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Encyclopedia > Atlas (mythology)
Lee Lawrie's colossal bronze Atlas, Rockefeller Center, New York
For the Transformers character see King Atlas (Transformers).

In Greek mythology, Atlas was one of the primordial Titans. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1944x2592, 1025 KB) Description: Atlas. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1944x2592, 1025 KB) Description: Atlas. ... Grill work from Education Building, Harrisburg, Pennsylvania Lee Oscar Lawrie (October 16, 1877 - January 23, 1963) was one of Americas foremost architectural sculptors and a key figure in the American art scene preceding World War II. His work includes the details on the Capitol building in Lincoln, Nebraska and... King Atlas is a fictional character in the various Transformers universes. ... The bust of Zeus found at Otricoli (Sala Rotonda, Museo Pio-Clementino, Vatican) Greek mythology is the body of stories belonging to the Ancient Greeks concerning their gods and heroes, the nature of the world and the origins and significance of their own cult and ritual practices. ... This article is about the race of Titans in Greek mythology. ...


Atlas (Eng. /'æt ləs/ Gk. Ἄτλας) was the son of the Titan Iapetus and the Oceanid Asia[1] or Klyménē (Κλυμένη):[2] In Greek mythology Iapetus, or Iapetos, was a Titan, the son of Uranus and Gaia, and father (by an Oceanid named Clymene or Asia) of Atlas, Prometheus, Epimetheus, and Menoetius and through Prometheus and Epimetheus and Atlas an ancestor of the human race. ... In Greek and Roman mythology, the Oceanids were the three thousand children of the Titans Oceanus and Tethys. ... Asia or Clymene in Greek mythology is a daughter of Oceanus and Tethys, the wife of the Titan Iapetus, and mother of Atlas, Prometheus, Epimetheus and Menoetius. ...

"Now Iapetus took to wife the neat-ankled maid Clymene, daughter of Ocean, and went up with her into one bed. And she bare him a stout-hearted son, Atlas: also she bare very glorious Menoetius and clever Prometheus, full of various wiles, and scatter-brained Epimetheus."[3] For other uses, see Menoetius. ... Prometheus Brings Fire to Mankind, by Heinrich Füger, (1817). ... In Greek mythology, Epimetheus (hindsight, literally hind-thought) was the brother of Prometheus (foresight, literally fore-thought), a pair of Titans who acted as representatives of mankind (Kerenyi 1951, p 207). ...

Hyginus emphasises the primordial nature of Atlas by making him the son of Aether and Gaea.[4] In contexts where a Titan and a Titaness are assigned each of the seven planetary powers, Atlas is paired with Phoebe and governs the moon.[5] He had three brothers — Prometheus, Epimetheus and Menoetius.[6] Gaius Julius Hyginus, (c. ... Aether (upper air), in Greek mythology, was the personification of the upper sky, space and heaven. ... For other uses, see Gaia. ... Phoebe (pronunced fee-bee) was one of the original Titans, one set of sons and daughters of Uranus and Gaia. ... The Moon has figured in many mythologies, often paired or contrasted with the Sun (see also Solar deity). ... Prometheus Brings Fire to Mankind, by Heinrich Füger, (1817). ... In Greek mythology, Epimetheus (hindsight, literally hind-thought) was the brother of Prometheus (foresight, literally fore-thought), a pair of Titans who acted as representatives of mankind (Kerenyi 1951, p 207). ... For other uses, see Menoetius. ...

Sculpture of Atlas, Praza do Toural, Santiago de Compostela
Sculpture of Atlas, Praza do Toural, Santiago de Compostela

Contents

Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1200x1600, 129 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Atlas (mythology) Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1200x1600, 129 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Atlas (mythology) Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to... Location Location of Santiago de Compostela Coordinates : , , Time zone : CET (GMT +1) - summer : CEST (GMT +2) General information Native name Santiago de Compostela (Galician) Spanish name Santiago de Compostela Postal code 15700 Website santiagodecompostela. ...

