FACTOID # 21: 15% of Army recruits from South Dakota are Native American, which is roughly the same percentage for female Army recruits in the state.
 
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Encyclopedia > Asian American
Asian American
Total population

Asian
14,907,198 Americans(2006 estimate)
5.0% of the US population[1] Image File history File links Elaine_Chao_large. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2400x3000, 4582 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Kalpana Chawla List of Aroras Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (2136x2670, 688 KB) Source: http://www. ... CICC 2002 permissioned recieved http://www. ... Image File history File links Ellison Onizuka portrait by NASA. File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2358x3000, 2160 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Hawaii Japanese American Eric Shinseki ...

Regions with significant populations
Alaska, Hawaii, West Coast, Northeast, Chicago
Language(s)
American English, Chinese, Tagalog, Vietnamese, Korean, Japanese, Indian languages, Cambodian, Hmong, Laotian, Thai, others
Religion(s)
Buddhism, Chinese folk religion, Christianity, Hinduism, Islam, Shamanism, Sikhism, Atheism, others

An Asian American is generally defined as a person of Asian ancestry and American citizenship,[2][3][4] although may also be extended to include non-citizen resident Asians as well.[5] The term Asian American was used informally by activists in the 1960s who sought an alternative to the term Oriental, arguing that the latter term was derogatory, and colonialist. Formal usage was introduced by academics in the early 1970s, notably by historian Yuji Ichioka, who is credited with popularizing the term.[6] Today, Asian American is the accepted term for most formal purposes, such as government and academic research, although the term is often shortened to Asian in common usage. According to Oxford English Dictionary, the term Asian is used in North America to refer to people from the Far East.[7] Official language(s) None[1] Spoken language(s) English 85. ... Official language(s) English, Hawaiian Capital Honolulu Largest city Honolulu Area  Ranked 43rd  - Total 10,931 sq mi (29,311 km²)  - Width n/a miles (n/a km)  - Length 1,522 miles (2,450 km)  - % water 41. ... Regional definitions vary from source to source. ... Regional definitions vary The Northeastern United States is a region of the United States. ... Nickname: Motto: Urbs in Horto (Latin: City in a Garden), I Will Location in the Chicago metro area and Illinois Coordinates: , Country State Counties Cook, DuPage Settled 1770s Incorporated March 4, 1837 Government  - Mayor Richard M. Daley (D) Area  - City  234. ... For other uses, see American English (disambiguation). ... Tagalog (pronunciation: ) is one of the major languages of the Republic of the Philippines. ... Map of South Asia in native languages. ... |familycolor=Hmong-Mien |states=Sichuan, Vietnam, Laos, Thailand, and USA. |speakers=over 4 million[1] |fam1=Hmong-Mien |iso2=hmn| |lc1=hmn|ld1=Hmong (generic)|ll1=none |lc2=mww|ld2=Hmong Daw (Laos, China)|ll2=none |lc3=hmv|ld3=Hmong Do (Vietnam)|ll3=none |lc4=hmf|ld4=Hmong Don (Vietnam... Lao (ພາສາລາວ phaasaa laao) is the official language of Laos. ... A silhouette of a Buddha statue at Ayutthaya, Thailand. ... Clothed statues of Matsu / Mazu (Chinese goddess of the Sea) Chinese folk religion comprises the religion practiced in much of China for thousands of years which included ancestor veneration and drew heavily upon concepts and beings within Chinese mythology. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      Christianity is... Hinduism (known as in modern Indian languages[1]) is a religious tradition[2] that originated in the Indian subcontinent. ... For people named Islam, see Islam (name). ... A shaman doctor of Kyzyl. ... Sikhism (IPA: or ; Punjabi: , , IPA: ) is a religion that began in fifteenth century Northern India with the teachings of Nanak and nine successive human gurus. ... “Atheist” redirects here. ... Asian people[1] is a demonym for people from Asia. ... “Citizen” redirects here. ... The term the Orient - literally meaning sunrise, east - is traditionally used to refer to Near, Middle, and Far Eastern countries. ... It has been suggested that Benign colonialism be merged into this article or section. ... Yuji Ichioka, born on June 23, 1936 in San Francisco, California, is an American historian best known for his work in ethnic studies, particularly Asian American Studies. ... The Oxford English Dictionary print set The Oxford English Dictionary (OED) is a dictionary published by the Oxford University Press (OUP), and is the most successful dictionary of the English language, (not to be confused with the one-volume Oxford Dictionary of English, formerly New Oxford Dictionary of English, of... The far east as a cultural block includes East Asia, Southeast Asia, Northeast Asia and South Asia. ...


As with other racial and ethnic groups, formal and common usage have changed markedly through the short history of this term. The most significant change occurred when the Hart-Celler Act of 1965 eliminated highly restrictive "national origins" quotas. The new country-specific quotas enabled significant immigration from every country in Asia, which led to dramatic and ongoing changes in the Asian American population. As a result of these population changes, the formal and common understandings of what defines Asian American have expanded to include progressively more of the people with ancestry from various parts of Asia. For other uses, see Race (disambiguation). ... President Johnson signs bill at Liberty Island, New York October 3, 1965 The Immigration and Naturalization Services Act of 1965 (also known as the Hart-Celler Act or the INS Act of 1965) abolished the national-origin quotas that had been in place in the United States since the Immigration... For other uses, see Asia (disambiguation). ...

Contents

Terminology

The most commonly-used definition of Asian American is the Census Bureau definition of Asian[8], largely because the Census definitions determine many government classifications, notably for equal opportunity programs and measurements. People with original origins from the Far East, Southeast Asia and the Indian Subcontinent are included in the Census definition of Asia. [9] and not considered Asian Americans.[10] The use of a separate "Asian" category in the Census is a recent addition, beginning in 1990. Since then, the Census definitions have varied over time. Most notably with the 2000 census separated Asian/Pacific Islander and moved Pacific Islander ethnicities into a separate racial group.


Earlier Census forms from 1980 and before listed particular Asian ancestries as separate groups along with White and Black or Negro.[11] Previously, Asian Americans were classified as "other". [12] But the 1980 census marked the first general analyses of Asians as a group, combining several individual ancestry groups into "Asian or Pacific Islander." By the 1990 census, Asian or Pacific Islander (API) was included as an explicit category, although respondents had to select one particular ancestry.[13][14] People of Middle Eastern ancestry are categorized in the white census category rather than Asian.[9] The term white American (often used interchangeably with Caucasian American[3] and within the United States simply white[4]) is an umbrella term that refers to people of European, Middle Eastern, and North African descent residing in the United States. ...


Finally, the definition of Asian American also has variations that derive from the use of the word American in different contexts. Immigration status, citizenship, acculturation, and language ability are some variables that are used to define American for various purposes and may vary in formal and everyday usage.[15] For example, restricting American to include only U.S. citizens conflicts with discussions of Asian American businesses, which generally refer both to citizens and non-citizens.[16] Use of the word American in the English language differs between historical, geographical and political contexts. ...


Demographics

Metropolitan Areas with the Highest Proportion of Asian Americans (2000 Census)[17]
Metropolitan Area Metropolitan population % of Asian Americans
Honolulu, HI MSA 876,156 46.0
San Francisco Bay Area 7,039,362 18.4
Greater Los Angeles Area 16,373,645 10.4
Sacramento CA CMSA 1,796,857 9.0
San Diego, CA MSA 2,813,833 8.9
Seattle-Tacoma metropolitan area 3,554,760 7.9
New York metropolitan area 21,199,865 6.8
Baltimore-Washington Metropolitan Area 7,608,070 5.3
Greater Houston 4,669,571 4.9
Las Vegas, NV/AZ MSA 1,563,282 4.7

The demographics of Asian Americans describe a heterogeneous group of people in the United States who can trace their ancestry to one or more countries in Asia. Because Asian Americans total less than 5% of the entire U.S. population, the diversity of the group is often disregarded in media and news discussions of "Asians" or of "Asian Americans." While there are some commonalities across ethnic sub-groups, there are significant differences among different Asian ethnicities that are related to each group's history. The demographics of Asian Americans describe a heterogeneous group of people in the United States who can trace their ancestry to one or more countries in Asia. ... Honolulu as seen from the International Space Station Honolulu is the largest city and the capital of the U.S. state of Hawai‘i. ... USGS satellite photo of the San Francisco Bay Area. ... The Greater Los Angeles Area, or the Southland, is the agglomeration of urbanized area around the city of Los Angeles, California, United States. ... “Sacramento” redirects here. ... Flag Seal Nickname: Americas Finest City Location Location of San Diego within San Diego County Coordinates , Government County San Diego Mayor City Attorney         City Council District One District Two District Three District Four District Five District Six District Seven District Eight Jerry Sanders (R) Michael Aguirre Scott Peters Kevin... Puget Sound For the university in this region, see University of Puget Sound. ... The New York metropolitan area is the most populous in the United States and the fourth most populous in the world (after Tokyo, Seoul, and Mexico City). ... It has been suggested that National Capital Region (United States) be merged into this article or section. ... The Houston–Sugar Land–Baytown metropolitan area, a title designated by the U.S. Census as of 2003, is the seventh-largest metropolitan area and one of the most diverse[2] in the United States consisting of 10 counties within the state of Texas. ... Vegas redirects here. ... For other uses, see Asia (disambiguation). ...


