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Encyclopedia > Associated Press
The Associated Press
Image:Associated Press logo.png
Type Not-for-profit Cooperative
Founded New York City, 1846 [1]
Headquarters New York City
Key people Tom Curley, President & CEO
Area served Worldwide
Industry News media
Products Wire service
Revenue $654,186,000 USD 2005 [1]
Operating income $17,959,000 USD 2005 [1]
Net income $18,528,000 USD 2005 [1]
Employees 3,700
Website ap.org
Part of the series on
Cooperatives
Types of Co-operatives

Housing cooperative
Building cooperative
Retailers' cooperative
Utility cooperative
Worker cooperative
Social cooperative
Consumers' cooperative
Agricultural cooperative
Credit union
Cooperative banking
Cooperative federation
Cooperative union
Cooperative wholesale society
Mutual insurance Image File history File links Associated_Press_logo. ... A nonprofit organization (abbreviated NPO, or non-profit or not-for-profit) is an organization whose primary objective is to support some issue or matter of private interest or public concern for non-commercial purposes. ... A cooperative (also co-operative or co-op) comprises a legal entity owned and democratically controlled by its members, with no passive shareholders. ... Nickname: Big Apple, Gotham, NYC, City That Never Sleeps, The Concrete Jungle, The City So Nice They Named It Twice Location in the state of New York Coordinates: Country United States State New York Boroughs The Bronx Brooklyn Manhattan Queens Staten Island Settled 1676 Government  - Mayor Michael Bloomberg (R) Area... 1846 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Nickname: Big Apple, Gotham, NYC, City That Never Sleeps, The Concrete Jungle, The City So Nice They Named It Twice Location in the state of New York Coordinates: Country United States State New York Boroughs The Bronx Brooklyn Manhattan Queens Staten Island Settled 1676 Government  - Mayor Michael Bloomberg (R) Area... The World in Plate Carrée Projection In English, world is rooted in a compound of the obsolete words were, man, and eld, age; thus, its oldest meaning is Age of Man. ... News media satellite up-link trucks and photojournalists gathered outside the Prudential Financial headquarters in Newark, New Jersey in August, 2004 following the announcement of evidence of a terrorist threat to it and to buildings in New York City. ... A news agency is an organization journalists established to supply news reports to organizations in the news trade: newspapers, magazines, and radio and television broadcasters. ... Revenue is a U.S. business term for the amount of money that a company earns from its activities in a given period, mostly from sales of products and/or services to customers. ... Image File history File links Green_Arrow_Up_(Darker). ... The United States dollar is the official currency of the United States. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Earnings before interest and taxes (EBIT), also known as operating income and operating profit, is a term used to describe a companys earnings. ... Image File history File links Green_Arrow_Up_(Darker). ... The United States dollar is the official currency of the United States. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Net income is equal to the income that a firm has after subtracting costs and expenses from the total revenue. ... Image File history File links Green_Arrow_Up_(Darker). ... The United States dollar is the official currency of the United States. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Employment is a contract between two parties, one being the employer and the other being the employee. ... A website (or Web site) is a collection of web pages, images, videos and other digital assets and hosted on a particular domain or subdomain on the World Wide Web. ... For cooperative as used in biochemistry, see cooperative binding. ... A housing co-operative is a legal entity, usually a corporation, that owns real estate, one or more residential buildings. ... Building co-operatives are co-operative housing corporations where individuals or families work together to directly construct their own homes on a co-op basis. ... A retailers cooperative or consumer cooperative is a business entity which employs economies of scale on behalf of its members to get discounts from manufacturers and to pool marketing. ... A utility cooperative is a type of cooperative that is tasked with the delivery of a public utility such as electricity or telecommunications to its members. ... A worker cooperative is a cooperative owned and operated by its worker-owners. There are no outside, or consumer owners, in a workers cooperative - only the workers own shares of the business. ... An Italian social cooperative is a particularly successful form of multi-stakeholder cooperative, of which some 7,000 exist. ... A consumers cooperative is a business owned by its customers for their mutual gain. ... A cooperative (also co-operative or co-op) comprises a legal entity owned and democratically controlled by its members, with no passive shareholders. ... A credit union is a not-for-profit co-operative financial institution that is owned and controlled by its members, through the election of a volunteer Board of Directors elected from the membership itself. ... This article, image, template or category belongs in one or more categories. ... A Co-operative Federation is a Co-operative society in which all members are, in turn, Co-operatives. ... A Co-operative Union is Co-operative Federation (that is, a Co-operative in which all the members are Co-operatives). ... A Co-operative Wholesale Society, or CWS, is a form of Co-operative Federation (that is, a Co-operative in which all the members are Co-operatives), in this case, the members are usually Consumers Co-operatives. ... Mutual insurance is a type of insurance where those protected by the insurance (policyholders) also own the organization. ...

