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Encyclopedia > Atlantic Wall
German coastal artillery in the Pas-de-Calais area, with laborers at work on casemate.
150mm cannon, Longues-sur-Mer.
150mm cannon, Longues-sur-Mer.
Top: Wounded Canadian soldiers lying near an Atlantic Wall bunker on Juno beach. Middle: The same bunker in 2006, entirely intact. Bottom: The view down the beach from the bunker, showing enfilading fire position.
Top: Wounded Canadian soldiers lying near an Atlantic Wall bunker on Juno beach. Middle: The same bunker in 2006, entirely intact. Bottom: The view down the beach from the bunker, showing enfilading fire position.
A map of the Atlantic Wall.

The Atlantic Wall (German: Atlantikwall) was an extensive system of coastal fortifications built by the German Third Reich in 1942 until 1944 during World War II along the western coast of Europe to defend against an anticipated Anglo-American led Allied invasion of the continent from Great Britain. Image File history File links Description: German coast artillery in the Pas-de-Calais area - Laborers at work on casemate Source: ibiblio. ... Image File history File links Description: German coast artillery in the Pas-de-Calais area - Laborers at work on casemate Source: ibiblio. ... 19th century coastal artillery guns preserved in Suomenlinna fortress in Helsinki Coastal artillery is the branch of armed forces concerned with operating mobile anti-ship artillery or fixed gun batteries in coastal fortifications. ... Pas-de-Calais is a département in northern France named after the strait which it borders. ... A Casemate is a heavy duty structure originally a vaulted chamber in a fortress. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (600x1342, 186 KB) Composite, made by me, of Image:Juno_wounded2. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (600x1342, 186 KB) Composite, made by me, of Image:Juno_wounded2. ... This article is about the beach codenamed in WWII. For other uses, see Juno Beach (disambiguation) Combatants Canada Germany Commanders Major-General R.F.L. Keller, 3rd Canadian Infantry Division Generalleutnant Wilhelm Richter, German 716th Static Infantry Division Strength 15,000 7,771 Casualties 340 dead, 739 other casualties Unknown... Enfilade and defilade are military tactical concepts used to describe a fighting units exposure to enemy fire. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (612x804, 60 KB) The File is an image that originated on wikipedia (Image:Second world war europe 1941-1942 map en. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (612x804, 60 KB) The File is an image that originated on wikipedia (Image:Second world war europe 1941-1942 map en. ... 19th century coastal artillery guns preserved in Suomenlinna fortress in Helsinki Coastal artillery is the branch of armed forces concerned with operating mobile anti-ship artillery or fixed gun batteries in coastal fortifications. ... Nazi Germany, or the Third Reich, commonly refers to Germany in the years 1933–1945, when it was under the firm control of the totalitarian and fascist ideology of the Nazi Party, with the Führer Adolf Hitler as dictator. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... Western Europe is distinguished from Central Europe and Eastern Europe by differences of history and culture rather than by geography. ...


Fritz Todt, who had designed the Siegfried Line (Westwall) along the Franco-German border, was the chief engineer employed in the design and construction of the wall's major fortifications. Thousands of forced laborers were impressed to construct these permanent fortifications along the Dutch, Belgian and French coasts facing the English Channel. Fritz Todt in the uniform of a major general of the Luftwaffe Fritz Todt (September 4, 1891 – February 8, 1942) was an German engineer and senior Nazi figure, the founder of Organisation Todt. ... The original Siegfried line (Siegfriedstellung) was a line of defensive forts and tank defenses built by Germany as a section of the Hindenburg Line 1916-1917 in northern France during World War I. However, in English, Siegfried line more commonly refers to the similar World War II defensive line, built... Motto: Liberté, Égalité, Fraternité Liberty, Equality, Fraternity Anthem: La Marseillaise Metropolitan France() – on the European continent() – in the European Union()  —  [] Capital (and largest city) Paris Official languages French Government Unitary republic  -  President Jacques Chirac  -  Prime Minister Dominique de Villepin Formation  -  Celtic Gaul 1200 BC   -  Franks 11 BC   -  Kingdom of France... Satellite view of the English Channel The English Channel (French: (IPA: ), the sleeve; Dutch: Het Kanaal) is the part of the Atlantic Ocean that separates the island of Great Britain from northern France and joins the North Sea to the Atlantic. ...


