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Encyclopedia > Atlanta, Georgia
City of Atlanta
Downtown Atlanta seen from Bank of America Plaza.
Downtown Atlanta seen from Bank of America Plaza.
Flag of City of Atlanta
Flag
Nickname: Hotlanta,[1] The A-T-L[2]
Location in Fulton and DeKalb counties and the state of Georgia
Location in Fulton and DeKalb counties and the state of Georgia
Coordinates: 33°45′18″N 84°23′24″W / 33.755, -84.39
Country United States
State Georgia
Counties Fulton, DeKalb
Terminus 1837
Marthasville 1843
City of Atlanta 1847[3]
Government
 - Mayor Shirley Franklin (D)
Area
 - City 132.4 sq mi (343.0 km²)
 - Land 131.8 sq mi (341.2 km²)
 - Water 0.7 sq mi (1.8 km²)
 - Urban 1,962.9 sq mi (5,083.9 km²)
 - Metro 8,376 sq mi (21,693.7 km²)
Elevation 738-1,050 ft (225-320 m)
Population (2007)
 - City 498,102
 - Density 3,690.5/sq mi (1,220.5/km²)
 - Urban 3,499,840
 - Metro 5,138,233 (9th Largest)
Time zone EST (UTC-5)
 - Summer (DST) EDT (UTC-4)
Area code(s) 404, 678, 770
FIPS code 13-04000[4]
GNIS feature ID 0351615[5]
Major Airport Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport- ATL (Major/International)
Website: atlantaga.gov

Atlanta (pronounced /ætˈlæntə/) is the capital and the most populous city of the U.S. state of Georgia, as well as the core city of the ninth most populous metropolitan area in the United States. It is the county seat of Fulton County, although a small portion of the city extends into DeKalb County. As of July 2006, the city of Atlanta had a population of 486,411[6] and a metropolitan population of 5,138,223.[7] Residents of the city are known as Atlantans. // Places The largest and best-known is Atlanta, Georgia; others include: Atlanta, Illinois, city Atlanta, Indiana, town Atlanta, Kansas, city Atlanta, Louisiana, village Atlanta, Michigan, unincorporated community Atlanta, Missouri, city Atlanta, Nebraska, village Atlanta, Texas, city Atlanta, Wisconsin, town Atlanta Township, Illinois Atlanta Township, Kansas Atlanta Township, Minnesota And in... Image File history File links Flag_of_Atlanta,_Georgia. ... EXAMPLE:Laughbox,Blondie,BamBam,Pinkie,etc. ... Image File history File links Fulton_County_Georgia_Incorporated_and_Unincorporated_areas_Atlanta_Highlighted. ... Fulton County is a county located in the U.S. state of Georgia. ... DeKalb County is a county located in the U.S. state of Georgia. ... This list of countries, arranged alphabetically, gives an overview of countries of the world. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      The political units and divisions of the United States include: The 50 states... The U.S. state of Georgia is divided into 159 counties. ... Fulton County is a county located in the U.S. state of Georgia. ... DeKalb County is a county located in the U.S. state of Georgia. ... A mayor (from the Latin māior, meaning larger, greater) is the modern title of the highest ranking municipal officer. ... Shirley Clarke Franklin (born May 10, 1945) is an American politician, a member of the Democratic Party, and the current mayor of Atlanta, Georgia since January 7, 2002. ... The Democratic Party is one of two major political parties in the United States, the other being the Republican Party. ... This article is about the physical quantity. ... For other uses, see City (disambiguation). ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... To help compare different orders of magnitude and geographical regions, we list here areas between 100 km² and 1000 km². See also areas of other orders of magnitude. ... Elevation histogram of the surface of the Earth – approximately 71% of the Earths surface is covered with water. ... A foot (plural: feet or foot;[1] symbol or abbreviation: ft or, sometimes, ′ – a prime) is a unit of length, in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... This article is about the unit of length. ... For other uses, see City (disambiguation). ... Population density per square kilometre by country, 2006 Population density map of the world in 1994. ... Cities with at least a million inhabitants in 2006 An urban area is an area with an increased density of human-created structures in comparison to the areas surrounding it. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... In the United States, the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) has produced a formal definition of metropolitan areas. ... Timezone and TimeZone redirect here. ... “Eastern Daylight Time” redirects here. ... -12 | -11 | -10 | -9:30 | -9 | -8 | -7 | -6 | -5 | -4 | -3:30 | -3 | -2:30 | -2 | -1 | -0:25 | UTC (0) | +0:20 | +0:30 | +1 | +2 | +3 | +3:30 | +4 | +4:30 | +4:51 | +5 | +5:30 | +5:40 | +5:45 | +6 | +6:30 | +7 | +7:20 | +7... Although DST is common in Europe and North America, most of the worlds people do not use it. ... Eastern Daylight Time or EDT is equal to: In North America, Eastern Standard Time + 1, or UTC − 4 hours. ... −12 | −11 | −10 | −9:30 | −9 | −8 | −7 | −6 | −5 | −4 | −3:30 | −3 | −2:30 | −2 | −1 | −0:25 | UTC (0) | +0:20 | +0:30 | +1 | +2 | +3 | +3:30 | +4 | +4:30 | +4:51 | +5 | +5:30 | +5:40 | +5:45 | +6 | +6:30 | +7 | +7:20 | +7... A telephone numbering plan is a plan for allocating telephone number ranges to countries, regions, areas and exchanges and to non-fixed telephone networks such as mobile phone networks. ... Area code 404 covers Atlanta and its immediate neighbors, roughly within Interstate 285. ... 678 is a telephone area code assigned to metropolitan Atlanta, Georgia and its suburbs and exurbs. ... 770 is a telephone area code assigned to [Central alabama]], Georgia and its suburbs and exurbs. ... Federal Information Processing Standards (FIPS) are publicly announced standards developed by the U.S. Federal government for use by all (non-military) government agencies and by government contractors. ... GNIS (The Geographic Names Information System) contains name and locative information about almost two million physical and cultural features located throughout the United States of America and its Territories. ... Atlanta Airport redirects here. ... Not to be confused with capitol. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      A U.S. state is any one of the fifty subnational entities of... In the United States, the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) has produced a formal definition of metropolitan areas. ... A county seat is a term for an administrative center for a county, primarily used in the United States. ... Fulton County is a county located in the U.S. state of Georgia. ... DeKalb County is a county located in the U.S. state of Georgia. ... The death toll from the July 2006 Java earthquake and the tsunami rises to 226. ... The Atlanta metropolitan area, commonly referred to as Metro Atlanta in Georgia, is the ninth-largest metropolitan area in the United States and consists of 28 counties in Georgia. ...


Atlanta has in recent years undergone a transition from a city of regional commerce to a city of international influence.[8] Between 2000 and 2006, the Atlanta metropolitan area grew 20.5%, making it the fastest growing metropolitan area in the nation.[9] Ten to fifteen years ago, Atlanta was sometimes considered a poster child for cities worldwide experiencing rapid growth and urban sprawl.[10][11] More recently, however, Atlanta has been commended by bodies such as the Environmental Protection Agency for the city's ability to balance its ambitious growth, with smart, eco-friendly policies. [12] A poster that generates sympathy for a child in order to promote childrens health and solicit donations The phrase poster child (sometimes poster boy) originally referred to a child afflicted by some disease or deformity whose picture is used on posters to raise money for charitable purposes; he was... Urban sprawl, also known as suburban sprawl, is the spreading out of a city and its suburbs over rural land at the fringe of an urban area. ...


During the Civil Rights Movement, Atlanta claimed to stand apart from southern cities that supported segregation, touting itself as "The City Too Busy to Hate." That characterization was sharply disputed by many Atlanta blacks, particularly student activists at Atlanta's black colleges and universities who from 1960 to the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 waged a determined effort to desegregate public facilities through nonviolent direct action such as sit-ins and marches.[13] Eventually, the city's progressive civil rights record and existing population of blacks made it increasingly popular as a relocation destination for black Americans. Blacks soon became the dominant social and political force in the city, though today some measure of demographic diversification has taken place.[14] Along with Los Angeles and St. Louis, Atlanta is one of three cities in the United States to have hosted the Summer Olympic Games. Prominent figures of the African-American Civil Rights Movement. ... First page of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 The Civil Rights Act of 1964 (Pub. ... A sit-in or sit-down is a form of direct action that involves one or more persons nonviolently occupying an area for protest, often to promote political, social, or economic change. ... Los Angeles and L.A. redirect here. ... Nickname: Location in the state of Missouri Coordinates: , Country State County Independent City Government  - Mayor Francis G. Slay (D) Area  - City  66. ... Poster for the 1920 Summer Olympics in Antwerp. ...

Contents

History

Main article: History of Atlanta
See also: Atlanta in the Civil War
A map showing roads and Indian trails circa 1815, with late 19th century Fulton County and City of Atlanta outlines overlaid.
A map showing roads and Indian trails circa 1815, with late 19th century Fulton County and City of Atlanta outlines overlaid.

On December 21, 1836 the Georgia General Assembly voted to build the Western and Atlantic Railroad to provide a trade route to the Midwest.[15] Following the forced removal of the Cherokee Nation between 1838 and 1839 the newly depopulated area was opened for the construction of a railroad. The area around the eastern terminus to the line began to develop first. By 1842, the settlement had six buildings and 30 residents and the town was renamed "Marthasville".[16] After a few renames, the Chief Engineer of the Georgia Railroad, J. Edgar Thomson, suggested that the area be renamed "Atlantica-Pacifica", which was quickly shortened to "Atlanta".[16] The residents approved, and the town was incorporated as "Atlanta" on December 29, 1847.[17] This article is about the state capital of Georgia. ... Atlanta, Georgia, was an important rail and commercial center during the American Civil War. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 431 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (526 × 731 pixel, file size: 69 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Atlanta, Georgia ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 431 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (526 × 731 pixel, file size: 69 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Atlanta, Georgia ... is the 355th day of the year (356th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1836 (MDCCCXXXVI) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Type Bicameral Houses Senate House of Representatives President of the Senate Casey Cagle, R since November 7, 2006 Speaker of the House Glenn Richardson, R since November 7, 2006 Members 236 Political groups (as of November 7, 2006 elections) Democratic Party Republican Party Meeting place Georgia State Capitol Web site... The Western & Atlantic Railroad of the State of Georgia (W&A) is a railroad that runs from Atlanta, Georgia, to Chattanooga, Tennessee. ... This article is about the Midwestern region in the United States. ... For the Norwegian musical group, see Trail of Tears (band); for the 2006 documentary, see The Trail of Tears: Cherokee Legacy. ... Alternate meanings: Cherokee (disambiguation) The Cherokee are a people native to North America who first inhabited what is now the eastern and southeastern United States before most were forcefully moved to the Ozark Plateau. ... | Jöns Jakob Berzelius, discoverer of protein 1838 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... 1839 (MDCCCXXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... John Edgar Thomson (February 10, 1808-May 27, 1874) was an American civil engineer, railroad executive and industrialist. ... is the 363rd day of the year (364th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1847 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ...

A slave auction house on Whitehall Street
A slave auction house on Whitehall Street

As more railroads were constructed, the town experienced a small boom, reaching 2,500 in population. In 1848, the first mayor was elected, the first homicide occurred and the first jail was built. Sidewalks were constructed and a town marshal appointed. By 1854 another railroad connected Atlanta to LaGrange, and the town grew to 7,741 by 1860.[18][19] Atlanta in fall 1864, before it was burned by Shermans army. ... Atlanta in fall 1864, before it was burned by Shermans army. ... Slave redirects here. ... LaGrange is a city in Troup County, Georgia, United States. ...


During the American Civil War, Atlanta served as an important railroad and military supply hub. In 1864, the city became the target of a major Union invasion. The area now covered by Atlanta was the scene of several battles, including the Battle of Peachtree Creek, the Battle of Atlanta, and the Battle of Ezra Church. On September 1, 1864, Confederate General John Bell Hood evacuated Atlanta after a four-month siege mounted by Union General William T. Sherman and ordered all public buildings and possible Confederate assets destroyed. The next day, Mayor James Calhoun surrendered the city, and on September 7 Sherman ordered the civilian population to evacuate. He then ordered Atlanta burned to the ground on November 11 in preparation for his march south, though spared the city's churches and hospitals.[20] Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... Combatants United States of America Confederate States of America Commanders William T. Sherman, James B. McPherson, John M. Schofield, George H. Thomas Joseph E. Johnston; replaced in July by John B. Hood † Leonidas Polk Strength Military Division of the Mississippi (Army of the Cumberland, Army of the Ohio, Army of... Battle of Peachtree Creek Conflict American Civil War Date July 20, 1864 Place Fulton County, Georgia Result Union victory The Battle of Peachtree Creek was a battle of the American Civil War, fought in Georgia on July 20, 1864. ... Combatants United States of America Confederate States of America Commanders William T. Sherman James B. McPherson† John B. Hood Strength Military Division of the Mississippi Army of Tennessee Casualties 3,641 8,499 The Battle of Atlanta was a battle of the Atlanta Campaign fought during the American Civil War... Battle of Ezra Church Conflict American Civil War Date July 28, 1864 Place Fulton County, Georgia Result Union victory The Battle of Ezra Church was fought on July 28, 1864, in Fulton County, Georgia, during the American Civil War. ... is the 244th day of the year (245th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1864 (MDCCCLXIV) was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a leap year starting on Sunday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ... Motto Deo Vindice (Latin: Under God, Our Vindicator) Anthem (none official) God Save the South (unofficial) The Bonnie Blue Flag (unofficial) Dixie (unofficial)  States that seceded under CSA control  States and territories claimed by CSA without formal secession and/or control Capital Montgomery, Alabama (until May 29, 1861) Richmond, Virginia... John Bell Hood (June 1[1] or June 29,[2] 1831 – August 30, 1879) was a Confederate general during the American Civil War. ... “General Sherman” redirects here. ... James M. Calhoun (February 12, 1811–October 1, 1875) was mayor of Atlanta, Georgia during the Civil War. ... is the 250th day of the year (251st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 315th day of the year (316th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


The rebuilding of the city — immortalized by the phoenix and motto "Resurgens" (Latin for "rising again") on the city seal — was gradual. From 1867 until 1888, U.S. Army soldiers occupied McPherson Barracks in southwest Atlanta to ensure Reconstruction era era reforms. To help the newly freed slaves, the Federal Government set up a Freedmen's Bureau, which helped establish what is now Clark Atlanta University, one of several historically black colleges in Atlanta. For other mythic firebirds, see Fire bird (mythology). ... For other uses, see Latins and Latin (disambiguation). ... In the history of the United States, Reconstruction was the period after the American Civil War when the southern states of the breakaway Confederacy were reintegrated into the United States of America. ... A Bureau agent stands between an armed group of Southern whites and a group of freed slaves in this 1868 picture from Harpers Weekly On March 3, 1865, Congress established the Bureau of Refugees, Freedmen, and Abandoned Lands, also known as the Freedmens Bureau, was a federal agency that... Clark Atlanta University (CAU) is a private institution of higher education in Atlanta, Georgia. ...


In 1868, Atlanta became the fifth city to serve as the state capital.[21] Henry W. Grady, the editor of the Atlanta Constitution, promoted the city to investors as a city of the "New South", one built on a modern economy, less reliant on agriculture. In the 1880s Georgia School of Technology and Atlanta Hospital were founded.[22] Portrait of Henry Grady Henry Woodfin Grady (May 17, 1851 – December 23, 1889) was a journalist and orator who helped reintegrate the states of the former Confederacy into the Union after the American Civil War. ... The Atlanta Journal-Constitution is the only major daily newspaper of Atlanta and metro Atlanta. ... Year 1880 (MDCCCLXXX) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Tuesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... The Georgia Institute of Technology, or Georgia Tech for short, is a public university in Atlanta, Georgia with over 16,000 students. ...

In 1907, Peachtree Street, the main street of Atlanta, was busy with streetcars and automobiles.

As Atlanta grew, ethnic and racial tensions mounted. The Atlanta Race Riot of 1906 left at least 27 dead[23] and over seventy injured. In 1913, Leo Frank, a Jewish supervisor at a factory in Atlanta was put on trial for raping and murdering a thirteen-year old white employee from a suburb of Atlanta, ultimately resulting in Frank's lynching. Peachtree St, Atlanta 1907 Library of Congress This image is in the public domain in the United States and possibly other jurisdictions. ... Peachtree St, Atlanta 1907 Library of Congress This image is in the public domain in the United States and possibly other jurisdictions. ... The Atlanta Race Riot of 1906 was a mass civil disturbance in Atlanta, Georgia, USA which began the evening of September 22nd and lasted until September 25th. ... For other persons named Leo Frank, see Leo Frank (disambiguation). ...