Rochdale Principles

Voluntary and open membership
Democratic member control
Member economic participation
Autonomy and independence
Education, training, and information
Cooperation among cooperatives
Concern for community
The first of the Rochdale Principles states that Co-operative societies must have an open and voluntary membership. ... The second of the Rochdale Principles states that Co-operative societies must have democratic member control. ... Member economic participation is one of the defining features of [[Cooperatives|Co-operative Soceities], and constitutes the third Rochdale Principle in the ICAs Statement on the Co-operative Identity. ... The fourth of the Rochdale Principles states that Co-operative societies must be autonomous and independent. ... The purpose of Co-operative education and Co-operative studies, according to the ICAs Statement on the Co-operative Identity, is that Co-operative societies provide education and training for their members, elected representatives, managers, and employees so they can contribute effectively to the development of their co-operatives. ... A Co-operative Federation is a Co-operative society in which all members are, in turn, Co-operatives. ... The seventh of the Rochdale Principles states that Co-operative societies must have concern for their communities. ...

Political and Economic Theories

Anarchism
Cooperative federalism
Cooperative individualism
Owenism
Third way
Socialism
Socially responsible investing
Social enterprise It has been suggested that Origins of anarchism and History of anarchism be merged into this article or section. ... Co-operative Federalism is a school of thought in the field of Co-operative economics. ... Owenism is a term used to represent the Utopian socialist philosophy of Robert Owen, and deriviations thereof. ... The Third Way is a centrist philosophy of governance that, at least from a traditional social democratic perspective, usually stands for deregulation, decentralization and lower taxes. ... Socialism refers to a broad array of doctrines or political movements that envisage a socio-economic system in which property and the distribution of wealth are subject to social control. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Social enterprises are organizations which trade in goods or services and link that trade to a social mission. ...

Key Theorists

Robert Owen
William King
The Rochdale Pioneers
G.D.H. Cole
Charles Gide
Beatrice Webb
Friedrich Raiffeisen
David Griffiths
Robert Owen (May 14, 1771 – November 17, 1858) was a Welsh socialist and social reformer. ... Dr. William King (1786-1865) was a British physician and philantropist from Brighton. ... The Rochdale Society of Equitable Pioneers, founded in 1844, is usually considered the first successful co-operative enterprise, forming the basis for the modern co-operative movement. ... George Douglas Howard Cole (September 25, 1889 - January 14, 1959) was an English journalist and economist, closely associated with the development of Fabianism. ... Charles Gide (1847–1932) was a French economist and notable ideologue of the cooperative movement in the first third of the 20th century. ... Beatrice Webb Martha Beatrice Potter Webb (January 2, 1858 - April 30, 1943) (also called Beatrice Webb) was a British socialist, economist and reformer, usually referred to in the same breath as her husband, Sidney Webb. ... Friedrich Wilhelm Raiffeisen (May 3, 1818, Hamm - May 11, 1888, Heddesdorf, currently known as Neuwied, Germany) was a German cooperative leader. ... David Griffiths is a Co-operative economist, who has contributed a number of books and articles on the subject of unemployment,[1] the history of Victorias Co-operative movement,[2] and social care co-operatives[3] amongst other subjects. ...

Organizations

List of cooperatives
List of cooperative federations
International Co-operative Alliance
Co-operative Party List of co-operative enterprises: // Canada Accessible Technologies (Westmount, NS) [1] Baseline Type and Graphics (Vancouver, BC) [2] BeaDazzled Bead Shop (Guelph, ON) [3] The Big Carrot (Toronto, ON) [4] Calgary Alternative Transportation Co-operative [5] Canadian Travel Co-op (Burlington, ON. Regina, SK) CFRO-FM (Vancouver, BC) [6] Circle... This is a list of Co-operative Federations. ... The International Co-operative Alliance (ICA) is a non-governmental association representing co-operatives and the co-operative movement worldwide. ... This article is about the British political party. ...