The 2000 U.S. census recorded 11.9 million people who reported themselves as having either full or partial Asian heritage, 4.2% of the U.S. population. The largest ethnic subgroups are Chinese (2.7 million), Filipinos (2.4M), Asian Indians (1.9M), Vietnamese (1.5M), Koreans (1.2M) , and Japanese (1.1M). Other sizable groups are Cambodians (206,000), Pakistanis (204,000), Laotians (198,000), Hmong (186,000), and Thais (150,000).[17] 2000 US Census logo The Twenty-Second United States Census, known as Census 2000 and conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States on April 1, 2000, to be 281,421,906, an increase of 13. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... For an article on American Indians see Native Americans. ... A Laotian American is a resident of the United States who is of ethnic Laotian descent and also one group of Asian Americans. ... A Hmong American is a resident of the United States who is of ethnic Hmong descent. ...


The Asian American population is heavily urbanized, with nearly three-quarters of Asian Americans living in metropolitan areas with population greater than 2.5 million. Asian Americans are concentrated in the largest U.S. cities, with 40% of all Asian Americans living in the metropolitan areas around Los Angeles, San Francisco, and New York City. Half of all Asian Americans (5.4M) live in Hawaii or the West Coast, mostly in California (4.2M). Census data shows that Asian American populations are developing in major metropolitan areas off of the West Coast, with visible communities in areas such as Baltimore-Washington Metropolitan Area and Greater Houston, to name the largest examples. Nickname: Location within Los Angeles County in the state of California Coordinates: , State County Settled 1781 Incorporated April 4, 1850 Government  - Type Mayor-Council  - Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa  - City Attorney Rocky Delgadillo  - Governing body City Council Area  - City  498. ... This page is a candidate for speedy deletion. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... Official language(s) English, Hawaiian Capital Honolulu Largest city Honolulu Area  Ranked 43rd  - Total 10,931 sq mi (29,311 km²)  - Width n/a miles (n/a km)  - Length 1,522 miles (2,450 km)  - % water 41. ... Regional definitions vary from source to source. ... Official language(s) English Capital Sacramento Largest city Los Angeles Largest metro area Greater Los Angeles Area  Ranked 3rd  - Total 158,302 sq mi (410,000 km²)  - Width 250 miles (400 km)  - Length 770 miles (1,240 km)  - % water 4. ... It has been suggested that National Capital Region (United States) be merged into this article or section. ... The Houston–Sugar Land–Baytown metropolitan area, a title designated by the U.S. Census as of 2003, is the seventh-largest metropolitan area and one of the most diverse[2] in the United States consisting of 10 counties within the state of Texas. ...


In regions with large numbers of Asian Americans, suburban communities have developed that are heavily or predominantly Asian. The schools in these areas may offer languages such as Mandarin as a second language. Since the 1970s, in addition to Chinatowns, "Little Manila", "Koreatowns" and "Little Saigons" have appeared in several cities. Large Japantowns once existed up and down the West Coast of the United States, but the ones that remain are mere vestiges of once vibrant pre-World War II communities. Standard Mandarin, also known as Modern Standard Chinese, is the official modern Chinese spoken language used by the Peoples Republic of China, the Republic of China (Taiwan), and is one of the four official languages of Singapore. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Little Manila (also known as Manilatowns or Filipinotowns) is term that refers to a community with a large Filipino expatriate and descendant population. ... Koreatown (Korean: 코리아타운) is a term to describe the Korean ethnic enclave within a city or metropolitan area. ... // Little Saigon is a name given to any of several overseas Vietnamese immigrant and descendant communities outside Vietnam, usually in the United States. ... Japantown is a common name for official Japanese American or Japanese Canadian communities in big cities. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000...


Asian Americans are visible and growing, but "underrepresented" (against the national aggregate) in several of the largest areas, including Chicago, Philadelphia, and Boston, although sizable concentrations (double the national percentage) can be found in urban neighborhoods of these cities such as Albany Park in Chicago and Olney in Philadelphia. Additionally, similar Asian populations are found in suburbs of these cities such as Naperville near Chicago; Millbourne, King of Prussia, and Cherry Hill near Philadelphia; Lowell and Lexington near Boston. Nickname: Motto: Urbs in Horto (Latin: City in a Garden), I Will Location in the Chicago metro area and Illinois Coordinates: , Country State Counties Cook, DuPage Settled 1770s Incorporated March 4, 1837 Government  - Mayor Richard M. Daley (D) Area  - City  234. ... For other uses, see Philadelphia (disambiguation) and Philly. ... Nickname: City on the Hill, Beantown, The Hub (of the Universe)1, Athens of America, The Cradle of Revolution, Puritan City, Americas Walking City Location in Massachusetts, USA Counties Suffolk County Mayor Thomas M. Menino(D) Area    - City 232. ... Albany Park is a residential and commercial neighborhood on the Northwest Side of Chicago, and one of the most diverse in the United States. ... Olney is a neighborhood in the North Philadelphia section of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. ... Incorporated City in 1890. ... , Millbourne is a borough in Delaware County, Pennsylvania, United States. ... King of Prussia is an unincorporated community in Upper Merion Township, Montgomery County, Pennsylvania, United States. ... Cherry Hill highlighted in Camden County Cherry Hill Township is a township located in Camden County, New Jersey. ... Nickname: Motto: Art is the Handmaid of Human Good Location in Middlesex County in Massachusetts Coordinates: , Country State County Middlesex County Settled 1653 Incorporated 1826 A city 1836 Government  - Type Manager-City council  - Mayor William F. Martin, Jr. ... Location in Middlesex County in Massachusetts Coordinates: , Country State County Middlesex County Settled 1642 Incorporated 1713 Government  - Type Representative town meeting Area  - Town  16. ...


According to the 2005 Current Population Survey Annual Social and Economic Supplement, Asian-American households had the highest median income at $57,518.[18]


History

This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ...

Early history

In 1763, Filipinos established the small settlement of Saint Malo in the bayous of current-day Louisiana, after fleeing mistreatment aboard Spanish ships. Since there were no Filipino women with them at the time, the Manilamen, as they were known, married Cajun women and Native Americans.[19] Saint Malo was a small fishing village that existed in Louisiana from the mid 18th century to the early 19th century. ... Saint Malo was a small fishing village that existed in St. ...


In Hawaii, Chinese sailors came to Hawaii in 1778, the same year that Captain James Cook stumbled upon the island. Many settled and intermarried with Hawaiian women. Some Island-born Chinese could be well into the 7th generation. A smaller proportion of Chinese, Korean and Japanese laborers were brought in during the 19th century to work on sugar plantations. Later, Filipinos were also brought in as laborers. Official language(s) English, Hawaiian Capital Honolulu Largest city Honolulu Area  Ranked 43rd  - Total 10,931 sq mi (29,311 km²)  - Width n/a miles (n/a km)  - Length 1,522 miles (2,450 km)  - % water 41. ...


A large number of Chinese and Japanese began immigrating to the U.S. in the mid 19th century. Many of these immigrants worked as laborers on the transcontinental railroad. A surge in Asian immigration in the late 19th century caused some to fear the growing number of Asians. This fear was referred to as the "yellow peril." Laws that were adopted in the United States included Asian Exclusion Act, Chinese Exclusion Act, etc. This article refers to a railroad built in the United States between Omaha and Sacramento completed in 1869. ... The Yellow Terror In All His Glory, 1899 editorial cartoon Yellow Peril (sometimes Yellow Terror) was a color metaphor for race that originated in the late nineteenth century with immigration of Chinese laborers to various Western countries, notably the United States, and later to the Japanese during the mid 20th... President Coolidge signs the immigration act on the White House South Lawn along with appropriation bills for the Veterans Bureau. ... The Chinese Exclusion Act may be: The Chinese Exclusion Act of 1882 passed in the United States in 1882 banning Chinese from entering American soil. ...