With the entry of the United States into World War II, soldiers from around the Southeastern United States went through Atlanta to train and later be discharged at Fort McPherson. War-related manufacturing such as the Bell Aircraft factory in the suburb of Marietta helped boost the city's population and economy. Shortly after the war, the Communicable Disease Center (CDC) was founded in Atlanta.[24] Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... The US Southeast is the eastern portion of the Southern United States, but the Census Bureau does not provide a standard definition of a Southeast region of the United States, and organizations that need to subdivide the US are free to define a Southeast region to fit their needs. ... Bell Aircraft Corporation assembly factory in Buffalo, New York, during the 1940s. ... Historic Downtown Marietta Marietta is a city located in central Cobb County, Georgia GR6, and is its county seat. ... The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in Atlanta, Georgia, is recognized as the leading United States agency for protecting the public health and safety of people. ...


In the wake of the landmark U.S. Supreme Court decision Brown v. Board of Education, which helped usher in the Civil Rights Movement, racial tensions in Atlanta began to express themselves in acts of violence. On October 12, 1958, a Reform Jewish temple on Peachtree Street was bombed; the synagogue's rabbi, Jacob Rothschild, was an outspoken advocate of integration.[25] A group of anti-Semitic white supremacists calling themselves the "Confederate Underground" claimed responsibility. The Supreme Court Building, Washington, D.C. The Supreme Court Building, Washington, D.C., (large image) The Supreme Court of the United States, located in Washington, D.C., is the highest court (see supreme court) in the United States; that is, it has ultimate judicial authority within the United States... Holding Segregation of students in public schools violates the Equal Protection Clause of the Fourteenth Amendment, because separate facilities are inherently unequal. ... Historically, the civil rights movement was a concentrated period of time around the world of approximately one generation (1960-1980) wherein there was much worldwide civil unrest and popular rebellion. ... is the 285th day of the year (286th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Jan. ... In the early morning hours of October, 12, 1958, an explosion tore through the side wall of the Hebrew Benevolent Congregation, a Reform Jewish temple located on Peachtree Street in Atlanta, Georgia, known simply as the Temple. ...

Atlanta's Inman Park neighborhood was the city's first planned suburb. Today, it features several mansions and many colorful restored bungalows.
Atlanta's Inman Park neighborhood was the city's first planned suburb. Today, it features several mansions and many colorful restored bungalows.

In the 1960s, Atlanta was a major organizing center of the US Civil Rights Movement, with Dr. Martin Luther King and students from Atlanta's historically black colleges and universities playing major roles in the movement's leadership. Two of the most important civil rights organizations -- SCLC and SNCC -- had their national headquarters in Atlanta. In April of 1960 black students published "AN APPEAL FOR HUMAN RIGHTS" condemning segregation and laying the justification for direct action against it. A wave of sit-ins followed resulting in almost 100 arrests.[26] On October 19, 1960, sit-ins at the lunch counters of several Atlanta department stores led to the arrest of Dr. King and more than 50 students, drawing attention from the national media and from presidential candidate John F. Kennedy.[27] Sit-ins and other forms of student-led protests against various forms of segregation at both commercial and public venues such as the City Hall cafeteria and Atlanta airport continued until passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 450 pixelsFull resolution (1920 × 1080 pixel, file size: 880 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) I, the creator of this work, hereby grant the permission to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 450 pixelsFull resolution (1920 × 1080 pixel, file size: 880 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) I, the creator of this work, hereby grant the permission to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free... Inman Park is a neighborhood of the city of Atlanta, Georgia, its first planned suburb. ... A bungalow is any single story house. ... The civil rights movement in the United States has been a long, primarily nonviolent struggle to bring full civil rights and equality under the law to all citizens of United States. ... “Martin Luther King” redirects here. ... The Southern Christian Leadership Conference Logo. ... The Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (or SNCC, pronounced snick) was one of the principal organizations of the American Civil Rights Movement in the 1960s. ... Year 1960 (MCMLX) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... A sit-in or sit-down is a form of direct action that involves one or more persons nonviolently occupying an area for protest, often to promote political, social, or economic change. ... is the 292nd day of the year (293rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1960 (MCMLX) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... John Kennedy and JFK redirect here. ... First page of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 The Civil Rights Act of 1964 (Pub. ...


Despite these incidents, Atlanta's political and business leaders labored to foster Atlanta's image as "the city too busy to hate". In 1961, Mayor Ivan Allen Jr. became one of the few Southern white mayors to support desegregation of Atlanta's public schools.[28] Ivan Jr. ...


In 1990, Atlanta was selected as the site for the Centennial Olympic Games 1996 Summer Olympics. Following the announcement, Atlanta undertook several major construction projects to improve the city's parks, sports facilities, and transportation. Atlanta became the third American city to host the Summer Olympics, after St. Louis and Los Angeles. The games themselves were marred by numerous organizational inefficiencies as well as the Centennial Olympic Park bombing.[29] The 1996 Summer h Olympics, formally known as the Games of the XXVI Olympiad and informally known as the Centennial Olympics, were held in 1996 in Atlanta, Georgia, United States. ... Nickname: Location in the state of Missouri Coordinates: , Country State County Independent City Government  - Mayor Francis G. Slay (D) Area  - City  66. ... Flag Seal Nickname: City of Angels Location Location within Los Angeles County in the state of California Coordinates , Government State County California Los Angeles County Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa (D) Geographical characteristics Area     City 1,290. ... The Centennial Olympic Park bombing was a terrorist bombing on July 27, 1996 in Atlanta, Georgia during the 1996 Summer Olympics, the first of four committed by Eric Robert Rudolph. ...


Geography

Atlanta's Piedmont Park, with a blanket of winter snow.

Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2048x1536, 1412 KB) Summary A snowy winter scene in midtown Atlanta. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2048x1536, 1412 KB) Summary A snowy winter scene in midtown Atlanta. ...

Topography

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 343.0 km² (132 sq mi). 341.2 km² (132 sq mi) of it is land and 1.8 km² (1 sq mi) of it is water. The total area is 0.51% water. At about 1,050 feet (320 m) above mean sea level (the airport is 1,010 feet (308 m)), Atlanta sits atop a ridge south of the Chattahoochee River. Atlanta has the highest average elevation of any major city east of Denver. The United States Census Bureau (officially Bureau of the Census as defined in Title ) is a part of the United States Department of Commerce. ... This article is about the use of the term in geography and physical geology. ... Map of the Apalachicola River system with the Chattahoochee highlighted. ... This article refers to the state capital of Colorado. ...


The Eastern Continental Divide line enters Atlanta from the south, proceeding to downtown. From downtown, the divide line runs eastward along DeKalb Avenue and the CSX rail lines through Decatur.[30] Rainwater that falls on the south and east side runs eventually into the Atlantic Ocean while rainwater on the north and west side of the divide runs into the Gulf of Mexico.[30] North American continental divides. ... Categories: Companies traded on NYSE | Railway companies of the United States | Alabama railroads | Connecticut railroads | Delaware railroads | Florida current railroads | Georgia railroads | Illinois railroads | Indiana railroads | Kentucky railroads | Louisiana railroads | Maryland railroads | Massachusetts railroads | Michigan railroads | Mississippi railroads | New Jersey railroads | New York railroads | North Carolina railroads | Ohio railroads | Pennsylvania... Gulf of Mexico in 3D perspective. ...


The latter is via the Chattahoochee River, part of the ACF River Basin, and from which Atlanta and many of its neighbors draw most of their water. Being at the far northwestern edge of the city, much of the river's natural habitat is still preserved, in part by the Chattahoochee River National Recreation Area. Downstream however, excessive water use during droughts and pollution during floods has been a source of contention and legal battles with neighboring states Alabama and Florida.[31][32] Map of the Apalachicola River system with the Chattahoochee highlighted. ... The ACF River Basin refers to the watershed of the Apalachicola/Chattahoochee/Flint River Basin, in the USA, which begins in northern Georgia and flows into the Gulf of Mexico at Apalachicola Bay, near Apalachicola, Florida. ... Chattahoochee River National Recreation Area preserves a series of sites between Atlanta, Georgia and Lake Sidney Lanier along the Chattahoochee River. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... This article is about the U.S. State of Florida. ...


Climate

Atlanta has a humid subtropical climate, (Cfa) according to the Köppen classification, with hot, humid summers and mild to chilly winters by the standards of the United States. July highs average 88 °F (31 °C) or above, and low average 67 °F (19 °C).[33] Infrequently, temperatures can even exceed 100 °F (38 °C). The highest temperature recorded in the city is 105 °F (41 °C), reached in July, 1980.[33] January is the coldest month, with an average high of 50 °F (10 °C), and low of 29 °F (−2 °C).[33] Warm fronts can bring springlike temperatures in the 60s and 70s in winter, and Arctic air masses can drop temperatures into the teens as well. The coldest temperature ever recorded was −9 °F (−23 °C) in February, 1899.[33] A close second was −8 °F (−22 °C), reached in January, 1985.[33] The humid subtropical climate (Köppen Cfa) is a climate zone characterized by hot, humid summers and chilly to mild winters. ... Updated Köppen-Geiger climate map[1] The Köppen climate classification is one of the most widely used climate classification systems. ... Year 1980 (MCMLXXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1980 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1899 (MDCCCXCIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday [1] of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... This article is about the year. ...


Like the rest of the southeastern U.S., Atlanta receives abundant rainfall, which is relatively evenly distributed throughout the year. Average annual rainfall is 50.2 inches (1,275 mm).[34] An average year sees frost on 36 days; snowfall averages about 2 inches (5 cm) annually. The heaviest single storm brought 10 inches (25 cm) on January 23, 1940.[35] Frequent ice storms can cause more problems than snow; the most severe such storm may have occurred on January 7, 1973.[36] is the 23rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1940 (MCMXL) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full 1940 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Ice storm could refer to: A type of winter storm characterized by freezing rain. ... is the 7th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the song by James Blunt, see 1973 (song). ...

Weather averages for Atlanta, Georgia
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
Record high °F (°C) 79 (26) 80 (27) 89 (32) 93 (34) 97 (36) 102 (39) 105 (41) 102 (39) 102 (39) 95 (35) 84 (29) 79 (26)
Average high °F (°C) 52 (11) 57 (14) 65 (18) 73 (23) 80 (27) 87 (31) 89 (32) 88 (31) 82 (28) 73 (23) 63 (17) 55 (13)
Average low °F (°C) 33 (1) 37 (3) 44 (7) 50 (10) 59 (15) 67 (19) 71 (22) 70 (21) 64 (18) 53 (12) 44 (7) 36 (2)
Record low °F (°C) -8 (-22) -9 (-23) 10 (-12) 25 (-4) 37 (3) 39 (4) 53 (12) 55 (13) 36 (2) 28 (-2) 3 (-16) 0 (-18)
Precipitation inches (mm) 5.03 (127.8) 4.68 (118.9) 5.38 (136.7) 3.62 (91.9) 3.95 (100.3) 3.63 (92.2) 5.12 (130) 3.67 (93.2) 4.09 (103.9) 3.11 (79) 4.10 (104.1) 3.82 (97)
Source: The Weather Channel[33] 2008-03-23

In 2007, the American Lung Association ranked Atlanta as having the 13th highest level of particle pollution in the United States[37] The combination of pollution and pollen levels, and uninsured citizens caused the Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America to name Atlanta as the worst American city for asthma sufferers to live in.[38]


2008 Atlanta tornado

Street level tornado track Map of the 2008 Atlanta Tornado (NWS Peachtree City, GA)
Street level tornado track Map of the 2008 Atlanta Tornado (NWS Peachtree City, GA)
Main article: 2008 Atlanta tornado outbreak

On March 14, 2008, at approximately 9:40 PM Eastern Daylight Time, a category EF2 tornado hit downtown Atlanta with winds up to 135 miles per hour. The tornado caused damage to Philips Arena, the Georgia Dome, Centennial Olympic Park, the CNN Center and the Georgia World Congress Center. The tornado also damaged the nearby neighborhoods of Vine City to the west and Cabbagetown and the Fulton Bag and Cotton Mills to the east. While there were dozens of injuries, only one fatality was reported.[39] City officials warned it could take months to clear the devastation left by the tornado.[40] is the 73rd day of the year (74th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... Eastern Standard Time redirects here. ... The Enhanced Fujita Scale, or EF Scale, is the scale for rating the strength of tornadoes in the United States estimated via the damage they cause. ... This article is about the weather phenomenon. ... For the stadium of PSV Eindhoven, see Philips Stadion. ... The Georgia Dome is a domed stadium located in Atlanta, Georgia that is owned and operated by The State of Georgia who operates The Dome, The Georgia World Congress Center, and Centennial Olympic Park. ... Fountain of Rings Centennial Olympic Park is a 21 acre (85,000 m²) public park located in downtown Atlanta, Georgia. ... The CNN Center is the world headquarters of the Cable News Network (CNN). ... The Georgia World Congress Center or GWCC is the major convention center in Atlanta, run by the state of Georgia. ... Cabbagetown is a neighborhood in Atlanta, Georgia located south of Inman Park, east of Oakland Cemetery, north of Grant Park and west of Reynoldstown. ...


Cityscape

Panoramic view of the central Atlanta skyline, spanning Midtown (left) and Downtown (right).
View of Metro-Atlanta from an aircraft, 03-2008.
View of Metro-Atlanta from an aircraft, 03-2008.
Midtown Atlanta at night, with Buckhead and Sandy Springs visible in the distance.
Midtown Atlanta at night, with Buckhead and Sandy Springs visible in the distance.
See also: List of Atlanta neighborhoods

Atlanta's skyline is punctuated with highrise and midrise buildings of modern and postmodern vintage. Its tallest landmark – the Bank of America Plaza – is the 29th-tallest building in the world at 1,023 feet (312 m). It is also the tallest building in the United States outside of Chicago and New York City.[41] Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (5940x600, 614 KB) Summary Jim Bean. ... For other uses, see Skyline (disambiguation). ... Midtown Atlanta is a district in Atlanta, Georgia situated between the commercial and financial district of downtown to the south and the affluent residential, shopping, and nightlife district of Buckhead to the north. ... Downtown Atlanta refers to the largest financial district for the city of Atlanta. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2816 × 2112 pixel, file size: 2. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2816 × 2112 pixel, file size: 2. ... Midtown Atlanta is a district in Atlanta, Georgia situated between the commercial and financial district of downtown to the south and the affluent residential, shopping, and nightlife district of Buckhead to the north. ... Downtown Atlanta refers to the largest financial district for the city of Atlanta. ... Midtown Atlanta is a district in Atlanta, Georgia situated between the commercial and financial district of downtown to the south and the affluent residential, shopping, and nightlife district of Buckhead to the north. ... Buckhead is a community within the city of Atlanta, comprising over 100,000 residents, forming approximately the northern one-fifth of Atlanta, Georgia, USA. Buckhead is legally defined as that portion of the city of Atlanta northwest of I-85 and northeast of I-75. ... Sandy Springs (once known as Hammond) is an unincorporated city located in Fulton County, Georgia, north of Atlanta and south of Roswell. ... This is the list of Atlanta neighborhoods Adamsville (38) Adams Park (35) Adair Park (13) Ansley Park (17) Atlantic Station (16) Bankhead (14) Ben Hill (37) Berkeley Park (15) Boulevard Brookhaven Brookwood Hills Buckhead (18) Cabbagetown (26) Candler Park (24) Capitol View (inside 34) Capitol View Manor (inside 34) Cascade... This article is about the Bank of America Plaza in Atlanta. ... Taipei 101, the worlds tallest completed building, is located in Taipei City, Taiwan These are lists of skyscrapers, ranked by: structural height (vertical elevation from the base to the highest architectural or integral structural element of the building). ... For other uses, see Chicago (disambiguation). ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ...


The city's highrises are clustered in three districts in the city—Downtown, Midtown, and Buckhead.[42] (there are two more major suburban clusters, Perimeter Center to the north and Cumberland/Vinings to the northwest). The central business district, clustered around the Hyatt Regency Atlanta hotel – the tallest building in Atlanta at the time of its completion in 1967 – also includes the newer 191 Peachtree Tower, Westin Peachtree Plaza, SunTrust Plaza, Georgia-Pacific Tower, and the buildings of Peachtree Center. Midtown Atlanta, farther north, developed rapidly after the completion of One Atlantic Center in 1987. Perimeter Center is a major edge city within metro Atlanta. ... Cumberlands Skyline Cumberland (also known as Cumberland-Galleria and Cobb-Galleria) is an edge city of Atlanta, Georgia with approximately 122,000 workers and 103,000 residents, and is a major hub for business, convention and retail in the region. ... Vinings is a census-designated place and an unincorporated town located in Cobb County, Georgia, just across the Chattahoochee River from Atlanta. ... 191 Peachtree Tower (more commonly called just Peachtree Tower) is the fourth tallest skyscraper in Atlanta. ... The Westin Peachtree Plaza is a skyscraper building in downtown Atlanta, Georgia. ... SunTrust Plaza (originally known as One Peachtree Center) is a skyscraper in downtown Atlanta. ... Georgia_Pacific_Building The Georgia-Pacific Tower is a 212-meter (695-foot) tall skyscraper in downtown Atlanta. ... Peachtree Center is a 13 block area located in the central business district of Atlanta, Georgia. ... Midtown Atlanta is a district in Atlanta, Georgia situated between the commercial and financial district of downtown to the south and the affluent residential, shopping, and nightlife district of Buckhead to the north. ... One Atlantic Center as seen from the south One Atlantic Center, also known as the IBM Tower, is a skyscraper located in Midtown Atlanta. ...


