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Encyclopedia > Athens
Athens
Αθήνα
Acropolis of Athens
Acropolis of Athens
Location
Coordinates 37°58′N 23°43′E / 37.967, 23.717Coordinates: 37°58′N 23°43′E / 37.967, 23.717
Time zone: EET/EEST (UTC+2/3)
Elevation (min-max): 70 - 338 m (230 - 1109 ft)
Government
Country: Greece
Periphery: Attica
Prefecture: Athens
Districts: 7
Mayor: Nikitas Kaklamanis  (ND)
(since: January 1, 2007)
Population statistics (as of 2001[1])
City Proper
 - Population: 745,514
 - Area:[2] 38.964 km² (15 sq mi)
 - Density: 19,133 /km² (49,555 /sq mi)
Metropolitan
 - Population: 3,761,810
 - Area: 411.717 km² (159 sq mi)
 - Density: 9,137 /km² (23,664 /sq mi)
Codes
Postal: 10x xx, 11x xx, 120 xx
Area: 21
Auto: Yxx, Zxx, Ixx (excluding INx)
Website
www.cityofathens.gr

Athens (pronounced /ˈæθənz/; Αθήνα, Athina [aˈθina]), the capital and largest city in Greece, dominates the Attica periphery: as one of the world's oldest cities, its recorded history spans at least 3,000 years. Athens is the capital city of Greece. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Acropolis_from_south-west. ... The Acropolis of Athens is the best known acropolis (high city, The Sacred Rock) in the world. ... Image File history File links Athens_seal. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 685 × 599 pixel Image in higher resolution (800 × 700 pixel, file size: 27 KB, MIME type: image/png) Other versions Adapted from Image:Greece outline map. ... Image File history File links Red_pog. ... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ... Timezone and TimeZone redirect here. ... Time zones of Europe: Light colours indicate countries not observing daylight saving Eastern European Time (EET) is one of the names of UTC+2 time zone, 2 hours ahead of Coordinated Universal Time. ... Eastern European Summer Time (EEST) is one of the names of UTC+3 time zone, 3 hours ahead of Coordinated Universal Time. ... Eastern European Time Central Africa Time Israel Standard Time South Africa Standard Time Central European Summer Time West Africa Summer Time Category: ... -12 | -11 | -10 | -9:30 | -9 | -8 | -7 | -6 | -5 | -4 | -3:30 | -3 | -2:30 | -2 | -1 | -0:25 | UTC (0) | +0:20 | +0:30 | +1 | +2 | +3 | +3:30 | +4 | +4:30 | +4:51 | +5 | +5:30 | +5:40 | +5:45 | +6 | +6:30 | +7 | +7:20 | +7... Elevation histogram of the surface of the Earth – approximately 71% of the Earths surface is covered with water. ... This list of countries, arranged alphabetically, gives an overview of countries of the world. ... The peripheries (περιφέρειες) are the subnational divisions of Greece. ... Attica (in Greek: Αττική, Attike; see also List of traditional Greek place names) is a periphery (subdivision) in Greece, containing Athens, the capital of Greece. ... Greece consists of 13 administrative regions known as Peripheries of Greece, which are further subdivided into 51 prefectures (nomoi, singular - nomos, Greek: νομοί, νομός)): See also List of the prefectures of Greece by area List of the prefectures of Greece by population density List of the prefectures of Greece by population External... Athens is one of the prefectures of Greece. ... Districts are a form of local government in several countries. ... A mayor (from the Latin māior, meaning larger, greater) is the modern title of the highest ranking municipal officer. ... Nikitas M. Kaklamanis (Greek Νικήτας Κακλαμάνης) (born 1 April 1946) is a Greek New Democracy (ND) politician and Mayor of Athens. ... Party logo New Democracy (ND, Greek: Νέα Δημοκρατία, Nea Dhimokratia), founded in 1974, is the main center-right liberal-conservative political party in Greece. ... is the 1st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... This is an alphabetical list of municipalities and communities in Greece. ... This article is about the physical quantity. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... Population density per square kilometre by country, 2006 Population density map of the world in 1994. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... Here are list of postal codes in Greece. ... This is a list of dialing codes in Greece. ... Greek car number plates are composed of three letters and four digits per plate (e. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Greece. ... Not to be confused with capitol. ... Attica (in Greek: Αττική, Attike; see also List of traditional Greek place names) is a periphery (subdivision) in Greece, containing Athens, the capital of Greece. ...


The Greek capital has a population of 745,514 (in 2001) within its administrative limits[1] and a land area of 39 km² (15 sq mi).[3] The urban area of Athens extends beyond the administrative city limits with a population of 3.37 million (in 2005).[4] The area of Athens prefecture spans 412 km² (159 sq mi)[3] and encompasses a population of 3.192.606.[1] The Athens Larger Urban Zone (LUZ) is the 8th most populated LUZ in the European Union with an estimated population of 3.89 million (in 2001).[5] A bustling and cosmopolitan metropolis, Athens is central to economic, financial, industrial, political and cultural life in Greece. It is rapidly becoming a leading business centre in the European Union. Cities with at least a million inhabitants in 2006 An urban area is an area with an increased density of human-created structures in comparison to the areas surrounding it. ... // Eurostat, the European Unions statistical agency, has created the concept of Larger Urban Zone (LUZ) in an effort to harmonize definitions[1] of urbanization in the European Union. ...


Classical Athens was a powerful city-state. A centre for the arts, learning and philosophy, home of Plato's Academy and Aristotle's Lyceum,[6][7] Athens was also the birthplace of Socrates, Pericles, Sophocles and its many other prominent philosophers, writers and politicians of the ancient world. It is widely referred to as the cradle of Western civilization and the birthplace of democracy,[8][9] largely due to the impact of its cultural and political achievements during the 5th and 4th centuries BC on the rest of the then known European continent.[10] A city-state is a region controlled exclusively by a city. ... For other uses, see Philosophy (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Plato (disambiguation). ... The School of Athens by Raphael (1509–1510), fresco at the Apostolic Palace, Vatican City. ... For other uses, see Aristotle (disambiguation). ... A Lyceum can be an educational institution (often a school of secondary education in Europe), or a public hall used for cultural events like concerts. ... This page is about the Classical Greek philosopher. ... For the Shakespeare play, see Pericles, Prince of Tyre. ... This article is about the Greek tragedian. ... This article is about society beginnings. ...


The heritage of the classical era is still evident in the city, represented by a number of ancient monuments and works of art, the most famous of all being the Parthenon on the Acropolis, widely considered a key landmark of early Western civilization. The city also retains a vast variety of Roman and Byzantine monuments, as well as a small number of remaining Ottoman monuments projecting the city's long history across the centuries. Landmarks of the modern era are also present, dating back to 1830 (the establishment of the independent Greek state), and taking in the Greek Parliament (19th century) and the Athens Trilogy (Library, University, and Academy). The Parthenon west façade For other uses, see Parthenon (disambiguation). ... The Acropolis of Athens is the best known acropolis (high city, The Sacred Rock) in the world. ... Roman Greece is the period of Greek history following the Roman victory over the Corinthians at the Battle of Corinth in 146 BC until the reestablishment of the city of Byzantium and the naming of the city by Emperor Constantine I as the capital of the Roman Empire (as Nova... Byzantine redirects here. ... The Hellenic Parliament (Greek: Βουλή των Ελλήνων; transliterated Vouli ton Ellinon; literally Council of the Greeks) is the parliament of Greece, located in Syntagma Square in Athens. ...


Athens was the host city of the first modern-day Olympic Games in 1896, and 108 years later it welcomed home the 2004 Summer Olympics, with great success.[11] The 1896 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the I Olympiad, were celebrated in 1896 in Athens, Greece. ... The ceremony for the lighting of the flame is arranged as a pagan pageant, with priestesses dancing. ...

Contents

Origin of the name

Statue of Athena, the patron goddess of Athens.
Statue of Athena, the patron goddess of Athens.
See wiktionary: Athens for the name in various languages.
Further information: Names of European cities in different languages: A

In Ancient Greek, the name of Athens was Ἀθῆναι IPA: [atʰɛ̑ːnaɪ], related tο name of the goddess Athena (Attic Ἀθηνᾶ [atʰɛːnȃː] and Ionic Ἀθήνη [atʰɛ́ːnɛː]). The city's name was in the plural, like those of Θῆβαι (Thēbai), Μυκῆναι (Mukēnai), and Δελφοί (Delphoi). Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (800x1067, 124 KB) Description: Helmeted Athena, Velletri-type. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (800x1067, 124 KB) Description: Helmeted Athena, Velletri-type. ... This is the Greek name of the capital of the Hellenic Republic (Greece). ... Beginning of Homers Odyssey The Ancient Greek language is the historical stage of the Greek language[1] as it existed during the Archaic (9th–6th centuries BC) and Classical (5th–4th centuries BC) periods in Ancient Greece. ... This is the Greek name of the capital of the Hellenic Republic (Greece). ... Attic Greek is the ancient dialect of the Greek language that was spoken in Attica, which includes Athens. ... Distribution of Greek dialects, ca. ... Thebes (Demotic Greek: Θήβα — Thíva; Katharevousa: — Thêbai or Thívai) is a city in Greece, situated to the north of the Cithaeron range, which divides Boeotia from Attica, and on the southern edge of the Boeotian plain. ... A clay tablet with writing in Linear B from Mycenae. ... For other uses, see Delphi (disambiguation). ...


In the 19th century, Ἀθῆναι (Athinai / [aˈθinɛ]) was formally re-adopted as the city's name. Since the official abandonment of Katharevousa Greek in the 1970s, Αθήνα (Athína / [aˈθina]) has become the city's official name. Katharevousa (Greek Καθαρεύουσα, IPA: ) is a form of the Greek language, created during the early 19th century by Adamantios Korais (1748-1833). ...


History

Main articles: History of Athens and Classical Athens
Early Athenian coin, 5th century BC. British Museum.
Early Athenian coin, 5th century BC. British Museum.

Athens has been continuously inhabited for at least 3,000 years. Classical Athens became the leading city of ancient Greece in the 5th century BC, with its cultural achievements laying the foundations of Western civilization. During the Middle Ages, the city experienced decline and then recovery under the Byzantine Empire, and was relatively prosperous during the Crusades, benefiting from Italian trade; after a long period of decline under the rule of the Ottoman Empire, Athens re-emerged in the 19th century as the capital of the independent Greek state, and in 1896 hosted the first modern Olympic Games. In the 1920s a number of Greek refugees, expelled from Asia Minor after the Greco-Turkish War (1919-1922), swelled Athens' population; nevertheless it was most particularly following the Second World War, and from the 1950s and 1960s, that the population of the city exploded, and Athens experienced a gradual expansion in all directions. In the 1980s it became evident that smog from factories and an ever increasing fleet of automobiles, as well as a lack of adequate free space due to overcongestion, had evolved into the city's most important challenges. A series of anti-pollution measures taken by the city's authorities in the 1990s, combined with a substantial improvement of the city's infrastructure (including the Attiki Odos ring road, the dramatic expansion of the Athens Metro, and the brand new Athens International Airport), alleviated pollution considerably and transformed Athens into a much more functional city. The History of Athens is one of the longest of any city in Europe and in the world. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 402 pixelsFull resolution (1213 × 609 pixel, file size: 307 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 402 pixelsFull resolution (1213 × 609 pixel, file size: 307 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... For other uses, see Athens (disambiguation). ... London museum | name = British Museum | image = British Museum from NE 2. ... The 5th century BC started the first day of 500 BC and ended the last day of 401 BC. // The Parthenon of Athens seen from the hill of the Pnyx to the west. ... For alternative meanings for The West in the United States, see the U.S. West and American West. ... Byzantine redirects here. ... This article is about the medieval crusades. ... Motto دولت ابد مدت Devlet-i Ebed-müddet (The Eternal State) Anthem Ottoman imperial anthem Borders in 1683, see: list of territories Capital Söğüt (1299–1326) Bursa (1326–1365) Edirne (1365–1453) Ä°stanbul (1453–1922) Government Monarchy Sultans  - 1281–1326 (first) Osman I  - 1918–22 (last) Mehmed VI Grand Viziers  - 1320... The five Olympic rings were designed in 1913, adopted in 1914 and debuted at the Games at Antwerp, 1920. ... Anatolia (Greek: ανατολη anatole, rising of the sun or East; compare Orient and Levant, by popular etymology Turkish Anadolu to ana mother and dolu filled), also called by the Latin name of Asia Minor, is a region of Southwest Asia which corresponds today to the Asian portion of Turkey. ... Combatants Greece Turkish Revolutionaries Commanders Gen Leonidas Paraskevopoulos, Gen Anastasios Papoulas, Gen Georgios Hatzianestis Ali Fethi Okyar, Ä°smet Ä°nönü, Mustafa Kemal Atatürk, Fevzi Çakmak Strength 200,000 men 120,000 men (plus village protectors) Casualties 23,500 dead; 20,820 captured 20,540 dead; 10,000 wounded The... Mushroom cloud from the nuclear explosion over Nagasaki rising 18 km into the air. ... Attiki Odos (Greek: Αττική Οδός) is a private-owned toll highway in Greece. ... The Athens Metro is the underground public transport system of Athens, Greece, constructed by the Attiko Metro company (Αττικό Μετρό, literally Attican metro) and the ISAP (Ilektrikoi Sidirodromoi Athinon-Pireos) company (Ηλεκτρικοί Σιδηρόδρομοι Αθηνών-Πειραιώς Athens - Piraeus Electric Railways). The Athens Metro is one of the most impressive underground Mass Transit systems in the world because... For the airport in Athens, Georgia, United States, see Athens-Ben Epps Airport. ...


Geography

Processed 3D view of the Attica Basin from space. Courtesy: NASA
Processed 3D view of the Attica Basin from space. Courtesy: NASA

Athens sprawls across the central plain of Attica, often referred to as the Attica Basin which is bound by Mount Aegaleo in the west, Mount Parnitha in the north, Mount Penteli in the northeast, Mount Hymettus in the east, and the Saronic Gulf in the southwest. The capital has expanded to cover the entire plain, making future growth difficult. The geomorphology of Athens causes the so-called temperature inversion phenomenon, and along with the failure of the Greek Government to control industrial pollution is responsible for the air pollution problems the city has recently faced.[12][13] (Los Angeles and Mexico City also suffer with similar geomorphology inversion problems).[13] The pollution of Athens was at one point so destructive, that according to the then Greek Minister of Culture, Constantine Trypanis, the carved details on the five caryatids of the Erechtheum have seriously degenerated, while the face of the horseman on the Parthenon's west side is all but obliterated.[14] A series of strict measures then taken by the authorities of the city throughout the 1990s resulted in a dramatic improvement of air quality; the appearance of smog (or nefos as the Athenians used to call it) has become an increasingly rare phenomenon. Download high resolution version (1362x852, 318 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Download high resolution version (1362x852, 318 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... For other uses, see NASA (disambiguation). ... Attica (in Greek: Αττική, Attike; see also List of traditional Greek place names) is a periphery (subdivision) in Greece, containing Athens, the capital of Greece. ... Aegaleo (Greek Αιγάλεω Aigáleo, Latin Aegaleus), also Aigaleo and Egaleo, is a mountain in Greece. ... Mount Parnitha (Greek, modern: Πάρνηθα, ancient/Katharevousa: -is, sometimes Parnetha), older forms Parnes, Parnis (also with the first an accented) is a densely forested mountain range north of Athens, the highest on the peninsula of Attica, with an elevation of 1,413 m and a summit known as Karavola (Καραβόλα). Much of... Pentéli or Pendeli, (Greek: Πεντέλη, ancient forms: Pentele or Pentelicus, Mendeli in medieval times) is a tall mountain and mountain range situated northeast of Athens and southwest of Marathon. ... Hymettus, also Hymettos (Gr. ... The Saronic Gulf or Gulf of Aegina in Greece forms part of the Aegean Sea and defines the eastern side of the isthmus of Corinth. ... Smoke rising in Lochcarron is stopped by an overlying layer of warmer air. ... Los Angeles and L.A. redirect here. ... Nickname: Location of Mexico City Coordinates: , Country Federal entity Boroughs The 16 delegaciones Founded c. ... The Hellenic Republic Ministry of Culture (official name) or Greek Ministry of Culture (Greek Υπουργείο Πολιτισμού, located in Athens, Greece, was founded in September 1971. ...


Climate

Climate chart for Athens
J F M A M J J A S O N D
 
 
46
 
13
6
 
 
48
 
13
7
 
 
43
 
16
8
 
 
28
 
20
11
 
 
18
 
25
15
 
 
10
 
29
20
 
 
5
 
32
22
 
 
5
 
32
22
 
 
13
 
29
19
 
 
48
 
23
14
 
 
51
 
18
11
 
 
66
 
14
8
temperatures in °Cprecipitation totals in mm
source: Weather Channel

Athens enjoys a typical mediterranean climate, with the greatest amounts of precipitation mainly occurring from mid-October to mid-April; any precipitation is sparse during summer and falls generally in the form of showers and/or thunderstorms. Due to its location in a strong rain shadow because of Mount Parnitha, however, the Athenian climate is much drier compared to most of the rest of Mediterranean Europe. The mountainous northern suburbs, for their part, experience a somewhat differentiated climatic pattern, with generally lower temperatures and more substantial snowfalls during winter. Fog is highly unusual in the city centre but it is more frequent to the east, behind the Hymettus mountain range.  Areas with Mediterranean climate A Mediterranean climate is one that resembles the climate of the lands in the Mediterranean Basin, which includes over half of the area with this climate type world-wide. ... A shelf cloud associated with a heavy or severe thunderstorm over Enschede, The Netherlands. ... For the Australian television series see Rain Shadow (TV series). ... Mount Parnitha (Greek, modern: Πάρνηθα, ancient/Katharevousa: -is, sometimes Parnetha), older forms Parnes, Parnis (also with the first a accented) is a densely forested mountain range north of Athens, the highest on the peninsula of Attica elevating officially at 1,413 m and the summit is called Karavola (Καραβόλα). Much of the... For other uses, see Temperature (disambiguation). ... This page is about the form of precipitation. ... For other uses, see Fog (disambiguation). ... Hymettus, also Hymettos (Gr. ...