·  v  d  e 

The Associated Press, or AP, is an American news agency, the world's largest such organization. The AP is a cooperative owned by its contributing newspapers and radio and TV stations in the United States, who both contribute stories to it and use material written by its staffers. Many newspapers and broadcasters outside the United States are AP subscribers — that is, they pay a fee to use AP material but are not members of the cooperative. A news agency is an organization of journalists established to supply news reports to organizations in the news trade: newspapers, magazines, and radio and television broadcasters. ... For cooperative as used in biochemistry, see cooperative binding. ... A television station is a type of broadcast station that broadcasts both audio and video to television receivers in a particular area. ...


As of 2005, AP's news is used by 1,700 newspapers, in addition to 5,000 television and radio outlets. Its photo library consists of more than 10 million images. The AP has 242 bureaus and serves 121 countries, with a diverse international staff drawing from all over the world. The AP Stylebook has become the de facto standard for newswriting in the United States. 2005 is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... A slightly outdated edition of the Stylebook The Associated Press Stylebook and Briefing on Media Law, usually simply called the AP Stylebook and nicknamed the journalists bible, is the primary guide of style and usage for most newspapers and newsmagazines in the United States. ...


The collapse of United Press International as a major competitor, AP's traditional rival, has left it as the only nationally oriented news service based in the United States. The other rival English-language news services, such as Reuters and the English language service of Agence France Presse, are based outside the United States. Front of UPI Headquarters, Washington, D.C. UPI redirects here. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... Reuters Group plc (LSE: RTR and NASDAQ: RTRSY); pron. ... Agence France-Presse (abbreviated AFP) is the oldest news agency in the world. ...


The AP has a straightforward, "just-the-facts" writing style, often using the inverted pyramid style of writing so that stories can be edited to fit available space in a newspaper without losing the essence of the story. The explosion of media and news outlets with the arrival of the Internet has made such concise writing less necessary, and raised the need for more feature-style writing. The inverted pyramid is a graphical metaphor that is most often used to illustrate how information should be arranged or presented within a text, in particular within a news story. ...


It has also posed a threat to AP's financial structure. On April 18, 2005, at its annual meeting, AP announced that as of 2006 it would, for the first time, begin charging separate fees for posting articles and pictures online. News outlets that buy AP's news, sports, business and entertainment coverage have previously been allowed to place the material online at no extra cost. The cooperative later backed down from the plan and, in a bid to reach more readers, launched asap, a service aimed at 18–34-year-olds. asap is The Associated Press news portal targeted at 18–34 year olds. ...


U.S. employees, except for a small group classified as "administrative," are represented by the News Media Guild and the Communication Workers of America. The News Media Guild (http://www. ... Communications Workers of America (CWA) is the largest communications and media labor union in the United States (the union also has locals in Canada), representing over 700,000 workers in both the private and public sectors. ...

Contents

History

AP was fomed in May 1846[2] by representatives of five competitive New York City newspapers, who wanted to pool resources to collect news from Europe. This became the Harbor News Association. After the Civil War, the owners of these newspapers realized that they, through their newspapers, were all essentially paying for the same information from their reporters. (Reporters covering the battle sites of the Civil War used the telegraph to send in their reports). The owners of the newspapers realized that it would be cheaper to have a service collect and pay for the information once from the telegraph company. At this time, the Harbor News Association became the Associated Press. The driving force in its formation was Moses Yale Beach, publisher of the New York Sun, when he invited the other New York publishers to join the Sun in a cooperative venture in covering the Mexican-American War. The five New York papers joined in the agreement were the Sun, the Journal of Commerce, the Courier and Enquirer, the Herald, and the Express. Until the advent of the Industrial Revolution and the Penny Press, newspapers competed by sending reporters out in rowboats to meet the ships as they arrived in the harbor. In 1849 the Harbor News Association opened the first bureau outside the U.S., in Halifax, Nova Scotia, to meet ships from Europe before they docked in New York. 1846 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Nickname: Big Apple, Gotham, NYC, City That Never Sleeps, The Concrete Jungle, The City So Nice They Named It Twice Location in the state of New York Coordinates: Country United States State New York Boroughs The Bronx Brooklyn Manhattan Queens Staten Island Settled 1676 Government  - Mayor Michael Bloomberg (R) Area... The original New York Sun began publication September 3, 1833, as a morning newspaper, and an evening edition began in 1887. ... Combatants United States Mexico Commanders Zachary Taylor Winfield Scott Stephen W. Kearney Antonio López de Santa Anna Mariano Arista Pedro de Ampudia Strength 7,000 - 43,000 18,000 - 40,000 Casualties KIA: 1,733 Total dead: 13,283 Wounded: 4,152 25,000 killed or wounded (Mexican government... Motto: (Out Of Many, One) (traditional) In God We Trust (1956 to date) Anthem: The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington D.C. Largest city New York City None at federal level (English de facto) Government Federal constitutional republic  - President George Walker Bush (R)  - Vice President Dick Cheney (R) Independence from... Motto: {{Unhide = {{{}}}}} E Mari Merces (Wealth from the Sea) Logo: Location City Information Established: April 1, 1996 Area: urban area 79. ... Motto: Munit Haec et Altera Vincit (Latin: One defends and the other conquers) Official languages English, French (Canadian Gaelic) [] Capital Halifax Largest city Halifax Regional Municipality Lieutenant-Governor Mayann E. Francis Premier Rodney MacDonald (PC) Parliamentary representation  - House seats  - Senate seats 11 10 Area Total  - Land  - Water  (% of total)  Ranked...