The influx of business to Midtown has continued[43] – the district's newest tower, 1180 Peachtree, opened in 2006 at a height of 645 feet (197 m), and achieved a Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) gold certification that year from the U.S. Green Building Council. Atlanta has been in the midst of a construction and retail boom, with over 60 new highrise or midrise buildings either proposed or under construction as of April 19, 2006.[2] October 2005 marked the opening of Atlantic Station, a former brownfield steel plant site redeveloped into a mixed-use urban district. In early 2006, Mayor Franklin set in motion a plan to make the 14-block stretch of Peachtree Street in Midtown Atlanta (nicknamed "Midtown Mile") a street-level shopping destination envisioned to rival Beverly Hills' Rodeo Drive or Chicago's Magnificent Mile.[44][45] 1180 Peachtree, commonly known as the Symphony Tower, is a 41-story skyscraper located at 1180 Peachtree Street in the Midtown district of Atlanta, Georgia, United States. ... Part of the old steel mill serves as a statue in central park This article describes a recently developed mixed-use neighborhood in Atlanta, Georgia. ... In town planning, brownfield land is an area of land previously used or built upon, as opposed to industry or mining and therefore may be contaminated by hazardous waste or pollution. ... Peachtree and 10th at the Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta Peachtree Street is the main north-south street of Atlanta, Georgia. ... Rodeo Drive sign Rodeo Drive (pronounced Spanish: ro-DAY-oh) generally refers to a famous three-block long stretch of boutiques and shops in Beverly Hills, California, United States, although the street stretches further north and south. ... Magnificent Mile looking south View north from the foot of the Magnificent Mile The Magnificent Mile is the portion of Michigan Avenue in Chicago, Illinois extending from the Chicago River to Oak Street in Near North Side community area. ...


In spite of civic efforts such as the opening of Centennial Olympic Park in downtown in 1996, Atlanta ranks near last in area of park land per capita among cities of similar population density, with 8.9 acres per thousand residents (36 m²/resident) in 2005.[46] The city has a reputation, however, as a "city of trees" or a "city in a forest";[47][48] beyond the central Atlanta and Buckhead business districts, the skyline gives way to a sometimes dense canopy of woods that spreads into the suburbs. Founded in 1985, Trees Atlanta has planted and distributed over 68,000 shade trees.[49] Fountain of Rings Centennial Olympic Park is a 21 acre (85,000 m²) public park located in downtown Atlanta, Georgia. ... Trees Atlanta is a non-profit organization in Atlanta which seeks to protect and restore trees to the city. ...


The city's northern section, Buckhead, is consistently ranked as one of the most affluent communities in the United States.[50] Since the opening of the intown segment of the Georgia 400 tollway, which linked the district to the city superhighway system in 1993, Buckhead has developed a dense commercial district, clustered around the high-end retail centers at Lenox Square and Phipps Plaza and including a growing number of office buildings and residential highrises, some in the 40+ story range. The Mansion on Peachtree, a 42 Story Luxury Hotel and Condominium tower will open in Early 2008 and the 50 story 3344 Peachtree/Sovereign, planned to reach 660 feet (201 m), is due for completion in late 2007.[51] Buckhead is a community within the city of Atlanta, comprising over 100,000 residents, forming approximately the northern one-fifth of Atlanta, Georgia, USA. Buckhead is legally defined as that portion of the city of Atlanta northwest of I-85 and northeast of I-75. ... A toll road, turnpike or tollpike is a road on which a toll authority collects a fee for use. ... Aerial view of Lenox Square with JW Marriott Hotel in background. ... Phipps Plaza, owned by Simon Property Group, is an 821,000 square foot (76,000 m²) mall in Buckhead, Atlanta and Lenox Squares upscale sister. ...


The edge cities clustered around Perimeter Mall and Cumberland Mall have distinct skylines of their own. The Concourse at Landmark Center, located near Perimeter Mall in Sandy Springs, includes a pair of buildings called the King and Queen that each measure 570 feet (174 m) in total height. Perimeter Mall is a major shopping mall in Atlanta that opened in 1971. ... Cumberland Mall, located in the Cumberland district of Atlanta near the suburbs of Smyrna and Vinings, opened on August 8, 1973 and was the largest mall in the country when it first opened. ... Built in phases between 1984 and 1991, the Concourse is a real estate development in Metro Atlantas Perimeter business district (in the city of Sandy Springs, Georgia). ...


Architecture

The Architecture of Atlanta has seen works by most major U.S. firms and some of the more prominent architects of the 20th century, including Michael Graves, Richard Meier, Renzo Piano, and soon, Santiago Calatrava and David Chipperfield. Atlanta's most notable hometown architect may be John Portman whose creation of the atrium hotel beginning with the Hyatt Regency Atlanta (1967) made a significant mark on the hospitality sector. A graduate of Georgia Tech's College of Architecture, Portman's work reshaped downtown Atlanta with his designs for the Atlanta Merchandise Mart, Peachtree Center, the Westin Peachtree Plaza Hotel, and SunTrust Plaza. The Architecture of Atlanta, though not as distinquished as that of cities such as Chicago and New York, has seen works by most major U.S. firms and some of the more prominent architects of the 20th century, including Michael Graves, Richard Meier, and soon, Santiago Calatrava. ... For other uses of terms redirecting here, see US (disambiguation), USA (disambiguation), and United States (disambiguation) Motto In God We Trust(since 1956) (From Many, One; Latin, traditional) Anthem The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City National language English (de facto)1 Demonym American... -1... Richard Meier (born October 12, 1934 in Newark, New Jersey) is a late twentieth century American architect known for his use of the purist white. ... The Padre Pio Pilgrimage Church in San Giovanni Rotondo. ... Santiago Calatrava Valls (born July 28, 1951) is an internationally recognized and award-winning Spanish architect and structural engineer whose principal office is in Zurich, Switzerland. ... David Chipperfield (b. ... John C. Portman, Jr. ... View of the Atrium from the 20th floor View of the Hyatt from the Marriott Marquis View of the Hyatt from the Westin Peachtree Plaza The Hyatt Regency in Atlanta, Georgia was constructed in 1967. ... The Georgia Institute of Technology, commonly known as Georgia Tech, is a public, coeducational research university, part of the University System of Georgia, and located in Atlanta, Georgia, USA, with satellite campuses in Savannah, Georgia, Metz, France, Shanghai, China, and Singapore. ... The College of Architecture (COA) at the Georgia Institute of Technology was established in 1908 as the Department of Architecture, offering the first four-year course of study in architecture in the Southern United States. ... Peachtree Center is a 13 block area located in the central business district of Atlanta, Georgia. ... The Westin Peachtree Plaza is an impressive skyscraper 220 meters (722 feet) tall, and contains 73 stories of hotel rooms. ... SunTrust Plaza (originally known as One Peachtree Center) is a skyscraper in downtown Atlanta. ...


Culture

The Sweet Auburn district is preserved as the Martin Luther King, Jr. National Historic Site.
The Sweet Auburn district is preserved as the Martin Luther King, Jr. National Historic Site.
The Varsity has been an Atlanta landmark for over 75 years.
Atlanta's Piedmont Park is the city's largest park. A portion of the park is seen here with the Midtown Atlanta Skyline.
Atlanta's Piedmont Park is the city's largest park. A portion of the park is seen here with the Midtown Atlanta Skyline.
Main article: Culture of Atlanta, Georgia
See also: List of famous Atlantans

File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... The Sweet Auburn Historic District is a historic African-American neighborhood along Auburn Avenue in Atlanta, Georgia. ... Martin Luther King redirects here. ... Download high resolution version (1730x989, 148 KB)The Varsity restaurant in Atlanta, Georgia. ... Download high resolution version (1730x989, 148 KB)The Varsity restaurant in Atlanta, Georgia. ... The Varsity, located on North Avenue The Varsity is a restaurant chain, iconic in the modern culture of Atlanta, Georgia. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2592x1944, 880 KB) I, the creator of this work, hereby grant the permission to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2592x1944, 880 KB) I, the creator of this work, hereby grant the permission to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1. ... Piedmont Park is the 189 acre Central Park of Atlanta, Georgia, located in Midtown, north of the city center. ... Midtown Atlanta is a district in Atlanta, Georgia situated between the commercial and financial district of downtown to the south and the affluent residential, shopping, and nightlife district of Buckhead to the north. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2112 × 2816 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2112 × 2816 pixel, file size: 1. ... The Fox Theatre (often marketed as the Fabulous Fox) in Atlanta, Georgia is one of the grand movie palaces built in the United States in the 1920s. ... The city of Atlanta, Georgia has a vibrant and lively culture. ... This is a list of famous people who have lived in the area in and near Atlanta, Georgia, including both natives and residents. ...

Tourism

See also: Atlanta attractions

Atlanta hosts a variety of museums on subjects ranging from history to fine arts, natural history, and beverages. The Martin Luther King, Jr. National Historic Site honors Atlanta's participation in the civil rights movement. Other history museums and attractions include the Atlanta History Center; the Atlanta Cyclorama and Civil War Museum (a huge painting and diorama in-the-round, with a rotating central audience platform, that depicts the Battle of Atlanta in the Civil War); the Carter Center and Presidential Library; historic house museum Rhodes Hall; and the Margaret Mitchell House and Museum. APEX Museum Atlanta Botanical Garden Atlanta Civic Center Atlanta Cyclorama Atlanta History Center Atlanta Preservation Center CNN Center Callanwolde Center for Fine Arts Carter Center Centennial Olympic Park Center for Puppetry Arts Chastain Park Amphitheatre Childrens Museum of Atlanta Fernbank Museum of Natural History Fox Theatre Georgia Aquarium Georgia... Interior of Ebenezer Baptist Church, view from behind the pulpit. ... The Atlanta History Center is located in the Buckhead district of Atlanta, Georgia. ... Atlanta Cyclorama building The Atlanta Cyclorama is a cylindrical panoramic painting of the American Civil War Battle of Atlanta. ... A diorama is any of the two display devices mentioned below. ... Combatants United States of America Confederate States of America Commanders William T. Sherman James B. McPherson† John B. Hood Strength Military Division of the Mississippi Army of Tennessee Casualties 3,641 8,499 The Battle of Atlanta was a battle of the Atlanta Campaign fought during the American Civil War... The Jimmy Carter Presidential Library The Carter Center is a human rights organization, founded in 1982 and chaired by former U.S. President Jimmy Carter. ... Exterior view of Rhodes Hall, the castle on Peachtree Street. ... The Margaret Mitchell House and Museum is the former home of the author Margaret Mitchell situated in midtown Atlanta, Georgia. ...


The arts are represented by several theaters and museums, including the Fox Theatre. The Woodruff Arts Center is home to the Tony Award winning Alliance Theatre, Atlanta Symphony, and High Museum of Art. The Atlanta Contemporary Art Center features challenging contemporary art and education geared toward working artists and collectors of art. Museums geared specifically towards children include the Fernbank Science Center and Imagine It! Atlanta's Children's Museum. The Atlanta Opera, founded in 1979 by members of two struggling local companies, has become one of the fastest growing opera companies in the nation and garners attention from audiences around the world.[52] The Fox Theatre (often marketed as the Fabulous Fox) in Atlanta, Georgia is one of the grand movie palaces built in the United States in the 1920s. ... The Woodruff Arts Center is an arts center in the Midtown district of Atlanta, Georgia. ... What is popularly called the Tony Award (formally, the Antoinette Perry Award for Excellence in Theatre) is an annual award celebrating achievements in live American theater, including musical theater, primarily honoring productions on Broadway in New York. ... The Alliance Theatre Company is a prestigious theatre company in Atlanta, Georgia based at the Alliance Theatre, a part of the Robert W. Woodruff Arts Center. ... High Museum, Atlanta. ... The Fernbank Science Center is a museum, classroom, and woodland complex located northeast of Atlanta, Georgia. ... Atlanta has always had a sordid love affair with opera. ...


Atlanta features the world's largest aquarium,[53] the Georgia Aquarium, which officially opened to the public on November 23, 2005. The new World of Coca-Cola, opened adjacent to the Aquarium in May 2007, features the history of the world famous soft drink brand. Underground Atlanta, a historic shopping and entertainment complex lies under the streets of downtown Atlanta. Atlantic Station, a huge new urban renewal project on the northwestern edge of Midtown Atlanta, officially opened in October 2005. The Varsity in Midtown Atlanta boasts the title of "the world's largest drive-in restaurant".[54] The Georgia Aquarium, located in Atlanta, Georgia at Pemberton Place, is billed as the worlds largest aquarium with more than 8 million US gallons (30,000 m³; 30,000,000 liters) of marine and fresh water, 1. ... is the 327th day of the year (328th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... World of Coca-Cola rotating logo in front of the main building in downtown Atlanta (the other side says Coke). The World of Coca-Cola is a permanent exhibition featuring the history of Coca-Cola and its well-known advertising. ... Underground Atlanta entrance Underground Atlanta is a shopping and entertainment complex in the Five Points neighborhood of downtown Atlanta, Georgia, near the intersection of the MARTA rail lines. ... Part of the old steel mill serves as a statue in central park This article describes a recently developed mixed-use neighborhood in Atlanta, Georgia. ... The Varsity, located on North Avenue The Varsity is a restaurant chain, iconic in the modern culture of Atlanta, Georgia. ...


Piedmont Park hosts many of Atlanta's festivals and cultural events.[55] Atlanta Botanical Garden sits next to the park. Zoo Atlanta, in Grant Park, features a panda exhibit. Just east of the city rises Stone Mountain, the largest piece of exposed granite in the world.[56] Six Flags Over Georgia Theme Park lies a few miles west of Atlanta on I-20. Piedmont Park is the 189 acre Central Park of Atlanta, Georgia, located in Midtown, north of the city center. ... The Atlanta Botanical Garden is a 30 acre (12 hectare) botanical garden located within Piedmont Park in Midtown Atlanta, Georgia, USA. The Atlanta Botanical Garden contains several different landscapes to display a variety of plants. ... Zoo Atlanta is an Association of Zoos and Aquariums-accredited wildlife park and major attraction in Atlanta, Georgia, USA. The 40 acre (16 hectare) zoo, founded in 1889, is located in Atlantas Grant Park and attracts around one million visitors a year. ... Grant Park Grant Park is the oldest city park in Atlanta, Georgia, United States. ... Panda may refer to: // Giant Panda Panda (plant), a genus of the family Euphorbiaceae PANDAS or P.A.N.D.A.S. is Pediatric Autoimmune Neuropsychiatric Disorders Associated with Streptoccal infections Qinling Panda, a subspecies of the Giant Panda. ... This article is about Stone Mountain in Georgia, USA. For other uses, see Stone Mountain (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see granite (disambiguation). ... Six Flags Over Georgia is a 230-acre theme park located west of Atlanta, in Austell, Georgia. ... This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ...


Entertainment and performing arts

See also: Popular music artists from Atlanta

Atlanta's classical music scene includes well-renowned ensembles such as the Atlanta Symphony Orchestra, Atlanta Opera, Atlanta Ballet, period-instrument ensemble New Trinity Baroque, Atlanta Boy Choir, and many others. Classical musicians include renowned conductors such as the late Robert Shaw and the Atlanta Symphony's Robert Spano. Atlanta, Georgia has a thriving music industry and is home to many famous hip-hop and R&B musicians. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (2592 × 1944 pixel, file size: 814 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) I, the creator of this work, hereby grant the permission to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (2592 × 1944 pixel, file size: 814 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) I, the creator of this work, hereby grant the permission to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the... High Museum, Atlanta. ... The Woodruff Arts Center is an arts center in the Midtown district of Atlanta, Georgia. ... Midtown Atlanta is a district in Atlanta, Georgia situated between the commercial and financial district of downtown to the south and the affluent residential, shopping, and nightlife district of Buckhead to the north. ... The Atlanta Symphony Orchestra (ASO) is an American orchestra based in Atlanta, Georgia. ... Atlanta has always had a sordid love affair with opera. ... The Atlanta Ballet was founded in 1929 by Dorothy Alexander as the Dorothy Alexander Concert Group, which later became the Atlanta Civic Ballet and, in 1967, the Atlanta Ballet. ... New Trinity Baroque is an American orchestra based in Atlanta. ... The Atlanta Boy Choir, based out of Atlanta, Georgia, was founded by Fletcher Wolfe in 1957, and is currently under the baton of David R. White, Artistic Director and Conductor. ... Robert Shaw (April 30, 1916 – January 25, 1999) was an American conductor most famous for his work with his namesake Chorale, with the Cleveland Orchestra and Chorus, and the Atlanta Symphony Orchestra and Chorus. ... Robert Spano (born 1960 or 1961 in Conneaut, Ohio) is the Music Director of the Atlanta Symphony Orchestra as well as the previous Music Director of the Brooklyn Philharmonic from 1996 to 2004. ...