Snowfalls occur almost on a yearly basis, though these do not normally lead to significant, if any, disruption. Nonetheless, the city has experienced its share of heavy snowfalls, not least in the past decade. During the blizzards of March 1987; February 1992; January 4-6, 2002; February 12-13, 2004 and February 16-18, 2008, snow blanketed large parts of the metropolitan area, causing havoc across much of the city.


Spring and fall (autumn) are considered ideal seasons for sightseeing and all kinds of outdoor activities. Summers can be particularly hot and at times prone to smog and pollution related conditions (however, much less so than in the past). The average daytime maximum temperature for the month of July is 92.3 °F (33.5 °C) and heatwaves are relatively common, occurring generally during the months of July and/or August, when hot air masses sweep across Greece from the south or the southwest. On such days only temperature maxima soar over 100 °F (37.8 °C). For other uses, see Smog (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Fahrenheit (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Celsius (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Fahrenheit (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Celsius (disambiguation). ...


The all-time high temperatures for the metropolitan area of Athens of 48.0 °C (118.4 °F)[15] were recorded in Elefsina, a suburb of Athens. The respective low-temperature record is −5.8 °C (21.6 °F), recorded at Nea Filadelfia.[16] During the February 2004 blizzard (one of the worst snowstorms ever to hit the city), temperatures plummeted to −7 °C (19.4 °F) at the University Campus, and −10.1 °C (13.8 °F) at the meteorological station of the National Observatory of Athens, in Penteli. For other uses, see Celsius (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Fahrenheit (disambiguation). ... Eleusis (Greek, Modern: Ελεύσινα, Ancient/Katharevousa: -is) was a small town about 30 km NW of Athens. ... For other uses, see Celsius (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Fahrenheit (disambiguation). ... There is also a village that has the name New Filadelfeia in the prefecture of Thessaloniki, see Nea FIladelfeia (Thessaloniki), Greece Nea Filadelfeia or Nea Filadelfia(Greek: Νέα Φιλαδέλφεια, meaning New Philadelphia), older rare New Philadelphia is a suburb in the northern part of Athens, Greece. ... The National Technical University of Athens (Greek: Εθνικό Μετσόβιο Πολυτεχνείο, National Metsovion Polytechnic), sometimes simply known as Athens Polytechnic, is among the oldest and most prestigious higher education institutions of Greece. ... For other uses, see Celsius (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Fahrenheit (disambiguation). ... The National Observatory of Athens is a research institute situated in Athens, Greece. ... Pentéli or Pendeli, (Greek: Πεντέλη, ancient forms: Pentele or Pentelicus, Mendeli in medieval times) is a tall mountain and mountain range situated northeast of Athens and southwest of Marathon. ...


Pollution and environment

Mount Lycabettus rising in central Athens.
Mount Lycabettus rising in central Athens.

Although air pollution remains to some degree an issue for Athens, particularly on the hottest summer days, widespread measures taken by the Greek authorities throughout the 1990s have effectively improved air quality. Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 398 × 599 pixel Image in higher resolution (2000 × 3008 pixel, file size: 3. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 398 × 599 pixel Image in higher resolution (2000 × 3008 pixel, file size: 3. ... A panoramic view of Athens from the Lykavittos Hill. ...


In late June 2007,[17] the Attica region experienced a number of brush fires,[17] including one that burned a significant portion of a large forested national park in Mount Parnitha,[18] which is considered critical to maintaining a better air quality in Athens all year round.[17] Damage to the park has led to worries over a stalling in the improvement of air quality in the city.[17] Attica (in Greek: Αττική, Attike; see also List of traditional Greek place names) is a periphery (subdivision) in Greece, containing Athens, the capital of Greece. ... The 2007 Greek forest fires were a series of massive forest fires that broke out in several areas across Greece throughout the summer of 2007. ... Mount Parnitha (Greek, modern: Πάρνηθα, ancient/Katharevousa: -is, sometimes Parnetha), older forms Parnes, Parnis (also with the first a accented) is a densely forested mountain range north of Athens, the highest on the peninsula of Attica elevating officially at 1,413 m and the summit is called Karavola (Καραβόλα). Much of the...


In January 2007, Athens briefly faced a waste management problem when its landfill near Ano Liosia, an Athenian suburb, reached capacity.[19] Piles of garbage filled the streets, causing pedestrians difficulty.[19] The crisis eased by mid-January when authorities began taking the garbage to a temporary landfill.[19] Look up landfill in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Ano Liosia or Ano Liossia (Greek:Άνω Λιόσια ) is a suburb in the nrothern part of Athens, Greece. ...


Government

Athens is the capital of Greece, but it is also the capital of the Attica Periphery and the Athens Prefecture. The city has been the capital of Greece since 1834, succeeding Nafplion, the city that was provisional capital during the Greek War of Independence ending in 1832. Attica (in Greek: Αττική, Attike; see also List of traditional Greek place names) is a periphery (subdivision) in Greece, containing Athens, the capital of Greece. ... Athens is one of the prefectures of Greece. ... Nafplion (Ναύπλιο; see also List of traditional Greek place names) is a town on the Peloponnese in Greece. ... Combatants Greek revolutionaries United Kingdom France Russian Empire  Ottoman Empire Egyptian Khedivate Commanders Theodoros Kolokotronis Alexander Ypsilanti Georgios Karaiskakis Omer Vryonis Mahmud Dramali Pasha ReÅŸid Mehmed Pasha Ibrahim Pasha. ...


Attica Periphery

The Athens Prefecture (blue), within the Attica Periphery (grey).

Athens is located within the Attica Periphery, which encompasses the most populated region of Greece, with around 3.7 million people. The Attica Periphery itself is split into four prefectures; they include the Athens Prefecture, Piraeus Prefecture, West Attica Prefecture, and the East Attica Prefecture. It is, however, one of the smaller peripheries in Greece, with an area of 3,808 km² (1,470 sq mi). Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1253x868, 49 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Athens ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1253x868, 49 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Athens ... The peripheries (περιφέρειες) are the subnational divisions of Greece. ... Athens is one of the prefectures of Greece. ... Piraeus is one of the prefectures of Greece. ... West Attica is one of the prefectures of Greece. ... East Attica is one of the prefectures of Greece. ...


Athens Prefecture

The Athens Prefecture is the most populous of all the Greek Prefectures, accounting for well over 2.6 million[1] of the 3.7 million[1] in the Attica Periphery. Athens can refer either to the entire metropolitan area, or to the Municipality of Athens. The next largest municipalities of Athens metropolitan area are the Municipality of Piraeus, the Municipality of Peristeri, and the Municipality of Kallithea. Each of these municipalities has an elected district council and a directly elected mayor. This article does not cite any references or sources. ... It has been suggested that Kaminia (Piraeus), Greece be merged into this article or section. ... Peristeri, older forms Peristerio and Peristerion is a suburban community in Athens area (Attica), Greece. ... Photo 1: Kallithea on the simulated view of Greater Athens from above. ...


Athens Municipality

The seven districts of Athens.
The seven districts of Athens.

The modern city of Athens consists of what was once a conglomeration of distinct towns and villages that gradually expanded and merged into a single large metropolis; most of this expansion occurred during the second half of the 20th century. The Greater Athens area is now divided into 55 municipalities, the largest of which is the Municipality of Athens or Dimos Athinaion, with a population of 745,514 people.[1] Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ...


Dora Bakoyanni, of the conservative New Democracy party, was Mayor of Athens from 1 January 2003 until 15 February 2006, when she joined the Greek cabinet as Minister of Foreign Affairs. During her tenure, she had been the 76th Mayor of Athens, and the first female ever to hold that post in the city's history; later replaced by Theodoros Behrakis. The next municipal elections took place in October 2006, at which time Nikitas Kaklamanis took over as the city's mayor. Dora Bakoyianni Dora Bakoyianni (born 1954), is the mayor of Athens, capital of Greece. ... Party logo New Democracy (ND, Greek: Νέα Δημοκρατία, Nea Dhimokratia), founded in 1974, is the main center-right liberal-conservative political party in Greece. ... is the 1st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 46th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Minister for Foreign Affairs is the senior minister at the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Greece. ... The Mayor of Athens is the head of the Municipality of Athens, the largest district of the City of Athens. ... Nikitas M. Kaklamanis (Greek Νικήτας Κακλαμάνης) (born 1 April 1946) is a Greek New Democracy (ND) politician and Mayor of Athens. ...


The Municipality of Athens is divided into seven municipal districts, or demotika diamerismata. The 7-district division is mainly used for administrative purposes. For Athenians the most popular way of dividing the city proper is through its neighbourhoods, each with its own distinct history and characteristics. Those include Pangrati, Ambelokipi, Exarcheia, Ano Patissia, Kato Patissia, Ilissia, Ano and Kato Petralona, Mets, Koukaki and Kypseli, the world's second most densely populated urban area. For a traveller unfamiliar with Athens, familiarity with the contours of these neighbourhoods can often be particularly useful in both exploring and understanding the city. Ambelokipi is a large, central district of the city of Athens. ... Exarcheia (Greek: Εξάρχεια) is the name of a neighborhood in downtown Athens close to the historical building of the National Technical University of Athens. ... Ano Patissia is a neighbourhood in Athens, Greece, and home of the Ano Patissia station. ...


Demographics

Athens population distribution

The municipality of Athens has an official population of 745,514[1] with a metropolitan population of 3.8 million (population including the suburbs).[1] The actual population, however, is believed to be higher, because during census-taking (carried out once every 10 years) some Athenian residents travel back to their birthplaces, and register as local citizens there.[20] Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 438 pixelsFull resolution (1173 × 642 pixel, file size: 398 KB, MIME type: image/png) The evolution in metropolitan area of Athens. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 438 pixelsFull resolution (1173 × 642 pixel, file size: 398 KB, MIME type: image/png) The evolution in metropolitan area of Athens. ...


Reflecting this uncertainty about population figures, various sources refer to a population of around 5 million people for Athens.[21][22] Also unaccounted for is an undefined number of unregistered immigrants originating mainly from Albania and other Eastern European countries.[23][24] Statistical regions of Europe as delineated by the United Nations (UN definition of Eastern Europe marked red):  Northern Europe  Western Europe  Eastern Europe  Southern Europe Pre-1989 division between the West (grey) and Eastern Bloc (orange) superimposed on current borders: Russia (dark orange), other countries formerly part of the USSR...


The ancient site of the city is centred on the rocky hill of the acropolis. In ancient times the port of Piraeus was a separate city, but it has now been absorbed into greater Athens. The rapid expansion of the city initiated in the 1950s and 1960s continues today, because of the transition from an agricultural to an industrial nation.[25] The expansion is now particularly toward the East and North East (a tendency greatly related to the new Eleftherios Venizelos International Airport and the Attiki Odos, the freeway that cuts across Attica). By this process Athens has engulfed many former suburbs and villages in Attica, and continues to do so. Throughout its long history, Athens has experienced many different population levels. The table below shows the historical population of Athens in recent times. It has been suggested that Kaminia (Piraeus), Greece be merged into this article or section. ... The E. Venizelos Athens International Airport The Eleftherios Venizelos International Airport, which began operation in March 2001, serves the city of Athens in Greece. ... Attiki Odos (Greek: Αττική Οδός) is a private-owned toll highway in Greece. ... Attica (in Greek: Αττική, Attike; see also List of traditional Greek place names) is a periphery (subdivision) in Greece, containing Athens, the capital of Greece. ...

Year City population Urban population Metro population
1833 4,000[26] - -
1870 44,500[26] - -
1896 123,000[26] - -
1921 (Pre-Population exchange) 473,000[26] - -
1921 (Post-Population exchange) 718,000[26] - -
1971 867,023[27] - -
1981 885,737 - -
1991 772,072 - 3,444,358[28]
2001 745,514[29] 3,130,841[29] 3,761,810[29]

Cartoon depicting a Turk and a Greek arguing over the exchange. ...

Culture

Main article: Culture of Greece

The Culture of Greece has evolved over thousands of years, with its beginnings in the Mycenaean and Minoan Civilizations, continuing most notably into Classical Greece, through the influence of the Roman Empire and its Greek Eastern successor the Byzantine Empire. ...

Archaeological hub

The city is one of the world's main centres of archaeological research. Apart from national institutions, like Athens University, the Archaeological Society, several archaeological Museums (including the National Archaeological Museum, the Cycladic Museum, the Epigraphic Museum, the Byzantine Museum, as well as museums at the ancient Agora, Acropolis, and Kerameikos), the city is also home to the Demokritos laboratory for Archaeometry as well as several regional and national archaeological authorities that form part of the Greek Department of Culture. Additionally, Athens hosts 17 Foreign Archaeological Institutes which promote and facilitate research by scholars from their respective home countries. As a result, Athens has more than a dozen archaeological libraries and three specialized archaeological laboratories, and is the venue of several hundred specialized lectures, conferences and seminars, as well as dozens of archaeological exhibitions, per year. At any given time, Athens is the (temporary) home to hundreds of international scholars and researchers in all disciplines of archaeology. The New Acropolis Museum is a museum by architect Bernard Tschumi located near the Acropolis in Athens, Greece. ... The Acropolis of Athens is the best known acropolis (high city, The Sacred Rock) in the world. ... For referencing in Wikipedia, see Wikipedia:Citing sources. ... The National and Kapodistrian University of Athens (Greek: Εθνικόν και Καποδιστριακόν Πανεπιστήμιον Αθηνών), usually referred to simply as the University of Athens, is the oldest university in the region of the eastern Mediterranean and has been in continuous operation since its establishment in 1837. ... The Archaeological Society of Athens (Εν Αθήναις Αρχαιολογική Εταιρεία) is a branch of the Hellenic Republics Ministry of Foreign Affairs. ... Façade of the National Archaeological museum of Athens. ... The Goulandris Museum of Cycladic Art is one of the great museums of Athens. ... The Rosetta Stone in the British Museum. ... The Byzantine Empire is the term conventionally used to describe the Roman Empire during the Middle Ages, centered at its capital in Constantinople. ... Remains of the agora built in Athens in the Roman period (east of the classical agora). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Kerameikos is the name of the deme or part of Athens to the northwest of the Acropolis and includes an extensive area both within and outside of the city walls. ... Demokritos is a scientific research centre in Greece, officially known as National Centre for Scientific Research Demokritos. It is the oldest and largest facility in Greece and covers a wide range of scientific research. ... Archaeological science (also known as Archaeometry) is the application of scientific techniques and methodologies to archaeology. ... The Hellenic Ministry of Culture (official name) or Greek Ministry of Culture, located in Athens, Greece, was founded in September 1971. ... There are 19 Foreign Archaeological Institutions in Greece. ...


Tourism

Athens has been a popular destination for travellers since antiquity. Over the past decade, the infrastructure and social amenities of Athens have been radically improved, in part due to the city's successful bid to stage the 2004 Olympic Games. The Greek Government, aided by the EU, has funded major infrastructure projects such as the state-of-the-art Eleftherios Venizelos International Airport,[30] the massive expansion of the Athens Metro system,[31] and the new Attiki Odos Motorway.[31] Home to a vast number of 5 and 4 star hotels, the city is currently the 6th most visited capital. A tourist destination is a city, town or other area the economy of which is dependent to a significant extent on the revenues accruing from tourism. ... (Redirected from 2004 Olympic Games) The Games of the XXVIII Olympiad, commonly known as the 2004 Summer Olympics were the 28th Summer Olympic Games. ... The Eleftherios Venizelos International Airport, (IATA: ATH, ICAO: LGAV) which began operation in March 2001, serves the city of Athens in Greece. ... The Athens Metro is the underground public transport system of Athens, Greece, constructed by the Attiko Metro company (Αττικό Μετρό, literally Attican metro) and the ISAP (Ilektrikoi Sidirodromoi Athinon-Pireos) company (Ηλεκτρικοί Σιδηρόδρομοι Αθηνών-Πειραιώς Athens - Piraeus Electric Railways). The Athens Metro is one of the most impressive underground Mass Transit systems in the world because... Attiki Odos (Greek: Αττική Οδός) is a private-owned toll highway in Greece. ...


Entertainment

Athens is home to 148 theatrical stages, more than any other European city, including the famous ancient Herodes Atticus Theatre, home to the Athens Festival, which runs from May to October each year.[32][33] In addition to a large number of multiplexes, Athens plays host to a variety of romantic, open air garden cinemas. The city also supports a vast number of music venues, including the Athens Concert Hall, known as the "Megaron Moussikis", which attracts world-famous artists all year round.[34] The Herod Atticus Odeon on the south slope of the Acropolis The Herodes Atticus Odeon was built in 161 by Herodes Atticus in memory of his wife, Aspasia Annia Regilla, on the south slope of the Acropolis hill. ... Athens Concert Hall The Athens Concert Hall (Greek: Μέγαρο Μουσικής Αθηνών Megaro Moussikis Athinon) is a concert hall located in Athens, on Vassilissis Sofias Avenue, and first opened in 1991 with two halls. ...