Early in 1944, Field Marshal Erwin Rommel was assigned to improve the defenses of the Wall. Rommel believed the existing coastal fortifications were entirely inadequate, and he immediately began strengthening them. Under his direction, a string of reinforced concrete pillboxes were built along the beaches, or sometimes slightly inland, to house machine guns, antitank guns, and light artillery. Minefields and antitank obstacles were planted on the beaches themselves, and underwater obstacles and mines were planted in the waters just off shore. The intent was to destroy the Allied landing craft before they could even unload. Note: This article is about the military usage of the word marshal. For other usages, see the end of this article. ... Erwin Johannes Eugen Rommel ( ) (15 November 1891 – 14 October 1944) was one of the most distinguished German field marshals of World War II. He was the commander of the Deutsches Afrika Korps and also became known by the nickname “The Desert Fox” (Wüstenfuchs,  ) for the skillful military campaigns he... Table of Fortification, from the 1728 Cyclopaedia. ... Reinforced concrete at Sainte Jeanne dArc Church (Nice, France): architect Jacques Dror, 1926–1933 Reinforced concrete, also called ferroconcrete in some countries, is concrete in which reinforcement bars (rebars) or fibers have been incorporated to strengthen a material that would otherwise be brittle. ... A bunker is a defensive warfare fortification to protect oneself. ... A machine gun is a fully-automatic firearm that is capable of firing bullets in rapid succession. ... Anti-tank, or simply AT, refers to any method of combating military armored fighting vehicles, notably tanks. ... “Minefield” redirects here. ... Polish wz. ... Landing craft Rapière LCU 1656 departs USS Bataan (LHD-5) well deck during Hurricane Katrina relief operations. ...


By the time of the invasion, the Germans had laid almost 6 million mines in northern France. More gun emplacements and minefields extended inland, along the roads leading out from the beaches. In likely landing spots for gliders and parachutists, the Germans emplaced slanted poles with sharpened tops, which the troops called Rommelspargel ("Rommel's asparagus"), and low-lying river and estuarine areas were permanently flooded as well. Combatants United States United Kingdom Canada Free France Poland Belgium Czechoslovakia Greece The Netherlands Norway Germany Commanders Dwight Eisenhower (Supreme Allied Commander) Bernard Montgomery (land) Bertram Ramsay (sea) Trafford Leigh-Mallory (air) Omar Bradley (US 1st Army) Miles Dempsey (UK 2nd Army) Harry Crerar (Canadian 1st Army) Gerd von Rundstedt... Gliders or Sailplanes are heavier-than-air aircraft primarily intended for unpowered flight. ... An American Paratrooper using a T-10C series parachute Paratroopers are soldiers trained in parachuting and formed into an airborne force. ... Rio de la Plata estuary Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Estuaries An estuary is a semi-enclosed coastal body of water with one or more rivers or streams flowing into it, and with a free connection to the open sea[1]. Estuaries are often associated with high rates of...


One of Germany's most clear-sighted Field Marshals, Rommel firmly believed that the invasion would have to be stopped at the beach itself, or the situation would otherwise inevitably lead to the defeat of Germany.


The defensive wall was never completed; consisting primarily of batteries, bunkers, and minefields, which during 1942-1944 stretched from the French-Spanish border into Norway (Festung Norwegen). A number of the bunkers are still present, for example near Scheveningen, The Hague, and in Normandy. After WWII some bunkers sank into the sand. The governments tried to blow them up but failed in the effort.[citation needed] It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Separation barrier. ... Remains of a battery of English cannon from Youghal, County Cork. ... Bunkers in Albania A bunker is a defensive military fortification. ... “Minefield” redirects here. ... 1942 (MCMXLII) was a common year starting on January 18 1815 (the link is to a full 1942 calendar). ... 1944 (MCMXLIV) was a leap year starting on Saturday. ... Festung Norwegen (Fortress Norway) was the German term for the heavy defense and fortification system of Norway during the occupation of Norway in World War II. By some, including Reichskommissar Josef Terboven, it was thought that these fortifications would serve effectively as a last perimeter of defense of the Third... Bunkers in Albania A bunker is a defensive military fortification. ... Scheveningen pier Scheveningen is part of Den Haag, the Netherlands. ... Coordinates: Country Netherlands Province South Holland Area (2006)  - Municipality 98. ... Flag of Normandy Normandy (in French: Normandie, and in Norman: Normaundie) is a geographical region in northern France. ...