The city has a well-known and active live music scene, though recently rapid gentrification and early venue closing times have hurt small clubs and other music venues. In the early 1980s, Atlanta was the home of a thriving new wave music scene featuring such bands as The Brains and The Producers, closely linked to the new wave scenes in Athens, Georgia and other college towns in the southeast. New Wave was a music genre that existed during the late 1970s and the early-to-mid 1980s. ... The Brains were an Atlanta-based New Wave band who released two albums in the early eighties. ... The Producers were a new wave and power pop band from Atlanta, Georgia in the 1980s. ... For other uses, see Athens (disambiguation). ...


Historically there have been a variety of live music traditions going back to Cabbagetown country music pioneer Fiddlin' John Carson, also including a thriving scene in the 90's, also in Cabbagetown, centered around a bar called Dotties, now known as Lenny's and relocated a few blocks away. Video Concert Hall, precursor to MTV, was founded in Atlanta. Fiddlin John Carson (March 23, 1868–December 11, 1949) was an early country music musician. ... Video Concert Hall was an early USA Network television program featuring an unhosted rotation of music videos. ... This article is about the original U.S. music television channel. ...


Atlanta has been referred to as a Hip-Hip capital due to its giving rise to many now popular rap artists.[57] Areas of the city such as Bankhead, College Park and East Atlanta are often mentioned in songs. Famous rappers that hail from Atlanta include Soulja Boy, T.I., Dem Franchise Boyz,Usher Raymond, Young Jeezy, Lil Jon, The Ying Yang Twins, Jermaine Dupree, Yung Joc, Cee-lo Green and Ludacris. DeAndre Way (born on July 28, 1990 in Chicago, Illinois), better known by his stage name, Soulja Boy, is an American rapper, best known for the dance and song called Crank That (Soulja Boy). // DeAndre was born in Chicago, Illinois, and moved to Atlanta, Georgia at the age of six. ... This article is about the musician. ... Dem Franchize Boyz is a rap group from Atlanta. ... Usher (born Usher Jamie Raymond, IV on October 14, 1978 in Chattanooga, Tennessee, United States) is an African-American singer and actor. ... Jay Jenkins (born September 28, 1977 in Columbia, South Carolina) formerly known as Lil J currently known as Young Jeezy, is an American rapper. ... Jonathan Smith (born January 27, 1972), better known by his stage name Lil Jon, is an American rapper, hype man, and producer. ... The Ying Yang Twins are an Atlanta-based crunk rap duo consisting of Kaine (born Eric Jackson on December 16, 1978) and D-Roc (born DAngelo Holmes on February 13, 1979). ... Jasiel A. Robinson (born April 2, 1983 in Atlanta, Georgia) better known by his stage name Yung Joc, is a Grammy Award-nominated American rapper from College Park, Georgia. ... Cee-Lo Green, or simply Cee-Lo is a Dirty South rapper, and a former member of Goodie Mob. ... Luda redirects here. ...


Sports

Atlanta has a rich sports history, including the oldest on-campus Division I football stadium, Bobby Dodd Stadium, built in 1913 by the students of Georgia Tech. Atlanta also played host to the second intercollegiate football game in the South, played between the A&M College of Alabama and the University of Georgia in Piedmont Park in 1892; this game is now called the Deep South's Oldest Rivalry. The city hosts college football's annual Chick-fil-A Bowl (Formerly known as The Peach Bowl) and the Peachtree Road Race, the world’s largest 10 km race.[58] Atlanta was the host city for the Centennial 1996 Summer Olympics. Centennial Olympic Park, built for 1996 Summer Olympics, sits adjacent to CNN Center and Philips Arena. It is now operated by the Georgia World Congress Center Authority. Atlanta hosted the NCAA Final Four Men's Basketball Championship most recently in April 2007. Image File history File links Turner_field_Braves. ... Image File history File links Turner_field_Braves. ... Turner Field is a ballpark in Atlanta, Georgia, home to Major League Baseballs Atlanta Braves since 1997. ... Bobby Dodd Stadium is the football stadium located on the campus of Georgia Tech in Atlanta, Georgia. ... The Georgia Institute of Technology, commonly known as Georgia Tech, is a public, coeducational research university, part of the University System of Georgia, and located in Atlanta, Georgia, USA, with satellite campuses in Savannah, Georgia, Metz, France, Shanghai, China, and Singapore. ... Auburn University (AU or Auburn) is a state university located in Auburn, Alabama, USA. With more than 24,100 students and 1,200 faculty, it is the second largest university in the state,[5] and according to U.S. News & World Report, has a selectivity rating of more selective. ... UGA Main Library The University of Georgia (UGA) is the largest institution of higher learning in the U.S. state of Georgia. ... Piedmont Park is the 189 acre Central Park of Atlanta, Georgia, located in Midtown, north of the city center. ... This article is about the rivalry between Georgia and Auburn. ... The Chick-fil-A Bowl, formerly called the Chick-fil-A Peach Bowl, and before that simply (and perhaps more familiarly) called the Peach Bowl, is an annual college football bowl game played in Atlanta, Georgia since December 1968. ... The Peachtree Road Race, founded in 1970, is the largest, and arguably the best and most famous, 10 kilometer running event in the world, boasting a field of 55,000 participants annually. ... The 1996 Summer h Olympics, formally known as the Games of the XXVI Olympiad and informally known as the Centennial Olympics, were held in 1996 in Atlanta, Georgia, United States. ... Fountain of Rings Centennial Olympic Park is a 21 acre (85,000 m²) public park located in downtown Atlanta, Georgia. ... The CNN Center is the world headquarters of the Cable News Network (CNN). ... For the stadium of PSV Eindhoven, see Philips Stadion. ... The Georgia World Congress Center or GWCC is the major convention center in Atlanta, run by the state of Georgia. ... The playoff term Final Four was originally popularized to refer to the final four teams in the NCAA Basketball Tournament; these are the champions of the tournaments four regional brackets, and the only teams remaining on the tournaments final weekend. ...


Major league sports

The city is also host to four different major league sports, The Atlanta Braves, Falcons, Hawks, and Thrashers. In the United States, the four prominent major professional sports leagues are the following: Major League Baseball (MLB), in existence de facto since 1903 National Football League (NFL), founded in 1920 National Basketball Association (NBA), founded in 1946 National Hockey League (NHL), founded in 1917 There are currently thirteen metropolitan...


The Atlanta Braves baseball team has been the Major League Baseball franchise of Atlanta since 1966. The team was founded in 1871 in Boston, Massachusetts as a National Association club, making it the oldest continuously operating sports franchise in North American sports. The Braves won the World Series in 1995 and had a recently ended unprecedented run of 14 straight divisional championships from 1991 to 2005. Major league affiliations National League (1876–present) East Division (1994–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 3, 21, 35, 41, 42, 44 Name Atlanta Braves (1966–present) Milwaukee Braves (1953-1965) Boston Braves (1941-1952) Boston Bees (1936-1940) Boston Braves (1912-1935) Boston Rustlers (1911) Boston Doves (1907-1910) Boston... This article is about the sport. ... Major Leagues redirects here. ... Boston redirects here. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... For other events named World Series, see World Series (disambiguation). ...

Grady Memorial Hospital is one of Atlanta's major Hospitals.
Grady Memorial Hospital is one of Atlanta's major Hospitals.

The Atlanta Falcons American football team plays at the Georgia Dome. They have been Atlanta's National Football League franchise since 1966. They have won the division title three times, and a conference championship once, going on to lose to the Denver Broncos in Super Bowl XXXIII. Super Bowl XXVIII and XXXIV were held in the city. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1280x960, 307 KB) Grady Memorial Hospital in Atlanta. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1280x960, 307 KB) Grady Memorial Hospital in Atlanta. ... Grady Memorial Hospital, frequently referred to as Grady Hospital or simply Grady, is the largest hospital in the state of Georgia, and is the public hospital for the city of Atlanta. ... League/Conference affiliations National Football League (1966–present) Eastern Conference (1966) Western Conference (1967-69) Coastal Division (1967-1969) National Football Conference (1970-present) NFC West (1970-2001) NFC South (2002-present) Current uniform Team colors Black, Red, Silver and White Mascot Freddie Falcon Personnel Owner Arthur Blank General Manager... United States simply as football, is a competitive team sport that is both fast-paced and strategic. ... The Georgia Dome is a domed stadium located in Atlanta, Georgia that is owned and operated by The State of Georgia who operates The Dome, The Georgia World Congress Center, and Centennial Olympic Park. ... NFL redirects here. ... League/Conference affiliations American Football League (1960-1969) Western Division (1960-1969) National Football League (1970–present) American Football Conference (1970–present) AFC West (1970–present) Current uniform Team colors Broncos Navy Blue, Orange, White[1] Mascot Thunder II (live horse) Miles (person in costume suit) Personnel Owner Pat Bowlen... Date January 31, 1999 Stadium Pro Player Stadium City Miami, Florida MVP John Elway, Quarterback Favorite Broncos by 7 1/2 National anthem Cher Coin toss Raymond Berry, Lenny Moore, Jim Parker, Art Donovan, Gino Marchetti, Frank Gifford, Roosevelt Brown, Don Maynard, Sam Huff, Tom Landry Referee Bernie Kukar Halftime... Date January 30, 1994 Stadium Georgia Dome City Atlanta, Georgia MVP Emmitt Smith, Running back Favorite Cowboys by 10 National anthem Natalie Cole Coin toss Joe Namath Referee Bob McElwee Halftime show Wynonna Judd, Naomi Judd, Clint Black, Travis Tritt, Tanya Tucker Attendance 72,817 TV in the United States... Date January 30, 2000 Stadium Georgia Dome City Atlanta, Georgia MVP Kurt Warner, Quarterback Favorite Rams by 7 National anthem Faith Hill Coin toss Super Bowl IV participants: Bud Grant, Lamar Hunt, Bobby Bell, Paul Krause, Willie Lanier, Alan Page, and Jan Stenerud Referee Bob McElwee Halftime show Phil Collins...


The Atlanta Hawks basketball team has been the National Basketball Association franchise of Atlanta since 1969. The team's sole NBA championship was in 1958, when they were the St. Louis Hawks. Atlanta, is also the new home for the Atlanta Dream from the WNBA. The Atlanta Hawks are an American professional basketball team based in Atlanta, Georgia. ... This article is about the sport. ... NBA redirects here. ... WNBA may also refer to WNBA-AM, a radio station in Illinois. ...


In 1999 the Atlanta Thrashers hockey team became Atlanta's National Hockey League franchise. They replaced the Atlanta Flames which had departed for Calgary, Alberta in 1980, becoming the Calgary Flames. The Thrashers made it to their first playoffs in 2007. The Atlanta Thrashers are a professional ice hockey team based in Atlanta, Georgia. ... Ice hockey, known simply as hockey in areas where it is more common than field hockey, is a team sport played on ice. ... NHL redirects here. ... The Atlanta Flames were a National Hockey League (NHL) team based in Atlanta, Georgia from 1972 to 1980. ... This article is about the Canadian city. ... For other uses, see Alberta (disambiguation). ... The Calgary Flames are a professional ice hockey team based in Calgary, Alberta, Canada and play out of the Pengrowth Saddledome. ...

Club Sport League Venue
Atlanta Falcons American Football National Football League Georgia Dome
Atlanta Braves Baseball Major League Baseball, NL Turner Field
Atlanta Hawks Basketball National Basketball Association Philips Arena
Atlanta Thrashers Ice Hockey National Hockey League Philips Arena
Atlanta Dream Basketball Women's National Basketball Association Philips Arena
Atlanta Rollergirls[59] Roller Derby Women's Flat Track Derby Association All American Skating Center
Atlanta Silverbacks Soccer (Football) USL First Division Silverbacks Park
Georgia Force Arena Football Arena Football League Arena at Gwinnett Center
Gwinnett Gladiators Ice Hockey ECHL Arena at Gwinnett Center
Atlanta Vision Basketball ABA:Blue Conference The Sampson's Center
Atlanta Xplosion Women's Football Independent Women's Football League Ray Manus Stadium, Roswell High School

League/Conference affiliations National Football League (1966–present) Eastern Conference (1966) Western Conference (1967-69) Coastal Division (1967-1969) National Football Conference (1970-present) NFC West (1970-2001) NFC South (2002-present) Current uniform Team colors Black, Red, Silver and White Mascot Freddie Falcon Personnel Owner Arthur Blank General Manager... United States simply as football, is a competitive team sport that is both fast-paced and strategic. ... NFL redirects here. ... The Georgia Dome is a domed stadium located in Atlanta, Georgia that is owned and operated by The State of Georgia who operates The Dome, The Georgia World Congress Center, and Centennial Olympic Park. ... Major league affiliations National League (1876–present) East Division (1994–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 3, 21, 35, 41, 42, 44 Name Atlanta Braves (1966–present) Milwaukee Braves (1953-1965) Boston Braves (1941-1952) Boston Bees (1936-1940) Boston Braves (1912-1935) Boston Rustlers (1911) Boston Doves (1907-1910) Boston... This article is about the sport. ... Major Leagues redirects here. ... National league can refer to: National Basketball League, in the United States and Canada, which merged with the rival Basketball Association of America to form the National Basketball Association National Football League, the major American football league in the United States National Hockey League, the major ice hockey league in... Turner Field is a ballpark in Atlanta, Georgia, home to Major League Baseballs Atlanta Braves since 1997. ... The Atlanta Hawks are an American professional basketball team based in Atlanta, Georgia. ... This article is about the sport. ... NBA redirects here. ... For the stadium of PSV Eindhoven, see Philips Stadion. ... The Atlanta Thrashers are a professional ice hockey team based in Atlanta, Georgia. ... Ice hockey, known simply as hockey in areas where it is more common than field hockey, is a team sport played on ice. ... NHL redirects here. ... For the stadium of PSV Eindhoven, see Philips Stadion. ... This article is about the sport. ... The Womens National Basketball Association (WNBA) is an organization governing a professional basketball league for women in the United States. ... For the stadium of PSV Eindhoven, see Philips Stadion. ... For the skate brand of the same name, see Roller Derby (brand). ... WFTDA Logo Founded in April 2004 as the United Leagues Coalition (ULC) and renamed in early 2006, the Womens Flat Track Derby Association (WFTDA) is an association of womens flat track roller derby leagues in the United States. ... The Atlanta Silverbacks are an American professional soccer club who currently play in the USL First Division, a division of the United Soccer Leagues, and the second division in the US Soccer hierarchy. ... Soccer redirects here. ... The United Soccer Leagues First Division (often referred to as simply, USL-1) is a professional mens soccer league in North America. ... Silverbacks Park is a soccer complex located in Atlanta, Georgia, and is home to the USL First Divisions Atlanta Silverbacks. ... Conference National Division Southern Year founded 2001 Home arena Philips Arena City, State Atlanta, Georgia Wild card titles 1: 2003 Division titles 1: 2005 Conference titles 1: 2005 ArenaBowl championships none The Georgia Force is in no way related to the San Antonio Force, which was an Arena Football League... Arena football is a sport invented by Jim Foster, a former executive of the United States Football League and the National Football League. ... The Arena Football League (AFL) was founded in 1987 as an American football indoor league. ... The Arena at Gwinnett Center is an indoor arena located in the Atlanta suburb of Duluth, Georgia. ... The Gwinnett Gladiators are a minor league ice hockey team playing at the Arena at Gwinnett Center in Duluth, Georgia. ... Ice hockey, known simply as hockey in areas where it is more common than field hockey, is a team sport played on ice. ... The ECHL (formerly the East Coast Hockey League) is a professional ice hockey league based in Princeton, New Jersey, with teams scattered across the United States and Canada, generally regarded as a tier below the American Hockey League. ... The Arena at Gwinnett Center is an indoor arena located in the Atlanta suburb of Duluth, Georgia. ... The Atlanta Vision is an American Basketball Association (ABA) team based in Atlanta. ... This article is about the sport. ... The American Basketball Association (ABA) is a mens basketball league founded in 1999. ... The Blue Conference is the Eastern Conference in the ABA. The league also has a Red Conference and a White Conference. ... Womens football can mean either a female version of American football or of football (soccer). ... The Independent Womens Football League was founded in 2000, and began play in 2001. ... Roswell High School (RHS) is a public high school in Roswell, Georgia, U.S.A. It serves the entire city of Roswell west of Georgia 400 and the city of Mountain Park. ...

Other sports organizations

In October 2007 the WNBA announced Atlanta would receive an expansion franchise to begin league play in May 2008. Named the Atlanta Dream, they will play in Philips Arena. However, the new franchise will not be affiliated with the Atlanta Hawks.[60] For the stadium of PSV Eindhoven, see Philips Stadion. ...


