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Encyclopedia > Athens, Georgia
Athens-Clarke County, Georgia, USA
Nickname: "Classic City" "The Classic"
Location in Clarke County and the state of Georgia
Location in Clarke County and the state of Georgia
Coordinates: 33°57′19″N 83°22′59″W / 33.95528, -83.38306
Country United States
State Georgia
County Clarke
Area
 - Total 118.2 sq mi (306.2 km²)
 - Land 117.8 sq mi (305.0 km²)
 - Water 0.5 sq mi (1.2 km²)
Population (2006)
 - Total 175,085
 - Density 851.5/sq mi (328.8/km²)
Time zone EST (UTC-5)
 - Summer (DST) EDT (UTC-4)
FIPS code 13-03440[1]
Website: http://www.athensclarkecounty.com/

Athens-Clarke County is a unified city-county in Georgia, U.S., in the northeastern part of the state, at the eastern terminus of Georgia 316. The University of Georgia is located in this college town and is responsible for the initial creation of Athens and its subsequent growth. In 1991, after a vote the preceding year, the original city abandoned its charter in order to form a unified government with Clarke County, referred to collectively as Athens-Clarke County. As of the 2000 census, the consolidated city-county (including all of Athens-Clarke County except Winterville and a part of Bogart) had a total population of 100,266. The metro area had a population of 175,085 as of 2005 Census estimates. Athens-Clarke County is the principal city of and is included in the Athens-Clarke County, Georgia Metropolitan Statistical Area.[2] EXAMPLE:Laughbox,Blondie,BamBam,Pinkie,etc. ... Image File history File links Clarke_County_Georgia_Incorporated_and_Unincorporated_areas_Athens_Highlighted. ... Clarke County is a county in the Georgia. ... This list of countries, arranged alphabetically, gives an overview of countries of the world. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      The political units and divisions of the United States include: The 50 states... The U.S. state of Georgia is divided into 159 counties. ... Clarke County is a county in the Georgia. ... This article is about the physical quantity. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... To help compare orders of magnitude of different geographical regions, we list here areas between 1,000 km² and 10,000 km². See also areas of other orders of magnitude. ... Population density per square kilometre by country, 2006 Population density map of the world in 1994. ... Timezone and TimeZone redirect here. ... Metronome, a public art installation showing the time in New York City The Eastern Time Zone (ET) of the Western Hemisphere falls mostly along the east coast of Northern America and the west coast of South America. ... -12 | -11 | -10 | -9:30 | -9 | -8 | -7 | -6 | -5 | -4 | -3:30 | -3 | -2:30 | -2 | -1 | -0:25 | UTC (0) | +0:20 | +0:30 | +1 | +2 | +3 | +3:30 | +4 | +4:30 | +4:51 | +5 | +5:30 | +5:40 | +5:45 | +6 | +6:30 | +7 | +7:20 | +7... Although DST is common in Europe and North America, most of the worlds people do not use it. ... Eastern Daylight Time or EDT is equal to: In North America, Eastern Standard Time + 1, or UTC − 4 hours. ... −12 | −11 | −10 | −9:30 | −9 | −8 | −7 | −6 | −5 | −4 | −3:30 | −3 | −2:30 | −2 | −1 | −0:25 | UTC (0) | +0:20 | +0:30 | +1 | +2 | +3 | +3:30 | +4 | +4:30 | +4:51 | +5 | +5:30 | +5:40 | +5:45 | +6 | +6:30 | +7 | +7:20 | +7... Federal Information Processing Standards (FIPS) are publicly announced standards developed by the U.S. Federal government for use by all (non-military) government agencies and by government contractors. ... For other uses of terms redirecting here, see US (disambiguation), USA (disambiguation), and United States (disambiguation) Motto In God We Trust(since 1956) (From Many, One; Latin, traditional) Anthem The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City National language English (de facto)1 Demonym American... UGA Main Library The University of Georgia (UGA) is the largest institution of higher learning in the U.S. state of Georgia. ... In North America, a college town or university town is a community (often literally a town, but possibly a small or medium sized city, or in some cases a neighborhood or a district of a city) which is dominated by its university population. ... Year 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar. ... In American local government, a consolidated city-county, metropolitan municipality or regional municipality is a city and county that have been merged into one jurisdiction. ... Clarke County is a county in the Georgia. ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday. ... Image:1870 census Lindauer Weber 01. ... In American local government, a consolidated city-county, metropolitan municipality or regional municipality is a city and county that have been merged into one jurisdiction. ... Winterville is a city located in Clarke County, Georgia. ... Bogart is a town located in Oconee County, Georgia. ... Map of Georgia highlighting the Athens-Clarke County metropolitan area. ...