Sports

Club Sport Founded League Venue
Olympiacos Football 1925 Super League Greece Karaiskákis Stadium
Panathinaikos FC Football 1908 Super League Greece Apostolos Nikolaidis Stadium
AEK Athens FC Football 1924 Super League Greece Athens Olympic Stadium
Panionios Football 1890 Super League Greece Nea Smyrni Stadium
Atromitos Football 1950 Super League Greece Peristeri Stadium
Panathinaikos BC Basketball 1922 A1 Ethniki Athens Olympic Indoor Hall
Olympiacos BC Basketball 1925 A1 Ethniki Peace and Friendship Stadium
AEK Athens BC Basketball 1928 A1 Ethniki Athens Olympic Indoor Hall
Panellinios Basketball 1891 A1 Ethniki Panellinios Indoor Hall
Panionios BC Basketball 1890 A1 Ethniki Helliniko Arena
Maroussi BC Basketball 1970 A1 Ethniki Maroussi Indoor Hall
Olympiacos SC Volleyball 1930 A1 Ethniki Rendis Indoor Hall
Panathinaikos VC Volleyball 1919 A1 Ethniki Glyfada Indoor Hall
AEK Athens VC Volleyball A1 Ethniki Nea Filadelfia Indoor Hall
Panellinios Volleyball A1 Ethniki Panellinios Indoor Hall
Olympiacos WPC Water polo A1 Ethniki Papastrateio Indoo Hall
Ethnikos Piraeus Water polo A1 Ethniki Papastrateio Hall
Panathinaikos Water Polo A1 Ethniki Athens Olympic Aquatic Centre
Panionios Water polo A1 Ethniki Nea Smyrni Hall
Vouliagmeni Water polo 1937 A1 Ethniki Vouliagmeni Hall
Spartakos Glyfadas Baseball 1990 National Baseball League Helliniko Baseball Centre
Maroussi 2004 Baseball 1990 National Baseball League Helliniko Baseball Centre
Athinaikos Handball 1927 National Handball League Helliniko Arena
Athens Rugby Rugby 1990 National Rugby League Athens Olympic Stadium
Starbucks Rugby Rugby 1983 National Rugby League Athens Olympic Stadium

The Athens area is home to three prestigious European clubs: Olympiacos, Panathinaikos and AEK Athens, all multi sport clubs. A host of other local clubs are also active in the areas, some listed above. Beach volleyball and windsurfing are both very popular in broader Attica, and nearby beaches are popular with surfers, who have created their own subculture. Olympiacos C.F.P. (Greek: ΟΣΦΠ - Ολυμπιακός Σύνδεσμος Φιλάθλων Πειραιώς - Olympiakos Syndesmos Filathlon Peiraios), Olympiacos Club of Fans of Piraeus, is one of the largest, and the most popular Greek multisport club based in Piraeus, Athens. ... “Soccer” redirects here. ... For other sports leagues which may be referred to by this name, see List of professional sports leagues. ... The Karaiskaki Stadium (in Greek: Γήπεδο Γεώργιος Καραϊσκάκης ; IPA: ) is in the Neo Faliro area of Piraeus, Greece. ... See also: Panathinaikos Panathinaikos FC, also known as PAO or Panathinaikos AO (Greek: ΠΑΟ - Παναθηναϊκός Αθλητικός Όμιλος - Panathinaikos Athlitikos Omilos), the All-Athenian Athletic Club, is a Greek association football club based in Athens, Greece. ... See also: Votanikos Arena, Panathinaikos Apostolos Nikolaidis Stadium (Stadio Apostolos Nikolaidis) is the football ground Panathinaikos has played for most of the years of its existence, since its foundation back in 1908. ... AEK FC, (Greek: – Athlitiki Enosis Konstantinoupoleos), the Athletic Union of Constantinople, known in European competitions as AEK Athens, is a Greek association football club based in the city of Athens, Greece. ... The Olympic Stadium (Greek: Ολυμπιακό Στάδιο) (also known as the Athens Olympic Stadium, and Spiridon Spiros Louis Stadium, named after the man to win the first Olympic marathon race) in 1896, is a stadium that is part of the Athens Olympic Sports Complex. ... Panionios GSS FC (Greek: Πανιώνιος Γυμναστικός Σύλλογος Σμύρνης - Panionios Gymnastikos Syllogos Smyrnis), the Pan-Ionian Gymnastic Association of Smyrna, is a Greek association football club based in the Athenian suburb of Nea Smyrni, Greece. ... Nea Smyrni Stadium is a multi-use stadium in Athens, Greece. ... Atromitos FC is a football club that plays in the Super League Greece. ... Peristeri Stadium is a multi-use stadium in Athens, Greece. ... 100 years celebration. ... This article is about the sport. ... The A1 Ethniki is the highest professional basketball competition among clubs in Greece. ... The Athens Olympic Sports Complex is the central group of facilities for the 2004 Summer Olympics. ... Olympiacos BC is a Greek basketball team, based in Piraeus, Athens. ... The Faliro Coastal Zone Olympic Sports Complex is a complex consisting of two indoor arenas and a beach volleyball stadium that hosted Handball, Taekwondo, and Volleyball events at the 2004 Summer Olympics. ... AEK BC (Greek: Αθλητική Ένωσις Κωνσταντινουπόλεως – Athlitiki Enosis Konstantinoupoleos), the Athletic Union of Constantinople, is a Greek sports club based in the city of Athens, Greece. ... // The Panellinios Gymnastikos Syllogos athletic club, located in Kypseli, Athens, Greece and founded in the year 1891 had a team of gymnasts compete at the 1896 Summer Olympics in Athens, Greece. ... The Helliniko Olympic Complex is situated on the east coast of Greece south of Athens, approximately 30 kilometres from the Olympic Village, and was built for the staging of the 2004 Summer Olympics and consists of 5 separate venues. ... Maroussi BC (Greek: Μαρούσι) , is a Greek basketball club based in Maroussi, a north suburb of Athens, Greece. ... Olympiacos SC is the volleyball team of the Greek sports club Olympiacos. ... For the ball used in this sport, see Volleyball (ball). ... Main article: Panathinaikos Panathinaikos Voleyball Club is the volleyball team of Panathinaikos, the Athens based Greek sport club. ... Glyfada Indoor Hall is an indoor arena in Athens, Greece. ... Olympiacos Water Polo Club is the water polo team of the Greek sports club Olympiacos. ... Water polo is a team water sport. ... Ethnikos Piraeus, or the second great team of Piraeus as they were once known, may have fallen into hard times recently but they boast of a great history. ... The Athens Olympic Sports Complex is the central group of facilities for the 2004 Summer Olympics. ... This article is about the sport. ... [[Image:scan10004 Athinaikos (Greek: Αθηναικός Αθλητικός Σύλλογος, Athnaiki Ethniki Syllogos or Athinaikos Athletic Association) is a Greek football club, formed in 1917. ... Handball player leaps towards the goal prior to throwing the ball, while the goalkeeper extends himself trying to stop it. ... For other uses, see Rugby (disambiguation). ... Olympiacos C.F.P. (Greek: ΟΣΦΠ - Ολυμπιακός Σύνδεσμος Φιλάθλων Πειραιώς - Olympiakos Syndesmos Filathlon Peiraios), Olympiacos Club of Fans of Piraeus, is one of the largest, and the most popular Greek multisport club based in Piraeus, Athens. ... Panathinaikos Athlitikos Omilos (Greek: Παναθηναϊκός Αθλητικός Όμιλος,  ), widely known both as Panathinaikos or PAO, is a Greek multisport club based in Athens, Greece. ... AEK Athens FC is the football club of the Athletic Union of Constantinople (AEK), a sports club founded in Athens, Greece in Turkey in 1922. ... For the ball used in this sport, see Volleyball (ball). ... A windsurfer with modern gear tilts the rig and carves the board to perform a planing jibe (downwind turn) close to shore in Maui, Hawaii. ... For other uses, see Surfing (disambiguation). ... In sociology, anthropology and cultural studies, a subculture is a set of people with a set of behaviors and beliefs, culture, which could be distinct or hidden, that differentiate them from the larger culture to which they belong. ...


Athens has twice played host to the summer Olympic Games: in 1896 and in 2004. The 2004 Summer Olympics inspired the development of the Athens Olympic Stadium, which has gained a reputation as one of the most beautiful in the world. The city has also hosted the UEFA Champions League final twice, in 1994 and in 2007, at the Athens Olympic Stadium[35] and the UEFA Cup Winners' Cup final in 1971 at the Karaiskákis Stadium, a state-of-the-art sports and entertainment complex. Athens has also hosted two Euroleague final fours, the first in 1993 at Peace and Friendship Stadium[36] and the second in 2007 at the Athens Olympic Indoor Hall,[37] and several competitions in other sports. The five Olympic rings were designed in 1913, adopted in 1914 and debuted at the Games at Antwerp, 1920. ... The 1896 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the I Olympiad, were celebrated in 1896 in Athens, Greece. ... The ceremony for the lighting of the flame is arranged as a pagan pageant, with priestesses dancing. ... The Olympic Stadium (Greek: Ολυμπιακό Στάδιο) (also known as the Athens Olympic Stadium, and Spiridon Spiros Louis Stadium, named after the man to win the first Olympic marathon race) in 1896, is a stadium that is part of the Athens Olympic Sports Complex. ... UEFA Champions League, which replaced the European Champions Cup, is a seasonal club football competition organised by UEFA since 1992 for the most successful football clubs in Europe. ... The UEFA Cup Winners Cup (also known as the European Cup Winners Cup) was a football club competition contested annually by the most recent winners of all European domestic cup competitions. ... The Karaiskaki Stadium (in Greek: Γήπεδο Γεώργιος Καραϊσκάκης ; IPA: ) is in the Neo Faliro area of Piraeus, Greece. ... The Euroleague (EL) is the highest caliber professional basketball competition in Europe, with teams from thirteen different European countries. ... The Faliro Coastal Zone Olympic Sports Complex is a complex consisting of two indoor arenas and a beach volleyball stadium that hosted Handball, Taekwondo, and Volleyball events at the 2004 Summer Olympics. ... The Athens Olympic Sports Complex is the central group of facilities for the 2004 Summer Olympics. ...


The Athens area encompasses a variety of terrain, notably hills and mountains rising around the metropolis, and the capital is the only major city in Europe to be bisected by a mountain range. Four mountain ranges extend into city boundaries, and thousands of miles of trails crisscross the city and neighbouring areas, providing exercise and wilderness access on foot, bike, or horse. Beyond Athens and across the county a great variety of outdoor activities are available and popular, including skiing, rock climbing, hang gliding, and windsurfing. Numerous outdoor clubs serve these sports, including the Athens Chapter of the Sierra Club, which leads over 4,000 outings annually in the area. For other uses, see City (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... For exotic financial options, see Mountain range (options). ... The term Exercise can refer to: Physical exercise such as running or strength training Exercise (options), the financial term for enacting and terminating a contract Category: ... For other uses, see Wilderness (disambiguation). ... Two hikers in the Mount Hood National Forest Eagle Creek hiking Hiking is a form of walking, undertaken with the specific purpose of exploring and enjoying the scenery. ... Mountain biker riding in the Arizona desert. ... Binomial name Equus caballus Linnaeus, 1758 The horse (Equus caballus, sometimes seen as a subspecies of the Wild Horse, Equus ferus caballus) is a large odd-toed ungulate mammal, one of ten modern species of the genus Equus. ... Cross-country skiing (skating style) in Einsiedeln, Switzerland. ... Climbers on Valkyrie at the Roaches. ... Hang gliding is one of the windsports. ... The Sierra Club is an American environmental organization founded on May 28, 1892 in San Francisco, California by the well-known preservationist John Muir, who became its first president. ...


Urban Landscape

Architecture

The Academy of Athens.
The Academy of Athens.

Athens is a melting pot of many different architectural styles, ranging from Greco-Roman, Neo-Classical, to modern. Many of the most prominent buildings of the city are either Greco-Roman or neo-classical in style. Some of the neo-classical buildings to be found are public buildings erected during the mid-nineteenth century under the guidance of Theophil Freiherr von Hansen: Athens Academy: Designed by Theofil Hansen and completed in 1887. ... Athens Academy: Designed by Theofil Hansen and completed in 1887. ... The main building of the Academy of Athens, one of Theophil Hansens Trilogy in central Athens. ... Theophil Edvard Freiherr von Hansen (original Danish name: Theophilus Hansen) (July 13, 1813 in Copenhagen - February 17, 1891 in Vienna) was a Danish architect. ...

The city also holds a number of palaces, such as the Royal Palace and Tatoi, former homes of the Greek monarchs. The Hellenic Parliament (Greek: Βουλή των Ελλήνων; transliterated Vouli ton Ellinon; literally Council of the Greeks) is the parliament of Greece, located in Syntagma Square in Athens. ... The Zappeion was a sporting arena in Athens, Greece used for the fencing events at the 1896 Summer Olympics. ... The Parliament in session, at the end of the 19th century The Old Parliament building (Greek: , Palaia Voulē) at Stadiou Street in Athens, housed the Greek parliament between 1875 and 1932. ... The main building of the Academy of Athens, one of Theophil Hansens Trilogy in central Athens. ... The National and Kapodistrian University of Athens (Greek: Εθνικόν και Καποδιστριακόν Πανεπιστήμιον Αθηνών), usually referred to simply as the University of Athens, is the oldest university in the region of the eastern Mediterranean and has been in continuous operation since its establishment in 1837. ...


Athenian Neighbourhoods

The Municipality of Athens is divided into several districts: Omonoia, Syntagma, Exarcheia, Aghios Nikolaos, Neapolis, Lykavittos, Lofos Strefi, Lofos Finopoulou, Lofos Filopappou, Pedion Areos, Metaxourgeio, Aghios Kostantinos, Larissa Station, Kerameikos, Psirri, Monastiraki, Gazi, Thission, Kapnikarea, Aghia Irini, Aerides, Anafiotika, Plaka, Acropolis, Pnyka, Makrygianni, Lofos Ardittou, Zappeion, Aghios Spyridon, Pangration, Kolonaki, Dexameni, Evaggelismos, Gouva, Aghios Ioannis, Neos Kosmos, Koukaki, Kynosargous, Fix, Ano Petralona, Kato Petralona, Rouf, Votanikos, Profitis Daniil, Akadimia Platonos, Kolonos, Kolokynthou, Attikis Square, Lofos Skouze, Sepolia, Kypseli, Aghios Meletios, Nea Kypseli, Polygono, Ampelokipoi, Panormou-Gerokomeio, Pentagono, Ellinorossoi, Kato Filothei, Ano Kypseli, Tourkovounia-Lofos Patatsou, Lofos Elikonos, Koliatsou, Thymarakia, Kato Patisia, Treis Gefyres, Aghios Eleftherios, Ano Patisia, Kypriadou, Prompona. Night view of the noisy and busy multi-cultural Omonoia Square in the heart of Athens. ... Syntagma Square (Πλατεία Συντάγματος, Constitution Square), is located in central Athens, Greece. ... Exarcheia (Greek: Εξάρχεια) is the name of a neighborhood in downtown Athens close to the historical building of the National Technical University of Athens. ... Lykavittos ( Greek: Λυκάβηττος) is a Cretaceous limestone hill in Athens, Greece. ... The Kerameikos is the name of the deme or part of Athens to the northwest of the Acropolis and includes an extensive area both within and outside of the city walls. ... Souvenir shop of Pandrossou street Monastiraki redirects here. ... Thiseio, also Thisseio, Thisio and Thissio (Greek: Εξάρχεια) is the name of a neighborhood in downtown Athens northwest of the Acropolis, 1. ... The Church of Panaghia Kapnikarea (Greek:Εκκλησία της Παναγίας Καπνικαρέας) or just Kapnikarea (Greek: Καπνικαρέα) is a Greek Orthodox church one of the oldest churches in Athens. ... Plaka by night Pláka (Greek: Πλάκα) is the old historical neighbourhood of Athens, Greece just under the Acropolis. ... Acropolis (Gr. ... The speakers platform at the Pnyx, with the Acropolis in the background. ... The Zappeion was a sporting arena in Athens, Greece used for the fencing events at the 1896 Summer Olympics. ... Pangrati (Greek: Παγκράτι, Pagkrati) is a suburb of Athens. ... Kolonaki (Greek: Κολωνάκι), literally Little Column is a prestigious neighbourhood in central Athens, Greece. ... For the Greek influenced newspaper in Australia, see Neos Kosmos (newspaper) Neos Kosmos (Greek: ) is the name of a neighborhood in the southwestern part of the city of Athens next to the historic centre. ... Koukaki (Greek: Κουκάκι) is a southwestern neighbourhood of the Municipality of Athens, Greece. ... Votanikos (Greek: Βοτανικός) is a subdivision located 3 km west of the downtown part of the Greek capital of Athens. ... Akadimia Platonos (Greek: Ακαδημία Πλάτωνος) is a subdivision located 3 km west-northwest of the downtown part of the Greek capital of Athens. ... In classical Greece Hippeios Colonus (Greek: Ίππειος Κολωνός, Colonus of the Horses) was a deme about 1 km (1 mile) to the northwest of Athens, near Platos Academy. ... Kypseli is a subdivision located in the central part of the Greek capital of Athens and is notable for being the most densely packed region in Greece. ... Ambelokipi is a large, central district of the city of Athens. ... There is also a Filothei in Filothei and in the prefectures of Ioannina and Phokida Filothei (Greek: Φιλοθέη) is a green, affluent suburb of Athens, Greece, consisting mainly of hillside villas with reasonably close proximity to the Olympic Stadium. ... Ano Patissia is a neighbourhood in Athens, Greece, and home of the Ano Patissia station. ...


Omonia

Omonia Square, located in the heart of the city, is regarded as the transportation centre of Athens.
Omonia Square, located in the heart of the city, is regarded as the transportation centre of Athens.

Omonia Square (Greek: Πλατεία Ομονοίας) is the oldest square in Athens. It is surrounded by hotels and fast food outlets, and contains a train station used by the Athens Metro and the Ilektrikos, appropriately named Omonoia Station. The square often becomes the focus for celebration of sporting victories, as seen after the country's winning of the Euro 2004 and the Eurobasket 2005 tournaments. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1272x848, 411 KB) Summary Omonoia(Omonia) Square in Athens, Greece. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1272x848, 411 KB) Summary Omonoia(Omonia) Square in Athens, Greece. ... Night view of the noisy and busy multi-cultural Omonoia Square in the heart of Athens. ... The Athens Metro is the underground public transport system of Athens, Greece, constructed by the Attiko Metro company (Αττικό Μετρό, literally Attican metro) and the ISAP (Ilektrikoi Sidirodromoi Athinon-Pireos) company (Ηλεκτρικοί Σιδηρόδρομοι Αθηνών-Πειραιώς Athens - Piraeus Electric Railways). The Athens Metro is one of the most impressive underground Mass Transit systems in the world because... Omonoia station is a subway station in Omonoia square of Athens used by Attiko Metro and Ilektrikos. ...