Atlanta is the home of the Atlanta Silverbacks of the United Soccer Leagues First Division (Men) and W-League (Women). The city is also on the short list for a potential expansion team in MLS Soccer.[61] In golf, the final event of the PGA Tour season, THE TOUR Championship, is played annually at East Lake Golf Club. This golf course is used because of its connection to the great amateur golfer Bobby Jones, an Atlanta native. The Atlanta Silverbacks are an American professional soccer club who currently play in the USL First Division, a division of the United Soccer Leagues, and the second division in the US Soccer hierarchy. ... The United Soccer Leagues (USL) is directly affiliated with the United States Soccer Federation (USSF), United States Adult Soccer Association (USASA) and the Canadian Soccer Association (CSA). ... Major League Soccer (MLS) is a North America professional soccer league. ... The PGA Tour is an organization that operates the USAs main professional golf tours. ... THE TOUR Championship (the capitalisation is official) is the final event of golfs PGA Tour season. ... The East Lake Golf Club is located in the neighborhood of East Lake which is in Atlanta, Georgia, U.S. It is best known for hosting THE TOUR Championship. ... Bobby Jones won the Grand Slam in 1930 Robert Tyre Jones Jr. ...


Media

See also: List of newspapers in Atlanta and List of broadcast stations in Atlanta

Atlanta's major daily paper is The Atlanta Journal-Constitution. Weekly papers include Creative Loafing, The Sunday Paper and Atlanta Nation. A monthly newsprint publication Stomp And Stammer features local music news, indie rock record reviews, and cultural commentary. International medical, law, and business publisher NewsRx is headquartered in the Atlanta suburb of Vinings. The Atlanta Arts community is connected through the ARTNEWS (list serve). List of newspapers in Atlanta In its history, Atlanta has had numerous daily and weekly newspapers Daily Intelligencer (1849 – 1871) daily Daily Examiner (1850? – 1857) daily (merged with Intelligencer) City Guardian (1861) Atlanta Southern Confederacy (1861 – 1864) Daily New Era (1866 – 1869) daily Atlanta Constitution (1868 – 2001) daily Daily True... Television Stations WXIA 11 (NBC) WSB 2 (ABC) WGCL 46 (CBS) WAGA 5 (FOX) WATL 36 (WB) WUPA 69 (UPN) WUVG 34 (Univision), a Spanish language network WPXA 14 (i) WHSG 63 (TBN) WGTV 8 (PBS) WPBA 30 (PBS) WATC 57, an independantly operated station which carries religious programming WTBS... The Atlanta Journal-Constitution is the only major daily newspaper in Atlanta and its suburbs. ... Creative Loafing is the name of two alternative weekly newspapers published by Tampa Bay, Florida-based Creative Loafing, Inc. ... The Sunday Paper is the name of an alternative weekly newspaper published in Atlanta, Georgia which focuses on news, culture and entertainment. ... Indie rock is a subgenre of rock music often used to refer to bands that are on small independent record labels or that arent on labels at all. ...


The Atlanta metro area is served by a wide variety of local television stations, and is the eighth largest designated market area (DMA) in the U.S. with 2,310,490 households, which is just over 2% of the national total.[62] All of the major networks have stations in the market, along with two PBS stations and some independent ones. Several cable television networks also operate from Atlanta, including TBS, CNN, Cartoon Network, Court TV, Boomerang, and TNT. These stations are owned by Turner Broadcasting System (now a subsidiary of Time Warner). The Weather Channel (owned by Landmark Communications) also broadcasts from the Atlanta area. According to Billboard, the first nationwide music video programming on cable television, Video Concert Hall was created in Atlanta. Not to be confused with Public Broadcasting Services in Malta. ... Cable TV redirects here. ... TBS also stands for Tokyo Broadcasting System, a Japanese television network. ... The Cable News Network, commonly known as CNN, is a major cable television network founded in 1980 by Ted Turner. ... For Cartoon Network outside of the United States, see Cartoon Network around the world. ... For the Canadian channel, see CourtTV Canada The Courtroom Television Network, more commonly known as Court TV, is an American cable television network owned by Time Warner that launched on July 1, 1991. ... Boomerang is the name of at least four television networks. ... Turner Network Television, usually referred to as TNT, is an American cable TV network created by media mogul Ted Turner and currently owned by the Turner Broadcasting System division of Time Warner. ... Turner Broadcasting logo Turner Broadcasting System, Inc. ... Time Warner Inc. ... The Weather Channel (TWC) is a cable and satellite television network that broadcasts weather and weather-related news 24 hours a day. ... Landmark Communications is a privately-held media company specializing in cable television, broadcast television, print publishing, and internet publishing. ... Billboard can refer to: Billboard magazine Billboard (advertising) Billboard antenna In 3D computer graphics, to billboard is to rotate an object so that it faces the viewer. ... A music video is a short film or video that accompanies a complete piece of music, most commonly a song. ... Video Concert Hall was an early USA Network television program featuring an unhosted rotation of music videos. ...


There are also numerous local radio stations serving every genre of music, sports, and talk. The nationally syndicated Neal Boortz and Clark Howard shows are broadcast from Atlanta radio station AM 750 WSB. Neal Boortz (born April 6, 1945), is a U.S. talk radio host. ... Clark Howard (born June 20, 1955), is a popular U.S. talk radio host of the nationally syndicated consumer advocate program The Clark Howard Show. ... WSB AM (NewsTalk 750) is an AM radio station in the city of Atlanta, Georgia with a frequency of 750kHz. ...


Cox Enterprises, which owns the Atlanta Journal-Constitution, WSB-TV, and WSB-AM-FM, is headquartered in Atlanta. Cumulus Media, Inc. engages in the acquisition, operation, and development of commercial radio stations in mid-size radio markets in the United States and is also headquartered in Atlanta, Georgia. As of December 31, 2005, it owned and operated 307 radio stations in 61 mid-sized U.S. media markets; and a multimarket network of 5 radio stations in the English-speaking Caribbean; as well as provided sales and marketing services for 2 radio stations under local marketing agreement. Nintendo's American Division has its distribution center based in Atlanta, the primary location from where imported games and products arrive to United States and are often inspected and shipped to stores nationwide. Cox Enterprises is the successor to the publishing company founded in Dayton, Ohio, by James Middleton Cox, who began with the Dayton Daily News. ... WSB-TV is the ABC affiliate in Atlanta, Georgia. ... Cumulus Media, Inc. ... is the 365th day of the year (366th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... For the video game system, see Nintendo Entertainment System. ...


Religion

North Avenue Presbyterian Church, on the southeast corner of North Avenue and Peachtree Street
North Avenue Presbyterian Church, on the southeast corner of North Avenue and Peachtree Street

There are over 1,000 places of worship within the city of Atlanta.[3] A majority of Atlantans profess to following a Protestant Christian faith, the city historically being a major center for traditional Southern denominations such as the Southern Baptist Convention, the United Methodist Church, and the Presbyterian Church (USA). There are a large number of "mega churches" in the area, especially in suburban areas, with congregations numbering in the thousands; Peachtree Presbyterian Church in Buckhead is the largest congregation of the Presbyterian Church (USA). The Varsity on North Avenue in Midtown Atlanta North Avenue in Atlanta is a major street dividing Downtown Atlanta from Midtown. ... Protestantism is a general grouping of denominations within Christianity. ... The Southern Baptist Convention (SBC) is a United States-based Christian denomination that consists of numerous agencies including six seminaries, two mission boards and a variety of other organizations such as: the Executive Committee of the Southern Baptist Convention, which can act for the SBC ad interim between annual meetings... This article is about the current Christian denomination based in the United States. ... Emblem of the PC(USA) The Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.) or PC(USA) is a mainline Protestant Christian denomination in the United States. ...


As the see of the Catholic Archdiocese of Atlanta, Atlanta serves as the metropolitan see for the Province of Atlanta. The archdiocesan cathedral is the Cathedral of Christ the King and the current archbishop is the Most Rev. Wilton D. Gregory. The Catholic population of metropolitan Atlanta and northern Georgia grew to 650,000 in 2006, boosted in recent years by Hispanic immigrants (especially in smaller Georgia communities) and migration from elsewhere in the U.S.[63] As of 2007 the Archdiocese of Atlanta included 84 parishes.[64] Also located in the metropolitan area are several Eastern Catholic parishes.[65] A see (from the Latin word sedem, meaning seat) is the throne (cathedra) of a bishop. ... The Roman Catholic Church, most often spoken of simply as the Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with over one billion members. ... The Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Atlanta is an ecclesiastical territory or diocese of the Roman Catholic Church in the southern United States. ... In hierarchical Christian churches, the rank of metropolitan bishop, or simply metropolitan, pertains to the diocesan bishop or archbishop (then more precisely called Metropolitan archbishop) of a metropolis; that is, the chief city of an old Roman province, ecclesiastical province, or regional capital. ... The Cathedral of Christ the King in Atlanta was built in the 1930s. ... Wilton Daniel Gregory (born December 7, 1947) is an African American prelate of the Roman Catholic Church. ... Hispanic (Spanish: ; Portuguese: ; Latin: , adjective from Hispānia, the Roman name for the Iberian Peninsula) is a term that historically denoted relation to the ancient Hispania and its peoples. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Relation to other religions Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Athanasius · Augustine · Constantine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas Calvin · Luther · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      The...


Atlanta is also the see of the Episcopal Diocese of Atlanta, which includes all of northern Georgia, much of middle Georgia and the Chattahoochee River valley of western Georgia. This Diocese is headquartered at the Cathedral of St Philip in Buckhead and is led by the Right Reverend J. Neil Alexander.[66] Seal of the Episcopal Diocese of Atlanta The Episcopal Diocese of Atlanta comprises middle and north Georgia. ... Map of the Apalachicola River system with the Chattahoochee highlighted. ... The Cathedral of Saint Philip, also known as St. ... The Right Reverend (Rt. ... The Rt. ...


Atlanta serves as headquarters for several regional church bodies also. The Southeastern Synod of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America, consisting of churches in Alabama, Georgia, Mississippi, and Tennessee, maintains offices in downtown Atlanta; ELCA parishes are numerous throughout the metro area. A smaller but influential group is the Southeast Conference, United Church of Christ, headquartered in Midtown and serving churches in the states of Alabama, Georgia, Mississippi, South Carolina, and central and eastern Tennessee. There are eight United Church of Christ congregations in the Atlanta metro area, one of which, First Congregational in the Sweet Auburn neighborhood, is noted for being the church with which former mayor Andrew Young is affiliated. The Evangelical Lutheran Church in America (ELCA) is a mainline Protestant denomination headquartered in Chicago, Illinois. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... This article is about the U.S. state of Tennessee. ... The Southeast Conference of the United Church of Christ is the judicatory that provides services to, and relates the congregations of, the UCC within the states of Alabama, Georgia, Mississippi, South Carolina, and central and eastern Tennessee. ... Disambiguation: This article is about the United States denomination known as United Church of Christ. ... The Sweet Auburn Historic District is a historic African-American neighborhood along Auburn Avenue in Atlanta, Georgia. ...


Traditional African-American denominations such as the National Baptist Convention and the African Methodist Episcopal Church are strongly represented in the area. These churches have several seminaries that form the Interdenominational Theological Center complex in the Atlanta University Center. The National Baptist Convention, USA, Inc. ... The African Methodist Episcopal Church, usually called the AME Church, is a Christian denomination founded by Bishop Richard Allen in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, in 1816. ... The Interdenominational Theological Center (ITC) is a Christian, an independent, non-profit, coeducational ecumenical, graduate professional school of theology. ... The Atlanta University Center is the largest consortium of African-American higher education in the United States of America. ...


The city also hosts the Greek Orthodox Annunciation Cathedral, the see of Metropolis of Atlanta and its bishop, Alexios. There are at least eleven Orthodox parishes in Atlanta, including Greek, Russian, Carpatho-Russian, Orthodox Church in America, Antiochian, Serbian, Ukrainian and Romanian. Greek Orthodox Church can refer to any of several hierarchical churches within the larger group of mutually recognizing Eastern Orthodox churches: the Orthodox Church of Constantinople, headed by the Patriarch of Constantinople, who is also the first among equals of the Eastern Orthodox Communion. ... Orthodox icon of Pentecost. ... The Orthodox Church in America (OCA/TOCA) is an autocephalous Eastern Orthodox Church, currently led by Metropolitan Herman (Swaiko). ... The Antiochian Orthodox Christian Archdiocese of North America (often referred to in North America simply as the Antiochian Archdiocese) is the sole jurisdiction of the Antiochian Orthodox Church in the USA and Canada with exclusive jurisdiction over the Antiochian Orthodox faithful in those countries, though these faithful were originally cared... Flag of the Serbian Orthodox Church Unknown flag, seen offten in public. ...


Metropolitan Atlanta is also home to a vibrant Jewish community estimated to include 120,000 individuals in 61,300 households.[67] This study places Atlanta's Jewish population as the 11th largest in the United States, up from 17th largest in 1996.[67]


The headquarters for The Salvation Army's United States Southern Territory is located in Atlanta.[68] The denomination has eight churches, numerous social service centers, and youth clubs located throughout the Atlanta area. Shield of The Salvation Army The Salvation Army is a non-military evangelical Christian organisation. ...


The city also has a temple for the Church of Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints. The Salt Lake Temple of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints is the largest attraction in the citys Temple Square. ...


Economy

See also: List of major companies in Atlanta
The World of Coca-Cola museum reopened at a new location near the Georgia Aquarium on May 26, 2007.
The World of Coca-Cola museum reopened at a new location near the Georgia Aquarium on May 26, 2007.
Rapid urbanization has increased the demand for residential units within the City of Atlanta.

One of seven American cities classified as Gamma world cities, Atlanta ranks third in the number of Fortune 500 companies headquartered within city boundaries, behind New York City and Houston.[69] Several major national and international companies are headquartered in Atlanta or its nearby suburbs, including three Fortune 100 companies: The Coca-Cola Company, Home Depot, and United Parcel Service in adjacent Sandy Springs. The headquarters of AT&T Mobility (formerly Cingular Wireless), the largest mobile phone service provider in the United States,[70] can be found a short distance inside the Perimeter beside Georgia State Route 400.[71] Newell Rubbermaid is one of the most recent companies to relocate to the metro area; in October 2006, it announced plans to move its headquarters to Sandy Springs.[72] Other headquarters for some major companies in Atlanta and around the metro area include Arby's, Chick-Fil-A, Earthlink, Equifax, Georgia-Pacific, Oxford Industries, Southern Company, SunTrust Banks, and Waffle House. Over 75% of the Fortune 1000 companies have a presence in the Atlanta area, and the region hosts offices of about 1,250 multinational corporations. There are many businesses who were founded or have their corporate headquarters in the city of Atlanta or the surrounding metro area. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2272 × 1704 pixel, file size: 857 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2272 × 1704 pixel, file size: 857 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... World of Coca-Cola rotating logo in front of the main building in downtown Atlanta (the other side says Coke). The World of Coca-Cola is a permanent exhibition featuring the history of Coca-Cola and its well-known advertising. ... The Georgia Aquarium, located in Atlanta, Georgia at Pemberton Place, is billed as the worlds largest aquarium with more than 8 million US gallons (30,000 m³; 30,000,000 liters) of marine and fresh water, 1. ... is the 146th day of the year (147th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2592x1944, 827 KB) The picture was taken by myself on October 5, 2006. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2592x1944, 827 KB) The picture was taken by myself on October 5, 2006. ... Federal Reserve Districts The United States Federal Reserve System consists of twelve Federal Reserve Banks, each responsible for a particular district, and some with branches. ... Midtown Atlanta is a district in Atlanta, Georgia situated between the commercial and financial district of downtown to the south and the affluent residential, shopping, and nightlife district of Buckhead to the north. ... In Atlanta, Georgia, the Downtown Connector or 75/85 (pronounced seventy-five eighty-five) is the overlapped connector of Interstate 75 and Interstate 85 through the core of the city. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 337 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (1080 × 1920 pixel, file size: 793 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Taken: October 30th, 2007. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 337 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (1080 × 1920 pixel, file size: 793 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Taken: October 30th, 2007. ... “World city” redirects here. ... The Fortune 500 is a ranking of the top 500 United States corporations as measured by gross revenue. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... Houston redirects here. ... The Coca-Cola Company (NYSE: KO) is one of the largest manufacturers, distributors and marketers of nonalcoholic beverage concentrates and syrups in the world. ... The Home Depot (NYSE: HD) is an American retailer of home improvement and construction products and services. ... United Parcel Service, Inc. ... Sandy Springs (formerly Hammond) is a newly incorporated city, as of December 2005, and a suburb of Atlanta, Georgia. ... This article is about the wireless subsidiary of AT&T. For the defunct wireless provider that was merged into Cingular in 2004, see AT&T Wireless Services. ... Georgia State Route 400 (always known locally as Georgia 400 or just 400, or by its nickname, the Alpharetta Autobahn) is a highway in the U.S. state of Georgia, muliplexed with U.S. 19 from exit 4B until its terminus just south of Dahlonega. ... Rubbermaid redirects here. ... Arbys is a fast food restaurant chain in the United States and Canada that is a wholly owned subsidiary of Triarc. ... Chick-fil-A (IPA pronunciation: ) is a chain headquartered in Atlanta, Georgia, that specializes in chicken entrees. ... It has been suggested that this article be split into multiple articles accessible from a disambiguation page. ... Equifax, Inc. ... Georgia-Pacific Corp. ... Oxford Industries, Inc. ... Southern Company (NYSE: SO) is a US electricity corporation. ... SunTrust Headquarters at SunTrust Plaza in Atlanta, GA. SunTrust Banks, Inc. ... Waffle House is a restaurant chain with 1500 stores found in twenty-five states in the United States. ... Fortune 1000 is a reference to a list maintained by the American business magazine Fortune. ...