Effects of war

During World War II, the United States government declared Japanese Americans a risk to national security and undertook the Japanese American Internment, authorized by President Franklin Roosevelt with United States Executive Order 9066. This controversial action forced the relocation of approximately 112,000 to 120,000 Japanese and Japanese Americans, taking them from the west coast of the United States to hastily constructed War Relocation Centers in remote portions of the nation's interior. 62% of those forced to relocate were United States citizens. Starting in 1990, the government paid some reparations to the surviving internees. Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... Serving from 1999 to 2003, Army General Eric Shinseki of Hawaii became the first Asian American military chief of staff. ... Jerome War Relocation Center in Jerome, Arkansas Japanese people heading off to an internment camp. ... Franklin Delano Roosevelt (January 30, 1882–April 12, 1945), often referred to as FDR, was the 32nd (1933–1945) President of the United States. ... United States Executive Order 9066 was signed into law on February 19, 1942 (during World War II), by President Franklin D. Roosevelt, utilizing his authority as Commander in Chief to exercise war powers. ...


Despite the internment, many Japanese American men served in World War II in the American forces. The 442nd Regimental Combat Team/100th Infantry Battalion, composed of Japanese Americans, is the most highly decorated unit in U.S. military history. The 442nd/100th fought valiantly in the European Theater even as many of their families remained in the detention camps stateside. The 100th was one of the first units to liberate the Nazi extermination camp at Dachau. The 442nd Regimental Combat Team, hiking up a muddy French road in the Chambois Sector, France, in late 1944. ... The 100th Battalion, 442nd Infantry is the only infantry unit in the U.S. Army Reserve and combines the identities of two Second World War Japanese-American units, the 100th Infantry Battalion and the 442nd Regimental Combat Team. ... German Führer Adolf Hitler Preceding events (See also Events preceding World War II in Europe and Causes of World War II.) br Germany was in debt after World War I, due to the Great Depression and the forced payments to the victors of World War I. Germans wanted a... National Socialism redirects here. ... The main entrance just after the liberation Memorial at the camp, 1997. ...


Immigration trends

Immigration trends of recent decades have dramatically altered the statistical composition and popular understanding of who is an Asian American. This transformation of Asian America, and of America itself, is the result of legislation such as the McCarran-Walter Act of 1952 and the Immigration and Nationality Services Act of 1965. The McCarran-Walter Act repealed the "free white persons" restriction of the Naturalization Act of 1790, but it retained the quota system that effectively banned nearly all immigration from Asia (for example, its annual quota of Chinese was only fifty). Asian immigration increased significantly after the 1965 Immigration Act altered the quota system. The preference for relatives, initially designed to reduce the number of Asian immigrants, eventually acted to accelerate their numbers. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2358x3000, 2160 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Hawaii Japanese American Eric Shinseki ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2358x3000, 2160 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Hawaii Japanese American Eric Shinseki ... This does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Eric Ken Shinseki (born November 28, 1942) is a retired General in the United States Army and served as the 34th Chief of Staff of the United States Army (1999 - 2003). ... The United States Army is the largest and oldest branch of the armed forces of the United States. ... The Immigration and Nationality Act (INA) of 1952 (better known as the McCarran-Walter Act) was a law passed by the United States Congress restricting immigration into the United States. ... President Johnson signs bill at Liberty Island, New York October 3, 1965 The Immigration and Naturalization Services Act of 1965 (also known as the Hart-Celler Act or the INS Act of 1965) abolished the national-origin quotas that had been in place in the United States since the Immigration... The original United States naturalization law of March 26, 1790 (1 Stat. ...


Historically, before 1965, Asian Americans were largely perceived as members of the two most numerous Asian ethnic groups, specifically Chinese and Japanese, as well as Filipinos, who became colonial subjects of the US in 1898 due to the Spanish-American War (also see Philippine-American War). Combatants United States Republic of Cuba Philippine Republic Spain Commanders Nelson A. Miles William R. Shafter George Dewey Máximo Gómez Emilio Aguinaldo Patricio Montojo Pascual Cervera Arsenio Linares Ramón Blanco Casualties 3,289 U.S. dead (432 from combat); considerably higher although undetermined Cuban and Filipino casualties... Combatants United States First Philippine Republic several groups post-1902 Commanders William McKinley Theodore Roosevelt Wesley Merritt Elwell Stephen Otis J. Franklin Bell Henry Ware Lawton† John J. Pershing Joseph Wheeler Emilio Aguinaldo Miguel Malvar Pio del Pilar Manuel Tinio Gregorio del Pilar† Licerio Geronimo Vicente Lukban Juan Cailles Maximino...


After the enactment of the 1965 Immigration Act, Asian American demographics changed rapidly. This act replaced exclusionary immigration rules of the Chinese Exclusion Act and its successors, such as the 1924 Immigration Act, which effectively excluded "undesirable" immigrants, including Asians. The 1965 rules set across-the-board immigration quotas for each country, opening the borders to immigration from Asia for the first time in nearly half a century. The Chinese Exclusion Act may be: The Chinese Exclusion Act of 1882 passed in the United States in 1882 banning Chinese from entering American soil. ... The United States Immigration Act of 1924 (Johnson-Reed Act) limited the number of immigrants who could be admitted from any country to 2% of the number of person from that country who were already living in the United States in 1890. ...


Immigration of Asian Americans were also affected by U.S. war involvement from the 1940s to the 1970s. In the wake of World War II, immigration preferences favored family reunification. This may have helped attract highly skilled workers to meet American workforce deficiencies. Another instance related to World War II was the Luce-Celler Act of 1946, which helped immigrants from India and the Philippines. The end of the Korean War and Vietnam War and the so-called "Secret Wars" in Southeast Asia brought a new wave of Asian American immigration, as people from Korea, Vietnam, Laos, and Cambodia arrived. Some of the new immigrants were war brides, who were soon joined by their families. Others, like the Southeast Asians, were either highly skilled and educated, or part of subsequent waves of refugees seeking asylum. Some factors contributing to the growth of sub-groups such as South Asians and mainland Chinese were higher family sizes, higher use of family-reunification visas, and higher numbers of technically skilled workers entering on H-1 and H-1b visas. The Luce-Celler Act of 1946 was proposed by Republican Clara Booth Luce and Democrat Emanuel Celler in 1943 and signed into being by President Harry Truman on July 2nd, 1946, granting naturalization rights to Filipinos and Indians. ... Combatants United Nations:  Republic of Korea,  Australia,  Belgium,  Luxembourg,  Canada,  Colombia,  Ethiopia,  France,  Greece,  Luxembourg,  Netherlands,  New Zealand,  Philippines,  South Africa,  Thailand,  Turkey,  United Kingdom,  United States Medical staff:  Denmark,  Australia,  Italy,  Norway,  Sweden Communist states:  Democratic People’s Republic of Korea,  Peoples Republic of China,  Soviet Union Commanders... Combatants Republic of Vietnam United States Republic of Korea Thailand Australia New Zealand The Philippines National Front for the Liberation of South Vietnam Democratic Republic of Vietnam People’s Republic of China Democratic Peoples Republic of Korea Strength US 1,000,000 South Korea 300,000 Australia 48,000... Combatants Kingdom of Laos, United States, Thailand, Republic of Vietnam Pathet Lao Democratic Republic of Vietnam The Secret War (1962-1975) also known as the Laotian Civil War was a term used to describe the Laotian front of the Vietnam War. ... This article is about the Korean peninsula and civilization. ...


Japanese Americans and South Asians are emblematic of the dramatic changes since the immigration reforms of the mid-20th century. Japanese Americans are among the most widely recognized of Asian American sub-groups. In 1970, there were nearly 600,000 Japanese Americans, making it the largest sub-group. Today, Japanese Americans are the sixth-largest group, with relatively low rates of births and immigration. In 2000, there were between 800,000 and 1.2 million Japanese Americans (depending on whether multi-ethnic responses are included). The Japanese Americans have the highest rates of native-born, citizenship, and assimilation into American values and customs.


In 1990, there were slightly fewer South Asians in the U.S. than Japanese Americans. By 2000, Indian Americans nearly doubled in population to become the third largest group, with increasing visibility in high-tech communities such as the Silicon Valley and the Seattle area. High rates of immigration from across Asia will make Asian Americans increasingly representative of the continent itself. Indian Americans have some of the highest rates of academic achievement among American ethnic and religious groups, with most immigrants speaking English. South Asians are increasingly accepted by most Asian organizations as another significant Asian group.