Psirri and Gazi

The reviving Psirri (Greek: Ψυρρή) neighbourhood - aka Athens's "meat packing district" - is dotted with renovated former mansions, artists' spaces, and small gallery areas. A number of its renovated buildings also now host a wide variety of fashionable bars, making it a hotspot for the city in the last decade, while a number of live music restaurants known as "rebetadika", after Rebetiko, a unique form of music that blossomed in Syros and Athens from the 1920s until the 1960s, are also to be found. Rebetiko is admired by many, and as a result rebetadika are often crammed with people of all ages who will sing, dance and drink till dawn. The Gazi (Greek: Γκάζι) area, one of the latest in full redevelopment, is located around a historic gas factory, now converted into the Technopolis cultural multiplex, and also includes artists' areas, a number of small clubs, bars and restaurants, as well as Athens' nascent "Gay Village". The metro's system recent expansion to the western suburbs of the city has brought easier access to the area since spring 2007, as the blue line now stops at Gazi (Kerameikos station). This article is considered orphaned, since there are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... Rebetiko, plural rebetika, (Greek ρεμπέτικο and ρεμπέτικα respectively) is the name for a type of urban Greek music. ... Syros (Greek: Σύρος), or Siros or Syra is a Greek island in the Cyclades, in the Aegean Sea. ... Rebetiko, plural rebetika, (Greek ρεμπέτικο and ρεμπέτικα respectively) is the name for a type of urban Greek music. ... Ghazw (plural ghazawāt) is an Arabic word meaning an armed incursion for the purposes of conquest, plunder, or the capture of slaves and is cognate with the terms ghāziya and maghāzÄ«. In pre-Islamic times it signified the plundering raids organized by nomadic Bedouin warriors against either... A gay village (also gay ghetto or gayborhood) is an urban geographic location with generally recognized boundaries where a large number of gay, lesbian, transgender, and bisexual people live. ... The Kerameikos is the name of the deme or part of Athens to the northwest of the Acropolis and includes an extensive area both within and outside of the city walls. ...


Syntagma

The historic and luxurious Grande Bretagne Hotel in Syntagma Square.

Syntagma Square, (Greek: Σύνταγμα), is the capital's central square, lying adjacent to Parliament and the city's most noted hotels. Ermou Street, an approximately 1 km-long pedestrian road connecting Syntagma Square to Monastiraki, has traditionally been a consumer paradise for both Athenians and tourists. Complete with fashion shops and shopping centres promoting most international brands, it now finds itself in the top 5 most expensive shopping streets in Europe, and the tenth most expensive retail street in the world.[39] Nearby, the renovated Army Fund building in Panepistimiou Street includes the "Attica" department store and several upmarket designer stores. Image File history File links Athens-Grande1. ... Image File history File links Athens-Grande1. ... Grand Bretagne is a luxurious hotel located in central Athens right next to Syntagma Square. ... Syntagma Square (Πλατεία Συντάγματος, Constitution Square), is located in central Athens, Greece. ... Syntagma Square (Πλατεία Συντάγματος, Constitution Square), is located in central Athens, Greece. ... Syntagma Square (Πλατεία Συντάγματος, Constitution Square), is located in central Athens, Greece. ...


Plaka, Monastiraki, and Thission

Plaka (Greek: Πλάκα), lying just beneath the Acropolis, is famous for its plentiful neoclassical architecture, making up one of the most scenic districts of the city. It remains a traditionally prime tourist destination with a number of picturesque tavernas and live performances. Nearby Monastiraki (Greek: Μοναστηράκι), for its part, is well-known for its string of small shops and markets, as well as its crowded flea market and tavernas specialising in souvlaki. Another district notably famous for its student-crammed, stylish cafés is Theseum or Thission (Greek: Θησείο), lying just west of Monastiraki. Thission is home to the remarkable ancient Temple of Hephaestus, standing atop a small hill. Plaka by night Pláka (Greek: Πλάκα) is the old historical neighbourhood of Athens, Greece just under the Acropolis. ... Acropolis (Gr. ... A Taverna is a small restaurant serving Greek cuisine, not to be confused with tavern. The Greek word is Ταβερνα and is originally derived from the Latin word taberna (shed or hut, from tabula board). As Greeks have migrated elsewhere, tavernas have spread throughout the world, especially countries such as the... Souvenir shop of Pandrossou street Monastiraki redirects here. ... Souvlaki (Greek: Σουβλάκι) is a popular Greek fast food consisting of small pieces of meat and sometimes vegetables grilled on a skewer. ... The Temple of Hephaestus, Athens: eastern face. ... Temple of Hephaestus, an Doric Greek temple in Athens with the original entrance facing east, 449 BC (western face depicted) Temple of Hephaestus, Athens: eastern face The Temple of Hephaestus in central ancient Athens, Greece, is the best-preserved ancient Greek temple in the world, but is far less well...


Kolonaki

Café and bars in the central Kolonaki district.
Café and bars in the central Kolonaki district.

The Kolonaki (Greek: Κολωνάκι) area, at the base of Lycabettus hill, is full of boutiques catering to well-heeled customers by day, and bars and more fashionable restaurants by night, but at other points also a wide range of art galleries and museums. This is often regarded as one of the more prestigious areas of the capital. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 534 pixelsFull resolution (1024 × 683 pixel, file size: 513 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Cafe, bars and restaurants in Kolonaki district of Athens, Greece. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 534 pixelsFull resolution (1024 × 683 pixel, file size: 513 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Cafe, bars and restaurants in Kolonaki district of Athens, Greece. ... Kolonaki (Greek: Κολωνάκι), literally Little Column is a prestigious neighbourhood in central Athens, Greece. ... Kolonaki (Greek: Κολωνάκι), literally Little Column is a prestigious neighbourhood in central Athens, Greece. ... Lykavittos ( Greek: Λυκάβηττος) is a Cretaceous limestone hill in Athens, Greece. ...


Exarcheia

Exarcheia (Greek: Εξάρχεια), located north of Kolonaki, has a mixed reputation as the recent or current location of the city's anarchist and drug scenes and as a culturally active student quarter with many cafés, bars and bookshops. Exarcheia is home to the Athens Polytechnic and the National Archaeological Museum; it also contains numerous important buildings of several 20th-century styles: Neoclassicism, Art Deco and Early Modernism (including Bauhaus influences). Exarcheia (Greek: Εξάρχεια) is the name of a neighborhood in downtown Athens close to the historical building of the National Technical University of Athens. ... Anarchism is a generic term describing various political philosophies and social movements that advocate the elimination of hierarchy and imposed authority. ... For other uses, see Drug (disambiguation). ... The National Technical University of Athens (Greek: Εθνικό Μετσόβιο Πολυτεχνείο, National Metsovion Polytechnic), sometimes simply known as Athens Polytechnic, is among the oldest and most prestigious higher education institutions of Greece. ... Façade of the National Archaeological museum of Athens. ... Late Baroque classicizing: G. P. Pannini assembles the canon of Roman ruins and Roman sculpture into one vast imaginary gallery (1756) Neoclassicism (sometimes rendered as Neo-Classicism or Neo-classicism) is the name given to quite distinct movements in the decorative and visual arts, literature, theatre, music, and architecture that... Asheville City Hall. ... Modern architecture, not to be confused with contemporary architecture, is a term given to a number of building styles with similar characteristics, primarily the simplification of form and the elimination of ornament. ... For information about British gothic rock band, see Bauhaus (band). ...


Suburbs

The Athens Metropolitan Area consists of 73 densely populated municipalities, sprawling around the city in virtually all directions. According to their geographic location in relation to the city of Athens, the suburbs are divided into four zones; the northern suburbs (including Ekali, Nea Erythrea, Agios Stefanos, Drosia, Kryoneri, Kifissia, Maroussi, Pefki, Lykovrisi, Heraklio, Glyka Nera, Vrilissia, Melissia, Pendeli, Halandri, Psychiko and Filothei); the southern suburbs, (including Palaio Faliro, Elliniko, Glyfada, Alimos, Voula and the southernmost suburb of Vouliagmeni); the eastern suburbs, (including Zografou, Vyronas, Kaisariani, Cholargos, Papagou and Aghia Paraskevi; and the western suburbs (including Peristeri, Ilion, Egaleo, Petroupoli and Nikaia). The northern and most of the southern suburbs are particularly affluent districts, inhabited primarily by middle-to-high and high income groups. The western suburbs are primarily resided in by middle income earners, with some areas resided in by middle-to-low income groups and still others by middle-to-high earners; while the eastern suburbs are primarily inhabited by middle and middle-to-high income groups. Ekali (Greek: Εκάλη, Latin: Hecale) is a rather exclusive suburban community in Attica, Greece -- just about 20 km north of Athens. ... Nea Erythraia (Greek: Νέα Ερυθραία), is a suburb in the northeastern part of Athens, Greece. ... Agios Stefanos (Greek: meaning Saint Stephen) is a rather exclusive suburb in Attica, Greece -- just about 23 km north of Athens. ... Drosia or Drossia (Greek: Δροσιά meaning cool, dew) is a rather exclusive suburb in Attica, Greece -- just about 22 km north of Athens. ... Kryoneri or Krioneri (Greek, Modern: Κρυονέρι, Katharevoussa: -ον meaning cold water), older forms: Kryonerion and Krionerion may refer to numerous settlements and villages that begin with this name in Greece: Kryoneri, Achaea, a village in Achaea, part of the municipality Kalavryta Kryoneri, Attica, a community in the East Attica prefecture Kryoneri, Corinthia... Kifissia (Greek, Modern: Κηφισιά;, Katharevousa: Κηφισσιά;, Ancient form/Latin: Cephissia) or Kifisia is a northern suburb of Athens, Greece. ... Maroussi or Amaroussi, also Marousi and Amarousi, (Greek, Modern: Μαρούσι, Katharevousa: -on) older forms: Amarousio, Amarousion, Amaroussi, Amaroussio, Amaroussion and Marousion is a suburban city NE of Athens, Greece. ... Coordinates 38°4′ N 23°48′ E Country Greece Periphery Attica Prefecture Athens Population 19,887 (2001) Elevation 260 m Postal code 151 xx Area code 210 Licence plate code Z Website www. ... Glyka Nera or Glika Nera (Greek: Γλυκά Νερά meaning sweet water), is a suburb in the northeastern part of Athens, Greece. ... Vrilissia (Greek: Βριλήσσια) is a northern suburb of Athens, Greece. ... Melissia or Melisia (Greek: Μελίσσια), is a suburb in the northeastern part of Athens, Greece. ... Pentéli or Pendeli, (Greek: Πεντέλη, ancient forms: Pentele or Pentelicus, Mendeli in medieval times) is a tall mountain and mountain range situated northeast of Athens and southwest of Marathon. ... Chalandri, Halandri or sometimes Khalandri (Greek, Modern: Χαλάνδρι, Ancient/Katharevousa: -on), older forms, Chalandrion, Halandrion, Khalandrion is a northern suburb in Athens, Greece. ... Psychiko (Greek:Ψυχικό; older form Psychikon) is a suburb of Athens, Greece. ... There is also a Filothei in Filothei and in the prefectures of Ioannina and Phokida Filothei (Greek: Φιλοθέη) is a green, affluent suburb of Athens, Greece, consisting mainly of hillside villas with reasonably close proximity to the Olympic Stadium. ... Palaio Faliro or Paleo Faliro (Greek, Modern: Παλαιό Φάληρο, Ancient/Katharevousa: Παλαιὸν Φάληρον, meaning Old Faliro), older forms Palaio Faliron or Paleo Faliron is a suburb in the southern part of Athens, Greece. ... Ellinikon (Greek: Ελληνικό, meaning Greek) is a suburb of Athens, Greece. ... Glyfada (Greek: Γλυφάδα) is a rather exclusive municipality of Athens in Greece south of Ellinikon and Athens with three main roads. ... Alimos (Greek: Άλιμος), Latin and older form: Alimus, is a suburb in the south southwestern part of Athens, Greece. ... Voula (Greek: Βούλα, translating to something like a spot) is an exclusive municipality and a suburban town in southern Attica and is the second southernmost municipality in the Megalo Daktylo (Large Fingernail), approximately 17 km S of Athens, Greece, SW of the Eleftherios Venizelos International Airport and the Attiki Odos (numbers... Vouliagmeni (Greek: Βουλιαγμένη, meaning sunken) is an exclusive municipality 20 km south of Athens. ... Zografou ( Greek: Ζωγράφου), rarely Zografos, is a suburb in the eastern part of Athens, Greece. ... Vyronas (Greek, Modern: Βύρωνας, Ancient/Katharevousa: Βύρων), older forms: Viron and Vyron is a suburb in the northeastern part of Athens, Greece. ... Kaisariani or Kaissariani ( Greek: Καισαριάνη), also Kesariani or Kessariani, is a suburb in the eastern part of Athens, Greece. ... Holargos or Cholargos, rarely Kholargos (Greek: Χολαργός) Latin/Older form: Cholargus is a suburb of Athens, Greece, located northwest of the city center. ... Papagou, uncommonly Papagos or Pappagos (Greek: Παπάγου) is a suburb in the northeastern part of Athens, Greece. ... For other uses, see Agia Paraskevi (disambiguation). ... Peristeri, older forms Peristerio and Peristerion is a suburban community in Athens area (Attica), Greece. ... Walls of the excavated city of Troy This article is about the city of Troy / Ilion as described in the works of Homer, and the location of an ancient city associated with it. ... Egaleo (Αιγάλεω) is a city in Attica, Greece. ... Petroupoli (Greek, modern: Πετρούπολη, Ancient/Katharevousa: -is), older form Petroupolis is a suburb in the west northwestern part of Athens, Greece. ... Nikaia or Nikea (Greek: Νίκαια) is a suburb in the west southwestern part of Athens, Greece. ...


The Athens city coastline, extending from the major commercial port of Piraeus to the southernmost suburb of Varkiza for some 50 km (30 mi), is also connected to the city centre by a tram (which, although modern, can be slow during rush hour), and is punctuated by a string of popular restaurants, cafes, vibrant music venues and modern sports facilities. The area is particularly packed with fashionable bars and nightclubs, that are literally crowded by the city's youth on a daily basis. Most of all during the summer months, the elegant coastal suburbs of Glyfada, Voula and Vouliagmeni host countless such meeting-points, continuing the length of Poseidonos Avenue and Alkyonidon Avenue. It has been suggested that Kaminia (Piraeus), Greece be merged into this article or section. ... Varkiza (Greek: Βάρκιζα), also Alianthos (Αλίανθος) is a suburban place that is part of the municipality of Vari in southern Attica and is the located east of the Megalo Daktylo (Large Finger). ... This article refers to public transport vehicles running on rails. ... Glyfada (Greek: Γλυφάδα) is a rather exclusive municipality of Athens in Greece south of Ellinikon and Athens with three main roads. ... Voula (Greek: Βούλα, translating to something like a spot) is an exclusive municipality and a suburban town in southern Attica and is the second southernmost municipality in the Megalo Daktylo (Large Fingernail), approximately 17 km S of Athens, Greece, SW of the Eleftherios Venizelos International Airport and the Attiki Odos (numbers... Vouliagmeni (Greek: Βουλιαγμένη, meaning sunken) is an exclusive municipality 20 km south of Athens. ... Is a famous and important coastal road of Athens, Greece that runs from Faliron to Glyfada and beyond. ...

The refurbished Athens Olympic Stadium was the site of the 2004 Olympic Games and the 2007 UEFA Champions League Final.

In the winter months, the focus of the city's nightlife moves up into the city centre, in Piraeus as well as across the northern suburbs. In addition, "Bournazi", at the western suburb of Peristeri, has also gained a reputation for its intense nightlife, having turned itself into a hotspot principally for residents of the western Athenian suburbs. In the northern districts, the attractive suburb of Kifissia again hosts a vast number of fashionable restaurants, bars and cafés. Download high resolution version (1600x1200, 980 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Download high resolution version (1600x1200, 980 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... The Olympic Stadium (also known as the Athens Olympic Stadium) is a stadium that is part of the Athens Olympic Sports Complex. ... The 2007 UEFA Champions League Final was a football match played at the Olympic Stadium in Athens, Greece, on 23 May 2007, to decide the winner of the 2006–07 UEFA Champions League. ... Kifissia (Greek, Modern: Κηφισιά;, Katharevousa: Κηφισσιά;, Ancient form/Latin: Cephissia) or Kifisia is a northern suburb of Athens, Greece. ...


The Mall Athens is a massive mall located in the northern suburb of Maroussi, providing an array of outlets. Nearby, the entirely new attraction of the massively upgraded main Olympic Complex (known by its Greek acronym OAKA) dominates the skyline. The whole area has been redeveloped according to a design by the Spanish architect Santiago Calatrava, with steel arches, landscaped gardens, fountains, futuristic glass, and a landmark new blue glass roof which was added to the main stadium. A second Olympic complex, next to the sea at the beach of Kallithea (Faliron), also features modern stadia, shops and an elevated esplanade. Work is underway to transform the grounds of the old Athens Airport - named Hellinikon - in the southern suburbs, into one of the largest landscaped parks in Europe, to be named the Hellenikon Metropolitan Park.[40] The Mall Athens is a huge shopping Mall in Athens, Greece. ... The Athens Olympic Sports Complex is the central group of facilities for the 2004 Summer Olympics. ... Santiago Calatrava Valls (born July 28, 1951) is an internationally recognized and award-winning Spanish architect and structural engineer whose principal office is in Zurich, Switzerland. ... Photo 1: Kallithea on the simulated view of Greater Athens from above. ... Ellinikon International Airport (IATA: ATH, ICAO: LGAT), sometimes spelled Hellinikon (in Greek Ελληνικόν) was the international airport of Athens for sixty years up until 2001 when it was replaced by Eleftherios Venizelos International Airport. ... Hellenikon Metropolitan Park as it has been named, will be a large urban park located in Hellinikon, near Athens, Greece. ...

