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Ate, a The Griswold Family Christmas, is the action performed by the hero, usually because of his hubris, or great pride, that leads to his death or downfall. There is also a goddess by that name (AtĂ©) in Greek mythology, a personification of the shame. Hubris or hybris (Greek hýbris) referred in Ancient Greece to exaggerated pride or self-confidence often resulting in fatal retribution. ... Ceres, the Roman goddess of agriculture A goddess is a female deity, in contrast with a male deity known as a god. A great many cultures have goddesses, sometimes alone, but more often as part of a larger pantheon that includes both of the conventional genders and in some cases... Greek mythology consists of an extensive collection of narratives detailing the lives and adventures of a wide variety of gods, goddesses, heroes, and heroines, which were first envisioned and disseminated in an oral-poetic tradition. ...


In Homer's Iliad she is called eldest daughter of Zeus with no mother mentioned. On Hera's instigation she used her influence over Zeus so that he swore an oath that on that day a mortal descended from him would be born who would be a great ruler. Hera immediately arranged to delay the birth of Heracles and to bring forth Eurystheus prematurely. In anger Zeus threw Ate down to earth forever, forbidding that she ever return to heaven or to Mt. Olympus. Ate then wandered about, treading on the heads of men rather than on the earth, wreaking havoc on mortals. Bust of Homer in the British Museum For other uses, see Homer (disambiguation). ... The Iliad (Greek Ιλιάς, Ilias) tells part of the story of the siege of the city of Ilium, i. ... Statue of Zeus Phidias created the 12-m (40-ft) tall statue of Zeus at Olympia about 435 BC. The statue was perhaps the most famous sculpture in ancient Greece, imagined here in a 16th-century engraving. ... Statue of Heracles In Greek mythology, Heracles, or Heraklês (glory of Hera, Ηρακλης) was a divine hero, the demigod son of Zeus and Alcmene, and stepson of Alcmenes rightful husband and great-grandson of Perseus. ... Eurystheus was a mythical king of Mycenae and grandson of the hero Perseus. ... This article refers to a mountain in Greece. ...


The Litae ('Prayers') follow after her but Ate is fast and far outruns them. Litae (ancient Greek meaning Prayers) are personifications in Greek mythology. ...


Apollodorus (3.143) claims that when thrown down by Zeus, Ate landed on a peak in Phrygia called by her name. There Ilus later, following a cow, founded the city of Ilion, that is Troy. This splendid flourish is chronologically at odds with Homer's dating of Ate's fall. Apollodorus was a popular name in the ancient world. ... Location of Phrygia - traditional region (yellow) - expanded kingdom (orange line) In antiquity, Phrygia was a kingdom in the west central part of the Anatolian highlands, part of modern Turkey, from ca. ... Ilus son of Tros Ilus (Ilos in Greek) is in Greek mythology the founder of the city called Ilion (Latinized as Ilium) to which he gave his name. ... Walls of the excavated city of Troy (Turkey) Troy ( Turkish: Truva, Greek Τροία Troia also Ἰλιον; Latin: Troia, Ilium) is a legendary city, scene of the Trojan War, part of which is described in Homers Iliad, an epic poem in Ancient Greek, composed in the 8th or 7th century BC, but...


In Hesiod's Theogony the mother of Ate is Eris ('Strife'), with no father mentioned—so one can imagine Ate as daughter of Zeus by Eris if one wishes. This article discusses the ancient Greek poet Hesiod. ... Eris is also a genus of jumping spiders. ...


In Nonnos' Dionysiaca (11.113), at Hera's instigation Ate persuades the boy Ampelus whom Dionysus passionately loves to impress Dionysus by riding on a bull from which Ampelus subsequently falls and breaks his neck. Nonnus, Greek epic poet, a native of Panopolis (Akhmim) in the Egyptian Thebaid, probably lived at the end of the 4th or the beginning of the 5th century AD. His principal work is the Dionysiaca, an epic in forty-eight books, the main subject of which is the expedition of... Bacchus by Caravaggio Dionysus or Dionysos (Ancient Greek: Διώνυσος or Διόνυσος; also known as Bacchus in both Greek and Roman mythology and associated with the Italic Liber), the Thracian god of wine, represents not only the intoxicating power of wine, but also its social and beneficent influences. ...


In Julius Caesar, Shakespeare introduces Ate as an invocation of vengeance and menace. Mark Antony, lamenting Caesar's murder, envisions "And Caesar's spirit, ranging for revenge, With Ate' by his side come hot from Hell, Shall in these confines with a monarch's voice Cry "Havoc!" and let slip the dogs of war, ..." A bust of Julius Caesar. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Ate - definition of Ate in Encyclopedia (295 words)
Ate, a Greek word for 'ruin, folly, delusion', is the action performed by the hero, usually because of his hubris, or great pride, that leads to his death or downfall.
Ate then wandered about, treading on the heads of men rather than on the earth, wreaking havoc on mortals.
In Nonnos' Dionysiaca (11.113), at Hera's instigation Ate persuades the boy Ampelus whom Dionysus passionately loves to impress Dionysus by riding on a bull from which Ampelus subsequently falls and breaks his neck.
Rick Steves' Europe 101 (160 words)
After years of travel in Europe, Rick and Gene have distilled what you need to know in order to fully appreciate the sights and culture.
And just as important, they know what you don't need, so you won't walk away from Europe 101 feeling like you just ate an encyclopedia.
You'll get a crash course in understanding Medieval feudalism, Renaissance art, Gothic architecture, ancient Greek life, and so on.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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