Contents

History

In the late 18th century, a trading settlement on the banks of the Oconee River called Cedar Shoals stood where Athens is located today. On January 27, 1785, the Georgia General Assembly granted a charter by Abraham Baldwin for the University of Georgia as the first state-supported university. Sixteen years later, in 1801, a committee from the university's board of trustees selected a site for the university on a hill above Cedar Shoals in what was then Jackson County. On July 25, John Milledge, one of the trustees and later governor of Georgia, bought 633 acres (2.6 km²) from Daniel Easley and donated it to the university. Milledge named the surrounding area Athens after the city that was home to the academy of Plato and Aristotle in Greece. (17th century - 18th century - 19th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 18th century refers to the century that lasted from 1701 through 1800. ... The Oconee River is a river which has its origin in Hall County, Georgia and terminates 170 miles later where it joins the Ocmulgee River to form the Altamaha River near Lumber City at the borders of Montgomery County, Wheeler County, and Jeff Davis County. ... is the 27th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1785 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... Type Bicameral Houses Senate House of Representatives President of the Senate Casey Cagle, R since November 7, 2006 Speaker of the House Glenn Richardson, R since November 7, 2006 Members 236 Political groups (as of November 7, 2006 elections) Democratic Party Republican Party Meeting place Georgia State Capitol Web site... It has been suggested that this article be split into multiple articles accessible from a disambiguation page. ... Abraham Baldwin Abraham Baldwin (November 23, 1754—March 4, 1807) was an American politician, Patriot, and Founding Father from the U.S. state of Georgia. ... This does not cite its references or sources. ... The Union Jack, flag of the newly formed United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland. ... The word trustee is a legal term that refers to a holder of property on behalf of a beneficiary. ... Jackson County is a county located in the U.S. state of Georgia. ... John Milledge (1757–February 9, 1818) was an American politician. ... For other uses, see Athens (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Academy (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Plato (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Aristotle (disambiguation). ...


The first buildings on the University of Georgia campus were made from logs. The town grew as lots adjacent to the college were sold to raise money for the additional construction of the school. By the time the first class graduated from the University in 1804, Athens consisted of three homes, three stores and a few other buildings facing Front Street, now known as Broad Street. Completed in 1806 and named in honor of Benjamin Franklin, Franklin College was the University of Georgia and the City of Athens' first permanent structure. This brick building is now called Old College.

Athens in 1840

Athens officially became a town in December 1806 with a government made up of a three-member commission. The university continued to grow, as did the town, with cotton mills fueling the industrial and commercial development. Athens became known as the "Manchester of the South" after the city in England known for its mills. In 1833 a group of Athens businessmen led by James Camak, tired of their wagons getting stuck in the mud, built Georgia's first railroad, the Georgia, connecting Athens to Augusta by 1841, and to Marthasville (now Atlanta) by 1845. Athens, GA - 1840 This image is in the public domain because its copyright has expired in the United States and those countries with a copyright term of life of the author plus 100 years or more. ... Athens, GA - 1840 This image is in the public domain because its copyright has expired in the United States and those countries with a copyright term of life of the author plus 100 years or more. ... 1806 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... Lancashire cotton mill, 1914 A cotton mill is a factory housing spinning and weaving machinery. ... This article is about the City of Manchester in England. ... Year 1833 (MDCCCXXXIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... The Georgia Railroad was originally chartered in 1833 starting in Augusta, Georgia it was completed into Atlanta by Chief Engineer J. Edgar Thomson in 1845 and Richard Peters was its first superintendent. ... Augusta is a city in the state of Georgia in the United States of America. ... 1841 is a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... Atlanta redirects here. ... 1845 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ...