Motorway interchange in the northern suburb of Maroussi.

The major waste management efforts undertaken in the last decade (especially the plant built on the small island of Psytalia) have improved water quality in the Saronic Gulf, and the coastal waters of Athens are now accessible again to swimmers. Many of the southern suburbs (such as Alimos, Palaio Faliro, Elliniko, Voula, Vouliagmeni and Varkiza) host a number of sandy beaches, most of which are operated by the Greek National Tourism Organisation and require an entrance fee. Fees are not excessive in most cases, and include a number of related conveniences. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1000x753, 206 KB) I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1000x753, 206 KB) I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Maroussi or Amaroussi, also Marousi and Amarousi, (Greek, Modern: Μαρούσι, Katharevousa: -on) older forms: Amarousio, Amarousion, Amaroussi, Amaroussio, Amaroussion and Marousion is a suburban city NE of Athens, Greece. ... Alimos (Greek: Άλιμος), Latin and older form: Alimus, is a suburb in the south southwestern part of Athens, Greece. ... Palaio Faliro or Paleo Faliro (Greek, Modern: Παλαιό Φάληρο, Ancient/Katharevousa: Παλαιὸν Φάληρον, meaning Old Faliro), older forms Palaio Faliron or Paleo Faliron is a suburb in the southern part of Athens, Greece. ... Ellinikon (Greek: Ελληνικό, meaning Greek) is a suburb of Athens, Greece. ... Voula (Greek: Βούλα, translating to something like a spot) is an exclusive municipality and a suburban town in southern Attica and is the second southernmost municipality in the Megalo Daktylo (Large Fingernail), approximately 17 km S of Athens, Greece, SW of the Eleftherios Venizelos International Airport and the Attiki Odos (numbers... Vouliagmeni (Greek: Βουλιαγμένη, meaning sunken) is an exclusive municipality 20 km south of Athens. ... Varkiza (Greek: Βάρκιζα), also Alianthos (Αλίανθος) is a suburban place that is part of the municipality of Vari in southern Attica and is the located east of the Megalo Daktylo (Large Finger). ... The Greek National Tourism Organisation (GNTO) is the government department for tourism in Greece. ...


The city is surrounded by four mountains; (Parnitha and Penteli accessible to the north, Hemmettus to the southeast, and Egaleo to the west). Mount Parnitha, in particular, is the tallest of the city (1,453 m (4,767 ft)) and has been declared a national park. Tens of well-marked paths, gorges, springs, torrents and caves dot the area, and one may even encounter deer in its dense forest. Hiking and mountain-biking in all four mountains have been and remain popular outdoor activities for many Athenians. Casinos operate on both Mount Parnitha, some 30 km (19 mi) from downtown Athens, (accessible by car or cable car) and the nearby town of Loutraki (accessible by car via the Athens - Corinth National Highway, or the suburban railroad). Mount Cook, a mountain in New Zealand A mountain is a landform that extends above the surrounding terrain in a limited area. ... Mount Parnitha (Greek, modern: Πάρνηθα, ancient/Katharevousa: -is, sometimes Parnetha), older forms Parnes, Parnis (also with the first an accented) is a densely forested mountain range north of Athens, the highest on the peninsula of Attica, with an elevation of 1,413 m and a summit known as Karavola (Καραβόλα). Much of... Loutraki (Greek, Modern: Λουτράκι, Ancient/Katharevousa: Λουτράκιον) is a seaside town located 4 km NE of Corinth in the Prefecture of Corinthia, Greece. ... Corinth, or Korinth (Greek: Κόρινθος, Kórinthos; see also List of traditional Greek place names) is a Greek city-state, on the Isthmus of Corinth, the narrow stretch of land that joins the Peloponnesus to the mainland of Greece. ...


Landmarks

Panoramic view of parts of central Athens as seen from Areopagus.

Large parts of the city centre have been redeveloped under a masterplan called Unification of Archeological Sites of Athens, which has also gathered funding from the EU to help enhance the project.[41][31] Most strikingly, the landmark Dionysiou Aeropagitou street has been pedestrianised, forming a scenic route. The route starts from the Temple of Olympian Zeus at Vasilissis Olgas Avenue, continues under the southern slopes of the Acropolis near Plaka, and finishes just beyond the Temple of Hephaestus in Thiseio. The route in its entirety provides visitors with views of the Parthenon and the Agora (the meeting point of ancient Athenians), away from the busy city centre. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (16079x1494, 4323 KB) Licensing File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (16079x1494, 4323 KB) Licensing File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... This article concerns the Classical judicial body. ... The Temple of Olympian Zeus, Athens: the most substantial surviving part of the temple. ... Plaka by night Pláka (Greek: Πλάκα) is the old historical neighbourhood of Athens, Greece just under the Acropolis. ... Temple of Hephaestus, an Doric Greek temple in Athens with the original entrance facing east, 449 BC (western face depicted) Temple of Hephaestus, Athens: eastern face The Temple of Hephaestus in central ancient Athens, Greece, is the best-preserved ancient Greek temple in the world, but is far less well... Thiseio, also Thisseio, Thisio and Thissio (Greek: Εξάρχεια) is the name of a neighborhood in downtown Athens northwest of the Acropolis, 1. ... The Parthenon west façade For other uses, see Parthenon (disambiguation). ... Remains of the agora built in Athens in the Roman period (east of the classical agora). ...

  • Syntagma Square (Constitution Square) is situated in central Athens and near the site of the former Royal Palace, now the Greek Parliament and other 19th century public buildings. The National Garden behind parliament, stretching to the Zappeion, is a verdant oasis for the city-centre. Syntagma is the largest square in the capital and also home to a number of luxury hotels, including the historic Grande Bretagne, Athens' first. Constitution Square is a tourist starting-point for the city, at the centre of an area where most of its famous ancient monuments are to be found, all within a 2 km (1 mi) radius.
  • Southeast of Syntagma Square stands the Kallimarmaro Stadium, the space where the first modern Olympic Games took place in 1896. It is a replica of the ancient Athenian stadium, and the only major stadium (in its capacity of 60,000) to be made entirely of white marble from Mount Penteli, the same material used for the construction of the Parthenon.
  • Athens is built around a number of hills. Lycabettus is one of the tallest hills of the city proper and according to ancient legend is actually a boulder thrown down from the sky by Athena. Located in the city centre, near Alexandras Avenue and Vassilissis Sofias Avenue, it offers vistas of sprawling Athens below. At its peak stands St. George's church; Philopappos hill is another famous landmark, located just to the southwest of Acropolis.
View of the Temple of Olympian Zeus (upper right) and the Arch of Hadrian (lower left) from the Acropolis of Athens.
View of the Temple of Olympian Zeus (upper right) and the Arch of Hadrian (lower left) from the Acropolis of Athens.
  • The old campus of the University of Athens, located in the middle section of Panepistimiou Street, is one of the finest buildings in the city. This, combined with the adjacent National Library and the Athens Academy close by, form an imposing "Athens Trilogy" built in the mid-19th century. However, most of the university's workings have been moved to a much larger, modern campus located in the eastern suburb of Zográfou. The second most significant academic institution in the city is the Athens Polytechnic School (Ethniko Metsovio Politechnio), to be found in Patission Street. More than 20 students were killed inside the university in November 17, 1973 during the Athens Polytechnic Uprising, against the military junta that ruled the nation from April 21, 1967 until July 23, 1974.

The Hellenic Parliament (Greek: Βουλή των Ελλήνων; transliterated Vouli ton Ellinon; literally Council of the Greeks) is the parliament of Greece, located in Syntagma Square in Athens. ... Syntagma Square (Πλατεία Συντάγματος, Constitution Square), is located in central Athens, Greece. ... Syntagma Square (Πλατεία Συντάγματος, Constitution Square), is located in central Athens, Greece. ... The Hellenic Parliament (Greek: Βουλή των Ελλήνων; transliterated Vouli ton Ellinon; literally Council of the Greeks) is the parliament of Greece, located in Syntagma Square in Athens. ... The National Gardens (formerly the Royal Gardens) (Greek: Εθνικός Κήπος) is a peaceful, green refuge of 15. ... The Zappeion was a sporting arena in Athens, Greece used for the fencing events at the 1896 Summer Olympics. ... Tiananmen Square, Beijing The Macroplaza, Monterrey Prato della Valle, Padova Naghsh-i Jahan Square, Isfahan Place de la Concorde, Paris Palace Square, St. ... Grand Bretagne is a luxurious hotel located in central Athens right next to Syntagma Square. ... Panathinaiko Stadium (also known as the Kallimarmaro) in Athens is the only major stadium in the world thats constructed fully of white marble from mount Penteli. ... The 1896 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the I Olympiad, were celebrated in 1896 in Athens, Greece. ... Pentéli or Pendeli, (Greek: Πεντέλη, ancient forms: Pentele or Pentelicus, Mendeli in medieval times) is a tall mountain and mountain range situated northeast of Athens and southwest of Marathon. ... The Parthenon west façade For other uses, see Parthenon (disambiguation). ... Lykavittos ( Greek: Λυκάβηττος) is a Cretaceous limestone hill in Athens, Greece. ... This is the Greek name of the capital of the Hellenic Republic (Greece). ... The Alexandras Avenue (Greek: Λεωφορος Αλεξάνδρας Leoforos Alexandras) is an avenue linking 28 Oktovriou Street and Kifissias Avenue as well as Vasileias Sofias Avenue and Mesogeiou Avenue via Fipiddou Street in the northern part of the city of Athens. ... Vassilissis Sofias Avenue or Vasilissis Sofias Avenue (Greek: Λεωφόρος Βασιλίσσης Σοφίας Leoforos Vassilissis Sofias) is a major avenue in the east side of Athens, the Greek capital. ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 575 pixelsFull resolution (1881 × 1351 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 575 pixelsFull resolution (1881 × 1351 pixel, file size: 1. ... The Temple of Olympian Zeus, Athens: the most substantial surviving part of the temple. ... [Image:http://www. ... The Acropolis of Athens is the best known acropolis (high city, The Sacred Rock) in the world. ... Façade of the National Archaeological museum of Athens. ... Patission Avenue or Patission Street is one of the major streets in central Athens. ... Greece has a rich and varied artistic history, spanning some 5000 years and beginning in the Cycladic and Minoan prehistorical civilization, giving birth to Western classical art in the ancient period (further developing this during the Hellenistic Period), to taking in the influences of Eastern civilizations and the new religion... the Benaki Museum, Athens, Greece The Benaki Museum was established and endowed in 1930 by Antonis Benakis in memory of his father Emmanuel Benakis, at the Benakis family mansion in downtown Athens. ... Pireos Street is a main road linking Athens and Piraeus. ... The Byzantine and Christian museum is situated at Vassilissis Sofias Avenue 22 in Athens. ... // The Stathatos mansion is one of the best examples of neoclassical architecture in Greece. ... Kolonaki (Greek: Κολωνάκι), literally Little Column is a prestigious neighbourhood in central Athens, Greece. ... The Games of the XXVIII Olympiad, commonly known as the 2004 Summer Olympics were the 28th Summer Olympic Games. ... The New Acropolis Museum is a museum by architect Bernard Tschumi located near the Acropolis in Athens, Greece. ... Bernard Tschumi (born January 25, 1944 Lausanne, Switzerland) is an architect, writer, and educator. ... For the song by Ai Otsuka, see Planetarium (song) // A planetarium is a theatre built primarily for presenting educational and entertaining shows about astronomy and the night sky, or for training in celestial navigation. ... Andrea Syngrou Avenue is an important road in Athens, linking Poseidonos Avenue with the centre and other avenues. ... The National and Kapodistrian University of Athens (Greek: Εθνικόν και Καποδιστριακόν Πανεπιστήμιον Αθηνών), usually referred to simply as the University of Athens, is the oldest university in the region of the eastern Mediterranean and has been in continuous operation since its establishment in 1837. ... There is also a Panepistimiou Street in Patras, see Panepistimiou Street (Patras) Panepistimiou Street (Greek: Οδός Πανεπιστιμίου) (named after the University of Athens which is on the upper corner) is a major street in Athens that runs one way for non-transit vehicles since 2002 from Amalias Avenue, Syntagma Square and Vasileias... A national library is a library specifically established by the government of a country to serve as the preeminent repository of information for that country. ... The main building of the Academy of Athens, one of Theophil Hansens Trilogy in central Athens. ... Zografou ( Greek: Ζωγράφου), rarely Zografos, is a suburb in the eastern part of Athens, Greece. ... The National Technical University of Athens (Greek: Εθνικό Μετσόβιο Πολυτεχνείο, National Metsovion Polytechnic), sometimes simply known as Athens Polytechnic, is among the oldest and most prestigious higher education institutions of Greece. ... 17 November is also the name of a Marxist group in Greece, coinciding with the anniversary of the Athens Polytechnic uprising. ... For the song by James Blunt, see 1973 (song). ... An AMX 30 tank standing in front of the Athens Polytechnic. ... is the 111th day of the year (112th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1967 (MCMLXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the 1967 Gregorian calendar. ... is the 204th day of the year (205th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1974 (MCMLXXIV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the 1974 Gregorian calendar. ...

Transportation

The Athens Mass Transit System consists of a large bus fleet, a trolleybus fleet that mainly serves the downtown area, the city's Metro, a tram line connecting the southern suburbs to the city centre,[44] and the Athens Suburban Railway service.[45] The Athens tram connects the city centre with the coast The Mass Transit System of Athens, Greece consists of: Buses (Operated by E.THE.L., Etaireia Thermikon Leoforeion, Thermal Bus Company, , in Greek) Electric Buses (Trolleys) (Operated by I.L.P.A.P., Ilektrika Leoforeia Periohis Athinon - Peiraios, Electric Buses... A trolleybus (also known as trolley bus, trolley coach, trackless trolley, trackless tram or simply trolley) is an electric bus powered by two overhead wires, from which it draws electricity using two trolley poles. ... This article refers to public transport vehicles running on rails. ...


Attiko Metro

Map of the Athens Metro.
Map of the Athens Metro.

The Athens Metro is more commonly known in Greece as the Attiko Metro (Greek: Αττικό Mετρό). While its main purpose is transport, it also houses Greek artifacts found during construction of the subway.[46] The Athens Metro supports an operating staff of 387 and runs two of the three metro lines;[47] its two lines (red and blue) were constructed largely during the 1990s, and the initial sections opened in January 2000, and the lines run entirely underground. The metro network operates a fleet of 42 trains consisting of 252 cars,[47] with a daily occupancy of 550,000 passengers.[47] The Blue Line runs from the western suburbs, namely the Egaleo station, through the central Monastiraki and Syntagma stations to Doukissis Plakentias avenue in the northeastern suburb of Halandri, covering a distance of 16 km (10 mi),[47] then ascending to ground level and reaching Eleftherios Venizelos International Airport, using the Suburban Railway infrastructure and extending its distance to 39 km (24 mi).[47] The Red Line, in counterpart, runs from Aghios Antonios to Aghios Dimitrios and covers a distance of 11.6 km (7 mi).[47] Extensions to both these lines are under construction, most notably westwards to Piraeus, southwards to the Old Hellinikon Airport East Terminal (the future Metropolitan Park), and eastward toward the easternmost suburb of Aghia Paraskevi. The eastern part is actually no extension per se, but rather an opening of new stations between the Ethniki Amyna and Doukissis Plakentias stations. The spring 2007 extension from Monastiraki westwards, to Egaleo, connected some of the main night life hubs of the city, namely the ones of Gazi (Kerameikos station) with Psyrri (Monastiraki station) and the city centre (Syntagma station). Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 560 pixelsFull resolution (2000 × 1400 pixel, file size: 245 KB, MIME type: image/png) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 560 pixelsFull resolution (2000 × 1400 pixel, file size: 245 KB, MIME type: image/png) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... The Athens Metro is the underground public transport system of Athens, Greece, constructed by the Attiko Metro company (Αττικό Μετρό, literally Attican metro) and the ISAP (Ilektrikoi Sidirodromoi Athinon-Pireos) company (Ηλεκτρικοί Σιδηρόδρομοι Αθηνών-Πειραιώς Athens - Piraeus Electric Railways). The Athens Metro is one of the most impressive underground Mass Transit systems in the world because... Egaleo (Αιγάλεω) is a city in Attica, Greece. ... Souvenir shop of Pandrossou street Monastiraki redirects here. ... Doukissis Plakentias is an Attiko Metro Blue Line (Line 3) Station situated in Agia Paraskevi, in Athens. ... Chalandri, Halandri or sometimes Khalandri (Greek, Modern: Χαλάνδρι, Ancient/Katharevousa: -on), older forms, Chalandrion, Halandrion, Khalandrion is a northern suburb in Athens, Greece. ... The E. Venizelos Athens International Airport The Eleftherios Venizelos International Airport, which began operation in March 2001, serves the city of Athens in Greece. ... Aghios Antonios is a subway (metro) station in Athens, Greece. ... Agios Dimitrios, Aghios Dimitrios or Ayios Dimitrios ( Greek: Άγιος Δημήτριος meaning Saint Demetrius) is a suburb in the southern part of Athens, Greece. ... It has been suggested that Kaminia (Piraeus), Greece be merged into this article or section. ... Ellinikon International Airport (IATA: ATH, ICAO: LGAT), sometimes spelled Hellinikon (in Greek Ελληνικόν) was the international airport of Athens for sixty years up until 2001 when it was replaced by Eleftherios Venizelos International Airport. ... Hellenikon Metropolitan Park as it has been named, will be a large urban park located in Hellinikon, near Athens, Greece. ... For other uses, see Agia Paraskevi (disambiguation). ... Ethniki Amyna (Εθνική Άμυνα) is an Attiko Metro Blue Line (Line 3) station, situated close to the Hellenic Ministry of Defence (Υπουργείο Εθνικής Αμύνης), and the Hellenic Ministry of Transportation and Communications. ... Doukissis Plakentias is an Attiko Metro Blue Line (Line 3) Station situated in Agia Paraskevi, in Athens. ... Souvenir shop of Pandrossou street Monastiraki redirects here. ... Egaleo (Αιγάλεω) is a city in Attica, Greece. ... The Kerameikos is the name of the deme or part of Athens to the northwest of the Acropolis and includes an extensive area both within and outside of the city walls. ... Souvenir shop of Pandrossou street Monastiraki redirects here. ... The Syntagma (Σύνταγμα), the Constitution of Greece is resolved by the Fifth Revisionary Parliament of the Hellenes and entered into force in 1975. ...


