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Encyclopedia > Atlanta Constitution

The Atlanta Journal-Constitution is the only major daily newspaper of Atlanta and metro Atlanta. It is the result of the merger between the Atlanta Journal and the Atlanta Constitution. The staff was combined in 1982, and all separate delivery of the morning Constitution and afternoon/evening Journal ended in 2001.[1] (http://www.writenews.com/2001/101701_atlanta_journal_constitution.htm)


Subsquent to the staff consolidation of 1982, the afternoon Journal maintained a center-right editorial page while the editorials and op-eds in the morning Constitution was reliably liberal. When the editions combined in 2001 the editorial page staffs also merged, and the editorials and op-eds have attempted to strike a more "balanced" tone.


During the 1880s, Constitution editor Henry W. Grady was a spokesman for the "New South," encouraging industrial development in the South. Joel Chandler Harris began writing for Grady's paper in 1876 and soon invented the character of Uncle Remus, a black storyteller. Ralph McGill, editor for the Constitution in the 1940s was one of the few southern newspaper editors to support the American Civil Rights Movement. From the 1970s until the 1990s, Lewis Grizzard was a popular humor columnist for the Constitution, portraying Southern "redneck" culture with a mixture of ridicule and respect. Other editors of the Atlanta Constitution include J. Reginald Murphy.


External links

  • Official website (http://www.ajc.com)





  Results from FactBites:
 
The Atlanta Journal-Constitution - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (689 words)
The Atlanta Journal-Constitution is the result of the merger between the Atlanta Journal and the Atlanta Constitution.
The Atlanta Constitution was first published on June 16, 1868 and was such force that by 1871 it had killed off the only Atlanta paper to survive the American Civil War, the Daily Intelligencer.
During the 1880s, Constitution editor Henry W. Grady was a spokesman for the "New South," encouraging industrial development in the South.
New Georgia Encyclopedia: Atlanta Journal-Constitution (2142 words)
He bought the Atlanta Daily Opinion, one of several newspapers serving the city's 20,288 residents, and renamed it the Atlanta Constitution.
He urged the reform of farming practices, the elimination of the county unit system, and an end to prejudices that sullied the reputation of Georgia and the region.
The Journal and Constitution fought off two serious challenges to their dominance in the last half of the twentieth century—from the Atlanta Times during the 1960s and from the Gwinnett Daily News (owned by the New York Times) in the 1990s.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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