  • 1861: Facing censorship in covering the American Civil War, reporters first filed under the anonymous byline "from the Associated Press agent."
  • 1876: Mark Kellogg, a stringer, becomes the first AP correspondent to die in the line of duty, at the Battle of the Little Bighorn. His final dispatch: "I go with Custer and will be at the death."
  • 1893: Melville E. Stone becomes the general manager of the reorganized A.P., a post he retains until 1921. Under his leadership, the A.P. becomes one of the world's most prominent news agencies.
  • 1899: AP uses Guglielmo Marconi's wireless telegraph to cover the America's Cup yacht race off Sandy Hook, New Jersey, the first news test of the new telegraph.
  • 1914: AP introduces the Teletype, which transmitted directly to printers over telegraph wires. Eventually a worldwide network of 60-word-per-minute Teletypes is built up.
  • 1935: AP starts WirePhoto, the world's first wire service for photographs. The first photo to transfer over the wires was of a plane crash in Morehouseville, N.Y., on Jan. 1, 1935.
  • 1938: AP shifts into 50 Rockefeller Plaza (known as "50 Rock") in the newly built Rockefeller Center, which would remain its headquarters for 68 years; in 2004 it shifted to expanded offices at 450 W. 33rd St.
  • 1941: AP expands from print into radio.
  • 1994: AP launches APTV, a global video newsgathering agency, headquartered in London.

1861 (MDCCCLXI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link with display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar) // January 1 - Benito Juárez captures Mexico City January 2 - Friedrich Wilhelm IV of Prussia dies and is succeeded by... Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... 1876 (MDCCCLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Saturday. ... A portrait of Mark Kellogg. ... Stringer can have different meanings, including: In journalism, a stringer is a freelance journalist, who is paid for each piece of published or broadcast work, rather than receiving a regular salary. ... Combatants Lakota, Northern Cheyenne, Arapaho United States Commanders Sitting Bull, Crazy Horse George Armstrong Custer â€ , Marcus Reno, Frederick Benteen, James Calhoun Strength 949 lodges (probably 950-1200 warriors) 31 officers, 566 troopers, 15 civilians, ~35-40 scouts Casualties ~138 killed ~168 wounded (according to Sitting Bull and Red Horse) ~268... Year 1893 (MDCCCXCIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar). ... Melville Elijah Stone (born 1848 in Hudson, Illinois- died 1929) Newspaper publisher, the founder of the Chicago Daily News, who became well known as the general manager of the reorganized Associated Press. ... Year 1921 (MCMXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for full calendar). ... Year 1899 (MDCCCXCIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar). ... Guglielmo Marchese Marconi, GCVO (25 April 1874-20 July 1937) was an Italian inventor, best known for his development of a practical radiotelegraph system, which served as the foundation for the establishment of numerous affiliated companies worldwide. ... Optical Telegraf of Claude Chappe on the Litermont near Nalbach, Germany Telegraph and telegram redirect here. ... The Americas Cup trophy The Americas Cup is the most famous and most prestigious regatta in the sport of sailing, and the oldest active trophy in international sport, predating the FA Cup by two decades and the Modern Olympics by 45 years. ... Image of Sandy Hook taken by NASA. Sandy Hook is a narrow coastal spit of land, approximately 12 mi (19 km) in length and 0. ... Official language(s) None, English de facto Capital Trenton Largest city Newark Area  Ranked 47th  - Total 8,729 sq mi (22,608 km²)  - Width 70 miles (110 km)  - Length 150 miles (240 km)  - % water 14. ... 1914 (MCMXIV) was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... A teleprinter (teletypewriter, teletype or TTY) is a now largely obsolete electro-mechanical typewriter which can be used to communicate typed messages from point to point through a simple electrical communications channel, often just a pair of wires. ... 1935 (MCMXXXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). ... Wirephoto is a term for sending pictures by either telegraph or telephone. ... Morehouse is a town located in Hamilton County, New York. ... Year 1938 (MCMXXXVIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will take you to calendar). ... Lower Plaza at Rockefeller Center. ... For the movie, see 1941 (film). ... 1994 (MCMXCIV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated as the International Year of the Family and the International Year of the Sport and the Olympic Ideal by United Nations. ... Associated Press Television News, known as either Associated Press TV News or APTN, is a global video news agency. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ...