Electric railway (ISAP)

An ISAP train (Green Line) passes by the Stoa of Attalus in central Athens.
An ISAP train (Green Line) passes by the Stoa of Attalus in central Athens.

The third line, not run by the Athens Metro, is the ISAP (Greek: ΗΣΑΠ), the Electric Railway Company. This is the Green line of the Athens Metro as shown on the adjacent map, and unlike the red and blue routes running entirely underground, ISAP runs either above-ground or below-ground at different sections of its journey. This same operation runs the original metro line from Piraeus to Kifisia; it serves 22 stations,[48] with a network length of 25.6 km (15.9 mi),[48] an operating staff of 730 and a fleet of 44 trains and 243 cars,[48] and a daily occupancy rate of 600,000 passengers.[48] The historic Green Line, a 25 km (16 mi)-long and 24-station line which forms the oldest and for the most part runs at ground level, connects the port of Piraeus to the northern suburb of Kifissia, and is set to be extended to Agios Stefanos, a suburb located 23 km (14 mi) to the north of the city centre, reaching to 36 km (22 mi). Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2816 × 2112 pixel, file size: 2. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2816 × 2112 pixel, file size: 2. ... Stoa of Attalos The Stoa of Attalos (also spelt Attalus) is one of the most impressive buildings in the Athenian Agora. ... It has been suggested that Kaminia (Piraeus), Greece be merged into this article or section. ... Kifissia (Greek, Modern: Κηφισιά;, Katharevousa: Κηφισσιά;, Ancient form/Latin: Cephissia) or Kifisia is a northern suburb of Athens, Greece. ...


Suburban rail (Proastiakos)

The Proastiakós connects Eleftherios Venizelos International Airport to the city of Corinth, 80 km (50 mi) west of Athens, via the central Larissa train station and the port of Piraeus, and is sometimes considered the fourth line of the Athens Metro. The metro network, Suburban Rail not included, currently extends to a length of 91 km (57 mi), expected to stretch to 124 km (77 mi) (72 stations) by 2009. The Proastiakos will be extended to Aigio (180 km (112 mi) west of Athens), and Chalkida by the end of 2007. The urban and suburban railway system is managed by three different companies; namely ISAP,[49] Attiko Metro (lines 2 & 3) and Proastiakós (line 4). Proastiakos train in Athens Central Railway Station The Proastiakos (Greek: Προαστιακός meaning literally the Suburban) is the suburban railway system of Athens, Greece. ... The E. Venizelos Athens International Airport The Eleftherios Venizelos International Airport, which began operation in March 2001, serves the city of Athens in Greece. ... Corinth, or Korinth (Greek: Κόρινθος, Kórinthos; see also List of traditional Greek place names) is a Greek city-state, on the Isthmus of Corinth, the narrow stretch of land that joins the Peloponnesus to the mainland of Greece. ...


Buses

The busy central Patission Avenue.
The busy central Patission Avenue.

The service operated under Ethel (Greek: ΕΘΕΛ) Thermal Bus Company is the main operator of buses in Athens. It consists of a network of 300 bus lines which span the entire Attica Basin,[50] with an operating staff of 5,327, and a fleet of 1,839 buses.[51] Of those 1,839 buses 295 run on natural gas,[51] making up the largest fleet of natural gas-run buses in Europe. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (900x1200, 295 KB) Summary Patission Avenue is one of the bussiest avenues of central Athens. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (900x1200, 295 KB) Summary Patission Avenue is one of the bussiest avenues of central Athens. ...


Besides being served by a fleet of natural-gas and normal buses, the Athens metropolitan area is also serviced by electric buses, or ILPAP, as the service is known in Athens (Greek: ΗΛΠΑΠ). The Electric Buses of the Athens and Pireaus Region (ILPAP) consists of 22 lines and an operating staff of 1,137,[52] and the network operates a fleet of 366 trolley buses able to run on diesel in case of power failure.[52] A trolleybus in Arnhem An electric trolleybus (also known as trolley bus or trackless trolley or simply trolley) is a bus powered by two overhead electric wires, from which the bus draws electricity using two trolley poles. ... Piraeus, or Peiraeus (Modern Greek: Πειραιά(ς) Pireá(s), Ancient Greek / Katharevousa: Πειραιεύς Pireéfs) is a city in the prefecture of Attica, Greece, located south of Athens. ...


Tram line

The tram operator has a fleet of 42 trams which serve 47 stations,[53] employ 345 people with an average daily occupancy of 80,000 passengers.[53] This network runs from Syntagma Square to the southwestern suburb of Palaio Faliro, where the line splits in two branches; the first runs along the Athens coastline toward the southern suburb of Glyfada, while the other heads toward the Piraeus district of Neo Faliro. Both the Syntagma - Palaio Faliro - Neo Faliro and the Syntagma - Glyfada lines opened on 19 July 2004, with further extensions planned towards the major commercial port of Piraeus, and the southernmost suburb of Vouliagmeni. Syntagma Square (Πλατεία Συντάγματος, Constitution Square), is located in central Athens, Greece. ... Palaio Faliro or Paleo Faliro (Greek, Modern: Παλαιό Φάληρο, Ancient/Katharevousa: Παλαιὸν Φάληρον, meaning Old Faliro), older forms Palaio Faliron or Paleo Faliron is a suburb in the southern part of Athens, Greece. ... Glyfada (Greek: Γλυφάδα) is a rather exclusive municipality of Athens in Greece south of Ellinikon and Athens with three main roads. ... It has been suggested that Kaminia (Piraeus), Greece be merged into this article or section. ... Syntagma Square (Πλατεία Συντάγματος, Constitution Square), is located in central Athens, Greece. ... is the 200th day of the year (201st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... It has been suggested that Kaminia (Piraeus), Greece be merged into this article or section. ... Vouliagmeni (Greek: Βουλιαγμένη, meaning sunken) is an exclusive municipality 20 km south of Athens. ...


Taxis

There is a plentiful supply of taxis in Athens. They are generally cheap, and during rush hour it is often considered normal to flag down a taxi when not more than one or two other customers are already in (although, officially, this is forbidden); convention dictates that if the second passenger happens to be heading in a similar direction and the original passenger has no complaints (seldom if ever is this an issue), he/she joins the journey, and both passengers give the fare as they would if travelling alone. For specific countries see Taxicabs around the world. ...


Eleftherios Venizelos International Airport

Interior of the Eleftherios Venizelos International Airport, only days before its opening in 2001. (European Airport of the year 2004.)
Interior of the Eleftherios Venizelos International Airport, only days before its opening in 2001. (European Airport of the year 2004.)

Athens is served by the state-of-the-art Eleftherios Venizelos International Airport (AIA) located near the town of Spata, in the eastern Messoghia plain, some 35 km (22 mi) east of Athens.[54] The airport was awarded the "European Airport of the Year 2004" Award.[55] Intended as an expandable hub for air travel in southeastern Europe, it was constructed in a record 51 months costing 2.2 billion euros, and employing a staff of 14,000.[55] An express bus service is provided, connecting the airport to the metro system, and 2 express bus services connect the airport to the port at Piraeus and the city centre respectively. Eleftherios Venizelos accommodates 65 landings and take-offs per hour,[54] with its 24 passenger boarding bridges,[54] 144 check-in counters and broader 150,000 m² (1,614,587 sq ft) main terminal,[54] and a commercial area of 7,000 m² (75,347 sq ft) which includes cafes and duty-free shops.[55] In 2007, the airport handled 16,538,390 passengers, an increase of 9.7% over the previous year of 2006.[56] Of those 16,538,390 passengers, 5,955,387 passed through the airport for domestic flights,[56] and 10,583,003 passengers travelled through for international flights.[56] Beyond the dimensions of its passenger capacity, AIA handled 205,294 total flights in 2007, or approximately 562 flights per day.[57] Image File history File links El-Venizelos7. ... Image File history File links El-Venizelos7. ... The E. Venizelos Athens International Airport The Eleftherios Venizelos International Airport, which began operation in March 2001, serves the city of Athens in Greece. ... The E. Venizelos Athens International Airport The Eleftherios Venizelos International Airport, which began operation in March 2001, serves the city of Athens in Greece. ... Spata (Greek: Σπάτα), is an urb in the eastern part of Athens, Greece. ... It has been suggested that Kaminia (Piraeus), Greece be merged into this article or section. ... For the Athens airport, see Athens International Airport. ...


Railways, highways and ferry connections

Interchange at the Attiki Odos near the Athens International Airport.
Interchange at the Attiki Odos near the Athens International Airport.

Athens is the hub of the country's national railway system (OSE), connecting the capital with major cities across Greece and abroad (Istanbul, Sofia, and beyond). However, this system is not very extensive, due largely to geomorphological factors. Ferries departing from the major port of Piraeus connect the city to the numerous Greek islands of the Aegean Sea. There are two main highways; one heading towards the western city of Patra in Peloponessus (GR-8A, E94) and the other heading to the north, towards Greece's second largest city, Thessaloniki (GR-1, E75). In 2001-2004, a ring road toll-motorway (Attiki Odos) was gradually completed, extending from the western industrial suburb of Elefsina all the way to the Athens International Airport. The Ymittos Periphery Highway is a separate section of Attiki Odos connecting the eastern suburb of Kaisariani to the northeastern town of Glyka Nera; this is where it meets the main part of the ring road. The span of the Attiki Odos in all is 70 km. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1417x1063, 1553 KB) Description Image of the Attiki Odos, a freeway in Greece License File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Greece Attiki Odos Metadata This file contains... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1417x1063, 1553 KB) Description Image of the Attiki Odos, a freeway in Greece License File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Greece Attiki Odos Metadata This file contains... Attiki Odos (Greek: Αττική Οδός) is a private-owned toll highway in Greece. ... It has been suggested that Kaminia (Piraeus), Greece be merged into this article or section. ... This is a list of some of the 3000 islands of Greece: Chrysi Crete Dia Euboea Gavdos Koufonisi Ydra The Cyclades Amorgos Anafi Andros Antiparos Anydro Delos Donoussa Folegandros Gyaros Ios Irakleia Kea Keros Kimolos Kithnos Makronisos Milos Mykonos (Mikonos) Naxos Paros Pholegandros Santorini (also called Thira) Serifos Sifnos Sikinos... Look up Aegean Sea in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Patras (Demotic Greek: Πάτρα, Pátra, IPA: , Classical Greek: Πάτραι, Pátrai, Latin: ) is Greeces third largest city and the capital of the prefecture of Achaea, located in northern Peloponnese, 215 kilometers west of Athens. ... Peloponnesos (Greek: Πελοπόννησος, sometime Latinized as Peloponnesus or Anglicized as The Peloponnese) is a large peninsula in Greece, forming the part of the country south of the Isthmus of Corinth. ... A non-freeway part of the road Greece Interstate 8A, sometimes Greece Interstate 8 is a toll road running from Kifissou avenue, in Athens up to the northeast of Patras. ... The E94 is part of the international E-road network, which is a series of main roads in the European Union. ... Thessaloniki or Salonica (Greek: ) is Greeces second-largest city and the capital of Macedonia, the largest Region of Greece. ... Greece Interstate 1 is one of the longest highways in Greece. ... The E75 is part of the Trans European Road Network, which is a series of main roads in the European Union. ... Attiki Odos (Greek: Αττική Οδός) is a private-owned toll highway in Greece. ... Eleusis (Game) The cardgame invented by Robert Abbott in 1962, and later popularized in 1977 by Martin Gardner in his Mathematical Games column in Scientific American magazine. ... For the airport in Athens, Georgia, United States, see Athens-Ben Epps Airport. ... Attiki Odos (Greek: Αττική Οδός) is a private-owned toll highway in Greece. ... Kaisariani or Kaissariani ( Greek: Καισαριάνη), also Kesariani or Kessariani, is a suburb in the eastern part of Athens, Greece. ... Glyka Nera or Glika Nera (Greek: Γλυκά Νερά meaning sweet water), is a suburb in the northeastern part of Athens, Greece. ...


Olympic Games

1896 Summer Olympics

Main article: 1896 Summer Olympics
The opening ceremony of the 1896 Olympic Games.
The opening ceremony of the 1896 Olympic Games.

1896 brought forth the revival of the modern Olympic Games, by Frenchman Pierre de Coubertin. Thanks to his efforts, Athens was awarded the first modern Olympic Games. In 1896, the city had an approximate population of 123,000[26] and the event helped boost the city's international profile. Of the venues used for these Olympics, the Kallimarmaro Stadium, and Zappeion were most crucial. It was to be more than 100 years before the city would restage the event. The 1896 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the I Olympiad, were celebrated in 1896 in Athens, Greece. ... Image File history File links From it: The opening ceremony of the 1896 Summer Olympics. ... Image File history File links From it: The opening ceremony of the 1896 Summer Olympics. ... His statue at the Centennial Olympic Park, Atlanta. ... The Zappeion was a sporting arena in Athens, Greece used for the fencing events at the 1896 Summer Olympics. ...


1906 Summer Olympics

The 1906 Summer Olympics, or the 1906 Intercalated games, were held very successfully in Athens. The intercalated competitions were intermediate games to the internationally organised olympics, and were meant to be organised in Greece. This idea later lost support from the IOC and these games were not made permanent. The 1906 Summer Olympics, also called the 1906 Intercalated Games, were held in Athens, Greece. ... Olympic Games Summer Olympic Games Medal count Winter Olympic Games Medal count Olympic sports Medal counts Participating NOCs Olympic symbols Olympics WikiProject Olympics Portal Athens 2004 • Beijing 2008 Torino 2006 • Vancouver 2010 ... Alternative meanings at IOC (disambiguation) The International Olympic Committee is an organization based in Lausanne, Switzerland, created by Pierre de Coubertin in 1894 to reinstate the Ancient Olympic Games held in Greece, and organize this sports event every four years. ...


2004 Summer Olympics

Main article: 2004 Summer Olympics

Athens was awarded the 2004 Summer Olympics on September 5, 1997 in Lausanne, Switzerland, after having lost a previous bid to host the 1996 Summer Olympics, to Atlanta, United States.[11] It was to be the second time Athens would have the honour of hosting the games, following the inaugural event of 1896. After 1990's unsuccessful bid, the 1997 bid was radically improved also including an appeal to Greece's Olympic history. In the last round of voting, Athens defeated Rome with 66 votes to 41.[11] Prior to this round, the cities of Buenos Aires, Stockholm and Cape Town had already been eliminated from competition, having received fewer votes.[11] The ceremony for the lighting of the flame is arranged as a pagan pageant, with priestesses dancing. ... is the 248th day of the year (249th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... Lausanne (pronounced ) is a city in the French-speaking part of Switzerland, situated on the shores of Lake Geneva (French: Lac Léman), and facing Évian-les-Bains (France) and with the Jura mountains to its north. ... The 1996 Summer h Olympics, formally known as the Games of the XXVI Olympiad and informally known as the Centennial Olympics, were held in 1996 in Atlanta, Georgia, United States. ... Atlanta redirects here. ... For other uses, see Rome (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Buenos Aires (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Stockholm (disambiguation). ... Nickname: Motto: Spes Bona (Latin for Good Hope) Location of the City of Cape Town in Western Cape Province Coordinates: , Country Province Municipality City of Cape Town Metropolitan Municipality Founded 1652 Government [1]  - Type City council  - Mayor Helen Zille  - City manager Achmat Ebrahim Area  - Total 2,499 km² (964. ...

The Olympic Flame at the Opening Ceremony of the 2004 Olympic Games, conceived by the avant garde choreographer Dimitris Papaioannou.
The Olympic Flame at the Opening Ceremony of the 2004 Olympic Games, conceived by the avant garde choreographer Dimitris Papaioannou.

During the first three years of preparations, the International Olympic Committee had repeatedly expressed some concern over the speed of construction progress for some of the new Olympic venues. In 2000 the Organising Committee's president was replaced by Gianna Angelopoulos-Daskalaki, who was the president of the original Bidding Committee in 1997. From that point on, preparations continued at a highly accelerated, almost frenzied pace. Download high resolution version (2024x1446, 1737 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Download high resolution version (2024x1446, 1737 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... The flame at the 2002 Winter Olympics The Olympic Flame, Olympic Fire, Olympic Torch, Olympic Light, Olympic Eye, and Olympic Sun are all names for an important marketing promotion and symbol of the Olympic Games. ... (Redirected from 2004 Olympic Games) The Games of the XXVIII Olympiad, commonly known as the 2004 Summer Olympics were the 28th Summer Olympic Games. ... Dimitris Papaioannou (born Athens, 1964) is a Greek avant-garde choreographer, director, dancer and artist who conceived and directed the critically lauded 2004 Summer Olympics Opening Ceremony and its closing counterpart, in addition to directing the ceremonies for the beginning and end of the 2004 Paralympics. ... Stamp The International Olympic Committee (French: Comité International Olympique) is an organization based in Lausanne, Switzerland, created by Pierre de Coubertin and Demetrios Vikelas on June 23, 1894. ... Gianna Angelopoulos-Daskalaki (born Gianna Daskalaki on December 12, 1955 in Heraklion, Crete) is a Greek politician and business woman. ...