Punishment

Atlas, along with his brother Menoetius, sided with the Titans in their war against the Olympians, the Titanomachy. His brothers Prometheus and Epimetheus weighed the odds and betrayed the other Titans by forming an alliance with the Olympians. When the Titans were defeated , many of them (including Menoetius) were confined to Tartarus, but Zeus condemned Atlas to stand at the western edge of the Gaia, the Earth and hold up Ouranos, the Sky on his shoulders, to prevent the two from resuming their primordial embrace. Thus he was Atlas Telamon, "enduring Atlas". Twelve Olympians, also known as the Dodekatheon (Greek: Δωδεκάθεον < δωδεκα, dodeka, twelve + θεον, theon, of the gods), in Greek religion, were the principal gods of the Greek pantheon, residing atop Mount Olympus. ... In Greek mythology, the Titanomachy, or War of the Titans (Greek: Τιτανομαχία), was the eleven-year series of battles fought between the two races of deities long before the existence of mankind: the Titans, fighting from Mount Othrys, and the Olympians, who would come to reign on Mount Olympus. ... This article is about the deity and the place in Greek mythology. ... For other uses, see Zeus (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Gaia. ... For other uses, see Uranus (disambiguation). ...

Greek deities
series
Primordial deities
Olympians
Aquatic deities
Chthonic deities
Personified concepts
Other deities
Titans
The Twelve Titans:
Oceanus and Tethys,
Hyperion and Theia,
Coeus and Phoebe,
Cronus and Rhea,
Mnemosyne, Themis,
Crius, Iapetus
Children of Hyperion:
Eos, Helios, Selene
Daughters of Coeus:
Leto and Asteria
Sons of Iapetus:
Atlas, Prometheus,
Epimetheus, Menoetius

A common misconception is that Atlas was forced to hold the Earth on his shoulders, but this is incorrect. Classical art shows Atlas holding a Celestial Sphere, not a Globe. The bust of Zeus found at Otricoli (Sala Rotonda, Museo Pio-Clementino, Vatican) Greek mythology is the body of stories belonging to the Ancient Greeks concerning their gods and heroes, the nature of the world and the origins and significance of their own cult and ritual practices. ... The ancient Greeks proposed many different ideas about the primordial gods in their mythology. ... Twelve Olympians, also known as the Dodekatheon (Greek: Δωδεκάθεον < δωδεκα, dodeka, twelve + θεον, theon, of the gods), in Greek religion, were the principal gods of the Greek pantheon, residing atop Mount Olympus. ... The ancient Greeks had a very small number of see gods. ... For other uses, see Chthon (disambiguation). ... For the rock band, see Muse (band). ... Asclepius (Greek , transliterated Asklēpiós; Latin Aesculapius) is the demigod of medicine and healing in ancient Greek mythology. ... This article is about the race of Titans in Greek mythology. ... Oceanus, with his wife, Tethys, ruled the seas before Poseidon. ... In Greek mythology, Tethys was a Titaness and sea goddess who was both sister and wife of Oceanus. ... This article is about Hyperion, a Titan in Greek mythology. ... In Greek mythology, Theia (also written Thea or Thia), also called Euryphaessa (wide-shining), was a Titan. ... In Greek mythology, Coeus (also Koios) was the Titan of intelligence. ... Phoebe (pronunced fee-bee) was one of the original Titans, one set of sons and daughters of Uranus and Gaia. ... Cronus is not to be confused with Chronos, the personification of time. ... Rhea (or Ria meaning she who flows) was the Titaness daughter of Uranus and of Gaia. ... Mnemosyne (Greek , IPA in RP and in General American) (sometimes confused with Mneme or compared with Memoria) was the personification of memory in Greek mythology. ... In Greek mythology, Hesiod mentions Themis among the six sons and six daughters—of whom Cronos was one—of Gaia and Ouranos, that is, of Earth with Sky. ... In Greek mythology, Crius was one of the Titans, a son of Uranus and Gaia. ... In Greek mythology Iapetus, or Iapetos, was a Titan, the son of Uranus and Gaia, and father (by an Oceanid named Clymene or Asia) of Atlas, Prometheus, Epimetheus, and Menoetius and through Prometheus and Epimetheus and Atlas an ancestor of the human race. ... Eos, by Evelyn De Morgan (1850 - 1919), 1895 (Columbia Museum of Art, Columbia, SC): for a Pre-Raphaelite painter, Eos was still the classical pagan equivalent of an angel Eos (dawn) was, in Greek Mythology, the Titan goddess of the dawn, who rose from her home at the edge of... For other uses, see Helios (disambiguation). ... This article is about the Greek goddess. ... For other uses, see Leto (disambiguation). ... Asteria in Greek mythology can refer to: // In Greek mythology, Asteria was the sixth Amazon killed by Heracles when he came for Hippolytes girdle. ... Prometheus Brings Fire to Mankind, by Heinrich Füger, (1817). ... In Greek mythology, Epimetheus (hindsight, literally hind-thought) was the brother of Prometheus (foresight, literally fore-thought), a pair of Titans who acted as representatives of mankind (Kerenyi 1951, p 207). ... For other uses, see Menoetius. ... The celestial spheres relate to Johannes Keplers work Harmonia Mundi in which he drew together theories from the world of music, architecture, planetary motion and astronomy and linked them together to form an idea of a harmony and cohesion underlying all world phenomena and ruled by a divine force. ... This article is about a spherical model of the Earth, or similar. ...