Notable contributions

This page is a list of notable Asian Americans. ...

Government

With a majority Asian-Pacific American population for most of its history, Hawaii has a long history of Asian political participation at all levels of government, and its Congressional delegation has been held by Asian Americans for most of its history. However, the first Asian American elected to the United States House of Representatives was Dalip Singh Saund, from Imperial County, California. Saund served as chair of the local Democratic party and Justice of the Peace before winning the House election in 1956. In 1976, the academic S.I. Hayakawa was elected to the Senate from California. Mainland U.S. politicians such as Mike Honda began their political careers in local offices and developed organizations that eventually supported their election to Congress, while Norman Mineta went on to become Secretary of Transportation between 2001 and 2006. Elaine Chao was selected as a White House Fellow, and then served in a series of appointed posts prior to becoming the Secretary of Labor. Similarly, Bobby Jindal served in statewide (Louisiana) and federal appointed offices before running for governor (2003), and winning election to Congress in 2004. In 1997, Gary Locke became the first Chinese American to be elected as a governor in the United States. Asian-Pacific American is a term that was used in the United States to include both Asian Americans and Americans of Pacific Islander American due to its official use as a race on the United States Census between the years 1990 and 2000. ... Official language(s) English, Hawaiian Capital Honolulu Largest city Honolulu Area  Ranked 43rd  - Total 10,931 sq mi (29,311 km²)  - Width n/a miles (n/a km)  - Length 1,522 miles (2,450 km)  - % water 41. ... Type Bicameral Speaker of the House of Representatives House Majority Leader Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Steny Hoyer, (D) since January 4, 2007 House Minority Leader John Boehner, (R) since January 4, 2007 Members 435 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party... Categories: Possible copyright violations ... Imperial County is a county located in the Imperial Valley, in the far southeast of the U.S. state of California, and borders both Arizona and Mexico. ... A justice of the peace (JP) is a puisne judicial officer appointed by means of a commission to keep the peace. ... Samuel Ichiye Hayakawa (July 18, 1906-February 27, 1992) was an English professor and academic who served as a United States Senator from California from 1977 to 1983. ... Michael Makoto Mike Honda (Japanese: 本田 誠 born June 27, 1941) is an American Democratic politician. ... Norman Yoshio Mineta (born November 12, 1931) is an American politician of the Democratic Party. ... The United States Secretary of Transportation is the head of the United States Department of Transportation. ... Elaine Lan Chao (Traditional Chinese: ; Hanyu Pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Chao Hsiao-lan;[1] born March 26, 1953) currently serves as the 24th United States Secretary of Labor in the Cabinet of President of the United States George W. Bush. ... The White House Fellows program was established by American President Lyndon B. Johnson in October 1964. ... The United States Secretary of Labor is the head of the United States Department of Labor. ... Bobby Jindal (born Piyush Jindal June 10, 1971, in Baton Rouge, Louisiana) is a Louisiana politician. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Former Governor Gary Locke Gary F. Locke (born January 21, 1950 in Seattle, Washington) was the Democratic governor of Washington (1997-2005), and the first Chinese-American governor in United States history. ...


Business

When Asians were largely excluded from labor markets in the 19th century, they started their own businesses. Some started laundries, which are now rare. Others started Chinese restaurants, which still can be found across the USA. Since the mid-20th century, Asians have expanded their involvement across the American economy.


Compared to their population base, Asian Americans today are well represented in the professional sector and tend to earn higher wages, especially in technology and business.[20] However, much has been written about the glass ceiling in regards to Asians, for they have been far less represented in higher levels of management compared with other ethnic groups. By the mid 20th century humans had achieved a mastery of technology sufficient to leave the surface of the Earth for the first time and explore space. ... In economics, a business is a legally-recognized organizational entity existing within an economically free country designed to sell goods and/or services to consumers, usually in an effort to generate profit. ... The term glass ceiling refers to situations where the advancement of a person within the hierarchy of an organization is limited. ...


Some Asian Americans have made major contributions to the American economy. An Wang founded Wang Laboratories in June 1951. Amar Bose founded the Bose Corporation in 1964. Jen-Hsun Huang co-founded the NVIDIA corporation in 1993. Jerry Yang co-founded Yahoo! Inc. in 1994. Andrea Jung serves as Chairman and CEO of Avon Products. Vinod Khosla was a founding CEO of Sun Microsystems and is a successful general partner of the venture capital firm Kleiner, Perkins, Caufield & Byers. Sabeer Bhatia co-founded Hotmail, which was acquired by Microsoft. Steve Chen, as a co-creator of YouTube, was a beneficiary of Google's $1.65 billion acquisition of that company in 2006. Dr. An Wang (Chinese: ; pinyin: Wáng Ä€n; February 7, 1920 – March 24, 1990) was a Chinese American computer engineer and inventor, and co-founder of computer company Wang Laboratories. ... Wang logo circa 1976. ... Amar Gopal Bose (Bengali: অমর গোপাল বসু Ômor Gopal Boshu) (born November 2, 1929) is the chairman and founder of Bose Corporation. ... The Bose Corporation is a privately-held American company based in Framingham, Massachusetts that specializes in audio equipment[2][3] and holds the philosophy of supporting its technological development through research (thus the company motto). ... Jen-Hsun Huang Jen-Hsun Huang (黃仁勳; pinyin: Huáng RénxÅ«n) (born February 17, 1963) co-founded NVIDIA Corporation in 1993 and is currently the CEO and President. ... NVIDIA Corporation (NASDAQ: NVDA) (pronounced ) is an American corporation specializing in the manufacture of GPU technologies for video cards, graphics cards, workstations, desktop computers, handhelds and more. ... Jerry Yang Chih-Yuan (Simplified Chinese: ; Traditional Chinese: ; Pinyin: ; born November 6, 1968) is a Taiwanese American entreprenuer, [2] co-founder with David Filo and CEO of Yahoo! Inc. ... Yahoo! - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... Andrea Jung (鍾彬嫻, pinyin: Zhōng BÄ«nxián) (born 1959) is a Chinese-Amsdffgfdgfdgerican business executive born in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Vinod Khosla (born January 28, 1955 in Pune, India[1]) is an Indian-American venture capitalist. ... Sun Microsystems, Inc. ... Kleiner, Perkins, Caufield & Byers is a major Sand Hill Road venture capital firm in Silicon Valley. ... Sabeer Bhatia (सबीर भाटिया) is a co-founder of Hotmail and an entrepreneur. ... Hotmail is a free webmail e-mail service, which is accessible via a web browser. ... Microsoft Corporation, (NASDAQ: MSFT, HKSE: 4338) is a multinational computer technology corporation with global annual revenue of US$44. ... Steve Chen (Chinese: , born about 1944 in Taiwan) is a computer engineer and pioneer. ...


Sports

See also: Category:Asian American sportspeople

Wataru Misaka became the first Asian American player in the NBA when he played for the New York Knicks in the 1947–48 season. Wataru Wat Misaka (Japanese 三阪亙; Misaka Wataru) (born December 21, 1923 in Ogden, Utah), was the first person of Asian descent to play in the American National Basketball Association. ... “NBA” redirects here. ... “Knicks” redirects here. ...


Asian Americans first made an impact in Olympic sports in the late 1940s and in the 1950s. Sammy Lee became the first Asian American to earn an Olympic Gold Medal, winning in platform diving in both 1948 and 1952. Amy Chow was a member of the gold medal women's gymnastics team at the 1996 Olympics; she also won an individual silver medal on the uneven bars. Gymnast Mohini Bhardwaj won a team silver medal in the 2004 Olympics. The five Olympic rings were designed in 1913, adopted in 1914 and debuted at the Games at Antwerp, 1920. ... Dr. Sammy Lee (b. ... Amy Chow (周婉儀; pinyin: Zhōu Wǎnyí; born May 15, 1978 in San Jose, California) is an American gymnast. ... (Redirected from 1996 Olympics) Categories: 1996 Summer Olympics ... Mohini Bhardwaj (born September 29, 1978 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania) is an American gymnast. ... The Games of the XXVIII Olympiad, commonly known as the 2004 Summer Olympics were the 28th Summer Olympic Games. ...