Although the heavy cost was criticized, estimated at $1.5 billion, as is usually the case with most Olympic cities, Athens was literally transformed into a more functional city that enjoys state-of-the-art technology both in transportation and in modern urban development.[58] Some of the finest sporting venues in the world were created in the city, all of which were fully ready for the games. The games welcomed over 10,000 athletes from all 202 countries.[58] The 2004 Games were judged a huge success, as both security and organization were exceptionally good, and only a few visitors reported minor problems mainly concerning accommodation issues. The 2004 Olympic Games were described as Unforgettable, dream Games, by IOC President Jacques Rogge for their return to the birthplace of the Olympics, and for superbly meeting the challenges of holding the Olympic Games.[58] The only observable problem was a somewhat sparse attendance of some early events. Eventually, however, a total of more than 3.5 million tickets were sold, which was higher than any other Olympics with the exception of Sydney (more than 5 million tickets were sold there in 2000).[59] Jacques Rogge Count Jacques Rogge (born May 2, 1942 in Ghent, Belgium) is by profession an orthopedic surgeon. ... This article is about the metropolitan area in Australia. ...


Sister cities

Athens has the following sister cities: Sign denoting twin towns of Neckarsulm, Germany Town twinning is a concept whereby towns or cities in geographically and politically distinct areas are paired with the goal of fostering human contact and cultural links. ...

Image File history File links Flag_of_Spain. ... Location Coordinates : Time Zone : CET (GMT +1) - summer: CEST (GMT +2) General information Native name Barcelona (Catalan) Spanish name Barcelona Nickname Ciutat Comtal (City of Counts) Postal code 08001–08080 Area code 34 (Spain) + 93 (Barcelona) Website http://www. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_Peoples_Republic_of_China. ... Peking redirects here. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Lebanon. ... This article is about the Lebanese city. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Palestine. ... This article is about the city in the West Bank. ... This article is about the Palestinian territories as a geopolitical phenomenon. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Romania. ... Nickname: Motto: Patria si Dreptul Meu (My Country and My Right) Location of Bucharest within Romania (in red) Coordinates: , Country County Founded 1459 (first official record) Government  - Mayor Adriean Videanu Area  - City 228 km² (88 sq mi)  - Metro 238 km² (91. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Egypt. ... For other uses, see Cairo (disambiguation). ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Colombia. ... Cali redirects here. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... For other uses, see Chicago (disambiguation). ... Motto: (traditional) In God We Trust (official, 1956–present) Anthem: The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City Official language(s) None at the federal level; English de facto Government Federal Republic  - President George W. Bush (R)  - Vice President Dick Cheney (R) Independence - Declared - Recognized... Image File history File links Flag_of_Romania. ... Map of Romania showing Cluj_Napoca Cluj_Napoca (Hungarian: Kolozsvár, German: Klausenburg, Latin: Claudiopolis), the seat of Cluj county, is one of the most important academic, cultural and industrial centers in Romania. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Peru. ... This article is the city in Peru. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Italy. ... Florence (or Firenze, Florentia and Fiorenza) is the capital city of the Italian region of Tuscany, and of the province of Florence. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Italy. ... For other uses, see Genoa (disambiguation). ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Cuba. ... This article is about the capital of Cuba. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Turkey. ... Istanbul (Turkish: , Greek: , historically Byzantium and later Constantinople; see other names) is Turkeys most populous city, and its cultural and financial center. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Ukraine. ... Map of Ukraine with Kiev highlighted Coordinates: , Country Ukraine Oblast Kiev City Municipality Raion Municipality Government  - Mayor Leonid Chernovetskyi Elevation 179 m (587 ft) Population (2006)  - City 4,450,968  - Density 3,299/km² (8,544. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Portugal. ... For other uses, see Lisbon (disambiguation). ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Slovenia. ... Location in Slovenia Coordinates: , Country Founded AD 15 (as Colonia Iulia Aemona) Government  - Mayor and governor Zoran Janković (Lista Zorana Jankovića) Area  - Total 275. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Los Angeles and L.A. redirect here. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Spain. ... This article is about the Spanish capital. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Nickname: Motto: Concordia Salus (well-being through harmony) Coordinates: , Country Province Region Montréal Founded 1642 Established 1832 Government  - Mayor Gérald Tremblay Area [1][2][3]  - City 365. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Russia. ... For other uses, see Moscow (disambiguation). ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Cyprus. ... District Nicosia District Government  - Mayor Eleni Mavrou Population (2004)  - City 270,000 (Greek part) 85,000 (Turkish part) 355,000 (Total) Time zone EET (UTC+2) Website: www. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Morocco. ... Mausoleum of Mohammed V through mosque ruins NASA image of Rabat Rabat (Arabic الرباط, transliterated ar-Rabāṭ or ar-Ribāṭ), population 1. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Italy. ... For other uses, see Rome (disambiguation). ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Chile. ... Location of Santiago commune in Greater Santiago Coordinates: , Region Province Foundation February 12, 1541 Government  - Mayor Raúl Alcaíno Lihn Area 1  - City 22. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_Dominican_Republic. ... For other uses, see Santo Domingo (disambiguation). ... Image File history File links Flag_of_South_Korea. ... Short name Statistics Location map Map of location of Seoul. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Bulgaria. ... This article is about the capital of Bulgaria. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Georgia. ... Location of Tbilisi in Georgia Coordinates: , Country Established c. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Albania. ... Nickname: Coordinates: , Country Albania Founded 1614 Elevation 295 ft (90 m) Population (2005 est)[1]  - City 585,756  - Metro 700,000 Tirana (Albanian: Tiranë or Tirana) is the capital and largest city of the Republic of Albania. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Poland. ... For other uses, see Warsaw (disambiguation) and Warszawa (disambiguation). ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Aerial photo (looking NW) of the Washington Monument and the White House in Washington, DC. Washington, D.C., officially the District of Columbia (also known as D.C.; Washington; the Nations Capital; the District; and, historically, the Federal City) is the capital city and administrative district of the United... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_Peoples_Republic_of_China. ... Xian redirects here. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Armenia. ... Location of Yerevan in Armenia Coordinates: , Country Established 782 BC Government  - Mayor Yervand Zakharyan Area  - City 227 km²  (87. ...

Cooperation

Image File history File links Flag_of_Serbia. ... For other uses, see Belgrade (disambiguation). ... Anthem:  Serbia() on the European continent()  —  [] Capital (and largest city) Belgrade Official languages Serbian Recognised regional languages Hungarian, Slovak, Romanian, Croatian, Rusyn 1 Albanian 2 Demonym Serbian Government Parliamentary Democracy  -  President Boris Tadić  -  Prime Minister Vojislav KoÅ¡tunica    -  First state 7th century   -  Serbian Kingdom3 1217   -  Serbian Empire 1345   -  Independence lost... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... This article is about the capital of France. ...

Cities nicknamed "Athens"

See Athens (disambiguation) for other cities named "Athens". Athens is the capital city of Greece. ...

, Madurai   (Tamil: , IPA: ) is a city and a municipal corporation with a city population of 922,913 according to 2001 census. ... Nickname: Location in the Commonwealth of Kentucky Coordinates: , Country United States State Kentucky Counties Fayette Government  - Mayor Jim Newberry (D) Area  - City  285. ... Berkeley is a city on the east shore of San Francisco Bay in Northern California, in the United States. ... Nashville redirects here. ... Edinburgh viewed from Arthurs Seat. ... Crawfordsville is a city in Montgomery County, Indiana, United States. ... Boston redirects here. ... This article is about the river in Germany. ... This article is about the capital of Germany. ... For other uses, see Munich (disambiguation). ... Matanzas is the capital of the Cuban Province Matanzas. ... For other uses, see Santo Domingo (disambiguation). ... Fireworks in Jyväskylä Jyväskylä (IPA: [jyʋæsËŒkylæ]) is a city located in central Finland, 147 km from Tampere and 270 km from Helsinki, near the lakes Päijänne and Keitele. ... For other uses, see Novi Sad (disambiguation). ... Anthem:  Serbia() on the European continent()  —  [] Capital (and largest city) Belgrade Official languages Serbian Recognised regional languages Hungarian, Slovak, Romanian, Croatian, Rusyn 1 Albanian 2 Demonym Serbian Government Parliamentary Democracy  -  President Boris Tadić  -  Prime Minister Vojislav KoÅ¡tunica    -  First state 7th century   -  Serbian Kingdom3 1217   -  Serbian Empire 1345   -  Independence lost... Krnov (read kûr´nôf in Czech, German: Jägerndorf, new-Polish: Krnów, old-Polish: Karniów, Latin: Carnovia) is an Upper Silesian city in the northeastern Czech Republic, in Moravian-Silesian Region, in the District of Bruntál, on the Opava River near the Polish border. ... Sárospatak is a town in Borsod-Abaúj-Zemplén county, Northern Hungary. ... Location    - Country  Portugal  - Region Centro  - Subregion Baixo Mondego  - District or A.R. Coimbra Mayor Carlos Encarnação  - Party PSD Area 319. ... São Luís is the capital of the state of Maranhão, Brazil. ... Juiz de Fora is a city in the southeast of Minas Gerais, Brazil close to the state border with Rio de Janeiro. ... The Roman Odeon. ... Sicily ( in Italian and Sicilian) is an autonomous region of Italy and the largest island in the Mediterranean Sea, with an area of 25,708 km² (9,926 sq. ... Nuoro (Nùgoro, that literally means home[1], in the ancient Nuoros dialect), is a town and province in central Sardinia, Italy, located at the slopes of Mount Ortobene. ... Sardinia (pronounced ; Italian: ; Sardinian: or ) is the second-largest island in the Mediterranean Sea (after Sicily). ... Flag Seal Location Tomsk and Oblast on the map of Russia Coordinates , Government Oblast Tomsk Mayor Aleksandr Makarov Geographical characteristics Area     City 294,6 km²     Land   294,6 km²     Water   0 km² Population     City (end of 2005) 509,568     Density   1,730/km² Elevation +100 m Website: Municipality website Main... This article is about Siberia as a whole. ... The Annual Dog Parade in DeLand Old Volusia County Courthouse in DeLand Manatees in Blue Spring State Park near DeLand DeLand is the county seat of Volusia County, Florida. ... Dunedin (ÅŒtepoti in Maori) is the second-largest city in the South Island of New Zealand, and the principal city of the region of Otago. ... Bogota redirects here. ... This article is about the city in Egypt. ...

Photo Gallery

See also

The Eurovision Song Contest 2006 was the fifty-first Eurovision Song Contest, held at the Olympic Indoor Hall in Athens, Greece on the 18 May 2006 (for the semi-final) and 20 May 2006 (for the final). ... Ancient Greece is the term used to describe the Greek-speaking world in ancient times. ... The Politics of Greece takes place in a large parliamentary representative democratic republic, whereby the Prime Minister of Greece is the head of government, and of a pluriform multi-party system. ... The National Technical University of Athens (Greek: Εθνικό Μετσόβιο Πολυτεχνείο, National Metsovion Polytechnic), sometimes simply known as Athens Polytechnic, is among the oldest and most prestigious higher education institutions of Greece. ... The National and Kapodistrian University of Athens (Greek: Εθνικόν και Καποδιστριακόν Πανεπιστήμιον Αθηνών), usually referred to simply as the University of Athens, is the oldest university in the region of the eastern Mediterranean and has been in continuous operation since its establishment in 1837. ... The term ancient Greece refers to the periods of Greek history in Classical Antiquity, lasting ca. ... This article is being considered for deletion in accordance with Wikipedias deletion policy. ... The National Technical University of Athens (Greek: Εθνικό Μετσόβιο Πολυτεχνείο, National Metsovion Polytechnic), sometimes simply known as Athens Polytechnic, is among the oldest and most prestigious higher education institutions of Greece. ... The Agricultural University of Athens (Greek Γεωπονικό Πανεπιστήμιο Αθηνών) is located in Athens, at the neighborhood of Votanikos. ... Panteion University Logo. ... The Athens University of Economics and Business (AUEB, ASOEE, or OPA) was founded in 1920 in Athens, Greece. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Façade of the National Archaeological museum of Athens. ... The National Library of Greece (Greek: ) is situated near the center of city of Athens. ... Pages in category Foreign Archaeological Institutes in Greece There are 26 pages in this section of this category. ...

References

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h PDF (875 KB) 2001 Census (Greek). National Statistical Service of Greece (ΕΣΥΕ). www.statistics.gr. Retrieved on 2007-10-30.
  2. ^ (Greek) Basic Characteristics. Ministry of the Interior. www.ypes.gr. Retrieved on 2007-08-07.
  3. ^ a b Characteristics. Hellenic Interior Ministry. www.ypes.gr. Retrieved on 2007-01-06.
  4. ^ "Population des villes et unités urbaines de plus de 1 million d'habitants de l'Union Européenne" (French). Institut National de la Statistique et des Études Économiques. Retrieved on 2006-04-10.
  5. ^ Urban Audit. Athina (PDF). Retrieved on 2007-12-28.
  6. ^ Plato's Academy. Hellenic Ministry of Culture. www.culture.gr. Retrieved on 2007-03-28.
  7. ^ CNN & Assiciated Press. "Greece uncovers 'holy grail' of Greek archeology", CNN.com, 1997-01-16. Retrieved on 2007-03-28. 
  8. ^ Athens aricle from Encyclopaedia Britannica Quote: Ancient Greek Athenai, historic city and capital of Greece. Many of classical civilization's intellectual and artistic ideas originated there and the city is generally considered to be the birthplace of Western civilization.
  9. ^ BBC History on Greek Democracy - Accessed on 26 January 2007
  10. ^ Encarta: Ancient Greece - Retrieved on 26 January 2007
  11. ^ a b c d CNN & Sports Illustrated. "Sentiment a factor as Athens gets 2004 Olympics", sportsillustrated.cnn.com, 1997-09-05. Retrieved on 2007-03-28. 
  12. ^ Daily Report on Air Pollution Levels. Hellenic Ministry of the Environment and Public Works. www.minenv.gr. Retrieved on 2007-01-26.
  13. ^ a b Tung, Anthony (2001). "The City the Gods Besieged", Preserving the World's Great Cities: The Destruction and Renewal of the Historic Metropolis. New York: Three Rivers Press, pg.266. ISBN 0-609-80815-X. 
  14. ^ "Acropolis: Threat of Destruction", Time Magazine, TIME.com, 1977-01-31. Retrieved on 2007-04-03. 
  15. ^ Elefsina. Hellenic National Meteorological Service. Retrieved on 2008-02-28.
  16. ^ Nea Filadelfia. Hellenic National Meteorological Service. Retrieved on 2008-02-28.
  17. ^ a b c d Kitsantonis, Niki. "As forest fires burn, suffocated Athens is outraged", International Herald Tribune, 2007-07-16. Retrieved on 2008-02-03. 
  18. ^ Hellenic Ministry for the Environment, Physical Planning, & Public Works (2007-07-18). "Συνέντευξη Τύπου Γ. Σουφλιά για την Πάρνηθα" (.doc) (in Greek). Press release. Retrieved on 2008-01-15. “Συνολική καμένη έκταση πυρήνα Εθνικού Δρυμού Πάρνηθας: 15.723 (Σύνολο 38.000)”
  19. ^ a b c "Rot sets in as Athens's trash problem mounts", 2007-01-30. Retrieved on 2008-02-10. 
  20. ^ Ta Nea onLine - Retrieved on 10 February 2007
  21. ^ Carassava, Anthee (2007-06-31). Athens is Burning. Time Magazine. www.time.com. Retrieved on 2007-08-02.
  22. ^ Athens travel guidequote: Fact 7: Nearly five million people – almost half of Greece's entire population – live in Athens.
    Airmiles UKquote: Did you know…? Nearly five million people – almost half of Greece's entire population - live in Athens.
    Taxis.grquote: In any other city with a population of five million..
    BBC News Europequote: The capital, with its population of five million,
    Europaquote: (the metropolitan area of Athens contains over five million inhabitants.
    International Railway Journal, August, 2000quote: The Athens urban area has a population of about five million
  23. ^ Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development: Economic Survey of Greece 2005. OECD. www.oecd.org (2005). Retrieved on 2007-01-06.
  24. ^ Central European Review: Living in a Policy Vacuum. Central European Review. www.ce-review.org. Retrieved on 2007-01-06.
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  27. ^ World Gazetter City Pop:Athens. www.world-gazetter.com.
  28. ^ World Gazetter Metro Pop:Athens. www.world-gazetter.com.
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  30. ^ AIA: Finance. Athens International Airport, S.A.. www.AIA.gr. Retrieved on 2007-04-05.
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  32. ^ Urban Audit - Home Page
  33. ^ [1][dead link]
  34. ^ Megaron Events Chart
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  36. ^ ATHENS 1993 - THE ARCHIVE - Welcome to EUROLEAGUE BASKETBALL
  37. ^ ATHENS 2007 - THE ARCHIVE - Welcome to EUROLEAGUE BASKETBALL
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  39. ^ Cushman & Wakefield - Global real estate solutions - News & Events
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  41. ^ Eaxa :: Ενοποιηση Αρχαιολογικων Χωρων Αθηνασ Α.Ε
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  43. ^ Ιδρυμα Ευγενιδου. Εκπαιδευτικο Κοινωφελεσ Ιδρυμα
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  45. ^ Προαστιακοσ
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  49. ^ ΗΣΑΠ
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  52. ^ a b Athens Urban Transport Network in Facts and Figures (pdf) page 11. OASA. Retrieved on 2007-01-28.
  53. ^ a b Athens Urban Transport Network in Facts and Figures (pdf) page 13. OASA. www.oasa.gr. Retrieved on 2007-01-28.
  54. ^ a b c d Athens International Airport: Facts and Figures. Athens International Airport. www.aia.gr. Retrieved on 2007-02-11.
  55. ^ a b c Athens International Airport: Airport Profile. Athens International Airport. www.aia.gr. Retrieved on 2007-02-11.
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  60. ^ Ciutats agermanades: Atenes. City of Barcelona. www.bcn.es. Retrieved on 2008-01-25.
  61. ^ Beijing Sister Cities. City of Beijing. www.ebeijing.gov.cn. Retrieved on 2007-01-03.
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Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 303rd day of the year (304th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 219th day of the year (220th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 6th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 100th day of the year (101st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 362nd day of the year (363rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 87th day of the year (88th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... is the 16th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 87th day of the year (88th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 26th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 26th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... is the 248th day of the year (249th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 87th day of the year (88th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 26th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also: 1977 (album) by Ash. ... is the 31st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 93rd day of the year (94th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 59th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 59th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 197th day of the year (198th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 34th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 199th day of the year (200th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For information on Wikipedia press releases, see Wikipedia:Press releases. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 15th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 30th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 41st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 41st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 214th day of the year (215th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 6th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 6th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 6th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 214th day of the year (215th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 95th day of the year (96th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 95th day of the year (96th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 41st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 47th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 3rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 26th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 35th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 35th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 28th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 28th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 28th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 28th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 42nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 42nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 37th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 37th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 242nd day of the year (243rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 88th day of the year (89th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 239th day of the year (240th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 89th day of the year (90th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 25th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 3rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 25th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 26th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 3rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 25th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 307th day of the year (308th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 25th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 3rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 25th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 26th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 25th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 25th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 26th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 26th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 26th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