Variations

In a late story,[7] a giant named Atlas tried to drive a wandering Perseus from the place where the Atlas mountains now stand. Later, out of pity, Athena revealed Medusa's head, turning Atlas to stone. As is not uncommon in myth, this account cannot be reconciled with the far more common stories of Atlas' dealings with Heracles, who was Perseus' great-grandson. For the constellation, see Perseus (constellation); for the Macedonian king, see Perseus of Macedon Perseus with the Head of Medusa Perseus was the son of Danae, the only child of Acrisius king of Argos. ... Map showing the location of the Atlas Mountains (colored red) across North Africa The Atlas Mountains (Arabic: ‎) are a mountain range in northwest Africa extending about 2,400 km (1,500 miles) through Morocco, Algeria, and Tunisia, and including The Rock of Gibraltar. ... For other uses, see Medusa (disambiguation). ... Alcides redirects here. ...


According to Plato, the first king of Atlantis was also named Atlas, but that Atlas was a mortal son of Poseidon.[8] A euhemerist origin for Atlas was as a legendary Atlas, king of Mauretania, an expert astronomer. For other uses, see Plato (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Atlantis (disambiguation). ... Neptune reigns in the city of Bristol. ... Euhemerus (Ευήμερος) (working late 4th century BCE) was a Greek mythographer at the court of Cassander, the king of Macedonia. ...


Encounter with Heracles

Heracles and Atlas, on a by the Athena Painter, c. 490-480 BCE (National Archeological Museum, Athens)
Heracles and Atlas, on a by the Athena Painter, c. 490-480 BCE (National Archeological Museum, Athens)

One of the hero Heracles' Twelve Labors involved the acquisition of some of the golden apples which grow in Hera's garden, tended by the Hesperides and guarded by the dragon Ladon. Heracles went to Atlas, the father of the Hesperides, and offered to hold the heavens for a little while in exchange for the apples, to which Atlas agreed. This would be an easy task for Atlas since he is related to the Hesperides who tend the apples in Hera's garden. Upon his return with the apples, however, Atlas attempted to trick Heracles into carrying the sky permanently by offering to deliver the apples himself. Heracles, suspecting Atlas didn't intend to return again, pretended to agree to Atlas' offer, asking only that Atlas take the sky again for a few minutes so Heracles could rearrange his cloak as padding on his shoulders. When Atlas set down the apples and took the heavens upon his shoulders again, Heracles took the apples and ran away. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (800x1128, 310 KB) Lekythos à fond blanc. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (800x1128, 310 KB) Lekythos à fond blanc. ... Alcides redirects here. ... Hercules and the Hydra by Antonio Pollaiuolo The Twelve Labours (Greek: dodekathlos) of Heracles (Latin: Hercules) are a series of archaic episodes connected by a later continuous narrative, concerning a penance carried out by Heracles, the greatest of the Greek heroes. ... For other uses, see Hera (disambiguation). ... Dragons play a role in Greek mythology. ... For the ancient Greek city Hesperides see Benghazi. ...


In some versions, Heracles instead built the two great Pillars of Hercules to hold the sky away from the earth, liberating Atlas much as he liberated Prometheus. This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Prometheus Brings Fire to Mankind, by Heinrich Füger, (1817). ...


Etymology

The etymology of the name Atlas is uncertain and still debated. Virgil took pleasure in translating etymologies of Greek names by combining them with adjectives that explained them: for Atlas his adjective is durus, "hard, enduring",[9] which suggested to George Doig[10] that Virgil was aware of the Greek τλήναι "to endure"; Doig offers the further possibility that Virgil was aware of Strabo's remark that the native North African name for this mountain was Douris.[11] Etymologies redirects here. ... For other uses, see Virgil (disambiguation). ... The Greek geographer Strabo in a 16th century engraving. ...