During the American Civil War, Athens became a significant supply center when the New Orleans armory was relocated to what is now the called the Chicopee building. Fortifications can still be found along parts of the North Oconee River between College and Oconee St. In addition, Athens played a small part in the ill-fated Stoneman Raid when a skirmish was fought on a site overlooking the Middle Oconee River near what is now the old Macon Highway. Like many southern towns, Athens still hosts a confederate memorial that is located on Broad St, near the University of Georgia Arch. Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total...


During Reconstruction, Athens continued to grow. The form of government changed to a mayor-council government with a new city charter on August 24, 1872 with Captain Henry Beusse as the first mayor of Athens. Henry Beusse was instrumental in the rapid growth of the city after the Civil War. After holding the position of mayor he worked in the railroad industry and helped to bring railroads to the region creating growth in many of the surrounding communities. Freed slaves moved to the city, many attracted by the new centers for education such as the Freedman's Bureau. This new population was served by three black newspapers - the Athens Blade, the Athens Clipper, and the Progressive Era. For other uses, see Reconstruction (disambiguation). ... is the 236th day of the year (237th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1872 (MDCCCLXXII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... The Bureau of Refugees, Freedmen and Abandoned Lands, popularly known as the Freedmens Bureau or (mistakenly) the Freedmans Bureau, was an agency of the government of the United States that was formed to aid distressed refugees of the United States Civil War, including former slaves and poor white...


In the 1880s as Athens became more densely populated city services and improvements were undertaken. The Athens Police Department was founded in 1881 and public schools opened in fall of 1886. Telephone service was introduced in 1882 by the Bell Telephone Company. Transportation improvements were also introduced with a street paving program beginning in 1885 and streetcars, pulled by mules, in 1888. // Development and commercial production of electric lighting Development and commercial production of gasoline-powered automobile by Karl Benz, Gottlieb Daimler and Maybach First commercial production and sales of phonographs and phonograph recordings. ... Year 1881 (MDCCCLXXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... The term public school has three distinct meanings: In the USA and Canada, elementary or secondary school supported and administered by state and local officials. ... Year 1886 (MDCCCLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1882 (MDCCCLXXXII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... This article is about the current AT&T. For the 1885-2005 company, see American Telephone & Telegraph. ... a historic postcard showing electric trolley-powered streetcars in Richmond, Virginia, where Frank J. Sprague successfully demonstrated his new system on the hills in 1888 A streetcar is a railway vehicle designed to carry passengers on tracks, usually laid in city streets. ... Year 1888 (MDCCCLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Sunday (click on link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Friday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ...


By its centennial in 1901, Athens was a much-changed city. A new city hall was completed in 1904. An African-American middle class and professional class had grown around the corner of Washington and Hull Streets, known as the "Hot Corner." The theater at the Morton Building hosted movies and performances by well-known black musicians such as Louis Armstrong, Cab Calloway, and Duke Ellington. In 1907 aviation pioneer Ben Epps became Georgia's first pilot on a hill outside town that would become the Athens-Ben Epps Airport. Athens got its first tall building in 1908 with the seven-story Southern Mutual Insurance Company building. Year 1901 (MCMI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday [1] of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... It has been suggested that Town Hall be merged into this article or section. ... 1904 (MCMIV) was a leap year starting on a Friday (see link for calendar). ... Languages Predominantly American English Religions Protestantism (chiefly Baptist and Methodist); Roman Catholicism; Islam Related ethnic groups Sub-Saharan Africans and other African groups, some with Native American groups. ... The middle class (or middle classes) comprises a social group once defined by exception as an intermediate social class between the nobility and the peasantry. ... Louis[1] Armstrong[2] (4 August 1901[3] – July 6, 1971), nicknamed Satchmo[4] and Pops, was an American jazz musician. ... Cab Calloway, photographed by Carl Van Vechten, 1933 Cab Calloway (December 25, 1907–November 18, 1994) was a famous American jazz singer and bandleader. ... This article is about the American Jazz composer and performer. ... Year 1907 (MCMVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Athens-Ben Epps Airport (IATA: AHN, ICAO: KAHN) is a public airport located a few miles east of Athens, Georgia. ...