  • City of Athens official website (Greek)
  • Athens contemporary architecture and suggested walking routes
  • An Online History of Athens
  • Athens in 421 BC
  • Athenian Owl coins

The term ancient Greece refers to the periods of Greek history in Classical Antiquity, lasting ca. ... Look up Aegean Sea in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The Helespont/Dardanelles, a long narrow strait dividing the Balkans (Europe) along the Gallipoli peninsula from Asia Anatolia (Asia Minor). ... Ancient Macedons regions and towns Macedon or Macedonia (Greek ) was the name of an ancient kingdom in the northern-most part of ancient Greece, bordered by the kingdom of Epirus to the west and the region of Thrace to the east. ... For modern day Sparta, see Sparti (municipality). ... Corinth, or Korinth (Greek: Κόρινθος, Kórinthos; see also List of traditional Greek place names) is a Greek city-state, on the Isthmus of Corinth, the narrow stretch of land that joins the Peloponnesus to the mainland of Greece. ... For the clipper ship, see Thermopylae (clipper). ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Antakya. ... This article is about the city in Egypt. ... View of the reconstructed Temple of Trajan at Pergamon Sketched reconstruction of ancient Pergamon Pergamon or Pergamum (Greek: Πέργαμος, modern day Bergama in Turkey, ) was an ancient Greek city, in Mysia, north-western Anatolia, 16 miles from the Aegean Sea, located on a promontory on the north side of the river... The lower half of the benches and the remnants of the scene building of the theater of Miletus (August 2005) Miletus (Carian: Anactoria Hittite: Milawata or Millawanda, Greek: Μίλητος transliterated Miletos, Turkish: Milet) was an ancient city on the western coast of Anatolia (in what is now Aydin Province, Turkey), near... For the town in the southern United States, see Ephesus, Georgia. ... For other uses, see Delphi (disambiguation). ... Olympia among the principal Greek sanctuaries Olympia (Greek: Olympía or Olýmpia, older transliterations, Olimpia, Olimbia), a sanctuary of ancient Greece in Elis, is known for having been the site of the Olympic Games in classical times, comparable in importance to the Pythian Games held in Delphi. ... For other uses of Troy or Ilion, see Troy (disambiguation) and Ilion (disambiguation). ... This article is about the Greek island of Rhodes. ... For other uses, see Crete (disambiguation). ... The art of ancient Greece has exercised an enormous influence on the culture of many countries from ancient times until the present, particularly in the areas of sculpture and architecture. ... Kylix, the most common drinking vessel in ancient Greece, c. ... TRENT IS SOOOOOOOOO HOT!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Ancient Greek law is a branch of comparative jurisprudence relating to the laws and legal institutions of Ancient Greece. ... Ancient Greek literature refers to literature written in the Greek language until the 4th century AD. // Wikisource has original text related to this article: an essay on the transition to written literature in Greece This period of Greek literature stretches from Homer until the 4th century BC and the rise... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... From the 1500s, a detail from Piero di Cosimos version of Perseus rescuing Andromeda. ... Pederastic courtship scene Athenian black-figure amphora, 5th c. ... Bilingual amphora by the Andokides Painter, ca. ... Courtesan and her client, Attican Pelike with red figures by Polygnotus, c. ... Greek religion encompasses the collection of beliefs and rituals practiced in Ancient Greece in form of cult practices, thus the practical counterpart of Greek mythology. ... Funerary stele: the slave represented as a shorter person, beside the mistress, Munich Glyptothek Slavery was an essential component of the development of Ancient Greece throughout its history. ... Ancient Greek technology is a set of artifacts and customs that lasted for more than one thousand years. ... For other uses of Greek Theatre, see Greek theatre (disambiguation). ... Ruins of the training grounds at Olympia The Ancient Olympic Games, originally referred to as simply the Olympic Games (Greek: ; Olympiakoi Agones) were a series of athletic competitions held between various city-states of Ancient Greece. ... Modern reconstruction of a hoplite phalanx formation. ... Ancient Greek philosophy focused on the role of reason and inquiry. ... Anaxagoras Anaxagoras (Greek: Αναξαγόρας, c. ... This article is about the Pre-Socratic philosopher. ... Anaximenes (in Greek: Άναξιμένης) of Miletus (585 BC - 525 BC) was a Greek philosopher from the latter half of the 6th century, probably a younger contemporary of Anaximander, whose pupil or friend he is said to have been. ... Portrait bust of Antisthenes Antisthenes (Greek: , c. ... For other uses, see Aristotle (disambiguation). ... ‎ Democritus (Greek: ) was a pre-Socratic Greek materialist philosopher (born at Abdera in Thrace ca. ... Diogenes Apolloniates or Diogenes of Apollonia (c. ... Diogenes (Greek: Diogenes o Sinopeus) the Cynic, Greek philosopher, was born in Sinope (modern day Sinop, Turkey) about 412 BC (according to other sources 399 BC), and died in 323 BC at Corinth. ... Epicure redirects here. ... Empedocles (Greek: , ca. ... Heraclitus of Ephesus (Ancient Greek - Herákleitos ho Ephésios (Herakleitos the Ephesian)) (about 535 - 475 BC), known as The Obscure (Ancient Greek - ho Skoteinós), was a pre-Socratic Greek philosopher, a native of Ephesus on the coast of Asia Minor. ... This article is about the philosopher. ... Parmenides of Elea (Greek: , early 5th century BC) was an ancient Greek philosopher born in Elea, a Hellenic city on the southern coast of Italy. ... For other uses, see Plato (disambiguation). ... Protagoras (in Greek Πρωταγόρας) was born around 481 BC in Abdera, Thrace in Ancient Greece. ... Pythagoras of Samos (Greek: ; born between 580 and 572 BC, died between 500 and 490 BC) was an Ionian Greek mathematician[1] and founder of the religious movement called Pythagoreanism. ... This page is about the Classical Greek philosopher. ... For the Defense and Security Company, see Thales Group. ... Zeno of Citium Zeno of Citium (The Stoic) (sometime called Zeno Apathea) (333 BC-264 BC) was a Hellenistic philosopher from Citium, Cyprus. ... Ancient Greek literature refers to literature written in the Greek language until the 4th century AD. // Wikisource has original text related to this article: an essay on the transition to written literature in Greece This period of Greek literature stretches from Homer until the 4th century BC and the rise... This article is about the ancient Greek playwright. ... Nofootnotes|date=February 2008}} Aesop, as conceived by Diego Velázquez Aesop, as depicted in the Nuremberg Chronicle by Hartmann Schedel in 1493. ... For other uses, see Aristophanes (disambiguation). ... Euripides (c. ... Herodotus of Halicarnassus (Greek: HÄ“ródotos Halikarnāsseús) was a Greek historian who lived in the 5th century BC (c. ... Roman bronze bust, the so-called Pseudo-Seneca, now identified by some as possibly Hesiod Hesiod (Hesiodos, ) was an early Greek poet and rhapsode, who presumably lived around 700 BC. Hesiod and Homer, with whom Hesiod is often paired, have been considered the earliest Greek poets whose work has survived... This article is about the Greek poet Homer and the works attributed to him. ... For other uses, see Lucian (disambiguation). ... Bust of Menander Menander (342–291 BC) (Greek ), Greek dramatist, the chief representative of the New Comedy, was born in Athens. ... For the PINDAR military bunker in London, please see the PINDAR section of Military citadels under London Pindar (or Pindarus, Greek: ) (probably born 522 BC in Cynoscephalae, a village in Boeotia; died 443 BC in Argos), was a Greek lyric poet. ... Mestrius Plutarchus (Greek: Πλούταρχος; 46 - 127), better known in English as Plutarch, was a Greek historian, biographer, essayist, and Middle Platonist. ... Polybius (c. ... For other uses, see Sappho (disambiguation). ... This article is about the Greek tragedian. ... For other uses, see Thucydides (disambiguation). ... Xenophon, Greek historian Xenophon (In Greek , ca. ... The restored Stoa of Attalus, Athens Architecture, executed to considered design, was extinct in Greece from the end of the Mycenaean period (about 1200 BC) to the 7th century BC, when urban life and prosperity recovered to a point where public building could be undertaken. ... The Parthenon west façade For other uses, see Parthenon (disambiguation). ... The site of the Temple of Artemis at Ephesus in Turkey. ... The Acropolis of Athens is the best known acropolis (high city, The Sacred Rock) in the world. ... Remains of the agora built in Athens in the Roman period (east of the classical agora). ... [Image:http://www. ... A 1908 illustration of the temple as it might have looked in the 5th century BCE Ruins of the Temple of Zeus at Olympia, Greece Metope showing Hercules and the Cretan Bull The Temple of Zeus at Olympia, Greece was built between 470 BCE and completed by 456 BCE to... “The Colossus of Rhodes” redirects here. ... Temple of Hephaestus, an Doric Greek temple in Athens with the original entrance facing east, 449 BC (western face depicted) Temple of Hephaestus, Athens: eastern face The Temple of Hephaestus in central ancient Athens, Greece, is the best-preserved ancient Greek temple in the world, but is far less well... General location of Samothrace The Samothrace Temple Complex, known as the Sanctuary of the Great Gods is one of the principal Pan-Hellenic religious sanctuaries, located on the island of Samothrace within the larger Thrace. ... Insert non-formatted text here This is a timeline of ancient Greece. ... Aegean civilization is a general term for the Bronze Age civilizations of Greece and the Aegean. ... The Minoan civilization was a bronze age civilization which arose on the island of Crete. ... This article is about the Greek archaeological site. ... The Greek Dark Ages (ca. ... The archaic period in Greece is the period during which the ancient Greek city-states developed, and is normally taken to cover roughly the 9th century to the 6th century BCE. The Archaic period followed the dark ages, and saw significant advancements in political theory, and the rise of democracy... Parthenon This article is on the term Classical Greece itself. ... The Hellenistic period of Greek history was the period between the death of Alexander the Great in 323 BC and the annexation of the Greek peninsula and islands by Rome in 146 BC. Although the establishment of Roman rule did not break the continuity of Hellenistic society and culture, which... Roman Greece is the period of Greek history following the Roman victory over the Corinthians at the Battle of Corinth in 146 BC until the reestablishment of the city of Byzantium and the naming of the city by Emperor Constantine I as the capital of the Roman Empire (as Nova... This an alphabetical list of ancient Greeks. ... For the film of the same name, see Alexander the Great (1956 film). ... // Lycurgus Lycurgus (Greek: , Lukoûrgos; 700 BC?–630 BC) was the legendary lawgiver of Sparta, who established the military-oriented reformation of Spartan society in accordance with the Oracle of Apollo at Delphi. ... For other uses, see Leonidas (disambiguation). ... Alcibiades Cleiniou Scambonides (Greek: ; English /ælsɪbaɪədi:z/; 450 BC–404 BC), also transliterated as Alkibiades, was a prominent Athenian statesman, orator, and general. ... Demosthenes (384–322 BC, Greek: Δημοσθένης, DÄ“mosthénÄ“s) was a prominent Greek statesman and orator of ancient Athens. ... For the Shakespeare play, see Pericles, Prince of Tyre. ... For other uses, see Solon (disambiguation). ... Themistocles (Greek: ; c. ... For other uses, see Archimedes (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Hippocrates (disambiguation). ... The Charioteer of Delphi, Delphi Archaeological Museum. ... The great kouros of Samos, the largest surviving kouros in Greece (Samos Archaeological Museum) The Ancient Greek word kouros meant a male youth, and is used by Homer to refer to young soldiers. ... The Lady of Auxerre, an example of a kore Kore (Greek - maiden), plural korai, is the name given to a type of ancient Greek sculpture of the archaic period, the female equivalent of a kouros. ... The Kritios boy belongs to the Late Archaic period and is considered the precursor to the later classical sculptures of athletes. ... The Doryphoros of Polykleitos The Doryphoros (Greek δορυφόρος, lit. ... Statue of Zeus The Greek sculptor Phidias created the 12-m (40-ft) tall Statue of Zeus in about 435 bc. ... Townley Discobolus, London, British Museum, with incorrectly restored head defying the balance of the figure The Discobolus of Myron (discus thrower Greek Δισκοβόλος του Μύρωνα) is a famous Roman marble copy of a lost Greek bronze original, completed during the zenith of the classical period between 460-450 BC. Myrons Discobolus was... -1... The statue of Laocoön and His Sons, also called the Laocoön Group, is a monumental marble sculpture, now in the Vatican Museums, Rome. ... Phidias Showing the Frieze of the Parthenon to his Friends by Sir Lawrence Alma-Tadema Phidias (or Pheidias) (in ancient Greek, ) (c. ... Death of Sarpedon, painted by Euphronios Euphronios was a Greek painter and potter of red-figure vases, active in Athens between 520 and 470 BC, the time of the Persian Wars. ... Polykleitos (or Polycletus, Polyklitos, Polycleitus, Polyclitus) the Elder was a Greek sculptor of the 5th century BC and the early 4th century BC. Next to famous Phidias, Myron and Kresilas he is the most important sculptor of the Classical antiquity. ... Minotaur, from a fountain in Athens, reflecting Myrons lost group of Theseus and the Minotaur (National Archeological Museum, Athens) Myron of Eleutherae (Greek Μύρων) working 480-444 BCE, was an Athenian sculptor from the mid-fifth century BCE.[1] He was born in Eleutherae on the borders of Boeotia and... Cavalry from the Parthenon Frieze, West II, British Museum. ... Praxiteles of Athens, the son of Cephisodotus, was the greatest of the Attic sculptors of the 4th century BC, who has left an imperishable mark on the history of art. ... St. ... The Kingdom of Cilician Armenia, 1199-1375. ... Derbe is an ancient city in todays Turkey. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... In antiquity, Phrygia (Greek: ) was a kingdom in the west central part of the Anatolia. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Mysia. ... Alexandria Troas (Alexandria of the Troad, mod. ... Coordinates 40°29′ N 25°31′ E Country Greece Periphery East Macedonia and Thrace Prefecture Evros Population 2,723 source (2001) Area 178. ... Kavala (also seen as Kavála, Kavalla, (Greek) (2001 pop. ... Map of Greece showing Philippi Philippi (in Ancient Greek / Philippoi) was a city in eastern Macedonia, founded by Philip II in 356 BC and abandoned in the 14th century after the Ottoman conquest. ... Localization of Amphipolis Amphipolis (Greek, Ἀμφίπολις – Amphípolis) was an ancient Greek city in the region once inhabited by the Edoni people in the present-day periphery of East Macedonia and Thrace. ... Thessaloniki or Salonica (Greek: ) is Greeces second-largest city and the capital of Macedonia, the largest Region of Greece. ... Berea is mentioned in the book of Acts in the Bible, for the ancient city of Beroea, now know as Veria. ... Corinth, or Korinth (Greek: Κόρινθος, Kórinthos; see also List of traditional Greek place names) is a Greek city-state, on the Isthmus of Corinth, the narrow stretch of land that joins the Peloponnesus to the mainland of Greece. ... There is another Kechries, see Kechries Kechries (Greek Modern: Κεχριές, rarely Κεχρεές, Ancient/Katharevousa: Kechreai), older form: Cenchreae, Kechriai, Kekhries, Kekhriai, Kekhriais is a community in the municipality of Corinth in Corinthia. ... For the town in the southern United States, see Ephesus, Georgia. ... Caesarea Palaestina, also called Caesarea Maritima, a town built by Herod the Great about 25 - 13 BC, lies on the sea-coast of Israel about halfway between Tel Aviv and Haifa, on the site of a place previously called Pyrgos Stratonos (Strato or Stratons Tower, in Latin Turris Stratonis). ... For Christians, Jerusalems place in the life of Jesus gives it great importance, in addition to its place in the Old Testament, the Hebrew Bible, as described above. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Antakya. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Athens Travel Information | Lonely Planet Destination Guide (338 words)
Redolent with history and mythology, Athens is an affable city enlivened by bustling outdoor cafes, pedestrian streets that wind through the city's ancient sites and its fair share of urban eccentrics.
Winters in Athens are lively and give you a different experience.
Bluelist it › If you want your list to be considered for the Athens book, use the keyword 'highlight'.
Athens for Health (76 words)
The Athens Access Management system provides users with single sign-on to numerous web-based services throughout the UK and overseas.
Athens was initially deployed in the higher education sector in 1996 and has firmly established itself as the de facto standard for secure access management to web-based services for the UK education and health sectors.
In December 2000, Athens was awarded the NHS Information Authority contract for Access Management Services for the National Library for Health (NLH).
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