The Channel Islands were heavily fortified, particularly the island of Alderney which is the closest to France. Hitler had decreed that 10% of the steel and concrete used in the Atlantic Wall go to the Channel Islands, because of the propaganda value of controlling British territory. Despite the mooting of Operation Constellation et al, the Allies bypassed the islands for this reason and did not try to liberate them when they liberated Normandy. The islands' German garrisons did not surrender until 9 May 1945 - one day after the rest of the German armed forces. The German garrison on Alderney did not surrender until 16 May.Boeyaka This article is about the British dependencies. ... Capital St Anne Status Part of Guernsey, Crown dependency of the UK Official language(s) English Head of Government Sir Norman Browse Population 2,400 Currency Pound sterling (GBP). ... Operation Constellation was the name of one of a number of WWII missions, proposed by Vice Admiral Lord Louis Mountbatten, in 1943 to take back the Channel Islands from German occupation in WWII. It was never mounted. ... Combatants United States United Kingdom Canada Free France Poland Belgium Czechoslovakia Greece The Netherlands Norway Germany Commanders Dwight Eisenhower (Supreme Allied Commander) Bernard Montgomery (land) Bertram Ramsay (sea) Trafford Leigh-Mallory (air) Omar Bradley (US 1st Army) Miles Dempsey (UK 2nd Army) Harry Crerar (Canadian 1st Army) Gerd von Rundstedt... May 9 is the 129th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (130th in leap years). ... 1945 (MCMXLV) was a common year starting on Monday. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... May 16 is the 136th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (137th in leap years). ...


See also


Hankley Common is a common near Elstead, Surrey, England. ... The Blockhouse was a 1973 film based on an apparent true story in book form written by Jean Paul Clebert, directed by Clive Rees and starring Peter Sellers. ...

 v  d  e 
Main articles on Battle of Normandy, Western Front, World War II
Operations Key locations See also