AP Sports Polls

The Associated Press Building in New York City. The AP left this building in 2004.
The Associated Press Building in New York City. The AP left this building in 2004.

The Associated Press is also known for putting together Associated Press (AP) Polls on numerous college sports in the United States. The AP Poll ranking the top-25 NCAA Division I-A college football and Division I men's and women's college basketball teams are the most well known. The polls are made by collecting top-25 votes of numerous designated sports journalists and then compiled at the AP office. The AP Poll in college football was particularly notable because it helped determine the ranking of teams at the end of the year for the Bowl Championship Series until the AP, citing conflict of interest, asked for the AP Poll to be removed from the Bowl Championship Series. In the 2005 season, the Harris Interactive College Football Poll took its place in the formula. The AP Poll is the longest serving college football poll, having started in 1936. Download high resolution version (1920x2560, 2358 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Download high resolution version (1920x2560, 2358 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Nickname: Big Apple, Gotham, NYC, City That Never Sleeps, The Concrete Jungle, The City So Nice They Named It Twice Location in the state of New York Coordinates: Country United States State New York Boroughs The Bronx Brooklyn Manhattan Queens Staten Island Settled 1676 Government  - Mayor Michael Bloomberg (R) Area... Refers to a set of physical activities comprising sports and games. ... The Associated Press (AP) Poll, along with the USA Today Coaches Poll, ranks the top 25 NCAA Division I college football and basketball teams, weekly. ... The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA, often pronounced N-C-Double-A ) is a voluntary association of about 1200 institutions, conferences, organizations and individuals that organizes the athletic programs of many colleges and universities in the United States. ... Division I is the highest level of intercollegiate athletics sanctioned by the National Collegiate Athletic Association in the United States. ... A college football game between Colorado State University and the Air Force Academy. ... Division I (or DI) is the highest level of intercollegiate athletics sanctioned by the National Collegiate Athletic Association in the United States. ... College basketball most often refers to the American basketball competitive governance structure established by the National Collegiate Athletic Association, or NCAA. // The game of basketball was invented by Dr. James Naismith in 1891. ... BCS Logo 2006-Present The Bowl Championship Series (BCS) is designed to pair the top two teams in college football against each other in the BCS National Championship Game with the winner being the BCS national champion. ... BCS Logo 2006-Present The Bowl Championship Series (BCS) is designed to pair the top two teams in college football against each other in the BCS National Championship Game with the winner being the BCS national champion. ... The Harris Interactive College Football Poll is a weekly ranking of the top 25 NCAA Division I-A college football teams. ... 1936 (MCMXXXVI) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ...


Cooperative Use of News

As part of their agreements with the Associated Press, most newspapers grant automatic permission for the Associated Press to distribute their local news reports. For example, on page two of every edition of the Washington Post, the masthead includes the announcement, "The Associated Press is entitled exclusively to use for republication of all news dispaches credited to it or not otherwise credited in this paper and all local news of spontaneous origin published herein." ... A masthead refers to the top of a mast of a ship. ...


Associated Press Television News

In 1994 London based Associated Press Television (APTV) was started to provide agency news material to television news broadcasters. Other providers of such material were Reuters Television and Worldwide Television News (WTN). Reuters Group plc (LSE: RTR and NASDAQ: RTRSY); pron. ...


