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Encyclopedia > Astronomical object

Astronomical objects are significant physical entities, associations or structures which current science has confirmed to exist in space. This does not necessarily mean that more current science will not disprove their existence. Some astronomical objects, such as Themis and Neith are, in light of more recent findings, considered not to exist at all. Others, like Pluto and Ceres, prove to be of an entirely different nature than first expected. In these cases, the scientific community must come to a consensus as to the new status of these objects. Obviously, not all scientists will agree; this gives birth to fringe science. However, fringe science is not always bad science. Some of our most fundamental scientific theories, such as the superstring theory and plate tectonics, were once considered fringe. Even in the mainstream community, new ideas are constantly changing the way we view the universe at large. Astronomical objects thought to exist based on scientific evidence are considered hypothetical. An entity is something that has a distinct, separate existence, though it need not be a material existence. ... Part of a scientific laboratory at the University of Cologne. ... Space has been an interest for philosophers and scientists for much of human history. ... On April 28, 1905, William H. Pickering, who had seven years earlier discovered Phoebe, announced the discovery of a tenth satellite of Saturn, which he promptly named Themis. ... Neith is the name given to an object first sighted by Giovanni Cassini, which he believed to be a moon of Venus. ... Adjectives: Plutonian Atmosphere Surface pressure: 0. ... 1 Ceres (SEER eez) was the first asteroid to be discovered, with a diameter of 959. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Fringe science is a phrase used to describe scientific inquiry in an established field that departs significantly from mainstream or orthodox theories. ... Bad science usually refers either to substandard scientific methods or to findings that have been arrived at by such methods. ... In mathematics, theory is used informally to refer to a body of knowledge about mathematics. ... Superstring theory is an attempt to explain all of the particles and fundamental forces of nature in one theory by modeling them as vibrations of tiny supersymmetric strings. ... The tectonic plates of the world were mapped in the second half of the 20th century. ... Look up mainstream in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Hypothetical astronomical objects are celestial bodies which some believe to exist. ...


Astronomical objects can be easily confused with "astronomical bodies". The term "body" indicates a simple object, such as a planet. These terms differ from "celestial objects" and "celestial bodies" only in that the latter terms do not include the Earth. The table below lists the general categories of objects by their location or structure. The eight planets and three dwarf planets of the Solar System. ... This article is about Earth as a planet. ...

Solar system Extrasolar objects
Simple objects Compound objects Extended objects

Major features of the Solar System (not to scale; from left to right): Pluto, Neptune, Uranus, Saturn, Jupiter, the asteroid belt, the Sun, Mercury, Venus, Earth and its Moon, and Mars. ... “Sol” redirects here. ... An artists concept of a protoplanetary disc. ... The eight planets and three dwarf planets of the Solar System. ... This article is about the planet. ... Adjectives: Venusian or (rarely) Cytherean Atmosphere Surface pressure: 9. ... This article is about Earth as a planet. ... Apparent magnitude: up to -12. ... Adjectives: Martian Atmosphere Surface pressure: 0. ... The relative sizes of and distance between Mars, Phobos, and Deimos, to scale. ... Adjectives: Jovian Atmosphere Surface pressure: 20–200 kPa[4] (cloud layer) Composition: ~86% Molecular hydrogen ~13% Helium 0. ... Jupiters outer moons and their highly inclined orbits. ... Adjectives: Saturnian Atmosphere Surface pressure: 140 kPa Composition: >93% hydrogen >5% helium 0. ... The Saturnian system (photographic montage) Saturn has fifty-six confirmed natural satellites, plus three unconfirmed moons. ... Adjectives: Uranian Atmosphere Surface pressure: 120 kPa (at the cloud level) Composition: 83% Hydrogen 15% Helium 1. ... Uranus has 27 known moons. ... Note: This article contains special characters. ... Neptune (top) and Triton (bottom), 3 days after the Voyager 2 flyby. ... Artists impression of Pluto (background) and Charon (foreground). ... Adjectives: Plutonian Atmosphere Surface pressure: 0. ... The planet Pluto has three known moons. ... Absolute magnitude: −1. ... Dysnomia (officially designated (136199) Eris I Dysnomia) is a moon of the dwarf planet Eris. ... Spectral type: G[8] Absolute magnitude: 3. ... 