Some modern linguists derive it and its Greek root from the Proto-Indo-European root *tel, 'to uphold, support'; others[citation needed] suggest that it is a pre-Indo-European name. Others[citation needed] suggest that Atlas comes from the Pelasgian language, and is related to the Greek borrowing "thalassa" (= sea). The Etruscan name for Atlas, aril, is etymologically independent.[12] The Proto-Indo-European language (PIE) is the hypothetical common ancestor of the Indo-European languages, spoken by the Proto-Indo-Europeans. ... Map showing the Neolithic expansions from the 7th to the 5th millennium BCE Europe in ca. ... Ancient Greek writers used the name Pelasgian to refer to groups of people who preceded the Greeks and dwelt in several locations in mainland Greece, Crete, and other regions of the Aegean as neighbors of the Hellenes. ...


Cultural influence

Atlas supports the terrestrial globe on a building in Collins Street, Melbourne, Australia
Atlas supports the terrestrial globe on a building in Collins Street, Melbourne, Australia

Atlas' best-known cultural association is in cartography. The first publisher to associate the Titan Atlas with a group of maps was Antonio Lafreri, on the title-page to Tavole Moderne Di Geografia De La Maggior Parte Del Mondo Di Diversi Autori; however, he did not use the word "atlas" in the title of his work, an innovation of Mercator who dedicated his "atlas" specifically "to honour the Titan, Atlas, King of Mauritania, a learned philosopher, mathematician, and astronomer." Image File history File linksMetadata Atlas_sculpture_on_collins_street_melbourne. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Atlas_sculpture_on_collins_street_melbourne. ... Collins Street near King Street Collins Street near Swanston Street Collins Street is a major street in the Melbourne central business district and runs approximately east to west. ... Cartography or mapmaking (in Greek chartis = map and graphein = write) is the study and practice of making maps or globes. ... Mercator is a Latin word which translates to merchant. Most commonly, it refers to Gerardus Mercator, a 16th century Flemish cartographer. ...


Since the middle of the sixteenth century, any collection of cartographic maps has come to be called an atlas. Gerardus Mercator was the first to use the word in this way, and he actually depicted the astronomer king. For other meanings of Atlas, see Atlas (disambiguation). ... Gerardus Mercator (March 5, 1512 – December 2, 1594) was a Flemish cartographer. ...


Atlas continues to be a commonly used icon in western culture (and advertising), as a symbol of strength or stoic endurance. He is often shown kneeling on one knee while supporting an enormous round globe on his back and shoulders. The globe originally represented the celestial sphere of ancient astronomy, rather than the earth. The use of the term atlas as a name for collections of terrestrial maps and the modern understanding of the earth as a sphere have combined to inspire the many depictions of Atlas' burden as the earth.


Atlas is seen on the cover of Van Halen's album "5150." This article is about the band Van Halen. ... 5150 is the seventh album by American hard rock band Van Halen, released in 1986. ...


Atlas was used as a symbol in Ayn Rand's novel, Atlas Shrugged. Atlas is used as a metaphor for the people who produced the most in society. Ayn Rand (IPA: , February 2 [O.S. January 20] 1905 – March 6, 1982), born Alisa Zinovyevna Rosenbaum (Russian: ), was a Russian-born American novelist and philosopher. ... For the film, see Atlas Shrugged (film). ...


Children

The Farnese Atlas, a 2nd century Roman copy of a Hellenistic work (Naples)
The Farnese Atlas, a 2nd century Roman copy of a Hellenistic work (Naples)

Sources describe Atlas as the father, by different goddesses, of numerous children, mostly daughters. Some of these are assigned conflicting or overlapping identities or parentage in different sources. The Farnese Atlas at the Museo Archaeologico Nazionale in Naples, Italy. ... The term Hellenistic (established by the German historian Johann Gustav Droysen) in the history of the ancient world is used to refer to the shift from a culture dominated by ethnic Greeks, however scattered geographically, to a culture dominated by Greek-speakers of whatever ethnicity, and from the political dominance... Location of the city of Naples (red dot) within Italy. ...