Since Tiffany Chin won the women's US Figure Skating Championship in 1985, Asian Americans have been prominent in that sport. Kristi Yamaguchi won three national championships, two world titles, and the 1992 Olympic Gold medal. Michelle Kwan has won nine national championships and five world titles, as well as two Olympic medals (silver in 1998, bronze in 2002). Categories: U.S. figure skaters | Figure skaters at the 1984 Winter Olympics | Substubs ... Kristi Tsuya Yamaguchi (born July 12, 1971) is an American figure skater. ... Michelle Wing Kwan (關穎珊) (born 7 July 1980) is an American figure skater and media celebrity who has won nine U.S. championships, five world championships, and two Olympic medals. ...


In football, Asian Americans' contributions are also gaining notice. Norm Chow is offensive coordinator for an NFL team, after 23 years coaching college teams, including four successful years as offensive coordinator at USC. Hines Ward is an NFL wide receiver who was the MVP of Super Bowl XL. Michael Chang was a top-ranked tennis player for most of his career. He won the French Open in 1989. Norman Chow (Chinese: ; pinyin: ; born May 3, 1946) is the offensive coordinator of the Tennessee Titans, a National Football League team. ... NFL logo For other uses of the abbreviation NFL, see NFL (disambiguation). ... The Trojan Shrine, better known as Tommy Trojan located in the center of University of Southern California campus. ... Hines E. Ward, Jr. ... In American sports, a Most Valuable Player (MVP) award is an honor typically bestowed upon the best performing player or players on a specific team, in an entire league, or for a particular contest or series of contests. ... Date February 5, 2006 Stadium Ford Field City Detroit, Michigan MVP Hines Ward, wide receiver Favorite Steelers by 4 National anthem Aaron Neville, Aretha Franklin and Dr. John, ASL performed by Angela LaGuardia Coin toss Tom Brady Referee Bill Leavy Halftime show The Rolling Stones Attendance 68,206 TV in... Michael Te-Pei Chang (張德培; Pinyin: Zhāng Dépéi; born February 22, 1972, in Hoboken, New Jersey, USA) is an American former professional tennis player. ...


Arts and entertainment

Lisa Ling is host of National Geographic Channel's Explorer and special correspondent for the Oprah Winfrey Show

Asian Americans have been involved in the entertainment industry since the first half of the 19th century, when Chang and Eng Bunker (the original "Siamese Twins") became naturalized citizens. Acting roles in television, cinema, and theater have been relatively few, and many available roles are for narrow, stereotypical characters. Early Asian American actors such as Sessue Hayakawa, Anna May Wong, and Bruce Lee encountered a movie-making culture that wanted to typecast them as caricatures. Lee abandoned Hollywood, and achieved world-wide fame in Hong Kong. In 1965, a group of actors formed East West Players (EWP), to provide Asian American actors greater opportunity to perform in leading roles. Several other Asian American theatre companies were formed in other cities, providing similar outlets there. This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 380 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (523 × 825 pixel, file size: 112 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Lisa Ling after a speaking event at The College of St. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 380 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (523 × 825 pixel, file size: 112 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Lisa Ling after a speaking event at The College of St. ... Lisa Ling (Chinese: ; pinyin: ) (born August 30, 1973 in Sacramento, California) is an American journalist, best known for her role as a co-host of ABCs The View, host of National Geographic Channels Explorer and special correspondent for the Oprah Winfrey Show. ... The National Geographic Channel is a subscription television network that features documentaries produced by the National Geographic Society. ... Oprah Winfrey during her car giveaway to the entire audience. ... A painting of Chang and Eng Bunker, circa 1836 Chang Bunker and Eng Bunker (May 11, 1811–January 17, 1874) were the twin brothers whose condition and birthplace became the basis for the term Siamese twins. ... Sessue Hayakawa (早川雪洲 Hayakawa Sessue, June 10, 1889 - November 23, 1973) was a Japanese actor in American films, including two in the U.S. National Film Registry: The Cheat in 1915 The Bridge on the River Kwai in 1957, for which he was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Supporting... Anna May Wong (January 3, 1905 – February 2, 1961) was the first notable Chinese American Hollywood actress. ... Bruce Lee (Traditional Chinese: ; Simplified Chinese: ; Pinyin: Lǐ Xiǎolóng; Cantonese Yale: Léih Síulùhng; November 27, 1940 – July 20, 1973) was an American-born martial artist, philosopher, instructor, and martial arts actor widely regarded as the most influential martial artist of the 20th century and a... Category: ...


George Takei and Pat Morita became well-known from supporting roles in Star Trek and Happy Days, two of the best-known series of the 1960s and 1970s. Miyoshi Umeki won the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress in 1957 for Sayonara and Haing Ngor won the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor in 1985 for The Killing Fields. Margaret Cho won the American Comedy Award for Best Female Comedian in 1994. Wah Chang was the designer for many of the props on the Star Trek series as well as The Time Machine, which received an Academy Award for special effects. George Hosato Takei (IPA: ) (born April 20, 1937) is an American actor known for his role in the TV series Star Trek, in which he played the helmsman Hikaru Sulu on the USS Enterprise. ... Noriyuki Pat Morita (June 28, 1932 – November 24, 2005) was an American actor who is probably best known for playing the roles of Arnold on the TV show Happy Days and Mr. ... The current Star Trek franchise logo Star Trek is an American science fiction entertainment series and media franchise. ... Happy Days is a popular American television sitcom that originally aired between 1974 and 1984 on the ABC television network. ... Miyoshi Umeki (May 8, 1929 – August 28, 2007[1]), was an Academy Award-winning actress best known for her roles as Katsumi, the wife of Joe Kelly (Red Buttons), in the 1957 film Sayonara, and as Mrs. ... The Academy Award for Best Performance by an Actress in a Supporting Role is one of the awards given to actresses working in the motion picture industry by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences; nominations are made by Academy members who are actors and actresses. ... The year 1957 in film involved some significant events. ... Sayonara is a 1957 film which tells the story of an American Air Force flier who was a fighter Ace during the Korean War. ... Dr. Haing S. Ngor (Traditional Chinese: 吳漢) (March 22, 1940 – February 25, 1996) was a Cambodian American physician and actor who is best known for winning a 1985 Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor for his performance in the movie The Killing Fields, in which he portrayed journalist and refugee Dith... The Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor is one of the awards given to male actors working in the motion picture industry by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences; nominations are made by Academy members who are actors and actresses. ... // Back to the Future, starring Michael J. Fox, Christopher Lloyd and Lea Thompson Rambo: First Blood Part II, starring Sylvester Stallone Rocky IV, starring Sylvester Stallone The Color Purple, starring Whoopi Goldberg, Danny Glover, Oprah Winfrey, Margaret Avery, Rae Dawn Chong, Adolph Caesar Out of Africa, starring Meryl Streep and... The Killing Fields (1984) is an award-winning dramatic British film based on the experiences of the journalists Dith Pran, who survived the Khmer Rouge regime, Sydney Schanberg, and Jon Swain. ... Margaret Cho (born December 5, 1968) is an American comedian, fashion designer and actress. ... The American Comedy Awards were a group of awards presented annually since 1987 to honor performances and performers in the field of comedy. ... On this book cover, Wah Chang poses with the jeweled dragon he built and animated for The Singing Bone segment of George Pals The Wonderful World of Brothers Grimm. ... The current Star Trek franchise logo Star Trek is an American science fiction entertainment series and media franchise. ... The Time Machine is a novel by H. G. Wells, first published in 1895, later made into two films of the same title. ... Although he never won an Oscar for any of his movie performances, the comedian Bob Hope received two honorary Oscars for his contributions to cinema. ...


Notable works of architecture were designed by Asian Americans, such as the Louvre Pyramid (designed by I. M. Pei), the World Trade Center(designed by Minoru Yamasaki), and the Vietnam Veterans Memorial (designed by Maya Lin). In commercial architecture, Gyo Obata, a founding partner of HOK, designed the National Air and Space Museum in Washington D.C. and the Taipei World Trade Center. The large glass pyramid of le musée du Louvre The Louvre Pyramid is a large metal and glass pyramid which serves as the main entrance to the Musée du Louvre and has become a landmark for the city of Paris. ... Ieoh Ming Pei (Chinese: ; Pinyin: ; b. ... This article is about the former World Trade Center (Twin Towers) in New York City. ... Minoru Yamasaki (December 1, 1912 – February 6, 1986) was an American architect best known for his design of the World Trade Center. ... The Vietnam Veterans Memorial is a national war memorial located in Washington, D.C., that honors members of the U.S. armed forces who had died in service or are unaccounted for during the Vietnam War. ... Visitors at Vietnam Veterans Memorial Maya Ying Lin (Chinese: ; pinyin: ; born October 5, 1959) is an American artist who has become known for her work in sculpture and landscape art. ... Gyo Obata (born 1923) is a significant American architect. ... Rendering of Sprint Center in Kansas City[1] Hellmuth, Obata + Kassabaum or HOK is a major, international architecture, interiors, engineering, planning and consulting firm established in 1955. ... National Air and Space Museum exterior The National Air and Space Museum (NASM) of the Smithsonian Institution is a museum in Washington, D.C., United States, and is the most popular of the Smithsonian museums. ... Aerial photo (looking NW) of the Washington Monument and the White House in Washington, DC. Washington, D.C., officially the District of Columbia (also known as D.C.; Washington; the Nations Capital; the District; and, historically, the Federal City) is the capital city and administrative district of the United... Taipei World Trade Center, TWTC, was started in January, 1986 by Taiwans foremost trade promotion organization, the Taiwan External Trade Development Council (TAITRA), to provide a single, modern venue that would combine exhibition space, conference facilities, offices, and hotel accommodation for international business. ...