Delta Air Lines is the city's largest employer and the metro area's third largest.[73] Delta operates the world's largest airline hub at Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport and, together with the hub of competing carrier AirTran Airways, has helped make Hartsfield-Jackson the world's busiest airport, both in terms of passenger traffic and aircraft operations. The airport, since its construction in the 1950s, has served as a key engine of Atlanta's economic growth.[74] Delta Air Lines, Inc. ... Atlanta Airport redirects here. ... AirTran Airways is a low-cost airline that is a Delaware corporation with headquarters in Orlando, Florida, USA and is a subsidiary of AirTran Holdings. ...


Atlanta has a sizable financial sector. SunTrust Banks, the seventh largest bank by asset holdings in the United States,[75] has its home office on Peachtree Street in downtown.[76] The Federal Reserve System has a district headquarters in Atlanta; the Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta, which oversees much of the deep South, relocated from downtown to midtown in 2001.[77] Wachovia announced plans in August 2006 to place its new credit-card division in Atlanta,[78] and city, state and civic leaders harbor long-term hopes of having the city serve as the home of the secretariat of a future Free Trade Area of the Americas.[79] SunTrust Headquarters at SunTrust Plaza in Atlanta, GA. SunTrust Banks, Inc. ... The Fed redirects here. ... The Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta is responsible for the 6th District of the Federal Reserve, which covers Alabama, Florida, Georgia, and parts of Louisiana, Mississippi, and Tennessee. ... The states in dark red comprise the Deep South. ... For Moravian settlements in North Carolina, see Wachovia, North Carolina. ... This article is about the payment system. ... The FTAA logo. ...


The auto manufacturing sector in metropolitan Atlanta has suffered setbacks recently, including the planned closure of the General Motors Doraville Assembly plant in 2008, and the shutdown of Ford Motor Company's Atlanta Assembly plant in Hapeville in 2006. Kia, however, has broken ground on a new assembly plant near West Point, Georgia.[80] General Motors Corporation, also known as GM, is a multinational corporation headquartered in the United States and has been the worlds largest and most dominant automaker since 1931 till the second half of 2007, surpassed by Toyota; as well as the global industry sales leader for 77 years. ... Doraville Assembly is a General Motors automobile factory in Doraville, Georgia. ... “Ford” redirects here. ... Atlanta Assembly is an automobile factory owned by Ford Motor Company in Hapeville, Georgia. ... Hapeville is a city in Fulton County, Georgia, United States located directly adjacent to the City of Atlanta. ... Kia redirects here. ... West Point is a city located in Harris County, Georgia. ...


The city is a major cable television programming center. Ted Turner began the Turner Broadcasting System media empire in Atlanta, where he bought a UHF station that eventually became WTBS. Turner established the headquarters of the Cable News Network at CNN Center, adjacent today to Centennial Olympic Park. As his company grew, its other channels – the Cartoon Network, Boomerang, TNT, Turner South, CNN International, CNN en Español, CNN Headline News, and CNN Airport Network – centered their operations in Atlanta as well (Turner South has since been sold). The Weather Channel, owned by Landmark Communications, has its offices in the nearby suburb of Marietta. Cable television or Community Antenna Television (CATV) (and often shortened to cable) is a system of providing television, FM radio programming and other services to consumers via radio waves transmitted directly to people’s televisions through fixed coaxial cables as opposed to the over-the-air method used in traditional... For other persons named Ted Turner, see Ted Turner (disambiguation). ... Turner Broadcasting logo Turner Broadcasting System, Inc. ... WTBS is an American TV station, broadcast on channel 17 (DTV channel 20) in the Atlanta, Georgia metropolitan area. ... CNN or Cable News Network is a cable television network that was founded in 1980 by Ted Turner & Reese Schonfeld [1]. It is a division of the Turner Broadcasting System, owned by Time Warner. ... The CNN Center is the world headquarters of the Cable News Network (CNN). ... Fountain of Rings Centennial Olympic Park is a 21 acre (85,000 m²) public park located in downtown Atlanta, Georgia. ... For Cartoon Network outside of the United States, see Cartoon Network around the world. ... Boomerang is the name of at least four television networks. ... Turner Network Television, usually referred to as TNT, is an American cable TV network created by media mogul Ted Turner and currently owned by the Turner Broadcasting System division of Time Warner. ... Turner South was begun in 2000 by Turner Broadcasting System as the first regional entertainment network developed especially for viewers in the southern U.S. The regional cable TV network offered movies, tv series, sitcoms, regional news updates, and unique original programming, plus professional sports coverage for Atlanta Braves (Major... CNN International (CNNI) is an English language television network that carries news, current affairs and business programming world-wide. ... CNN en Español is a division of Cable News Network (CNN) broadcasting world news in Spanish 24 hours a day from CNNs global headquarters in Atlanta, Georgia, in the United States. ... CNN Headline News is a spin-off network from the original Cable News Network (CNN) television news network in the United States and Canada. ... CNN Airport Network is a specialized television network and division of Cable News Network (CNN) broadcasting general news, weather, stock market updates and features to airports across North America. ... The Weather Channel (TWC) is a cable and satellite television network that broadcasts weather and weather-related news 24 hours a day. ... Landmark Communications is a privately-held media company specializing in cable television, broadcast television, print publishing, and internet publishing. ... Historic Downtown Marietta Marietta is a city located in central Cobb County, Georgia GR6, and is its county seat. ...


Cox Enterprises, a privately held company controlled by siblings Barbara Cox Anthony and Anne Cox Chambers, has substantial media holdings in and beyond Atlanta. Its Cox Communications division is the nation's third-largest cable television service provider;[81] the company also publishes over a dozen daily newspapers in the United States, including The Atlanta Journal-Constitution. WSB – the flagship station of Cox Radio – was the first AM radio station in the South. Cox Enterprises is the successor to the publishing company founded in Dayton, Ohio, by James Middleton Cox, who began with the Dayton Daily News. ... Barbara Cox Anthony (1923 - May 28, 2007) was the second and youngest daughter of James M. Cox, a Democratic Governor of Ohio, newspaper publisher and broadcaster. ... Anne Cox Chambers (born December 1, 1919) is a billionaire media proprietor. ... Cox Communications is a privately owned subsidiary of Cox Enterprises providing digital cable television and telecommunications services in the United States. ... WSB AM (NewsTalk 750) is a clear channel AM radio station located in Atlanta, Georgia with a frequency of 750 kHz. ... Mediumwave radio transmissions (sometimes called Medium frequency or MF) are those between the frequencies of 300 kHz and 3000 kHz. ...


Atlanta is also home to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Adjacent to Emory University, with a staff of nearly 15,000 (including 6,000 contractors and 840 Commissioned Corps officers) in 170 occupations, including: engineers, entomologists, epidemiologists, biologists, physicians, veterinarians, behavioral scientists, nurses, medical technologists, economists, health communicators, toxicologists, chemists, computer scientists, and statisticians. Headquartered in DeKalb County, CDC has 10 other offices throughout the United States and Puerto Rico. In addition, CDC staff are located in local health agencies, quarantine/border health offices at ports of entry, and 45 countries around the world. Originally established in 1946 as the Communicable Disease Center, its primary function was to combat malaria, the deep southeast being the heart of the U.S. malaria zone at the time. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in Atlanta, Georgia, is recognized as the leading United States agency for protecting the public health and safety of people. ... Malaria is a vector-borne infectious disease caused by protozoan parasites. ...


Demographics

See also: Population of Atlanta
Atlanta population
Year City
proper
[82] Metro
area
1850 2,572 N/A
1860 9,554 N/A
1870 21,789 N/A
1880 37,409 N/A
1890 65,533 N/A
1900 89,872 419,375
1910 154,839 522,442
1920 200,616 622,283
1930 270,366 715,391
1940 302,288 820,579
1950 331,314 997,666
1960 487,455 1,312,474
1970 496,973 1,763,626
1980 425,022 2,233,324
1990 394,017 2,959,950
2000 416,474 4,112,198
2006 486,411[6] 5,138,223

As of July 2006, the Atlanta metropolitan area had an estimated population of 5,138,223.[7] According to the 2000 census, there were 416,474 people (486,411 in the July 2006 estimate),[6] 168,147 households, and 83,232 families residing in the city proper. The population density was 3,161 people per square mile (1,221/km²). There were 186,925 housing units at an average density of 1,419/sq mi (548/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 59.39% Black, 33.22% White, 2.93% Asian, 0.18% Native American, 0.04% Pacific Islander, 1.99% from other races, and 1.24% from two or more races. 6.49% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.[83] The city also has the third highest percentage (12.8%) of gay, lesbian, and bisexual couples among the fifty largest cities in the United States.[84] After steadily growing for its first 100 years, the population within the city limits of Atlanta began to fall while the metro area continued to grow. ... The Atlanta metropolitan area, commonly referred to as Metro Atlanta in Georgia, is the ninth-largest metropolitan area in the United States and consists of 28 counties in Georgia. ... Image:1870 census Lindauer Weber 01. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... Hispanic Americans (Spanish: Hispano Americano) are Americans of Hispanic ethnicity who largely identify with the Hispanic cultural heritage. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ...


There were 168,147 households out of which 22.4% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 24.5% were married couples living together, 20.7% had a female householder with no husband present, and 50.5% were non-families. 38.5% of all households were made up of individuals and 8.3% had someone living alone who is 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.30 and the average family size was 3.16. Matrimony redirects here. ...


In the city the population was spread out with 22.3% under the age of 18, 13.3% from 18 to 24, 35.2% from 25 to 44, 19.4% from 45 to 64, and 9.7% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 32 years. For every 100 females there were 98.6 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 97.6 males.


The median income for a household in the city was $51,482 and the median income for a family was $55,939. Males had a median income of $36,162 compared to $30,178 for females. The per capita income for the city was $29,772, and 24.4% of the population and 21.3% of families were below the poverty line, including 38.8% of those under the age of 18 and 20.7% of those 65 and older. The per capita income for a group of people may be defined as their total personal income, divided by the total population. ... Map of countries showing percentage of population who have an income below the national poverty line The poverty line is the level of income below which one cannot afford to purchase all the resources one requires to live. ...


According to a 2000 daytime population estimate by the Census Bureau,[85] over 250,000 more people commuted to Atlanta on any given workday, boosting the city's estimated daytime population to 676,431. This is an increase of 62.4% over Atlanta's resident population, making it the largest gain in daytime population in the country among cities with fewer than 500,000 residents.


According to census estimates, the city of Atlanta is the fastest growing city in the nation since 2000 by numerical increase.[86]


Atlanta is also home to the fastest growing millionaire population in the United States. The number of households in Atlanta with $1 million or more in investable assets, not including primary residence and consumable goods, will increase 69% through 2011, to approximately 103,000 households.[87]


Law and government

See also: List of mayors of Atlanta
The town square in downtown Marietta, a Cobb County suburb of Atlanta.
The town square in downtown Marietta, a Cobb County suburb of Atlanta.

Atlanta is governed by a mayor and a city council. The city council consists of 15 representatives—one from each of the city's twelve districts and three at-large positions. The mayor may veto a bill passed by the council, but the council can override the veto with a two-thirds majority. The mayor of Atlanta is Shirley Franklin. This is the list of mayors of Atlanta — former mayors of the city of Atlanta. ... Download high resolution version (519x640, 46 KB)Atlanta City Hall, 68 Mitchell Street Southwest, Atlanta, Fulton County, GA; Elevated view showing north(main) and west elevations HABS, GA,61-ATLA,7-1 This image is from HABS/HAER, the Historic American Buildings Survey/Historic American Engineering Record collection at the... Download high resolution version (519x640, 46 KB)Atlanta City Hall, 68 Mitchell Street Southwest, Atlanta, Fulton County, GA; Elevated view showing north(main) and west elevations HABS, GA,61-ATLA,7-1 This image is from HABS/HAER, the Historic American Buildings Survey/Historic American Engineering Record collection at the... Since Atlanta was founded, there have been four official city halls of Atlanta. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2936x1940, 457 KB)Georgia State Capitol building in Atlanta, Georgia. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2936x1940, 457 KB)Georgia State Capitol building in Atlanta, Georgia. ... East side (back) of the The Georgia State Capitol The Georgia State Capitol in Atlanta, Georgia is an architecturally and historically significant building listed on the National Register of Historic Places. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2032x1524, 1079 KB) Marietta, Georgia. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2032x1524, 1079 KB) Marietta, Georgia. ... Historic Downtown Marietta Marietta is a city located in central Cobb County, Georgia GR6, and is its county seat. ... Cobb County is a county located in the U.S. state of Georgia. ... A mayor (from the Latin māior, meaning larger, greater) is the modern title of the highest ranking municipal officer. ... Shirley Clarke Franklin (born May 10, 1945) is an American politician, a member of the Democratic Party, and the current mayor of Atlanta, Georgia since January 7, 2002. ...


Every mayor elected since 1973 has been black.[88] Maynard Jackson served two terms and was succeeded by Andrew Young in 1982. Jackson returned for a third term in 1990 and was succeeded by Bill Campbell. In 2001, Shirley Franklin became the first woman to be elected Mayor of Atlanta, and the first African-American woman to serve as mayor of a major southern city.[89] She was re-elected for a second term in 2005, winning 90% of the vote. Atlanta city politics during the Campbell administration suffered from a notorious reputation for corruption, and in 2006 a federal jury convicted former mayor Bill Campbell on three counts of tax evasion in connection with gambling income he received while Mayor during trips he took with city contractors.[90] Maynard Jackson, Jr. ... Andrew Jackson Young, Jr. ... Bill Campbell (born 1953 in Raleigh, North Carolina), served as mayor of Atlanta, Georgia from 1994 to 2002. ... Bill Campbell (born 1953 in Raleigh, North Carolina), served as mayor of Atlanta, Georgia from 1994 to 2002. ...


As the state capital, Atlanta is the site of most of Georgia's state government. The Georgia State Capitol building, located downtown, houses the offices of the governor, lieutenant governor and secretary of state, as well as the General Assembly. The Governor's Mansion is located on West Paces Ferry Road, in a residential section of Buckhead. Atlanta is also home to Georgia Public Broadcasting headquarters and Peachnet, and is the county seat of Fulton County, with which it shares responsibility for the Atlanta-Fulton Public Library System. In countries with federal constitutions divided into subnational entities known as states, the state capital is the administrative center of a state. ... East side (back) of the The Georgia State Capitol The Georgia State Capitol in Atlanta, Georgia is an architecturally and historically significant building listed on the National Register of Historic Places. ... This is a list of Governors of the state of Georgia, including governors of the British colony of Georgia. ... Type Bicameral Houses Senate House of Representatives President of the Senate Casey Cagle, R since November 7, 2006 Speaker of the House Glenn Richardson, R since November 7, 2006 Members 236 Political groups (as of November 7, 2006 elections) Democratic Party Republican Party Meeting place Georgia State Capitol Web site... Georgia Governors Mansion The Governors Mansion is the official home of the Governor of the U.S. state of Georgia. ... Through much of the 19th century, Paces Ferry was an important ferry across the Chattahoochee River near Atlanta. ... Georgia Public Broadcasting (GPB) is the public radio and television network in the U.S. state of Georgia. ... The Atlanta-Fulton Public Library System is a network of public libraries serving the City of Atlanta and County of Fulton, both in Georgia. ...


Crime

According to the Federal Bureau of Investigation's annual Uniform Crime Report, Atlanta recorded 90 homicides in 2005, down from 151 in 2004. Violent crime in 2005 was the lowest since 1969.[91] Murders peaked at 271 in 1973, for a murder rate of 58 per 100,000.


Atlanta's Mayor Franklin is a member of the Mayors Against Illegal Guns Coalition,[92] an organization formed in 2006 and co-chaired by New York City mayor Michael Bloomberg and Boston mayor Thomas Menino. The Mayors Against Illegal Guns Coalition is a coalition of mayors from 225 different United States cities, with a stated goal of making the public safer by getting illegal guns off the streets. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... Michael Rubens Bloomberg (born 14 February 1942) is an American businessman, founder of Bloomberg L.P., and the current Mayor of New York City. ... Boston redirects here. ... Thomas Michael Menino (born December 27, 1942) is the current mayor of Boston, Massachusetts, United States and the citys first Italian-American mayor. ...


Surrounding cities

The population of the Atlanta region spreads across a metropolitan area of 8,376 square miles (21,694 km²) – a land area larger than that of Massachusetts.[93] Because Georgia contains more counties than any other state east of the Mississippi River (an accident of history explained by the now-defunct county unit system of weighing votes in primary elections),[94] area residents live under a heavily decentralized collection of governments. As of the 2000 census, fewer than one in ten residents of the metropolitan area lived inside Atlanta city proper.[95] The Atlanta metropolitan area, commonly referred to as Metro Atlanta in Georgia, is the ninth-largest metropolitan area in the United States and consists of 28 counties in Georgia. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... For the river in Canada, see Mississippi River (Ontario). ... The County Unit System was used by the U.S. state of Georgia to determine a victor in its elections. ... For other uses, see Primary. ...