253 Mathilde, a C-type asteroid. ... Vulcanoids are hypothetical asteroids that may orbit in a dynamically stable zone between 0. ... Apohele asteroids are a subclass of Aten asteroids. ... Near-Earth asteroids (NEAs) are asteroids whose orbits are close to Earths orbit. ... The Arjuna asteroids are a class of near-Earth asteroids whose orbits are very Earth-like in character, having low inclination, orbital periods close to one Earth year, and low eccentricity. ... The Aten asteroids are a group of near-Earth asteroids, named after the first of the group to be discovered (2062 Aten, discovered January 7, 1976 by Eleanor F. Helin). ... The Apollo asteroid 25143 Itokawa. ... The Amor asteroids are a group of near-Earth asteroids named after the asteroid 1221 Amor. ... A Mars-crosser asteroid is an asteroid whose orbit crosses that of Mars. ... For details on the physical properties of bodies in the asteroid belt see Asteroid and Main-belt comet. ... The Hungaria asteroids are a group of asteroids in the main belt that orbit the sun between 1. ... The Phocaea asteroids are a group of asteroids that orbit the sun between 2. ... The Nysa asteroids (also known as the Hertha family or the Polana family) are a group of asteroids in the Main Belt orbiting the sun between 2. ... The Alinda asteroids are a group of asteroids with a semi-major axis of about 2. ... Hilda asteroids are asteroids with a semi-major axis between 3. ... 2 Pallas (pal-us) was the first asteroid discovered after 1 Ceres. ... The Maria asteroids are a group of asteroids that orbit the sun with a between about 2. ... The Koronis family is a family of asteroids in the Main Belt between Mars and Jupiter. ... Eos family is a prominent family of asteroids that are believed to have formed as a result from an ancient catastrophic collision between asteroids. ... The Themis Asteroid Family The Themis Asteroid Family is a Hirayama family of asteroids found in the outer portion of the main asteroid belt, between the orbits of Mars and Jupiter. ... The Griqua asteroids are a group of asteroids in the Main Belt orbiting the sun between 3. ... 65 Cybele (sib-a-lee) is one of the largest asteroids in the main belt. ... 279 Thule is a very large Main belt asteroid. ... Image of the Trojan asteroids in front of and behind Jupiter along its orbital path. ... Trojan asteroids of Jupiter (coloured green) in front of and behind Jupiter along its orbital path. ... Image of the Trojan asteroids (coloured green) in front of and behind Jupiter along its orbital path. ... As of March 2007, there are five[1] known Neptune Trojans (named by analogy to the Trojan asteroids) which have the same orbital period as the planet. ... Damocloids are asteroids such as 5335 Damocles and 1996 PW that have long-period highly eccentric orbits typical of periodic comets such as 1P/Halley, but without showing a cometary coma or tail. ... The centaurs are a class of icy planetoids that orbit the Sun between Jupiter and Neptune, named after the mythical race of centaurs. ... A trans-Neptunian object (TNO) is any object in the solar system that orbits the sun at a greater distance on average than Neptune. ... The Kuiper belt, derived from data from the Minor Planet Center. ... In astronomy, a plutino is a trans-Neptunian object that has a 3:2 orbital resonance with Neptune. ... A cubewano is any substantial Kuiper belt object, orbiting beyond about 41 AU and not controlled by resonances with the outer planets. ... While a Plutino completes 2 orbits around the Sun in the time it takes Neptune to complete 3 orbits, a Twotino makes 1 orbit around the Sun in the time it takes Neptune to complete 2 orbits. ... A scattered disk object (or scattered disc object or SDO) is a trans-Neptunian object of the Kuiper belt with a very eccentric orbit. ... 