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Encyclopedia > Atmospheric pressure demo

The easiest way to demonstrate atmospheric pressure is to conduct a soda can experiment. This is also my science fair project. The materials needed are: A cold bowl of water, a soda can, a small amount of water (room temperature), a device capable of heating the bottom of the can.


1. Put regular water into the soda can until it covers the whole bottom. 2. Heat the bottom of the soda can. 3. When the water starts boiling, invert the can and place it in the cold water. 4. The external pressure will crush the can.



SURFING ON THE WEB, I FOUND A WEBSITE THAT SHOWS WHAT HAPPENS: http://hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.edu/hbase/kinetic/pcokem.html#c1



~Kunal Delvadia~


  Results from FactBites:
 
Atmospheric pressure - Facts, Information, and Encyclopedia Reference article (1023 words)
Atmospheric pressure varies widely on the Earth, and these variations are important in studying weather and climate.
Atmospheric pressure is often measured with a mercury barometer, and a height of approximately 30 inches of mercury is often used to teach, make visible, and illustrate (and measure) atmospheric pressure.
In terms of city water pressure, one atmosphere is approximately one-half to one-fifth the pressure of typical city water mains (i.e., water pressure is around 2 to 5 atmospheres).
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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