  • and by one or more unspecified goddesses

In Greek mythology, Hesperius (evening) was the mother of the Hesperides by Atlas. ... For the ancient Greek city Hesperides see Benghazi. ... In Greek mythology, Pleione was the sea-nymph Oceanid of Mount Cyllene in Arkadia, southern Greece. ... // Aethra was a daughter of King Pittheus of Troezen and, with the king Aegeus of Athens — or in some versions, Poseidon — mother of Theseus. ... In Greek mythology, two different groups of people were referred to as the Hyades (the rainy ones). Pluvius (he who sends rain) was also used to describe them. ... Hyas, in Greek mythology, was a son of the Titan Atlas by Aethra (one of the Oceanids). ... THE TITLE IS WRONG MUST BE = Pleiades (Greek Mythology) Greek myths is not the only or more important for be considered as whole. ... Now hes left to pine on an island, wracked with grief (Odyssey V): Calypso and Odysseus, by Arnold Böcklin, 1883 Calypso (Greek: Καλυψώ, I will conceal, also transliterated as Kalypsó or Kālypsō), was a naiad, daughter of Atlas who lived on the island of Gozo in Greek mythology. ... Dione in Greek mythology is a vague goddess presence who has her most concrete form in Book V of Homers Iliad as the mother of Aphrodite: Aphrodite journeys to Diones side after she has been wounded in battle while protecting her favorite son Aeneas. ... In Greek mythology, two people bore the name Maera. ...

See also

The Farnese Atlas at the Museo Archaeologico Nazionale in Naples, Italy. ... Atlantes in eclectic style, Kanałowa Str. ...

Notes

  1. ^ Pseudo-Apollodorus, Bibliotheke i.2.3.
  2. ^ Hesiod (Theogony 359 [as a daughter of Tethys], 507) gives her name as Clymene but Apollodorus (1.8) gives instead the name Asia, as does Lycophron (1411). It is possible that the name Asia became preferred over Hesiod's Clymene to avoid confusion with what must be a different Oceanid named Clymene, who was mother of Phaethon by Helios in some accounts.
  3. ^ Hesiod, Theogony 507ff
  4. ^ Hyginus, Preface to Fabulae.
  5. ^ Classical sources: Homer, Iliad v.898; Apollonius Rhodius ii. 1232; Bibliotheke i.1.3; Hesiod, Theogony 113; Stephanus of Byzantium, under "Adana"; Aristophanes Birds 692ff; Clement of Rome Homilies vi.4.72.
  6. ^ Hesiod, Theogony 371
  7. ^ Polyeidos, Fragment 837; Ovid, Metamorphoses 4.627
  8. ^ Plato, Critias
  9. ^ Aeneid iv.247: "Atlantis duri" and other instances; see Robert W. Cruttwell, "Virgil, Aeneid, iv. 247: 'Atlantis Duri'" The Classical Review 59.1 (May 1945), p. 11.
  10. ^ George Doig, "Vergil's Art and the Greek Language" The Classical Journal 64.1 (October 1968, pp. 1-6) p. 2.
  11. ^ Strabo, 17.3; since the Atlas mountains rise in the region inhabited by Berbers, it could be that the name is taken from one of the Berber languages.
  12. ^ Paolo Martino, Il nome Etrusco di Atlante (Rome: Università di Roma) 1987.
  13. ^ Diodorus Siculus, The Library of History 4.26.2
  14. ^ Hyginus, Astronomica 2.21; Ovid, Fasti 5.164
  15. ^ Hyginus, Fabulae 192
  16. ^ Hyginus, Fabulae 192
  17. ^ Hesiod, Works and Days 383; Apollodorus, 3.110; Ovid, Fasti 5.79
  18. ^ Homer, Odyssey 1.52; Apollodorus, E7.23
  19. ^ Hyginus, Fabulae 82, 83
  20. ^ Pausanias, Guide to Greece 8.12.7, 8.48.6