90377 Sedna is a trans-Neptunian object, discovered by Mike Brown (Caltech), Chad Trujillo (Gemini Observatory) and David L. Rabinowitz (Yale University) on November 14, 2003. ... Comet Hale-Bopp Comet West For other uses, see Comet (disambiguation). ... This image is an artists rendering of the Oort cloud and the Kuiper Belt. ... It has been suggested that micrometeoroid be merged into this article or section. ... Photo of a burst of meteors with extended exposure time A meteor is the visible path of a meteoroid that enters the Earths (or another bodys) atmosphere, commonly called a shooting star or falling star. ... The Taurids Meteor Shower A meteor shower, some of which are known as a meteor storm or meteor outburst, is a celestial event where a group of meteors are observed to radiate from one point in the sky. ... Infrared Image of a possible extrasolar planet (lower left) in the Constellation Taurus, taken by the Hubble Space Telescope. ... Artists impression of roaster extrasolar planet HD 209458b (Osiris). ... An Eccentric Jupiter is a Jovian planet that orbits its star in a highly eccentric orbit, much like a comet. ... An artists conception of PSR 1257+12s system of planets Pulsars are rapidly rotating neutron stars. ... Gliese 581 c, a Super-Earth and its star as rendered in Celestia. ... 2003 Transit of Mercury The term transit or astronomical transit has two meanings in astronomy: A transit is the astronomical event that occurs when one celestial body appears to move across the face of another celestial body, as seen by an observer at some particular vantage point. ... A rogue planet is a planet that either has an extremely elongated orbit around its star so that it is not on the same orbital plane as the other planets in the system, or it is an interstellar planet, a planet that drifts freely through space and doesnt orbit... An interstellar planet is a hypothetical type of rogue planet that has been ejected from its solar system by a proto-gas giant to become an outcast, drifting in interstellar space. ... A Chthonian planet (sometimes misspelled Cthonian), is a gas giant with its hydrogen and helium atmosphere stripped away due to its closeness to its star. ... A trojan planet is a theoretical planet orbiting in the lagrange point of a star and a massive orbiting body, a gas giant or potentially a smaller companion star. ... This brown dwarf (smaller object) orbits the star Gliese 229, which is located in the constellation Lepus about 19 light years from Earth. ... Sub-brown dwarfs or brown sub-dwarfs are cold masses smaller than the low-mass cut-off for brown dwarfs. ... STAR is an acronym for: Organizations Society of Ticket Agents and Retailers], the self-regulatory body for the entertainment ticket industry in the UK. Society for Telescopy, Astronomy, and Radio, a non-profit New Jersey astronomy club. ... In astronomy, stellar classification is a classification of stars based initially on photospheric temperature and its associated spectral characteristics, and subsequenly refined in terms of other characteristics. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... A carbon star is a late type giant star similar to the red giants (or occasionally red dwarf) star whose atmosphere contains more carbon than oxygen; the two elements combine in the upper layers of the star, forming carbon monoxide, which consumes all the oxygen in the atmosphere, leaving carbon... Artists impression of a Wolf-Rayet star Wolf-Rayet stars (often referred to as WR stars) are evolved, hot, massive stars which have very strong stellar winds. ... Barium stars are G to K class giants, whose spectra indicate an overabundance of s-process elements by the presence of singly ionized barium, Ba II, at λ 455. ... Blue stragglers are stars in open or globular clusters that are hotter and bluer than other cluster stars having the same luminosity. ... STAR is an acronym for: Organizations Society of Ticket Agents and Retailers], the self-regulatory body for the entertainment ticket industry in the UK. Society for Telescopy, Astronomy, and Radio, a non-profit New Jersey astronomy club. ... In astronomy, stellar classification is a classification of stars based initially on photospheric temperature and its associated spectral characteristics, and subsequenly refined in terms of other characteristics. ... A subdwarf star, sometimes denoted by sd, is luminosity class VI under the Yerkes spectral classification system. ... Hertzsprung-Russell diagram The main sequence of the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram is the curve where the majority of stars are located in this diagram. ... Hertzsprung-Russell diagram The main sequence of the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram is the curve where the majority of stars are located in this diagram. ... STAR is an acronym for: Organizations Society of Ticket Agents and Retailers], the self-regulatory body for the entertainment ticket industry in the UK. Society for Telescopy, Astronomy, and Radio, a non-profit New Jersey astronomy club. ... Subgiant are Olly Maw, Dan Hayes and Tushar Joshi, a live dance music band from the UK formed in 2000. ... Giant star is a star that has stopped fusing hydrogen in its core. ... The luminosity class II