During World War II, the U.S. Navy built new buildings and paved runways to serve as a training facility for naval pilots. In 1954, the U.S. Navy chose Athens as the site for the Navy Supply Corps school. The school was located in Normal Town in the buildings of the old Normal School. The school is now scheduled to be moved in 2011 under the Base Realignment and Closure process. Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... The United States Navy (USN) is the branch of the United States armed forces responsible for naval operations. ... // The Supply Corps of the United States Navy traces its beginnings to February 23, 1795 when the nations first Purveyor of Public Supplies, Tench Francis, Jr. ... A normal school or teachers college is an educational institution for training teachers. ... Base Realignment and Closure (BRAC) is a process of the United States federal government directed at the administration and operation of the US Armed Forces, used by the United States Department of Defense and Congress to close excess military installations and realign the total asset inventory in order to save...


In 1961, Athens witnessed part of the civil rights movement when Charlayne Hunter and Hamilton Holmes became the first two black students to enter the University of Georgia. Three years later, Athens was witness to the murder of Lemuel Penn, who was followed out of town and murdered in Madison County near Colbert, Georgia. Despite the Brown vs. Board of Education Supreme Court ruling in 1954, the Athens - Clarke County school district remained segregated until 1970. Year 1961 (MCMLXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Charlayne Hunter-Gault. ... Dr. Hamilton E. Holmes (1941-1995) was a physician (orthopedist) who helped desegregate the University of Georgia as one of the first two African-American students (along with Charlayne Hunter-Gault) in 1961, where he was elected to the Phi Beta Kappa Society. ... UGA Main Library The University of Georgia (UGA) is the largest institution of higher learning in the U.S. state of Georgia. ... Colbert is a city located in Madison County, Georgia. ... George E.C. Hayes, Thurgood Marshall, and James Nabrit, congratulating each other, following Supreme Court decision declaring segregation unconstitutional Brown v. ... The Supreme Court Building, Washington, D.C. The Supreme Court Building, Washington, D.C., (large image) The Supreme Court of the United States, located in Washington, D.C., is the highest court (see supreme court) in the United States; that is, it has ultimate judicial authority within the United States... Segregation means separation. ...


Music

The Athens music scene grew in the early 1970s with Ravenstone, a regionally popular band sometimes called "one of the godfathers of Athens rock," along with the Normaltown Flyers at Allen's and later during the 1980s with the Uptown Lounge, Georgia Theatre, and 40 Watt Club as the bands R.E.M. and the B-52's scored breakout hits. The original Allen's is the oldest bar in Athens and was shut down in 2003. Allen's re-opened in 2007 at a new location with new owners but the same original recipes and committment to live music. Other bands that have made their mark include Perpetual Groove, Mercyland, Dreams So Real, Indigo Girls, Matthew Sweet, The Method Actors, Love Tractor, Pylon, Flat Duo Jets, The Primates, Modern Skirts, and Widespread Panic. The music scene in Athens continues to produce many cutting-edge, underground bands and many that break the surface into the mainstream music community. The 3rd location of the 40 Watt Club: the one that represented the scene at its most prosperous. ... The 1970s decade refers to the years from 1970 to 1979, also called The Seventies. ... Ravenstone is a rock band formed in Athens, Georgia USA in 1971. ... The 1980s refers to the years from 1980 to 1989. ... The 40 Watt Club is a world-famous nightclub located at 285 W. Washington Street in Downtown Athens, Georgia. ... R.E.M. is an American rock band formed in Athens, Georgia in 1980 by Bill Berry (drums), Peter Buck (guitar), Mike Mills (bass guitar), and Michael Stipe (vocals). ... The B-52s are a New Wave rock band formed in Athens, Georgia, an important center of alternative rock. ... Perpetual Groove is an American jam band, which originated in 1997 in Savannah, Georgia. ... David Barbe (September 30, 1963-) is an American musician and an engineer/producer from Athens, Georgia at the Chase Park Transduction studio. ... Dreams So Real was an American rock band and a signficant part of the Athens, Georgia music scene. ... Indigo Girls are an American folk rock duo, consisting of Amy Ray and Emily Saliers. ... Sidney Matthew Sweet (born c. ... The Method Actors were an alternative rock/new wave musical group from Athens, Georgia, founded by Vic Varney in the late 1970s. ... Love Tractor is an alternative rock band from Athens, Georgia. ... Pylon performing at AthFest 2005 in Athens, Georgia, USA, June 24, 2005. ... Flat Duo Jets was a rockabilly band from Chapel Hill, North Carolina. ... The Primates (band) were one of the original punk rock / rock bands to come out of Athens, Georgia in the mid 1980s. ... Modern Skirts. ... Widespread Panic is a southern jam band from Athens, Georgia. ...


