Postconquest Mexico", in Native Traditions in the Postconquest World, Elizabeth Hill Boone and Tom Cummins, ed., Dumbarton Oaks, Wasington, D. C., 1998.

External links

  • The Boturini Codex

 
 

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