A 2006 survey by the Metro Atlanta Chamber of Commerce counted 140 cities and towns in the 28-county metropolitan statistical area in mid-2005.[93] Four cities – Sandy Springs, Johns Creek, Milton, and Chattahoochee Hill Country – have incorporated or won legislative approval for incorporation since then.[96][97][98] Sandy Springs (once known as Hammond) is an unincorporated city located in Fulton County, Georgia, north of Atlanta and south of Roswell. ... According to the USGS GNIS, there are 144 things in the U.S. named Johns Creek: Johns Creek (north of Atlanta) Johns Creek (northwestern Georgia) Johns Creek (southern Georgia) This list is incomplete; you can help by expanding it. ... // Milton may refer to: People with the surname Milton: John Milton (1608–1674), English poet Milton (surname), other people with that surname People with the given name Milton: Milton (given name) In Australia: Milton, New South Wales Milton, Queensland Milton railway station, Brisbane In Canada: Milton, Ontario Milton (GO Station...


Atlanta's environs include the following suburbs, listed in order of population:[99]

Location in Fulton County in the state of Georgia Coordinates: , Country United States State Georgia County Fulton County, Georgia Incorporated February 16, 1854 Government  - Mayor Jere Wood (R) Area  - City 38. ... Sandy Springs (formerly Hammond) is a newly incorporated city, as of December 2005, and a suburb of Atlanta, Georgia. ... Historic Downtown Marietta Marietta is a city located in central Cobb County, Georgia GR6, and is its county seat. ... Johns Creek (population approximately 63,000 to 70,000) is an area of Fulton County, Georgia which is proposed to be incorporated as a city (the only type of municipality in the state) in December 2006. ... Atlanta from southern Smyrna on a clear day; the large nearby tower is Plant Atkinson. ... Alpharetta is a city in Fulton County, Georgia, United States. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Peachtree City (zip code 30269) is a city in Fayette County, Georgia, United States. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Kennesaw is a city in Cobb County, Georgia, United States. ... Douglasville is a city in Douglas County, Georgia, United States. ... The Historic Lawrenceville Courthouse Lawrenceville is the county seat of Gwinnett County, Georgia, in the United States. ... Newnan is a city in Coweta County, Georgia, 39 miles (63 km) south by west of Atlanta. ... Cartersville is a city in Bartow County, Georgia, in the United States. ... A picture from the annual Duluth Fall Festival Duluth is a city in Gwinnett County, Georgia, and a suburb of Atlanta located in the Metro Atlanta area. ... Griffin is a city in Spalding County, Georgia, United States. ... Forest Park is a city located in Clayton County, Georgia. ... Stockbridge is a city located in Henry County, Georgia. ... Panoramic of Carrollton circa 1912. ... Location in Cherokee County and the state of Georgia Coordinates: , Country State Counties Cherokee Government  - Mayor Donnie Henriques (R) Area  - City  0. ... College Park is a city located partly in Fulton County, Georgia and partially in Clayton County, Georgia, in the United States. ... Milton (population approximately 20,000) is an area of Fulton County, Georgia which became incorporated as a city (the only type of municipality in the state) on December 1, 2006. ... Motto: Everybodys Somebody in Snellville Location in Gwinnett County, Georgia Coordinates: County Gwinnett Incorporated 1923 Government  - Mayor Jerry Oberholtzer Area  - City 25. ... For the south-western Georgia county, see Decatur County, Georgia. ... Canton is a city in and the county seat of Cherokee County[3], Georgia, United States. ... McDonough is a city in Henry County, Georgia, United States. ... Fayetteville is a city in Fayette County, Georgia, United States. ...

Education

Emory University's Quadrangle

Image File history File linksMetadata Emory-university-quad. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Emory-university-quad. ... Emory University is a private university located in the metropolitan area of the city of Atlanta and in western unincorporated DeKalb County, Georgia, United States. ...

Colleges and universities

Atlanta has more than 30 institutions of higher education, including the Georgia Institute of Technology and Georgia State University. The city also hosts the Atlanta University Center, a consortium of prestigious, historically black colleges and universities. Its members include Clark Atlanta University, Morehouse College, Spelman College, and the Interdenominational Theological Center. Adjoining the AUC schools, but independent from them, is the Morehouse School of Medicine. The Savannah College of Art and Design opened a Midtown Atlanta, campus in 2005 and shortly thereafter acquired the Atlanta College of Art. Also in the city are the John Marshall Law School (Atlanta) and the Reformed Theological Seminary. The University of Cambridge is an institute of higher learning. ... The Georgia Institute of Technology, commonly known as Georgia Tech, is a public, coeducational research university, part of the University System of Georgia, and located in Atlanta, Georgia, USA, with satellite campuses in Savannah, Georgia, Metz, France, Shanghai, China, and Singapore. ... Georgia State University (GSU) is an urban research university in the heart of downtown Atlanta, Georgia, USA. Founded in 1913, it serves over 28,000[2] students, and is one of the University System of Georgias four research universities. ... The Atlanta University Center is the largest consortium of African-American higher education in the United States of America. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... Clark Atlanta University (CAU) is a private institution of higher education in Atlanta, Georgia. ... Morehouse College is a private, four-year, all-male, historically black liberal arts college in Atlanta, Georgia. ... Spelman College is a four-year liberal arts womans college in Atlanta, Georgia. ... The Interdenominational Theological Center (ITC) is a Christian, an independent, non-profit, coeducational ecumenical, graduate professional school of theology. ... Morehouse School of Medicine is a medical school in Atlanta, Georgia, USA. Originally part of African-American all-male Morehouse College, it was founded in 1975 during the tenure of college president Hugh M. Gloster as a two year program in the basic sciences called The School of Medicine at... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Atlanta College of Art, established in 1905, was the first for-profit college of design and art in the Southeastern United States. ... Not to be confused with the unrelated John Marshall Law School in Chicago, Illinois The John Marshall Law School is a law school in Atlanta, Georgia, that was founded in 1933 and accredited by the American Bar Association in 2005. ... Reformed Theological Seminary (RTS) is a non-denominational, evangelical Protestant seminary dedicated to training current and future leaders (especially its Presbyterian and Reformed branches) to be pastors, missionaries, educators, and Christian counselors. ...


Suburban Atlanta contains several colleges, including Emory University, an internationally prominent liberal arts and research institution; Oglethorpe University, named for the founder of Georgia; Agnes Scott College, an all-women's college; and several state-run institutions such as Southern Polytechnic State University,Kennesaw State University and Georgia Perimeter College. Emory University is a private university located in the metropolitan area of the city of Atlanta and in western unincorporated DeKalb County, Georgia, United States. ... Oglethorpe University is a private liberal arts college in Atlanta, Georgia, United States. ... Buttrick Hall Looking across the quad McCain Library at dusk Agnes Scott College is a private liberal arts womens college in Decatur, Georgia, near Atlanta. ... Southern Polytechnic State University (SPSU or Southern Tech) is Georgias Technology University, located just northwest of Atlanta in Marietta, Georgia, USA. It is a part of the University System of Georgia. ... Kennesaw State University, commonly known as KSU or Kennesaw State, is a public, coeducational university and is part of the University System of Georgia. ... Georgia Perimeter College is a two-year Associate degree granting unit of the University System of Georgia. ...


Elementary and secondary schools

The public school system (Atlanta Public Schools) is run by the Atlanta Board of Education with superintendent Dr. Beverly L. Hall. As of 2007, the system has an active enrollment of 49,773 students, attending a total of 106 schools: including 58 elementary schools (three of which operate on a year-round calendar), 16 middle schools, 20 high schools, and 7 charter schools.[100] The school system also supports two alternative schools for middle and/or high school students, two single gender academies, and an adult learning center.[100] The school system also owns and operates radio station WABE-FM 90.1 (the National Public Radio affiliate) and PBS television station WPBA 30. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2592x1944, 890 KB) I, the creator of this work, hereby grant the permission to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2592x1944, 890 KB) I, the creator of this work, hereby grant the permission to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1. ... Grady High Schools Charles Allan Drive Building (C-Building). ... Midtown Atlanta is a district in Atlanta, Georgia situated between the commercial and financial district of downtown to the south and the affluent residential, shopping, and nightlife district of Buckhead to the north. ... Atlanta Public Schools is a school district based in Atlanta, Georgia, United States. ... WABE FM (90. ... NPR redirects here. ...


Notable private schools in Atlanta include The Westminster Schools, Pace Academy, The Lovett School, Holy Spirit Preparatory School, The Paideia School, The Alfred and Adele Davis Academy, Yeshiva Atlanta, The Galloway School (Chastain Park),(Christ the King School), and the Atlanta International School. Other notable private schools near Atlanta include Marist School (Dunwoody in unincorporated DeKalb County), Wesleyan School, Greater Atlanta Christian School, St. Pius X Catholic High School (Chamblee), The Epstein School (Sandy Springs), Holy Innocents' Episcopal School (Sandy Springs), the Weber School (Sandy Springs), The Walker School in Marietta, Whitefield Academy in Smyrna/Vinings/Mableton, and neighboring the airport Woodward Academy (College Park). The Westminster Schools is a private secondary school in Atlanta, Georgia. ... Pace Academy is a pre-first through twelfth grade college preparatory private school, located at 966 West Paces Ferry Road in the Buckhead area of Atlanta, Georgia. ... Name The Lovett School Address 4075 Paces Ferry Road Atlanta, GA 30327-3099 Established 1926 Community Suburban Students Coeducational Grades Kindergarten to 12 Headmaster William S. Peebles IV Accreditation Southern Association of Colleges and Schools, Southern Association of Independent Schools Mascot the Lovett Lion Colors Blue and White Motto Omnia... Holy Spirit Preparatory School is a preparatory school located in Atlanta, Georgia and was established in 1996. ... The Paideia School is a private school located in Atlanta, Georgia. ... Founded by Elliott Galloway in 1969, the Galloway School is located in the Buckhead (Atlanta) district of Atlanta, Georgia in the United States. ... Atlanta International School is a private primary and secondary school located in Atlanta, Georgia. ... Marist School is an Indepedent private Catholic high school in unincorporated DeKalb County, Georgia, United States, east of the city of Atlanta. ... Dunwoody redirects here. ... Name Wesleyan School Address 5450 Spalding Drive Norcross, Georgia 30092 (770) 448-7640 Established 1964 Community Suburban Type Private Religion Methodist Grades K to 12 Enrollment 1075 (2004-2005) Accreditation Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Nickname Wesleyan Mascot Wolf Colors Hunter Green and Gold Motto Jesus, Others, Yourself (May... Greater Atlanta Christian School (GACS) is a private Christian school affiliated with the Church of Christ that is located in Norcross, Georgia. ... Name St. ... Chamblee is a city in DeKalb County, Georgia, United States. ... The Epstein School is a Solomon Schechter school in Atlanta, Georgia. ... Sandy Springs (formerly Hammond) is a newly incorporated city, as of December 2005, and a suburb of Atlanta, Georgia. ... Holy Innocents Episcopal School, founded in 1959, is an independent co-educational preparatory school located in Atlanta, Georgia. ... Sandy Springs (formerly Hammond) is a newly incorporated city, as of December 2005, and a suburb of Atlanta, Georgia. ... The Doris and Alex Weber Jewish Community High School, formerly New Atlanta Jewish Community High School, is a trans-denominational Jewish high school located in Sandy Springs, Georgia, a suburban Atlanta-metro area city. ... Sandy Springs (formerly Hammond) is a newly incorporated city, as of December 2005, and a suburb of Atlanta, Georgia. ... The Walker School, formerly known as the Joseph T. Walker School, is located on Cobb Parkway (U.S. 41) in Marietta, Georgia, in what was originally Sprayberry High School. ... Whitefield Academy is a K-12 classical Christian school in Kansas City, Missouri. ... Woodward Academy is a private day school located in College Park, Georgia, USA. // Woodward Academy was founded in 1900 as the Georgia Military Academy, a military boarding school for boys. ... This page is a candidate for speedy deletion, because: Fork, smells like copyvio If you disagree with its speedy deletion, please explain why on its talk page or at Wikipedia:Speedy deletions. ...


Transportation

Metropolitan Atlanta Rapid Transit Authority provides public transportation in Atlanta
Metropolitan Atlanta Rapid Transit Authority provides public transportation in Atlanta
The Downtown Connector, with the downtown skyline in the background
The Downtown Connector, with the downtown skyline in the background
A MARTA bus

Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport (IATA: ATL, ICAO: KATL), the world's busiest airport as measured by passenger traffic and by aircraft traffic,[101] provides air service between Atlanta and many national and international destinations. Situated 10 miles (16 km) south of downtown, the airport covers most of the land inside a wedge formed by Interstate 75, Interstate 85, and Interstate 285. The MARTA rail system has a station within the airport terminal, and provides direct service to Downtown, Midtown, Buckhead, and Sandy Springs. The major general aviation airports near the city proper are DeKalb-Peachtree Airport (IATA: PDK, ICAO: KPDK) and Brown Field (IATA: FTY, ICAO: KFTY). See List of airports in the Atlanta area for a more complete listing. ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (2016x1347, 545 KB) MARTA N3 (North Avenue) station File links The following pages link to this file: Atlanta, Georgia MARTA ... ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (2016x1347, 545 KB) MARTA N3 (North Avenue) station File links The following pages link to this file: Atlanta, Georgia MARTA ... Marta redirects here. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2592x1944, 801 KB) I, the creator of this work, hereby grant the permission to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2592x1944, 801 KB) I, the creator of this work, hereby grant the permission to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1. ... In Atlanta, Georgia, the Downtown Connector or 75/85 (pronounced seventy-five eighty-five) is the overlapped connector of Interstate 75 and Interstate 85 through the core of the city. ... Downtown Atlanta refers to the largest financial district for the city of Atlanta. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2592x1944, 982 KB) I, the creator of this work, hereby grant the permission to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2592x1944, 982 KB) I, the creator of this work, hereby grant the permission to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1. ... Atlanta Airport redirects here. ... An IATA airport code, also known an IATA location identifier, IATA station code or simply a location identifier [1], is a three-letter code designating many airports around the world, defined by the International Air Transport Association (IATA). ... The ICAO (IPA pronunciation: ) airport code or location indicator is a four-letter alphanumeric code designating each airport around the world. ... The thirty worlds busiest airports by passenger traffic are measured by number of total passengers (data provided by Airports Council International). ... The thirty worlds busiest airports by traffic movements are measured by total movements (data provided by Airports Council International). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Interstate 85 Interstate 85 (abbreviated I-85) is an interstate highway in the southeastern United States. ... Interstate 285 (abbreviated I-285) is a beltway interstate highway encircling Atlanta, Georgia, for 63. ... A general aviation scene at Kemble Airfield, England. ... DeKalb-Peachtree Airport (IATA: PDK, ICAO: KPDK) is a municipal general aviation airport located in Chamblee, Georgia, just northeast of Atlanta. ... An IATA airport code, also known an IATA location identifier, IATA station code or simply a location identifier [1], is a three-letter code designating many airports around the world, defined by the International Air Transport Association (IATA). ... The ICAO (IPA pronunciation: ) airport code or location indicator is a four-letter alphanumeric code designating each airport around the world. ... Fulton County Airport at Charlie Brown Field (IATA: FTY, ICAO: KFTY) is a local airport located just west of Atlanta, and run by Fulton County, Georgia. ... An IATA airport code, also known an IATA location identifier, IATA station code or simply a location identifier [1], is a three-letter code designating many airports around the world, defined by the International Air Transport Association (IATA). ... The ICAO (IPA pronunciation: ) airport code or location indicator is a four-letter alphanumeric code designating each airport around the world. ... The following airports serve the area around Atlanta, Georgia, USA: Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport (KATL) Marietta/Dobbins Air Reserve Base (Atlanta Naval Air Station) (KMGE) DeKalb-Peachtree Airport (KPDK) Atlanta/Fulton County Airport-Brown Field (KFTY) Atlanta/Cobb County Airport-McCollum Field (KRYY) Lawrenceville/Gwinnett County Airport-Briscoe Field...


With a comprehensive network of freeways that radiate out from the city, Atlantans rely on their cars as the dominant mode of transportation in the region – a fact that leads some to call the city "the Los Angeles of the South."[102] Atlanta is mostly encircled by Interstate 285, a beltway locally known as "the Perimeter" which has come to mark the boundary between the interior of the region and its surrounding suburbs. Terms such as ITP (Inside The Perimeter) and OTP (Outside The Perimeter) have arisen to describe area neighborhoods, residents, and businesses. Los Angeles and L.A. redirect here. ... Interstate 285 (abbreviated I-285) is a beltway interstate highway encircling Atlanta, Georgia, for 63. ... For the American political term, see Inside the Beltway and Beltway bandits. ... “Suburbia” redirects here. ...