in the Yerkes spectral classification is given to bright giants. ... Supergiants are the most massive stars. ... A hypergiant is a massive star, larger than even a supergiant, with a mass up to 100 times that of our Sun, approaching the theoretical limit of star mass (120 solar masses; any higher, and stellar equilibrium could not be maintained; the star would produce so much energy that it... STAR is an acronym for: Organizations Society of Ticket Agents and Retailers], the self-regulatory body for the entertainment ticket industry in the UK. Society for Telescopy, Astronomy, and Radio, a non-profit New Jersey astronomy club. ... Population III stars are a hypothetical population of extremely massive stars that are believed to have been formed in the early universe. ... Stars observed in our galaxy appear to group into two general types called Population I and Population II. (A hypothetical third group, Population III, does not occur in our galaxy. ... The galactic halo is a region of space surrounding spiral galaxies, including our galaxy, the Milky Way. ... Stars observed in our galaxy appear to group into two general types called Population I and Population II. (A hypothetical third group, Population III, does not occur in our galaxy. ... STAR is an acronym for: Organizations Society of Ticket Agents and Retailers], the self-regulatory body for the entertainment ticket industry in the UK. Society for Telescopy, Astronomy, and Radio, a non-profit New Jersey astronomy club. ... In astronomy, stellar evolution is the sequence of radical changes that a star undergoes during its lifetime (the time in which it emits light and heat). ... A Protostar is an object that forms by contraction out of the gas of a giant molecular cloud in the interstellar medium. ... Young stellar object (YSO) denotes a star in its early stage of evolution. ... Hertzsprung-Russell diagram The main sequence of the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram is the curve where the majority of stars are located in this diagram. ... According to the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram, a red giant is a large non-main sequence star of stellar classification K or M; so-named because of the reddish appearance of the cooler giant stars. ... Betelgeuse, viewed from a distance of 8 AU. By comparison, this is our own Sun, and how it would appear when viewed from the same distance. ... Rigel, viewed from a distance. ... Artists impression of a Wolf-Rayet star Wolf-Rayet stars (often referred to as WR stars) are evolved, hot, massive stars which have very strong stellar winds. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... A neutron star is one of the few possible endpoints of stellar evolution. ... This article or section contains a plot summary that is overly long or excessively detailed. ... Cepheid in the Spiral Galaxy M100 A Cepheid variable or Cepheid is a member of a particular class of variable stars, notable for a fairly tight correlation between their period of variability and absolute luminosity. ... A W Virginis variable is a variable star similar to a Cepheid variable. ... A Delta Scuti variable is a variable star which exhibits variations in its luminosity due to both radial and non-radial pulsations of the stars surface. ... Hertzsprung-Russell diagram adapted from Powell. ... Mira variables, named after the star Mira (IPA [ˈmai. ... Semiregular variable stars are giants or supergiants of intermediate and late spectral type showing considerable periodicity in their light changes, accompanied or sometimes interrupted by various irregularities. ... An irregular variable is a type of variable star in which variations in brightness show no regular periodicity. ... Beta Cephei variables are variable stars which exhibit variations in their brightness due to pulsations of the stars surfaces. ... Alpha Cygni variables are variable stars which exhibit non-radial pulsations. ... RV Tauri variables are supergiant variable stars. ... An eruptive variable is a variable star characterised by sudden extreme increases in luminosity. ... A flare star is a variable star which can undergo unpredictable dramatic increases in brightness for a few minutes or a few hours. ... T Tauri stars are a class of variable stars named after their prototype T Tauri. ... In stellar evolution, FU Orionis stars are pre-main sequence stars which display an extreme change in magnitude and spectral type. ... Also known as S Doradus type stars, a luminous blue variable is a very large, very bright, variable star. ... Artists conception of a cataclysmic variable system Cataclysmic variables are a class of binary stars containing