Landing Points: Combatants United States United Kingdom Canada Free France Poland Belgium Czechoslovakia Greece The Netherlands Norway Germany Commanders Dwight Eisenhower (Supreme Allied Commander) Bernard Montgomery (land) Bertram Ramsay (sea) Trafford Leigh-Mallory (air) Omar Bradley (US 1st Army) Miles Dempsey (UK 2nd Army) Harry Crerar (Canadian 1st Army) Gerd von Rundstedt... During World War II, the Western Front was the theater of fighting west of Germany, encompassing France, Belgium, the Netherlands, Luxemberg, and Denmark. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... The Battle of Normandy was fought in 1944 between the German forces occupying Western Europe and the invading Allies. ... The Battle of Normandy was fought in 1944 between the German forces occupying Western Europe and the invading Allies. ... Operation Neptune refers to the landing phase of Operation Overlord, the Allied invasion of Normandy. ... During World War II, Operation Chicago was carried out by the Allies in 1944. ... During World War II, Operation Detroit was the glider insertion of the U.S. 82nd Airborne Division into Normandy on the night of 6 June 1944 as part of Operation Overlord. ... Operation Tonga: Pathfinders synchronising their watches in front of an Armstrong Whitworth Albemarle. ... Operation Pluto (Pipe-Lines Under The Ocean) was a World War II operation by British scientists, oil companies and armed forces to construct undersea oil pipelines under the English Channel between England and France. ... Operation Fortitude was the codename for the deception operations used by the Allied forces during World War II in connection with the Normandy landings (Operation Overlord). ... Combatants Allied Powers Nazi Germany Commanders Bernard Montgomery, Miles Dempsey, Richard OConnor, Guy Simonds Edgar Feuchtinger, Erwin Rommel, Gerd von Rundstedt, Günther von Kluge Strength 2nd British Army, 51st Highland Division, 11th British Armoured divison, 7th British Armoured Divison, Polish 1st Armoured Division, VIII British Corps, Royal Air... Combatants Allied Powers Nazi Germany Commanders Lieutenant General Richard OConnor SS General Paul Hausser Strength 1 armoured division 3 infantry divisions 1 armoured brigade 2 SS Panzer Divisions 5 Panzer battlegroups Casualties British VIII Corps 4,020 12th SS Panzer Regiment 324 25th SS Panzer-Grenadier Regiment 383 26th... During World War 2, Operation Charnwood (Allies, 1944) had the objective to capture Caen and its surroundings during the ongoing Battle of Normandy. ... During World War II, Operation Atlantic (Allies, 1944) was a Canadian offensive, part of the British great breakout tentative (Operation Goodwood) during the Battle of Normandy, on June 19th. ... Operation Goodwood was an Allied military operation of World War II from July 18 to 20 July 1944 taking place in Normandy some weeks following D-Day. ... During World War II, Operation Spring (Allies, 1944) enabled to secure territory gains around Caen and its surroundings during the Battle of Normandy, after Operation Goodwood. ... Combatants Allied Powers Germany Commanders General Omar Bradley, General George S. Patton SS General Paul Hausser Strength 8 infantry divisions, 4 armoured divisions 2 infantry divisions, 11 infantry battlegroups, 2 Panzer Divisions, 1 Panzergrenadier Division Casualties Unknown Unknown Operation Cobra was the codename for the World War II operation planned... During World War II, Operation Bluecoat was an attack by British Second Army south of Caumont, France executed 29 July 1944. ... During World War II, Operation Totalize (Allies, 1944) was a ground attack on 7 August 1944 by British, Canadian and Polish forces to breakout from the Normandy beachhead along the Caen-Falaise road. ... Operation Tractable was a military operation commanded by II Canadian Corps in Normandy in August 1944. ...

Other key locations: Combatants United Kingdom Germany Commanders Lieutenant-General Miles Dempsey, British 50th (Northumbrian) Infantry Division Generalleutnant Wilhelm Richter, German 716th Static Infantry Division Generalleutnant Dietrich Kraiss, German 352nd Static Infantry Division Strength 24,970 Unknown Casualties 400 altogether Unknown This article is about a World War II invasion. ... This article is about the beach codenamed in WWII. For other uses, see Juno Beach (disambiguation) Combatants Canada Germany Commanders Major-General R.F.L. Keller, 3rd Canadian Infantry Division Generalleutnant Wilhelm Richter, German 716th Static Infantry Division Strength 15,000 7,771 Casualties 340 dead, 739 other casualties Unknown... Combatants United States Germany Commanders Omar Bradley Norman Cota Clarence R. Huebner U.S. 1st Infantry Division U.S. 29th Infantry Division Dietrich Kraiss German 352nd Infantry Division Strength 43,250 Unknown Casualties 3,336 1,200 The build-up of Omaha Beach: reinforcements of men and equipment moving inland. ... Pointe du Hocs location Preinvasion bombing of Pointe du Hoc by 9th Air Force bombers. ... Combatants United Kingdom Germany Commanders General-Lieutenant Miles Dempsey, British 3rd Infantry Division Generalleutnant Wilhelm Richter, German 716th Static Infantry Division Hans von Luck, German 21st Panzer Division Strength 28,845 Unknown Casualties 630 Unknown German defense at Ouistreham. ... Combatants United States Germany Commanders Raymond O. Barton Theodore Roosevelt Jr U.S. 4th Infantry Division Karl-Wilhelm von Schlieben Dietrich Kraiss German 352nd Infantry Division German 709th Infantry Division Strength 32,000  ? Casualties 700 Unknown American assault troops move onto Utah Beach, carrying full equipment. ...