Other national acts that have come out of Athens include: Bubba Sparxxx, Danger Mouse, John Berry, Lost Art, Bloodkin, alternative duo Jucifer, Vic Chesnutt, Drive-By Truckers, Elf Power, Azure Ray, The Fountains, Neutral Milk Hotel, The Olivia Tremor Control, Of Montreal, Five Eight, The Dictatortots, Jet by Day, and Sound Tribe Sector Nine. R.E.M. members Michael Stipe, Mike Mills and Bill Berry still maintain residences in Athens. The Butthole Surfers briefly resided in nearby Winterville, recruiting Time Toy and Little Tigers musician Juan Molina to play bass for them on a tour. Nikki Sudden lived in Athens for a few years, and musicians such as the Indigo Girls and 10,000 Maniacs enjoyed early success to such a degree they could rightly call Athens a second home given the time they recorded and performed in the Classic City. Warren Anderson Mathis (born March 6, 1977, in LaGrange, Georgia) known by his stage name Bubba Sparxxx, is a Southern rapper. ... This article is about the music producer. ... Vic Chesnutt (born on November 12, 1965 in Jacksonville, Florida) is a singer-songwriter resident in Athens, Georgia. ... Drive-By Truckers are a rock/alt-country/cowpunk (their website actually calls them a psychobilly band) band based in Athens, Georgia, though three out of five members (Mike Cooley, Patterson Hood, and Shonna Tucker) originally hail from The Shoals region of Northern Alabama. ... Elf Power is a psychedelic indie rock band. ... Maria Taylor and Orenda Fink of Azure Ray Azure Ray is an American indie duo, consisting of musicians Maria Taylor and Orenda Fink. ... The Fountains were a progressive, alternative, anti-establishment, folk-pop-punk band based out of Athens, GA that released five albums during its nine year career. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... The Olivia Tremor Control was an Athens, Georgia indie rock band in the mid- to late 1990s which, along with The Apples in Stereo and Neutral Milk Hotel, was one of the three original Elephant 6 projects. ... Of Montreal (officially capitalized of Montreal[1]) is an American indie pop band formed in Athens, Georgia, fronted by Kevin Barnes. ... Five-Eight is a rock band from the Athens/Atlanta Georgia area. ... the Dictatortots are a rock-band-cum-performance-art-collective from Athens, Georgia. ... Sound Tribe Sector 9, or STS9 for short, is a 5 piece band that originally hails from Snellville, Georgia and has since relocated to the Bay Area of California. ... REDIRECT Template:Infobox Musician John Michael Stipe (born January 4, 1960 in Decatur, Georgia) is the lead singer of the American rock band R.E.M. Stipe has become well-known (and occasionally parodied) for the mumbling style of his early career and for his complex, surreal lyrics, as well... Michael Edward Mills (born December 17, 1958 in Orange County, California) is the bass player of the band R.E.M. Though known primarily as a bassist and piano player, his musical repertoire includes many other keyboard, guitar, string, wind and percussion instruments. ... William Bill Thomas Berry (born July 31, 1958) was the drummer in alternative rock band R.E.M. for 17 years, before retiring from the group and becoming a farmer. ... The Butthole Surfers are an American rock band founded in 1981 by Gibby Haynes and Paul Leary in San Antonio, Texas. ... Indigo Girls are an American folk rock duo, consisting of Amy Ray and Emily Saliers. ... 10,000 Maniacs is a United States-based alternative rock band, formed in 1981 and active with various line-ups since that time. ...