Many Asian Americans have also penetrated in the fashion world with Monique Lhuillier's dresses parading in the Hollywood redcarpet and Chloe Dao winning Project Runway. Vera Wang and Anna Sui are also highly accomplished fashion designers. Categories: Possible copyright violations ... ... Chloe Dao (born ca. ... Project Runway is an American reality television series on the Bravo network that focuses on fashion design. ... Vera Wang (Chinese: ; Pinyin: ; born June 27, 1949) is an American fashion designer based in New York, NY, USA. She is known for her wedding gown collection, among other specialties. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...


In the print medium, Jhumpa Lahiri received a Pulitzer Prize for Fiction for her book The Interpreter of Maladies. Jim Lee is considered to be one of the most popular comic book artists and is one of the founders of Image Comics. Adrian Tomine's cartoons are featured in The New Yorker. Naomi Hirahara won a 2007 Edgar Award for her novel Snakeskin Shamisen. Jhumpa Lahiri Vourvoulias (born Nilanjana Sudeshna in 1967) (Bengali: ঝুম্পা লাহিড়ী Jhumpa Lahiŗi) is a contemporary Indian American author based in New York City. ... The Pulitzer Prize for Fiction has been awarded since 1948 for distinguished fiction by an American author, preferably dealing with American life. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... A comic book is a magazine or book containing the art form of comics. ... Image Comics is an American comic book publisher. ... Adrian Tomine (born 1974) is a popular Gen X cartoonist is perhaps best known for his periodical illustrations in The New Yorker. ... For other uses, see New Yorker. ... The Edgar Allan Poe Awards (popularly called the Edgars), named after Edgar Allan Poe, are presented every year by the Mystery Writers of America. ...


Across genres of music, Asian Americans have gained respect and celebrity. Cellist Yo-Yo Ma and conductor Zubin Mehta are significant figures in classical music. In popular music, Amerie is a notable R&B singer. James Iha is best-known as guitarist with The Smashing Pumpkins. Mike Shinoda and Joseph Hahn are members of the popular rap rock band Linkin Park. In hip-hop, Apl.de.ap is a member of The Black Eyed Peas. A colorful video by rapper Jin spiraled him to fame in 2003. Asian American jazz is a musical movement in the United States begun in the 20th century by Asian American jazz musicians. This is a Chinese name; the family name is Ma Yo-Yo Ma (Traditional Chinese: ; Simplified Chinese: ; pinyin: ) (b. ... Zubin Mehta (b. ... Amerie Mi Marie Rogers (born January 12, 1980),[1] known professionally as Amerie, is an American R&B singer, songwriter, record producer, dancer, actress, and model. ... James Yoshinobu Iha (Japanese: 井葉吉伸, Iha Yoshinobu or ジェームス・イハ, Jēmusu Iha) born March 26, 1968 in Chicago, Illinois, USA) is an American rock musician. ... The Smashing Pumpkins are an American alternative rock band that formed in Chicago in 1988. ... Michael Kenji Shinoda (born February 11, 1977)[1][2] is an American musician, record producer, and artist from Agoura Hills, California. ... Joseph Hahn (born in Glendale, California March 15, 1977) is the Korean American DJ for nu metal band Linkin Park. ... Linkin Park is a rock band from Agoura Hills, California. ... Allan Pineda Lindo, (b. ... The Black Eyed Peas is an American hip-hop group from Los Angeles, California, who have enjoyed worldwide pop success. ... Jin may refer to: In Chinese history: Jin (廑), a ruler of the Xia dynasty (2033 BC–1562 BC) Jin (state) (746 BC-403 BC) (晉), a state in northern China during the Spring and Autumn Period Jin Dynasty, used to refer to a number of Chinese dynastic kingdoms: Jìn Dynasty... Asian American jazz is a musical movement in the United States begun in the 20th century by Asian American jazz musicians. ...


The 1957 novel Flower Drum Song is based on the San Francisco nightclub Forbidden City. Rodgers and Hammerstein adapted it into a musical that was produced on Broadway in 1958 and on film in 1961. Largely remembered for the hit song "I Enjoy Being A Girl", it would not be produced with an all-Asian cast until a 2002 Broadway revival. In 1988, Playwright David Henry Hwang's Broadway hit M. Butterfly won a Tony for Best Play, among other awards. Flower Drum Song was originally a novel by Chinese American author C.Y. Lee. ... The Forbidden City was a nightclub and cabaret in San Franciscos Chinatown during the 1940s and 1950s. ... Rodgers (left) and Hammerstein (right), with Irving Berlin (middle) and Helen Tamiris, watching auditions at the St. ... David Henry Hwang (born August 11, 1957) is a contemporary American playwright who has risen to prominence as the preeminent Asian American dramatist in the U.S. He was born in Los Angeles, California and was educated at Stanford University and the Yale School of Drama. ... M. Butterfly is a 1988 play by David Henry Hwang, which deals with themes about cultural stereotypes of East vs West (see Orientalism), and is loosely based on the real life relationship between Bernard Boursicot and Shi Pei Pu. ...


Lucy Liu had a big part in the Ally McBeal TV show from 1998 to 2002 before going on to lead roles in feature films. Sandra Oh won several awards for her role in Grey's Anatomy. Daniel Dae Kim has achieved some recognition as a sex symbol from his role on Lost, B. D. Wong currently stars on Law & Order: SVU after being featured in the critically-acclaimed series Oz. Lucy Alexis Liu (Chinese: 劉玉玲 Liú Yùlíng, born December 2, 1968 in Queens, New York) is an Emmy Award-nominated American actress. ... For the character, see Ally McBeal (character). ... Sandra Oh (born July 20, 1971) is a Golden Globe Award-winning and a three-time Emmy Award-nominated Canadian actress. ... This article is about the television series. ... Daniel Dae Kim (born August 4, 1968) is a Korean/American actor. ... “LOST” redirects here. ... Bradley Darryl Wong (born October 24, 1960), known as B.D. Wong, and Ba Dass Wong, is a Tony Award-winning American actor who is best-known for his role in the Broadway production of M. Butterfly and for his role as Dr. George Huang on NBCs Law & Order... Law & Order: Special Victims Unit - Season 5 DVD Law & Order: Special Victims Unit (also known as Law & Order: SVU) is the first of three spin-offs of Law & Order (the other two being Law & Order: Criminal Intent and Law & Order: Trial by Jury; all series are presented on the NBC... Oz was the first one-hour dramatic television series to be produced by HBO. The show, which aired for six seasons between 1997 and 2003, was created by Tom Fontana, and produced by Barry Levinson. ...