The Bibliotheke was renowned as the chief work of Greek historian and scholar. ... Roman bronze bust, the so-called Pseudo-Seneca, now identified by some as possibly Hesiod Hesiod (Hesiodos, ) was an early Greek poet and rhapsode, who presumably lived around 700 BC. Hesiod and Homer, with whom Hesiod is often paired, have been considered the earliest Greek poets whose work has survived... Theogony (Greek: Θεογονία, theogonia = the birth of God(s)) is a poem by Hesiod describing the origins and genealogies of the gods of the ancient Greeks, composed circa 700 BC. The title of the work comes from the Greek words for god and seed. // Hesiods Theogony is a large-scale... Tethys can refer to: Tethys the titaness of Greek mythology Tethys the natural satellite of Saturn The Tethys Ocean existed between the continents of Gondwana and Laurasia before the opening of the Atlantic Ocean on Earth. ... Apollodorus was a common name in ancient Greece. ... Lycophron was a Greek poet and grammarian. ... In Greek and Roman mythology, the Oceanids were the three thousand children of the Titans Oceanus and Tethys. ... This article or section should be merged with Phaëton Phaethon A Greek god who the phrase a boy Doing a mans job comes from. ... For other uses, see Helios (disambiguation). ... This article is about the Greek poet Homer and the works attributed to him. ... title page of the Rihel edition of ca. ... Apollonius of Rhodes (Apollonius Rhodius), librarian at Alexandria, was a poet, the author of Argonautica, a literary epic retelling of ancient material concerning Jason and the Argonauts quest for the Golden Fleece in the mythic land of Colchis. ... The Bibliotheke was renowned as the chief work of Greek historian and scholar. ... Stephanus Byzantinus (Stephanus of Byzantium), the author of a geographical dictionary entitled Εθνικα (Ethnica), of which, apart from some fragments, we possess only the meagre epitome of one Hermolaus. ... This article is about the 5-4th century BC dramatist. ... ... Polyeidos (ca 400 BCE) was a dithyrambic poet who was also skilful as a painter; he seems to have been esteemed almost as highly as Timo­theus, whom one of his pupils, Philotas, once conquered in competition. ... For other uses, see Plato (disambiguation). ... Critias, a dialogue of Platos, speaks about a variety of subjects. ... Aeneas flees burning Troy, Federico Barocci, 1598 Galleria Borghese, Rome The Aeneid (IPA English pronunciation: ; in Latin Aeneis, pronounced — the title is Greek in form: genitive case Aeneidos) is a Latin epic written by Virgil in the 1st century BC (between 29 and 19 BC) that tells the legendary story... The Berbers (also called Imazighen, free men, singular Amazigh) are a predominantly Muslim ethnic group indigenous to the Maghreb, speaking the Berber languages of the Afroasiatic family. ... The Berber languages (or Tamazight) are a group of closely related languages mainly spoken in Morocco and Algeria. ... Diodorus Siculus (c. ... Gaius Julius Hyginus, (c. ... For other uses, see Ovid (disambiguation) Publius Ovidius Naso (March 20, 43 BC – 17 AD) was a Roman poet known to the English-speaking world as Ovid who wrote on topics of love, abandoned women and mythological transformations. ... The book Works and Days Works and Days (in ancient Greek , which sometimes goes by the Latin name Opera et Dies, as in the OCT) is a Greek poem of some 800 verses written by Hesiod (around 700 BC). ... Apollodorus was a common name in ancient Greece. ... This article is about the Greek poet Homer and the works attributed to him. ... Pausanias (Greek: ) was a Greek traveller and geographer of the 2nd century A.D., who lived in the times of Hadrian, Antoninus Pius and Marcus Aurelius. ...

Sources

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Atlas (mythology)
Robert von Ranke Graves (24 July 1895 – 7 December 1985) was an English poet, scholar, and novelist. ... The Greek Myths (1955) is a comprehensive anthology of Greek mythology, published in two volumes. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Atlas (247 words)
Atlas is a scion of the Titans, the Greek race of giants, and the son of Iapetus and the nymph Clymene.
In the revolt of the Titans against the gods of the Olympic, Atlas stormed the heavens and Zeus punished him for this deed by condemning him to forever bear the heavens upon his shoulders.
When Atlas returned with the apples, Heracles requested him to assume the load for a moment, saying he needed to adjust the pad to ease the pressure on his shoulders.
Atlas, Greek Mythology Link - www.maicar.com (792 words)
Atlas is said to have reigned in Arcadia and have been succeeded by Deimas, son of Dardanus 1, the king who is at the origin of the royal house of Troy.
But Heracles 1 asked Atlas to hold the sky for a moment while he placed a pad on his head, and when Atlas held the sky again, Heracles 1 picked up the apples and left.
The Pelopides (descendants of Pelops 1) may be called descendants of Atlas because Pelops 1's wife was the daughter of a Pleiad and the PLEIADES were daughters of Atlas.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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