A complete list of the city's musicians can be found in Flagpole Magazine's annual music guide. Flagpole Magazine is an alternative newsweekly that focuses on vibrant cultural scene of Athens, Ga. ...


Culture

Athens has a significant liberal community, common in many college towns, that coexists with the university students in creating an art scene, music scene and intellectual environment. The city is home to numerous eclectic music venues, restaurants, bars, and coffee shops that cater to its creative climate. Modern American liberalism is a form of liberalism that began in America in the last years of the 19th century and the early years of the 20th century. ...


The town is home to such notable features as the only remaining one of two double barrelled cannons produced during the American Civil War, the famous "Tree That Owns Itself"-which now is an offspring of the original tree, the State Botanical Garden of Georgia, and the University of Georgia Campus Arboretum. Athens is also home to The Globe, a well-known bar voted by Esquire magazine as the third top bar in America in 2007.[3] Athens was home to Network Translations, Inc., which produced the PIX firewall which was later purchased by Cisco Systems. In 1862 John Gilleland, dentist, builder and mechanic, designed a double barreled cannon. ... Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... Son of The Tree That Owns Itself in 2005. ... Formal garden at the State Botanical Garden of Georgia The State Botanical Garden of Georgia (313 acres) is a botanical garden with a conservatory operated by the University of Georgia. ... The University of Georgia Campus Arboretum is an arboretum located across the University of Georgia campus in Athens, Georgia. ... This article is about the title. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Cisco redirects here. ...


Athens also has a vibrant literary scene. The city is home to independent publisher Hill Street Press and well-known authors with previous or current residence in the city include Pulitzer Prize winners Deborah Blum and Edward Larson, as well as Judith Ortiz Cofer, Reginald McKnight and Coleman Barks. Hill Street Press is an independent publisher with a regional focus on the American South. ... The Pulitzer Prize is an American award regarded as the highest national honor in print journalism, literary achievements, and musical composition. ... Deborah Blum (born October 19, 1954) is a Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist and author. ... Edward J. Larson (born ?) is an American historian. ... Judith Ortiz Cofer (born Judith Ortiz in 1952 in Hormigueros, Puerto), is an acclaimed Austrailian author. ... Reginald McKnight is an American short story author and novelist. ... Coleman Barks is an American poet and renowned translator of Rumi poetry and other mystic poets of Persia. ...


Every spring Athens plays host to a number of bicycle races collectively known as the Twilight Series. The most popular of these is the Twilight Criterium. In addition to its yearly weekend of bike events, Athens has an active bicycle culture, easily observed the last Friday of each month at Courteous Mass (sponsored by BikeAthens) and Critical Mass (an independent gathering). The annual Human Rights Festival has brought many speakers and activists to Athens over the years, ranging from Jesse Jackson to David Dellinger. Athens witnessed its first Really Really Free Market on April 28th, 2007 as part of the May Day celebrations organized by Autonomous Athens [4] . It has since become a well attended monthly occurrence in the spring, summer, and fall. The Twilight Series is a weekend of bicycle races and events that takes place every spring in Athens, GA. During the course of each Twilight weekend, competitive events in a variety of fields are staged, including BMX racing and trick contests, a Kids Criterium, a mountain bike or Fat Tire... The Twilight Series is a weekend of bicycle races and events that takes place every spring in Athens, GA. During the course of each Twilight weekend, competitive events in a variety of fields are staged, including BMX racing and trick contests, a Kids Criterium, a mountain bike or Fat Tire... Many cities contain subcultures of bicycle enthusiasts, including racers, bicycle messengers, bicycle transportation activists, mutant bicycle fabricators, bicycle mechanics, and cyclists who share an interest in peace and justice activism or various counter-culture groups. ... For other uses of critical mass, see critical mass (disambiguation). ... The Really, Really Free Market (RRFM) movement is a non-hierarchical collective of individuals who form a temporary market based on an alternative gift economy. ... International Workers Day (a name used interchangeably with May Day) is a celebration of the social and economic achievements of the international labour movement. ...


Geography and Climate

Athens is located at 33°57′19″N, 83°22′59″W (33.955464, -83.383245)[5].