Recently the hit U.S. TV series Survivor created teams along racial lines. People of East Asian and South East Asian ancestry composed the Asian tribe.[21] Look up survivor in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


Science and technology

Asian Americans have made notable contributions to science and technology. Chien-Shiung Wu was known to many scientists as the "First Lady of Physics". Tsung-Dao Lee and Chen Ning Yang received the 1957 Nobel Prize in Physics for their work in particle physics. Har Gobind Khorana shared the 1968 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for his work in genetics and protein synthesis. Subrahmanyan Chandrasekhar shared the 1983 Nobel Prize in Physics and had the Chandra X-ray Observatory named after him. In 1984, Dr. David D. Ho first reported the "healthy carrier state" of HIV infection, which identified HIV-positive individuals who showed no physical signs of AIDS. Steven Chu shared the 1997 Nobel Prize in Physics for his research in cooling and trapping atoms using laser light. Daniel Tsui shared the 1998 Nobel Prize in Physics in 1998 for helping discover the fractional Quantum Hall effect. Tsien Hsue-shen co-founded the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Download high resolution version (601x858, 142 KB)From the Brookhaven National Laboratory. ... Download high resolution version (601x858, 142 KB)From the Brookhaven National Laboratory. ... Tsung-Dao Lee (T. D. Lee, 李政道 Pinyin: Lǐ Zhèngdào) (born November 24, 1926) is a Chinese American physicist, well known for parity violation, Lee Model, particle physics, relativistic heavy ion (RHIC) physics, nontopological solitons and soliton stars. ... The Nobel Prizes (Swedish: ), as designated in Alfred Nobels will in 1895, are awarded for physics, chemistry, physiology or medicine, literature, and peace. ... A magnet levitating above a high-temperature superconductor demonstrates the Meissner effect. ... Chien-Shiung Wu (Traditional Chinese: ; pinyin: Wú Jiànxíong; May 13, 1912–February 16, 1997) was a Chinese American physicist with an expertise in radioactivity. ... Tsung-Dao Lee (T. D. Lee, 李政道 Pinyin: Lǐ Zhèngdào) (born November 24, 1926) is a Chinese American physicist, well known for parity violation, Lee Model, particle physics, relativistic heavy ion (RHIC) physics, nontopological solitons and soliton stars. ... Zhen-Ning Franklin Yang (Traditional Chinese: ; pinyin: ) (born 22 September[1], 1922) is a Chinese American physicist who worked on statistical mechanics and symmetry principles. ... Hannes Alfvén (1908–1995) accepting the Nobel Prize for his work on magnetohydrodynamics [1]. List of Nobel Prize laureates in Physics from 1901 to the present day. ... Thousands of particles explode from the collision point of two relativistic (100 GeV per nucleon) gold ions in the STAR detector of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. ... Har Gobind Khorana (born January 9, 1922) is an American molecular biologist born of Indian Punjabi heritage in British India. ... Emil Adolf von Behring was the first person to receive the Nobel Prize in physiology or Medicine, for his work on the treatment of diphtheria. ... Chandrasekhar redirects here. ... Year 1983 (MCMLXXXIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1983 Gregorian calendar). ... Hannes Alfvén (1908–1995) accepting the Nobel Prize for his work on magnetohydrodynamics [1]. List of Nobel Prize laureates in Physics from 1901 to the present day. ... The Chandra X-ray Observatory is a satellite launched on STS-93 by NASA on July 23, 1999. ... Dr. David Ho David Da-i Ho (何大一, pinyin: Hé DàyÄ«) (born November 3, 1952) is a Taiwanese American AIDS researcher famous for pioneering the use of protease inhibitors in treating HIV-infected patients with his team. ... Species Human immunodeficiency virus 1 Human immunodeficiency virus 2 Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is a retrovirus that causes acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS, a condition in humans in which the immune system begins to fail, leading to life-threatening opportunistic infections). ... For other uses, see AIDS (disambiguation). ... Steven Chu (Chinese: ; pinyin: ), born 1948 in St. ... Daniel Tsui won the Nobel Prize in Physics with Robert Laughlin and Horst L. Störmer in 1998 for for their discovery of a new form of quantum fluid with fractionally charged excitations (according to the Nobel Committee). ... The quantum Hall effect is a quantum-mechanical version of the Hall effect, observed in two-dimensional electron systems subjected to low temperatures and strong magnetic fields, in which the Hall conductance takes on the quantized values where is the elementary charge and is Plancks constant. ... Tsien Hsue-shen Tsien Hsue-shen (Simplified Chinese: , Traditional Chinese: ; pinyin: Qián XuésÄ“n; born December 11, 1911) is a scientist who was a major figure in the missile and space programs of both the United States and Peoples Republic of China (PRC). ... For the singer/songwriter, see Jon Peter Lewis. ...


Journalism

Connie Chung was one of the first Asian American national correspondents for a major TV news network, reporting for CBS in 1971. She later co-anchored the CBS Evening News from 1993 to 1995. At ABC, Ken Kashiwahara began reporting nationally in 1974. Ann Curry joined NBC News as a reporter in 1990, later becoming prominently associated with the Today Show in 1997. Carol Lin is perhaps best known for being the first to break news on-air of 9-11 on CNN. Recently, Juju Chang, James Hatori, John Yang and Julie Chen have become familiar faces on television news. Constance Yu-Hwa Chung Povich (Simplified Chinese: ; Traditional Chinese: ; Pinyin: ; born August 20, 1946) is an American journalist who has appeared on many USA television news networks. ... Ann Curry (born November 19, 1956) is an American journalist and television personality who has served as news anchor on NBCs Today since May 1997 and host of Dateline NBC since May 2005. ... Carol Lin Carol Lin anchors CNN Newsroom on Saturday and Sunday evenings on CNN. She is based in Atlanta. ... 9-11 can refer to: The September 11, 2001 attacks A collection of interviews of Noam Chomsky by a variety of European publications and individual interviewers during the month after the September 11, 2001 attacks September 11 (month-day date notation) 9 November (day-month date notation) The North American... This article is being considered for deletion in accordance with Wikipedias deletion policy. ... Julie Suzanne Chen (born January 6, 1970) is an American television personality, news anchor, journalist, and producer for CBS, and is the wife of Leslie Moonves. ...


Cultural issues

Until the late 20th century, the term "Asian American" was adopted mostly by activists, while the average persons of Asian ancestries considered themselves their own ethnicity.[22] The murder of Vincent Chin in 1982 was a pivotal civil rights case, marking the emergence of Asian Americans as a distinct racial group in United States.[23][22] This article deals primarily with stereotypes of East Asians. ... Vincent Chin (Chinese: ) (1955 – June 23, 1982) was a Chinese American industrial draftsman murdered in 1982 in the Detroit, Michigan enclave of Highland Park by two white autoworkers, Chrysler plant superintendent Ronald Ebens and his recently laid off step-son, Michael Nitz. ...


Study has indicated that most non-Asian Americans do not differentiate between Asian Americans and Chinese Americans generally, and stereotypes towards both groups are nearly identical.[24] A 2001 survey of Americans' attitudes toward Asian Americans and Chinese Americans indicated that 24% of the respondents disapprove of intermarriage with an Asian American, second only to African Americans; 23% would be uncomfortable supporting an Asian American presidential candidate, compared to 15% for an African American, 14% for a woman and 11% for a Jew; 17% would be upset if a substantial number of Asian Americans moved into their neighborhood; 68% had somewhat or very negative attitude toward Chinese Americans in general.[25] The study did find several positive perceptions of Chinese Americans: strong family values (91%); honesty as business people (77%); high value on education (67%).[24] For the term used in computing, see stereotype (UML). ... Othello and Desdemona from William Shakespeares Othello, a play often depicted as concerning a biracial couple. ... African Americans, also known as Afro-Americans or black Americans, are an ethnic group in the United States of America whose ancestors, usually in predominant part, were indigenous to Sub-Saharan and West Africa. ...


There is a widespread perception that Asian Americans are not "American" but are instead "perpetual foreigners".[25][26] Asian Americans typically report being asked the question "where are you really from?" by other Americans, regardless of how long they or their ancestors have lived in United States.[26][27]


Model minority

Main article: Model minority

Some refer to Asian Americans as a model minority because the Asian American culture contains a high work ethic, respect for elders and high valuation of family. Statistics such as household income and low incarceration rate[28] are also discussed as positive aspects of Asian Americans. April 1984 cover of Newsweek featuring an article on the success of Asian American students Model minority refers to a minority ethnic, racial, or religious group whose members achieve a higher degree of success than the population average. ... April 1984 cover of Newsweek featuring an article on the success of Asian American students Model minority refers to a minority ethnic, racial, or religious group whose members achieve a higher degree of success than the population average. ...


This concept appears to valorize Asian Americans, but it can also be considered an overly narrow and overly one-dimensional portrayal of Asian Americans, leaving out other human qualities such as vocal leadership, negative emotions, and desire for creative expression.