In 1998 APTV left the Associated Press building in the City of London and merged with WTN to create Associated Press Television News in the existing WTN building in North London. The City of London is a geographically-small city within Greater London, England. ... Associated Press Television News, known as either Associated Press TV News or APTN, is a global video news agency. ...


Current events

Guantánamo Bay detainees

The Associated Press made available for download the unclassified portions of the dossiers of 59 Guantánamo Bay detainees, which they acquired through Freedom of Information Act requests. This list of Guantanamo Bay detainees is compiled from various sources. ... Nearly sixty countries around the world have implemented some form of freedom of information legislation, which sets rules on governmental secrecy. ...

In 2005, AP requested that the Department of Defense provide transcripts and related documents from the Combatant Status Review Tribunals (CSRTs). The Department of Defense released redacted versions of the transcripts and related documents, claiming that the release of the detainees' names and other identifying information in unredacted versions would violate their privacy (as protected by Exemption 6 to the Freedom of Information Act). The Department of Defense never claimed that the release of unredacted versions would compromise national security. In 2005, U.S. District Judge Jed S. Rakoff ordered the Department of Defense to ask each detainee for permission for their names to be released, and on January 24, 2006, Rakoff ruled in favor of the Associated Press, finding that the Department of Defense had failed to offer adequate evidence to support their claims and that the detainees' had no reasonable expectation of privacy under the order, and therefore ordered the Department of Defense to release the unredacted transcripts and related documents.[3] Documents of only 317 of the 490 detainees were released on March 3, 2006. Although justice Rakoff had already dismissed this argument, Pentagon spokesman Bryan Whitman justified withholding the names out of a concern for the detainees' privacy. [2] [3] The Associated Press made available for internet download a library of dossiers of the Guantanamo Bay detainees Combatant Status Review Tribunals. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards and make it easier to understand, this article or section may require cleanup. ... The United States Department of Defense, abbreviated DoD or DOD and sometimes called the Defense Department, is a civilian Cabinet organization of the United States government. ... Judge Jed S. Rakoff Jed S. Rakoff (born 1943) is a United States District Judge for the Southern District of New York. ... Please wikify (format) this article as suggested in the Guide to layout and the Manual of Style. ...


Jamil Hussein controversy

Some Associated Press reporters have been accused by bloggers of using fake sources, in particular a purported police captain Jamil Hussein, for their reporting of sectarian violence in Iraq. The Associated Press stood by its reporting, and on January 4, 2007 the Iraqi Interior Ministry recognized Jamil as an active member of the Baghdad police force, and said he now faces arrest for talking to journalists. Ministry spokesman Abdul-Karim Khalaf, who had previously denied the existence of Hussein, acknowledged that the officer was assigned to the Khadra police station.[4]. Despite this, a number of right-wing bloggers argued that the controversy did not end with the proof of Hussein's existence, but raised deeper questions about the work of The Associated Press in Iraq. The Jamil Hussein controversy refers to allegations that some Associated Press reporters were using fake sources in their reporting on Iraq. ... The Ministry of Interior in Iraq handles policing and border enforcement. ... Baghdad (Arabic ) is the capital of Iraq and of Baghdad Governorate. ... For the band, see The Police. ...


Governance

The Associated Press is governed by an elected board of directors. In relation to a company, a director is an officer of the company charged with the conduct and management of its affairs. ...

