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Encyclopedia > Atheroembolic disease

Atheroembolic disease is medical conditions caused by the embolization of ruptured atheromatous plaques into distal blood vessels. h ... The blood vessels are part of the circulatory system and function to transport blood throughout the body. ...

Contents


Symptoms

  • Pain, abdominal/flank, legs, thighs or foot - continuous
  • Claudication
  • Vascular insufficiency, purple toes
  • Hypertension - high blood pressure
  • Skin ulcers
  • Hematuria - blood in the urine

Claudication, literally limping, is used as a medical term in various contexts. ... Hypertension or high blood pressure is a medical condition where the blood pressure in the arteries is chronically elevated. ... An ulcer (from Latin ulcus) is an open sore of the skin, eyes or mucous membrane, often caused by an initial abrasion and generally maintained by an inflammation and/or an infection. ... In medicine, hematuria is the presence of blood in the urine. ...

Risk factors

For information about smoking tobacco, see tobacco smoking. ... Hypercholesterolemia (literally: high blood cholesterol) is the presence of high levels of cholesterol in the blood. ... Hypertension or high blood pressure is a medical condition where the blood pressure in the arteries is chronically elevated. ... Diabetes mellitus is a medical disorder characterized by varying or persistent hyperglycemia (elevated blood sugar levels), especially after eating. ...

Complications

A stroke or cerebrovascular accident (CVA) occurs when the blood supply to a part of the brain is suddenly interrupted by occlusion (an ischemic stroke- approximately 90%of strokes) or by hemorrhage (a hemorrhagic stroke - approximately 10% of strokes). ... A myocardial infarction occurs when an atherosclerotic plaque slowly builds up in the inner lining of a coronary artery and then suddenly ruptures, totally occluding the artery and preventing blood flow downstream. ... Amputation is the removal of a body extremity by trauma or surgery. ...

Diagnosis

A urinalysis (or UA) is an array of tests performed on urine, usually used in medical diagnosis. ... A complete blood count (CBC) or full blood count (FBC) is a test requested by a doctor or other medical professional that gives information about the cells in a patients blood. ... Creatinine is a breakdown product of creatine phosphate in muscle, and is usually produced at a fairly constant rate by the body (depending on muscle mass). ... Angiography or arteriography is a medical imaging technique in which an X-ray picture is taken to visualize the inner opening of blood filled structures, including arteries, veins and the heart chambers. ...

Treatment

Atheroembolic disease is difficult to treatment. The primary treatment is prevention, by controling the risk factors (i.e. smoking, cholesterol, diabetes, hypertension).


Prognosis of the condition is generally poor as embolization is usually chronic.


External links

  • Atheroembolic renal disease - U of Maryland Medical Center
  • Atheroembolic renal disease - medlineplus.org

  Results from FactBites:
 
Atheroembolic renal disease (900 words)
Atheroembolic renal disease may cause reduced kidney function including acute or chronic renal failure.
Hypertension that is difficult to control may be the first clue that atheroembolic renal disease exists, or routine examination or examination for other disorders may reveal the disease.
A kidney or abdominal ultrasound, abdominal CT scan, abdominal MRI, or abdominal X-ray may be abnormal, indicating atheroembolic disease.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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