The model minority concept can also affect Asians' public education. Asians are often stereotyped as over-achieving students. This stereotype can adversely affect Asian American students if school officials expect them to over-achieve. [29]


See also

From http://www. ... An American-born Chinese or ABC is a person born in the United States of Chinese ethnic descent. ... History A small neighborhood grocery store in Buenos Aires owned by Asian-Argentines Argentinas Asian population is descended from several waves of Asian immigration that have occured in the last century. ... An Asian Australian can be generally defined as a person of Asian ancestry or origin who was born in or is an immigrant to Australia. ... Canadians of Asian ancestry comprise the largest visible minority in Canada, at almost 10% of the Canadian population. ... The term British Asian is used to denote a person of Southern Asian ancestry or origin, or sometimes Western Asian origin, who was born in or was an immigrant to the United Kingdom. ... Languages English, Chinese, Japanese, Filipino, Malay, Thai, Korean amongst others Religions The British census states that British Asian exclusively means those people of South Asian origin (especially India, Pakistan and Bangladesh), unlike other uses such as Asian American. ... Alternate name Traditional Chinese: Simplified Chinese: British Chinese, also Chinese British, Chinese Britons or British-born Chinese (often informally referred to as BBCs), are people of Chinese ancestry who were born in or have immigrated to the United Kingdom. ... Chinese for Affirmative Action is an organization with the mission of defending and promoting the civil and political rights of Chinese and Asian Americans. ... The phrase Got Rice? is a term that was coined by Asian American youth in the 1990s shortly after the original Got Milk? advertising campaign for the California Milk Board in 1993. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Jade Ribbon Campaign to fight hepatitis B and liver cancer. ... This is a list of notable Russian-Americans as well as those Americans of a Rossiyan origin. ... Eugène Delacroixs Liberty Leading the People, symbolising French nationalism during the July Revolution 1830. ... Theodor Herzl, the founder of modern Zionism. ... This article deals primarily with stereotypes of East Asians and Southeast Asians. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with US per capita income by ancestry. ...

References

  1. ^ U.S. Census Bureau, Annual Estimates of the Population by Sex, Race, and Hispanic or Latino Origin for the United States: April 1, 2000 to July 1, 2006 (NC-EST2006-03) at census.gov. Retrieved on 19 May 2007.
  2. ^ Oxford Dictionary of American English
  3. ^ Merriam-Webster Dictionary
  4. ^ American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language
  5. ^ Encarta Asian Americans
  6. ^ K. Connie Kang, "Yuji Ichioka, 66; Led Way in Studying Lives of Asian Americans," Los Angeles Times, September 7, 2002. Reproduced at ucla.edu by the Asian American Studies Center.
  7. ^ Asian. AskOxford.com. Retrieved on 2007-09-29.
  8. ^ U.S. Census Bureau, Census 2000 Summary File 1 Technical Documentation, 2001, at Appendix B-14, [1]. "A person having origins in any of the original peoples of the Far East, Southeast Asia, or the Indian subcontinent including, for example, Cambodia, China, India, Japan, Korea, Malaysia, Pakistan, the Philippine Islands, Thailand, and Vietnam. It includes ‘‘Asian Indian,’’ ‘‘Chinese,’’ ‘‘Filipino,’’ ‘‘Korean,’’ ‘‘Japanese,’’ ‘‘Vietnamese,’’ and ‘‘Other Asian.’’"
  9. ^ a b U.S. Census Bureau, 2000 Census of Population, Public Law 94-171 Redistricting Data File.Race Retrieved September 18, 2006
  10. ^ Menon, Sridevi. Duke University. "Where is West Asia in Asian America?Asia and the Politics of Space in Asian America." 2004. April 26, 2007. http://socialtext.dukejournals.org/cgi/reprint/24/1_86/55.pdf
  11. ^ 1980 Census: Instructions to Respondents, republished by Integrated Public Use Microdata Series, Minnesota Population Center, University of Minnesota at www.ipums.org Accessed 19 Nov 2006.
  12. ^ Lee, Gordon. Hyphen Magazine. "The Forgotten Revolution." 2003. January 28, 2007.[2]
  13. ^ 1990 Census: Instructions to Respondents, republished by Integrated Public Use Microdata Series, Minnesota Population Center, University of Minnesota at www.ipums.org Accessed 19 Nov 2006.
  14. ^ Reeves, Terrance Claudett, Bennett. United States Census Bureau. Asian and Pacific Islander Population: March 2002. 2003. September 30, 2006. [3].
  15. ^ Wood, Daniel B. "Common Ground on who's an American." Christian Science Monitor. January 19, 2006. Accessed 16 Feb 2007.
  16. ^ US Census Bureau, Asian Summary of Findings. Retrieved on 2006-12-17.
  17. ^ a b Jessica S. Barnes and Claudette E. Bennett. The Asian Population: 2000. Census Bureau publication c2kbr01-16. Issued February 2002.
  18. ^ US Census Press Releases. 30 Aug. 2005. United States Census Bureau. 29 Sep. 2007 <http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/www/releases/archives/income_wealth/005647.html>.
  19. ^ http://www.filipinoamericans.net/manilamen.shtml
  20. ^ Broad racial disparities persist. Retrieved on 2006-12-18.
  21. ^ [4]
  22. ^ a b Alethea Yip. Remembering Vincent Chin. Asian Week. Retrieved on 2007-03-14.
  23. ^ ACAPAA. Pilicy Recommendation Document.. State of Michigan. Retrieved on 2007-03-14.
  24. ^ a b Committee of 100 (2001-04-25). Committee of 100 Announces Results of Landmark National Survey on American Attitudes towards Chinese Americans and Asian Americans. Retrieved on 2007-06-14.
  25. ^ a b Matthew Yi, et al.. Asian Americans seen negatively. Retrieved on 2007-06-14.
  26. ^ a b Frank H. Wu. Asian Americans and the Perpetual Foreigner Syndrome. Retrieved on 2007-06-14.
  27. ^ K. Bergquist. Image Conscious. Retrieved on 2007-06-14.
  28. ^ Bureau of Justice Statistics: Criminal Offenders Statistics, 2005-11-13[5]
  29. ^ Frank H. Wu (2002). Yellow. Basic Books. ISBN 0465006396. 

Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st Century. ... is the 272nd day of the year (273rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 17 is the 351st day of the year (352nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The United States Census Bureau (officially Bureau of the Census as defined in Title ) is a part of the United States Department of Commerce. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 352nd day of the year (353rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st Century. ... is the 73rd day of the year (74th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st Century. ... is the 73rd day of the year (74th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st Century. ... is the 165th day of the year (166th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st Century. ... is the 165th day of the year (166th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st Century. ... is the 165th day of the year (166th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st Century. ... is the 165th day of the year (166th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 317th day of the year (318th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

Further reading

Books

  • Helen Zia Asian American Dreams: The Emergence of an American People New York: Farrar, Strauss and Giroux, 2000. ISBN 0-374-52736-9.
  • Pyong Gap Min Asian Americans: Contemporary Trends and Issues Thousand Oaks, Ca.: Pine Science Press, 2005. ISBN 1-4129-0556-7
  • Frank H. Wu Yellow: Race in American Beyond Black and White New York: Basic Books, 2002. ISBN 0-465-00639-6
  • Ronald Takaki Strangers from a Different Shore: A History of Asian Americans New York: Little, Brown, 1998. ISBN 0-316-83130-1
  • Lisa Lowe Immigrant Acts: On Asian American Cultural Politics Durham: Duke University Press, 1996. ISBN 978-0822318644

Journal Helen Zia (謝漢蘭; pinyin: Xiè Hànlán) (1952 - ) is a second generation Chinese American and an award-winning journalist and scholar who has covered Asian American communities and social and political movements for decades. ... Frank H. Wu is dean of Wayne State University Law School in Detroit, Michigan. ... Ronald Takaki (born 1939) in Oahu, Hawaii is an ethnic studies historian. ...

  • Journal of Asian American Studies

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Asian American: Definition and Much More from Answers.com (7265 words)
Asian Americans are concentrated in the largest U.S. cities, with 40% of all Asian Americans living in the metropolitan areas around Los Angeles, San Francisco, and New York City.
Asian Americans are visible and growing, but "underrepresented" (against the national aggregate) in several of the largest areas, including Chicago, Philadelphia, and Boston, although sizable concentrations (double the national percentage) can be found in urban neighborhoods of these cities such as Albany Park in Chicago and Olney in Philadelphia.
Asian Americans are extremely well represented in the education sector, especially in the college level with the highest average college graduates at around 52% and the whole Asian people constitutes around 20% of Ivy League colleges.
Asian American Health (272 words)
Asian American diversity extends to socioeconomic indicators, with members found throughout the spectra of poverty to wealth, and illiteracy to advanced education (U.S. Census Bureau Facts for Features).
Asian Americans have among the highest rates of tuberculosis and hepatitis B in the United States.
Asian Indians have an unusually high rate of coronary artery disease, and parasitic infections are particularly widespread among Southeast Asian refugees (Cancer Facts on Asians and Pacific Islanders).
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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