a white dwarf and a companion star. ... A dwarf nova is a type of cataclysmic variable, consisting of a close binary star system in which one of the components is a white dwarf, which accretes matter from its companion. ... Artists conception of a white dwarf star accreting hydrogen from a larger companion A nova (pl. ... Multiwavelength X-ray image of the remnant of Keplers Supernova, SN 1604. ... Remnant of Keplers Supernova, SN 1604. ... The expanding remnant of SN 1987A, a Type II-P supernova in the Large Magellanic Cloud. ... A collapsar is a fast-rotating Wolf-Rayet star with a massive (greater than 30 solar masses) core, which collapses to form a large, rotating black hole, drawing in the surrounding envelope of stellar matter at relativistic speeds with a Lorentz factor of around 150, making collapsars the fastest celestial... Eta Carinae, in the constellation of Carina, one of the nearer candidates for a hypernova Hypernova (pl. ... Alpha² Canum Venaticorum variables are main sequence variable stars of spectral class B8p to A7p. ... Rotating ellipsoidal variables are a class of variable star. ... Animation showing how an eclipsing binary stars light intensity changes as they orbit An eclipsing binary star is a binary star in which the orbit plane of the two stars lies so nearly in the line of sight of the observer that the components undergo mutual eclipses. ... Algol (β Per / Beta Persei) is a bright star in the constellation Perseus. ... Algol (β Per / Beta Persei) is a bright star in the constellation Perseus. ... Beta Lyrae variables are a class of close binary stars. ... A W Ursae Majoris variable is a type of variable star. ... In astronomy, the term compact star (sometimes compact object) is used to refer collectively to white dwarfs, neutron stars, other exotic dense stars, and black holes. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... A black dwarf is a hypothetical astronomical object: a white dwarf so old that it has cooled down so that it no longer emits significant heat or light. ... A neutron star is one of the few possible endpoints of stellar evolution. ... Artists conception of a magnetar, with magnetic field lines A magnetar is a neutron star with an extremely powerful magnetic field, the decay of which powers the emission of copious amounts of high-energy electromagnetic radiation, particularly X-rays and gamma-rays. ... It has been suggested that Radio pulsar be merged into this article or section. ... A strange star or quark star is a hypothetical type of star composed of strange matter, or quark matter. ... A preon star is a hypothetical compact star made of preons, a group of theoretical subatomic particles that may compose quarks and leptons. ... Simulated view of a black hole in front of the Milky Way. ... An Intermediate-mass black hole (IMBH) is a black hole whose mass is significantly more than stellar black holes (a few tens of the mass of Sun) yet far less than supermassive black holes (a few millions of the mass of Sun). ... Top: artists conception of a supermassive black hole drawing material from a nearby star. ... The image above shows the optical afterglow of gamma ray burst GRB-990123 taken on January 23, 1999. ... An artists concept of a protoplanetary disc. ... A star system or stellar system is a small number of stars that orbit each other,[1] bound by gravitational attraction. ... STAR is an acronym for: Organizations Society of Ticket Agents and Retailers], the self-regulatory body for the entertainment ticket industry in the UK. Society for Telescopy, Astronomy, and Radio, a non-profit New Jersey astronomy club. ... Major features of the Solar System (not to scale; from left to right): Pluto, Neptune, Uranus, Saturn, Jupiter, the asteroid belt, the Sun, Mercury, Venus, Earth and its Moon, and Mars. ... A star system or stellar system is a small number of stars that orbit each other,[1] bound by gravitational attraction. ... Artists impression of a binary system consisting of a black hole, with an accretion disc around it, and a main sequence star. ... This topic is about the astronomical phenomenon. ... A visual binary star is a binary star for which the angular separation between the two components is great enough to permit them to be observed as a double star in a telescope. ... An astrometric binary star is a binary star for which only one of its component stars could be visually observed. ... A spectroscopic binary star is a binary star which cannot be resolved as a visual binary, even with telescopes of the highest existing resolving power. ... Animation showing how an eclipsing binary stars light intensity changes as they orbit An eclipsing binary star is a binary star in which the orbit plane of the two stars lies so nearly in the line of sight of the observer that the components undergo mutual eclipses. ... Detached binaries are a kind of binary stars where each component is within its Roche lobe. ... Semidetached binary stars are the ones where one of the components fills its Roche lobe and the other does not. ... Contact binaries are a type of binary stars where both components of the binary fill their Roche lobes. ... X-ray bursters are a class of binary stars which have periodic outbursts luminous in X-rays. ... A triple star system consists of three gravitationally bound stars. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... A stellar association is a very loose star cluster, looser than both open clusters and globular clusters. ... The Pleiades is one of the most famous open clusters. ... The Globular Cluster M80 in the constellation Scorpius is located about 28,000 light years from the Sun and contains hundreds of thousands of stars. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... In astronomy, an asterism is a pattern of stars seen in Earths sky which is not an official constellation. ... NGC 4414, a typical spiral galaxy in the constellation Coma Berenices, is about 17,000 parsecs in diameter and approximately 20 million parsecs distant. ... In astronomy, a bulge is a huge, tightly packed group of stars. ... A spiral galaxy presents a face-on view of its spiral arms. ... The galactic halo is a region of space surrounding spiral galaxies, including our galaxy, the Milky Way. ... The Structure of the Galaxy The galactic corona (not to be confused with the suns corona), also called the dark matter halo, is a region of space surrounding the galactic halo of spiral galaxies, including the Milky Way Galaxy that consist mostly of dark matter. ... NGC 4414, a typical spiral galaxy in the constellation Coma Berenices, is about 17,000 parsecs in diameter and approximately 20 million parsecs distant. ... NGC 4414, a typical spiral galaxy in the constellation Coma Berenices, is about 17,000 parsecs in diameter and approximately 20 million parsecs distant. ... It has been suggested that spiral nebula be merged into this article or section. ... NGC 1300, viewed nearly face-on. ... The Spindle Galaxy (NGC 5866), a lenticular galaxy in the Draco constellation. ... An elliptical galaxy is a type of galaxy in the Hubble sequence characterized by the following physical properties: The giant elliptical galaxy NGC 4881 (the spherical glow at upper left) lies at the edge of the Coma Cluster of Galaxies. ... A ring galaxy is a galaxy with a ring-like appearance. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... NGC 4414, a typical spiral galaxy in the constellation Coma Berenices, is about 17,000 parsecs in diameter and approximately 20 million parsecs distant. ... The cluster of galaxies known as Abell S0740, taken by NASAs Hubble telescope. ... A dwarf galaxy is a small galaxy composed of up to several billion stars, a small number compared to our own Milky Ways 200-400 billion stars. ... An active galaxy is a galaxy where a significant fraction of the energy output is not emitted by the normal components of a galaxy: stars, dust and interstellar gas. ... The introduction to this article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject matter. ... A blazar is a very compact and highly variable energy source associated with a supermassive black hole at the center of a host galaxy. ... An active galaxy is a galaxy where a significant fraction of the energy output is not emitted by the normal components of a galaxy: stars, dust and interstellar gas. ... Seyfert galaxies are spiral or irregular galaxies containing an extremely bright nucleus, most likely caused by a supermassive black hole, that can sometimes outshine the surrounding galaxy. ... [[Image: Antennae the collision of NGC 4038/NGC 4039. ... A dark galaxy is a galaxy size object made out of dark matter. ... Galaxy groups and clusters are super-structures in the spread of galaxies of the cosmos. ... In astronomy, a galaxy cluster cloud is a denser part of a galaxy supercluster, consisting of several galaxy clusters. ... Superclusters are large groupings of smaller galaxy groups and clusters, and are among the largest structures of the cosmos. ... In astronomy, filaments are one of the largest known structures in the Universe, thread-like structures with a typical length of 70 to 150 megaparsec that form the boundaries between large voids in the universe. ... In astronomy, voids are the empty spaces between filaments, the largest-scale structures in the