Three major interstate highways converge in Atlanta; I-20 runs east to west across town, while I-75 runs from northwest to southeast, and I-85 runs from northeast to southwest. The latter two combine to form the Downtown Connector (I-75/85) through the middle of the city. The combined highway carries more than 340,000 vehicles per day. The Connector is of the ten most congested segments of interstate highway in the United States.[103] The intersection of I-85 and I-285 in Doraville – officially called the Tom Moreland Interchange, is known to most residents as Spaghetti Junction. Metropolitan Atlanta is approached by thirteen freeways. In addition to the aforementioned interstates, I-575, Georgia 400, Georgia 141, I-675, Georgia 316, I-985, Stone Mountain Freeway (US 78), and Langford Parkway (SR 166) all terminate just within or beyond the Perimeter, with the exception of Langford Parkway, limiting the transportation options in the central city. A typical rural stretch of Interstate highway, with two lanes in each direction separated by a large grassy median, and with cross-traffic limited to overpasses and underpasses. ... “I-20” redirects here. ... In Atlanta, Georgia, the Downtown Connector or 75/85 (pronounced seventy-five eighty-five) is the overlapped connector of Interstate 75 and Interstate 85 through the core of the city. ... Doraville is a city located in DeKalb County, Georgia. ... Tom Moreland Interchange from I-85 traveling southbound. ... Spaghetti Junction is a nickname that can be given to a complicated or massively intertwined interchange, such that it resembles a plate of spaghetti. ... Interstate 575 (Georgia State Route 417) is an interstate highway in the United States which begins at Interstate 75 near Kennesaw and connects the metro Atlanta area with the north Georgia mountains. ... Georgia Highway 400 (always known locally as Georgia 400) is a highway in the U.S. state of Georgia that goes from Atlanta at I-85 to Buckhead, Sandy Springs, Roswell, Alpharetta, Forsyth County, Dawson County, and Dahlonega. ... Interstate 675 is the name of three distinct interstate highways associated with Interstate 75 in the united States: in Georgia, Michigan, and Ohio. ... Georgia State Route 316 (also known as University Parkway, Ga. ... Interstate 985 (Sydney Lanier Parkway) begins at Interstate 85 mile 113 near Suwanee and continues northward to the north Georgia city of Gainesville. ... United States Highway 78 is an east-west United States highway that runs for 715 miles (1,151 km) from Charleston, South Carolina to Memphis, Tennessee. ...


This strong automotive reliance has resulted in heavy traffic and contributes to Atlanta's air pollution, which has made Atlanta one of the more polluted cities in the country.[104] In recent years, the Atlanta metro area has ranked at or near the top of the longest average commute times in the U.S. The Clean Air Campaign was created in 1996 to help reduce pollution in metro Atlanta. This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... Air pollution is the modification of the natural characteristics of the atmosphere by a chemical, particulate matter, or biological agent. ... // The Clean Air Campaign is a not-for-profit organization that motivates Georgians to take action to improve air quality and reduce traffic congestion. ...


Notwithstanding heavy automotive usage, Atlanta's commuter heavy rail system, operated by Metropolitan Atlanta Rapid Transit Authority (MARTA), is the seventh busiest in the country.[105] MARTA also operates a bus system within Fulton, DeKalb, and Gwinnett Counties. Clayton, Cobb, and Gwinnett counties each operate separate, autonomous transit authorities, using buses but no trains. The term heavy rail is often used for regular railways, to distinguish from systems such as trams/light rail and metro. ... Marta redirects here. ... The following is a list of rapid systems transit in the United States, ranked by ridership. ... Autobus redirects here. ...


Atlanta has a reputation as being one of the most dangerous cities for pedestrians,[106] as far back as 1949 when the Gone with the Wind author Margaret Mitchell was struck by a speeding car and killed while crossing Peachtree Street. For the film, see Gone with the Wind (film). ... Margaret Munnerlyn Mitchell (November 8, 1900 – August 16, 1949), popularly known as Margaret Mitchell was an American author, who won the Pulitzer Prize in 1937 for her novel, Gone with the Wind, published in 1936. ... Peachtree and 10th at the Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta Peachtree Street is the main north-south street of Atlanta, Georgia. ...


The proposed Beltline would create a greenway and public transit system in a circle around the city from a series of mostly abandoned rail lines. This rail right-of-way would also accommodate multi-use trails connecting a string of existing and new parks. In addition, there is a proposed streetcar project that would create a streetcar line along Peachtree Street from downtown to the Buckhead area as well as possibly another East-West MARTA line. The Belt Line (or sometimes Beltline) is a proposed light rail or possibly heavy rail (metro) line around the core of Atlanta. ... A right-of-way (plural: rights-of-way) is an easement or strip of land granted to a railroad company upon which to build a railroad. ... A trail, in the most general sense, is any linear route for travel. ... a historic postcard showing electric trolley-powered streetcars in Richmond, Virginia, where Frank J. Sprague successfully demonstrated his new system on the hills in 1888 A streetcar is a railway vehicle designed to carry passengers on tracks, usually laid in city streets. ...


Atlanta began as a railroad town and it still serves as a major rail junction, with several freight lines belonging to Norfolk Southern and CSX intersecting below street level in downtown. It is the home of major classification yards for both railroads, Inman Yard on the NS and Tilford Yard on the CSX. Long-distance passenger service is provided by Amtrak's Crescent train, which connects Atlanta with many cities. The Amtrak station is located several miles north of downtown - and it lacks a connection to the MARTA rail system. An ambitious, long-standing proposal would create a Multi-Modal Passenger Terminal downtown, adjacent to Philips Arena and the Five Points MARTA station, which would link, in a single facility, MARTA bus and rail, intercity bus services, proposed commuter rail services to other Georgia cities, and Amtrak. Norfolk Southern Corporation (AAR reporting mark NS) NYSE: NSC is a US publicly-traded stock corporation based in Norfolk, Virginia. ... CSX redirects here. ... The high-speed Acela Express in West Windsor, New Jersey. ... The Crescent is a passenger train operated by Amtrak in the eastern part of the United States. ...


Greyhound Lines provides intercity bus service between Atlanta and many locations throughout the United States (from coast to coast), Canada, and the Mexican border. This article is about the US bus line. ...


Sister cities

Atlanta has eighteen sister cities, as designated by Sister Cities International, Inc. (SCI):[107] Sign denoting twin towns of Neckarsulm, Germany Town twinning is a concept whereby towns or cities in geographically and politically distinct areas are paired with the goal of fostering human contact and cultural links. ...

Image File history File links Flag_of_Belgium_(civil). ... For other places with the same name, see Brussels (disambiguation). ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Romania. ... Nickname: Motto: Patria si Dreptul Meu (My Country and My Right) Location of Bucharest within Romania (in red) Coordinates: , Country County Founded 1459 (first official record) Government  - Mayor Adriean Videanu Area  - City 228 km² (88 sq mi)  - Metro 238 km² (91. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Benin. ... Cotonou is the economic capital of Benin, as well as its largest city. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_South_Korea. ... Short name Statistics Location map Map of South Korea highlighting the city. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Japan. ... This article is about a city in Fukuoka Prefecture, Japan. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Nigeria. ... For other uses, see Lagos (disambiguation). ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Jamaica. ... Doctors Cave Beach Club is a popular tourist destination in Montego Bay Montego Bay is a city in Jamaica that contains Jamaicas largest airport, Sangster International Airport. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_United_Kingdom. ... This article is about a city in the United Kingdom. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Germany. ... Nürnberg redirects here. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Greece. ... Olympia among the principal Greek sanctuaries Olympia (Greek: Olympía or Olýmpia, older transliterations, Olimpia, Olimbia), a sanctuary of ancient Greece in Elis, is known for having been the site of the Olympic Games in classical times, comparable in importance to the Pythian Games held in Delphi. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Trinidad_and_Tobago. ... Port of Spain, population 49,000 (2000), is the capital of Trinidad and Tobago and the countrys second largest city by population, after San Fernando. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Israel. ... Raanana (Hebrew: ‎; Standard Hebrew ) is a city in the southern Sharon Plain in the Center District of Israel, Israel, 19 km north of Tel Aviv. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Brazil. ... This article is about the Brazilian city. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_Dominican_Republic. ... Salcedo is the capital city of the Salcedo province in the Dominican Republic. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Austria. ... This article is about the capital of the Austrian state of Salzburg. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_Republic_of_China. ... This article is about the city. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Georgia. ... Location of Tbilisi in Georgia Coordinates: , Country Established c. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... New city flag (Occitan cross) Traditional coat of arms Motto: (Occitan: For Toulouse, always more) Location Coordinates Time Zone CET (GMT +1) Administration Country Region Midi-Pyrénées Department Haute-Garonne (31) Intercommunality Community of Agglomeration of Greater Toulouse Mayor Jean-Luc Moudenc  (UMP) (since 2004) City Statistics Land...

Notes

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  2. ^ a b Growth in the A-T-L. UrbanPlanet Institute LLC. Retrieved on 2007-06-26.
  3. ^ a b Atlanta, Ga.. Information Please® Database. Pearson Education, Inc. Retrieved on 2006-05-17.
  4. ^ American FactFinder. United States Census Bureau. Retrieved on 2008-01-31.
  5. ^ US Board on Geographic Names. United States Geological Survey (2007-10-25). Retrieved on 2008-01-31.
  6. ^ a b c Population Estimates for the 25 U.S. Cities with the Largest Numerical Increase from July 1, 2005 to July 1, 2006. U.S. Census Bureau (2007-06-28). Retrieved on 2007-08-13.
  7. ^ a b Annual Estimates of the Population of Metropolitan and Micropolitan Statistical Areas: April 1, 2000 to July 1, 2006 (Microsoft Excel). United States Census Bureau. Retrieved on 2007-09-03.
  8. ^ Metro Atlanta Chamber of Commerce (2006-10). "Atlanta's International Influence". Press release. Retrieved on 2007-08-27.
  9. ^ Demographia United States Metropolitan Areas 2000-2006 (County Based). Demographia (2007-03-23). Retrieved on 2007-09-28.
  10. ^ Koolhaas, Rem; Bruce Mau (1996). S,M,L,XL. New York City: Monacelli Press. ISBN 1-885254-86-5. 
  11. ^ Apple, Jr., R.W.. "ON THE ROAD: A City in Full: Venerable, Impatient Atlanta", The New York Times, February 25, 2000. Retrieved on 2007-09-28. 
  12. ^ Template:Cite government agency
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Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 266th day of the year (267th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 271st day of the year (272nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 177th day of the year (178th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 137th day of the year (138th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The United States Census Bureau (officially Bureau of the Census as defined in Title ) is a part of the United States Department of Commerce. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 31st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... InsertSLUTTY WHORES≤ non-formatted text here{| class=toccolours border=1 cellpadding=4 style=float: right; margin: 0 0 1em 1em; width: 20em; border-collapse: collapse; font-size: 95%; clear: right; |+ United States Geological Survey |- |style= align=center colspan=2| [[Image:USGS logo. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 298th day of the year (299th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 31st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 179th day of the year (180th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 225th day of the year (226th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Microsoft Excel (full name Microsoft Office Excel) is a spreadsheet application written and distributed by Microsoft for Microsoft Windows and Mac OS. It features calculation and graphing tools which, along with aggressive marketing, have made Excel one of the most popular microcomputer applications to date. ... The United States Census Bureau (officially Bureau of the Census as defined in Title ) is a part of the United States Department of Commerce. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 246th day of the year (247th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For information on Wikipedia press releases, see Wikipedia:Press releases. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 239th day of the year (240th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 82nd day of the year (83rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 271st day of the year (272nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Remment Koolhaas, IPA: , (born November 17, 1944 in Rotterdam) is a Dutch architect, architectural theorist, urbanist and Professor in Practice of Architecture and Urban Design at the Graduate School of Design at Harvard University, USA. Koolhaas first studied scriptwriting at the Dutch Film Academy, and was then a journalist for... Bruce Mau (born October 25, 1959 in Sudbury, Ontario) is a Canadian designer. ... S,M,L,XL (ISBN 1885254865) is a book by Rem Koolhaas and Bruce Mau. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed internationally. ... is the 56th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 271st day of the year (272nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed internationally. ... is the 70th day of the year (71st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 316th day of the year (317th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 265th day of the year (266th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 335th day of the year (336th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 242nd day of the year (243rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 271st day of the year (272nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 317th day of the year (318th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 265th day of the year (266th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 335th day of the year (336th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 317th day of the year (318th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 317th day of the year (318th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 249th day of the year (250th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 108th day of the year (109th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Martin Luther King Jr. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 5th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 2nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 82nd day of the year (83rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 186th day of the year (187th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 186th day of the year (187th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 186th day of the year (187th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 82nd day of the year (83rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 92nd day of the year (93rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 92nd day of the year (93rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 92nd day of the year (93rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 298th day of the year (299th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 298th day of the year (299th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 74th day of the year (75th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 74th day of the year (75th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... The Cable News Network, commonly known as CNN, is a major cable television network founded in 1980 by Ted Turner. ... is the 76th day of the year (77th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 76th day of the year (77th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 177th day of the year (178th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 177th day of the year (178th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 335th day of the year (336th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 177th day of the year (178th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 177th day of the year (178th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 170th day of the year (171st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 271st day of the year (272nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 179th day of the year (180th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 177th day of the year (178th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 158th day of the year (159th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 271st day of the year (272nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 271st day of the year (272nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 335th day of the year (336th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 177th day of the year (178th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 273rd day of the year (274th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 188th day of the year (189th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 1st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 188th day of the year (189th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 188th day of the year (189th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... May 14 is the 134th day of the year (135th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 271st day of the year (272nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 7th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... March 26 is the 85th day of the year (86th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 1st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 80th day of the year (81st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 22nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 80th day of the year (81st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 320th day of the year (321st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 80th day of the year (81st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 354th day of the year (355th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 353rd day of the year (354th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 353rd day of the year (354th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 360th day of the year (361st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 271st day of the year (272nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 264th day of the year (265th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... April 8 is the 98th day of the year (99th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 177th day of the year (178th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 292nd day of the year (293rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 271st day of the year (272nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 177th day of the year (178th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 290th day of the year (291st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 317th day of the year (318th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 271st day of the year (272nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 220th day of the year (221st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 181st day of the year (182nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 234th day of the year (235th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 234th day of the year (235th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... is the 341st day of the year (342nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 271st day of the year (272nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 233rd day of the year (234th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 271st day of the year (272nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 177th day of the year (178th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 221st day of the year (222nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 234th day of the year (235th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 234th day of the year (235th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 92nd day of the year (93rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 185th day of the year (186th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... “PDF” redirects here. ... MiB redirects here. ... is the 46th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 92nd day of the year (93rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 1st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 2nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 66th day of the year (67th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 318th day of the year (319th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 27th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 164th day of the year (165th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 2nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 272nd day of the year (273rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 271st day of the year (272nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 271st day of the year (272nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 271st day of the year (272nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 271st day of the year (272nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 336th day of the year (337th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 271st day of the year (272nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 284th day of the year (285th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 177th day of the year (178th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 284th day of the year (285th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 177th day of the year (178th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 80th day of the year (81st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 271st day of the year (272nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 4th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Atlanta Journal-Constitution is the only major daily newspaper of Atlanta and metro Atlanta. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 6th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 271st day of the year (272nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 271st day of the year (272nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 92nd day of the year (93rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... is the 31st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 271st day of the year (272nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday. ... is the 167th day of the year (168th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 271st day of the year (272nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 271st day of the year (272nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

References

  • Atlanta and Environs: A Chronicle of Its People and Events: Years of Change and Challenge, 1940-1976 by Franklin M. Garrett, Harold H. Martin
  • Atlanta, Then and Now. Part of the Then and Now book series.
  • Darlene R. Roth and Andy Ambrose. Metropolitan Frontiers: A short history of Atlanta. Atlanta: Longstreet Press, 1996. An overview of the city's history with an emphasis on its growth.
  • Sjoquist, Dave (ed.) The Atlanta Paradox. New York: Russell Sage Foundation. 2000.
  • Stone, Clarence. Regime Politics: Governing Atlanta, 1946-1988. University Press of Kansas. 1989.
  • Elise Reid Boylston. Atlanta: Its Lore, Legends and Laughter. Doraville: privately printed, 1968. Lots of neat anecdotes about the history of the city.
  • Frederick Allen. Atlanta Rising. Atlanta: Longstreet Press, 1996. A detailed history of Atlanta from 1946 to 1996, with much about City Councilman, later Mayor, William B. Hartsfield's work in making Atlanta a major air transport hub, and about the American Civil Rights Movement as it affected (and was affected by) Atlanta.

Martin Luther King is perhaps most famous for his I Have a Dream speech, given in front of the Lincoln Memorial during the 1963 March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom This article is about the civil rights movement following the Brown v. ...

External links

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  • Official Website
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  • Atlanta Convention and Visitors Bureau
  • Atlanta Time Machine
  • Atlanta travel guide from Wikitravel
  • Atlanta, Georgia is at coordinates 33°46′N 84°23′W / 33.76, -84.39 (Atlanta, Georgia)Coordinates: 33°46′N 84°23′W / 33.76, -84.39 (Atlanta, Georgia)

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