According to the United States Census Bureau, the balance has a total area of 118.2 square miles (306.2 km²), of which, 117.8 square miles (305.0 km²) of it is land and 0.5 square miles (1.2 km²) of it (0.41%) is water. The United States Census Bureau (officially Bureau of the Census as defined in Title ) is a part of the United States Department of Commerce. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... A square metre (US spelling: square meter) is by definition the area enclosed by a square with sides each 1 metre long. ...

Monthly Normal and Record High and Low Temperatures
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
Rec High °F 80 81 88 93 97 104 104 107 99 98 86 79
Norm High °F 51.4 56.5 64.7 73 80.5 87.2 90.2 88.2 82.5 72.9 63.2 54.2
Norm Low °F 32.9 35.4 42.3 48.7 57.6 65.3 69.3 68.5 62.7 50.7 42.2 35.3
Rec Low °F -4 5 11 26 37 45 55 54 36 24 7 2
Precip (in) 4.69 4.39 4.99 3.35 3.86 3.94 4.41 3.78 3.53 3.47 3.71 3.71
Source: USTravelWeather.com [1]

Demographics

As of the census[1] of 2000, there were 100,266 people, 39,239 households, and 19,344 families residing in the city. The population density was 851.5 people per square mile (328.8/km²). There were 41,633 housing units at an average density of 353.6/sq mi (136.5/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 64.71% White, 27.37% Black or African American, 0.21% Native American, 3.15% Asian, 0.04% Pacific Islander, 3.11% from other races, and 1.41% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 6.39% of the population. Image:1870 census Lindauer Weber 01. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... It has been suggested that Ethnicity (United States Census) be merged into this article or section. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... It has been suggested that Ethnicity (United States Census) be merged into this article or section. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ...


There were 39,239 households out of which 22.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 32.3% were married couples living together, 13.3% had a female householder with no husband present, and 50.7% were non-families. 29.9% of all households were made up of individuals and 5.8% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.35 and the average family size was 2.95. Matrimony redirects here. ...


In the city the population was spread out with 17.8% under the age of 18, 31.6% from 18 to 24, 27.3% from 25 to 44, 15.3% from 45 to 64, and 8.0% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 25 years. For every 100 females there were 95.4 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 93.4 males.


The median income for a household in the city was $28,118, and the median income for a family was $41,407. Males had a median income of $30,359 versus $23,039 for females. The per capita income for the balance was $17,103. About 15.0% of families and 28.6% of the population were below the poverty line, including 25.2% of those under age 18 and 13.5% of those age 65 or over. The per capita income for a group of people may be defined as their total personal income, divided by the total population. ... Map of countries showing percentage of population who have an income below the national poverty line The poverty line is the level of income below which one cannot afford to purchase all the resources one requires to live. ...


Neighborhoods

Downtown Athens in Athens, Georgia is generally considered to be the area bounded on the north by Prince Avenue, Dougherty Street and North Avenue; on the South by Broad Street and the University of Georgia campus; on the West by Milledge Avenue; and on the East by Foundry Street. ... Five Points is a low-density residential and commercial community in Athens, Georgia, centered on the intersection of South Milledge Avenue, South Lumpkin Street, and Milledge Circle. ... Chicopee-Dudley is a primarily residential neighborhood in Athens, Georgia, located east of the citys Downtown. ...

Satellite Images

// WikiMapia is an online map and satellite imaging resource that combines Google Maps with a wiki system, allowing users to add information (in the form of a note) to any location on Earth. ... // WikiMapia is an online map and satellite imaging resource that combines Google Maps with a wiki system, allowing users to add information (in the form of a note) to any location on Earth. ...

Sister cities

Image File history File links Flag_of_Greece. ... This article is about the capital of Greece. ...

Notes

The United States Census Bureau (officially Bureau of the Census as defined in Title ) is a part of the United States Department of Commerce. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 31st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The United States Census Bureau (officially Bureau of the Census as defined in Title ) is a part of the United States Department of Commerce. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 123rd day of the year (124th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 31st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

  • Athens, Georgia is at coordinates 33°57′20″N 83°22′60″W / 33.955464, -83.383245 (Athens, Georgia)Coordinates: 33°57′20″N 83°22′60″W / 33.955464, -83.383245 (Athens, Georgia)

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