Universe that contain very few, or no, galaxies. ... Debris disk around star AU Microscopii. ... Heliospheric current sheet, the largest structure in the Solar System, results from the influence of the Suns rotating magnetic field on the plasma in the interplanetary medium (Solar Wind) [1]. (click to enlarge) The interplanetary medium is the material which fills the solar system and through which all the... A protoplanetary disc (also protoplanetary disk, proplyd) is an accretion disc surrounding a T Tauri star. ... The interstellar medium (or ISM) is the name astronomers give to the tenuous gas and dust that pervade interstellar space. ... The Triangulum Emission Nebula NGC 604 The Pillars of Creation from the Eagle Nebula For other uses, see Nebula (disambiguation). ... An emission nebula is a cloud of ionized gas ( a plasma) emitting light of various colors. ... NGC 6543, the Cats Eye Nebula A planetary nebula is an astronomical object consisting of a glowing shell of gas and plasma formed by certain types of stars at the end of their lives. ... The Crab Nebula is an expanding cloud of gas created by the 1054 supernova. ... A plerion (Greek full) is also called pulsar wind nebula. ... NGC 604, a giant H II region in the Triangulum Galaxy. ... The Witch Head reflection nebula (IC2118), about 1000 light years from earth, is associated with the bright star Rigel in the constellation Orion. ... Dark Nebula Dark Nebula (Dark Zero in the original Japanese version) is a fictional character in the Kirby series of video games for Nintendo. ... A molecular cloud is a type of interstellar cloud whose density and size permits the formation of molecules, most commonly molecular hydrogen (H2). ... An image of Bok globules in the H II region IC 2944, taken with the WFPC2 instrument on the Hubble Space Telescope A Bok globule is a dark cloud of dense dust and gas in which star formation is sometimes taking place. ... A protoplanetary disc (also protoplanetary disk, proplyd) is an accretion disc surrounding a T Tauri star. ... An H I region (pronounced aitch one region) is an interstellar cloud composed of neutral atomic hydrogen (H1). ... Intergalactic space is the physical space between galaxies. ... In cosmology, the cosmic microwave background radiation (most often abbreviated CMB but occasionally CMBR, CBR or MBR, also referred as relic radiation) is a form of electromagnetic radiation discovered in 1965 that fills the entire universe. ... In astrophysics and cosmology, dark matter refers to hypothetical matter of unknown composition that does not emit or reflect enough electromagnetic radiation to be observed directly, but whose presence can be inferred from gravitational effects on visible matter. ... Massive compact halo object, or MACHO, is a general name for any kind of astronomical body that might explain the apparent presence of dark matter in galaxy halos. ... In astrophysics, WIMPs, or weakly interacting massive particles, are hypothetical particles serving as one possible solution to the dark matter problem. ... A cosmic string is a hypothetical 1-dimensional topological defect in the fabric of spacetime. ... A domain wall is a theoretical 2-dimensional singularity. ...

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  Results from FactBites:
 
Encyclopedia: Astronomical object (5108 words)
The azimuth of an object in the sky is the angular distance measured eastwards along the horizon from the north point to the intersection of the object's vertical circle (the line drawn from the zenith (the point in the sky directly overhead) through the object to the horizon).
The galactic latitude (b) of an object in the sky is its angular distance north or south of the galactic equator.
The ecliptic latitude of an object in the sky is its angular distance north or south of the ecliptic.
Jodrell Bank Observatory: Astronomical Almanac Help (7137 words)
The parallactic angle of an object is the angle between the celestial pole (north or south depending on location), the object and the zenith (the point in the sky directly overhead).
The galactic longitude (l) of an object in the sky is its angular distance (from 0 to 360 degrees) from the nominal galactic centre measured eastwards along the galactic equator to the intersection of the great circle passing through the object.
The ecliptic longitude of an object in the sky is its angular distance (from 0 the 360 degrees) measured eastwards along the ecliptic from the position of the vernal equinox to the intersection of the object's great circle of longitude.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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