More information on Battle of Normandy:

D-day from Wiktionary
D-day Textbooks from Wikibooks
D-day Quotations from Wikiquote
D-day Source texts from Wikisource
D-day Images and media from Commons
D-day from Wikinews
Bayeux (pronounced ) is a small town and commune in the Calvados département, in Normandy, northwestern France. ... Combatants Allied Powers Nazi Germany Commanders Bernard Montgomery, Miles Dempsey, Richard OConnor, Guy Simonds Edgar Feuchtinger, Erwin Rommel, Gerd von Rundstedt, Günther von Kluge Strength 2nd British Army, 51st Highland Division, 11th British Armoured divison, 7th British Armoured Divison, Polish 1st Armoured Division, VIII British Corps, Royal Air... This does not cite its references or sources. ... Combatants Allied Powers Germany Commanders J. Lawton Collins Friedrich Dollman Strength Unknown 40,000 Casualties 2,800 killed, 5,700 missing, 13,500 wounded 39,000 captured The Battle of Cherbourg was part of the Battle of Normandy during World War II, it was fought immediately after the successful Allied... Combatants North: United Kingdom Canada Polish Army in the West South: United States Free French Forces Nazi Germany Commanders Bernard Montgomery Omar Bradley Guy Simonds George Patton Günther von Kluge Walter Model Strength unknown 150,000 Casualties Canadian: 18,500 Polish: 2,300 U.S and French: unknown 10... Pegasus Bridge before its replacement Pegasus was the name given to a bridge over the Caen canal, near the town of Ouistreham. ... The Battle of Villers-Bocage (June 13, 1944) was an unusual clash between the British and Germans in northern France during World War II. Michael Wittmann, an SS-Obersturmführer, led a unit of six PzKpfw VI Tiger tanks of the 501st Battalion to secure the N175 road near Villers... Land on Normandy In military parlance, D-Day is a term often used to denote the day on which a combat attack or operation is to be initiated. ... Combatants Canada United Kingdom Germany Commanders Louis Mountbatten J. H. Roberts Gerd von Rundstedt Strength 6,086 1,500 Casualties Canada: 950 dead, 2,340 captured wounded or not; United Kingdom: 600; United States:4+; 311 dead, 280 wounded The Dieppe Raid, also known as The Battle of Dieppe or... Badge of the 79th Armoured Division Amphibious DD tanks await blowing of breaches in the sea wall on Utah Beach. ... This is a list of Allied forces in the Normandy Campaign between 6 June-25 August 1944. ... A Mulberry harbour was a type of temporary harbour developed in World War II to offload cargo on the beaches during the Allied invasion of Normandy. ... Combatants United States1 United Kingdom2 Free France3 Germany Commanders Lt. ... Normandy American Memorial The World War II Normandy American Cemetery and Memorial honors American soldiers who died during operations in Europe during World War II. // History The cemetery is located on the site of the temporary American St. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Image File history File links Wikibooks-logo. ... Image File history File links Wikiquote-logo. ... Image File history File links Wikisource-logo. ... Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... Image File history File links Wikinews-logo. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Saving Private Ryan: Atlantic Wall (521 words)
Construction on the defenses, dubbed the "Atlantic Wall," began in March of 1942 and consisted of a variety of walls, bunkers, minefields, barbed wire fences, trenches, observation posts, artillery positions, beach obstacles, and other defensive constructions.
Field Marshal Erwin Rommel was appointed as commander of Army Group B in 1943, and set about to reinforce the Atlantic Wall in accordance with the German doctrine that called for the immediate and absolute defeat of any Allied landings.
German propaganda had succeeded in convincing many that the Atlantic Wall was impenetrable, but in fact it was highly vulnerable and proved as such during the Operation Overlord assault on June 6, 1944.
The Atlantic Wall - German coastal defences in France 1940 - 1944 (639 words)
This bulwark, which became famous as the "Atlantic Wall", should prevent an Allied invasion or, at least, delay it until the Germans could mobilize sufficient armored forces to defend the enemy.
The British raid on the village of Dieppe on August 19, 1942 showed very clearly that the fortifications of the Atlantic Wall were absolutely inevitable to protect against the Second Front of the Allies.
Due to their overall sea and air power the troops could break through the Atlantic Wall at four of the five landing sectors on the first day of the invasion.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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