The Dallas Morning News is the major daily newspaper serving the Dallas, Texas area. ... Tom Curley is the current president and chief executive officer of the Associated Press - one of the most powerful men in American media. ... Morristown is a city in Tennessee, United States. ... The Tribune Company is a large multimedia corporation based in Chicago, Illinois. ... The Gazette is a daily newspaper published in the American city of Cedar Rapids, Iowa. ... The Arkansas Democrat-Gazette is a daily newspaper published in Little Rock, Arkansas. ... The Journal Gazette is one of two major newspapers based out of Fort Wayne, Indiana. ... --207. ... Boisfeuillet Jones, Jr. ... The Washington Post is the largest newspaper in Washington, D.C., the capital of the United States. ... Lee Enterprises (NYSE: LEE) is a newspaper company based in Davenport, Iowa Lee owns several newspapers including the Corvallis Gazette-Times. ... Photo submitted by Neil Hutton Flight Lieutenant David Samuel Anthony Lord VC DFC RAF (18 October 1913 – 19 September 1944) was an Irish recipient of the Victoria Cross, the highest and most prestigious award for gallantry in the face of the enemy that can be awarded to British and Commonwealth... The E.W. Scripps Company (NYSE: SSP) is a media conglomerate founded by Edward W. Scripps on November 2, 1878, originally known as the Cleveland Penny Press. ... Gannett Company, Inc. ... The Rutland Herald is the second largest daily newspaper in Vermont, USA. With a weekly circulation of just over 20,000, it is the main source of news geared towards the southern part of the state, along with the Brattleboro Reformer. ... Advance Publications is owned by the descendants of Samuel I. Newhouse. ... The McClatchy Company NYSE: MNI is an American publishing company based in Sacramento, California, that operates a number of newspapers and websites. ... Incorporated Village in 1873. ... Bonneville International Corporation, managed by Deseret Management Corporation, is a broadcasting company wholly owned by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (the LDS Church). ... Cape Girardeau (pronounced ) (French: Cap-Girardeau, pronounced ) is a city located in the county of the same name in Missouri, 115 miles south of Saint Louis. ... William Dean Singleton is founder, vice chairman and chief executive officer of MediaNews Group, the seventh-largest newspaper company in the United States. ... MediaNews Group, based in Denver, is one of the largest newspaper companies in the United States. ... Jay R. Smith (August 29, 1915 - October 5, 2002) was an American former child actor who replaced Mickey Daniels as the freckle-faced kid of the Our Gang series in 1925. ... Cox Enterprises is the successor to the publishing company founded at Dayton, Ohio, by James Middleton Cox, who began with the Dayton Daily News. ... David Westin President of ABC News David Westin is currently president of ABC News. ... ABC News logo ABC News is a division of ABC television and radio networks (ABC), owned by The Walt Disney Company. ... Media General NYSE: MEG is a media company based in the Southeastern United States. ...

Web resource

The AP's multi-topic structure has lent itself well to web portals, such as Yahoo, msn.com, etc, which all have news pages which constantly need to be updated. Often, such portals will rely on AP and other news services as their first source for news coverage of breaking news items. Yahoo's "Top News" page gives the AP top visibility out of any news outlet. This has been of major impact to the AP's public image and role, as it gives new credence to the AP's continual mission of having staff for covering every area of news fully and promptly. Yahoo! - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ...


See also

Hal Buell is the former head of the Photography Service (photo director) at the Associated Press. ... With the U.S. fleet off Iwo Jima in the background, Joe Rosenthal strikes a pose on the summit of Mount Suribachi Joe Rosenthal (October 9, 1911 – August 20, 2006) was an American photographer who received the Pulitzer Prize for his iconic World War II photograph Raising the Flag on... Brian Murphy (1959-)is the U.S. religion editor at the Associated Press and the author of a number of non-fiction books on religion, including The New Men, a chronicle of American seminarians in Rome, and The Root of Wild Madder, about the carpet trade in Iran and Afghanistan. ...

References

  1. ^ a b c Consolidated Financial Statements, The Associated Press and Subsidiaries: Years ended December 31, 2005 and 2004. Associated Press (2006-03-07). Retrieved on 2006-10-13.]
  2. ^ AP Is Older Than Was Thought, Papers Show, Associated Press, January 31, 2006
  3. ^ Judge Orders Release of Gitmo Detainee IDs, Washington Post, January 24, 2006
  4. ^ "Iraq threatens arrest of police officer" AP, 04 January 2007

For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... March 7 is the 66th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (67th in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... October 13 is the 286th day of the year (287th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... January 31 is the 31st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... ... January 24 is the 24th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ...

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  Results from FactBites:
 
Associated Press - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1347 words)
Associated Press, or AP, is an American news agency, the world's largest such organization.
The Associated Press is also known for putting together Associated Press (AP) Polls on numerous college sports in the United States.
The Associated Press is governed by an elected board of directors.
Encyclopedia4U - Associated Press - Encyclopedia Article (349 words)
The Associated Press (AP) claims to be the world's oldest and largest news agency.
The collapse of United Press International, AP's historic competitor in the U.S., has left the it as the only national news service in the country.
It is so omnipresent that the Associated Press Stylebook has become the de facto standard for news-writing in the country.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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