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Encyclopedia > Ashridge
Ashridge Forest, April
View from Bridgewater Monument to the house

Ashridge is an estate and house in Hertfordshire, England; part of the land stretches into Buckinghamshire and it is close to the Bedfordshire border. It is situated in the Chiltern Hills, an Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty, about two miles north of Berkhamsted and twenty miles north west of London. Surrounding villages include Aldbury, Pitstone, Ivinghoe, Little Gaddesden, Nettleden, and Potten End. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 533 pixelsFull resolution (3504 × 2336 pixel, file size: 8. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 533 pixelsFull resolution (3504 × 2336 pixel, file size: 8. ... Download high resolution version (1920x2560, 965 KB)Ashridge: the monument. ... Download high resolution version (1920x2560, 965 KB)Ashridge: the monument. ... The momument The Bridgewater Monument (Grid ref: SP 970 131) is a tower in the Chiltern Hills in England, built in 1832 in memory of Francis Egerton, 3rd Duke of Bridgewater, the father of inland navigation. It is 108 feet tall, with 170 steps inside, designed by Sir Jeffry Wyatville... Download high resolution version (2560x1920, 950 KB)Ashridge: view from the top of the monument to the house. ... Download high resolution version (2560x1920, 950 KB)Ashridge: view from the top of the monument to the house. ... For the similarly named county in the West Midlands region, see Herefordshire. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... Buckinghamshire (abbreviated Bucks) is one of the home counties in South East England. ... Bedfordshire (abbreviated Beds) is a county in England that forms part of the East of England region. ... The Chiltern Hills are a chalk escarpment in south east England. ... An Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty (AONB) is an area of countryside with significant landscape value in England, Wales or Northern Ireland, that has been specially designated by the Countryside Agency on behalf of the United Kingdom government. ... Berkhamsted is a historic town of some 19,000 people. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... Aldbury is a village in Hertfordshire in England, near the borders of Bedfordshire and Buckinghamshire. ... Pitstone (formerly Pightelsthorn) is a village in Buckinghamshire, England. ... Ivinghoe is a village in Buckinghamshire, England, close to the border with Hertfordshire and Bedfordshire. ... Little Gaddesden is a village in the English county of Hertfordshire. ... Nettleden is a village in Hertfordshire, England. ...


The estate comprises 20 square kilometres (5,000 acres) of woodlands (known as Ashridge Forest), commons and chalk downland which supports a rich variety of wildlife. It also offers a good choice of waymarked walks through outstanding country. Waymarking is a means by which people can catalog, mark, locate and log unique and interesting locations around the world. ...

Contents

Ashridge Priory

Main article: Ashridge Priory

In mediæval times it was the location of an Ashridge Priory founded in 1276 by the Earl of Cornwall, who had a palace here. Ashridge Priory was a medieval abbey of the Brothers of Penitence. ... Ashridge Priory was a medieval abbey of the Brothers of Penitence. ... The title of Earl of Cornwall was created several times in the Peerage of England before 1337, when it was superseded by the title Duke of Cornwall, which became attached to heirs-apparent to the throne. ... The quintessential medieval European palace: Palais de la Cité, in Paris, the royal palace of France. ...


At the foundation of the abbey the Earl of Cornwall donated, among other things, a phial of Christ's blood, in honour of which the convent adjacent to the abbey was founded. This made the abbey and convent a center of pilgrimage, meaning that the abbey grew quite wealthy. Christ is the English term for the Greek word (Christós), which literally means The Anointed One. ... This article is about an abbey as a religious building. ... This article is about the religious or spiritual journey. ...


In 1290 King Edward I held parliament at the abbey while he spent Christmas in Pitstone. Edward I (17 June 1239 – 7 July 1307), popularly known as Longshanks[1], also as Edward the Lawgiver because of his legal reforms, and as Hammer of the Scots,[2] achieved fame as the monarch who conquered Wales and who tried to do the same to Scotland. ... Christmas is an annual holiday that celebrates the birth of Jesus. ... Pitstone (formerly Pightelsthorn) is a village in Buckinghamshire, England. ...


The abbey was dissolved during the Dissolution of the Monasteries and later became the private residence of Princess Elizabeth, younger daughter of King Henry VIII. It was here that she was arrested in 1552, under suspicion of treason. dissolution see Dissolution. ... This article is about Elizabeth I of England. ... “Henry VIII” redirects here. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


The Egerton Family

From 1604 to 1848 the estate was the property of the Dukes and Earls of Bridgewater (the Egerton family). The Bridgewater Monument was built in memory of the 3rd Duke, Francis Egerton, the "father of inland navigation" with a view to the Grand Union Canal. The monument contains a narrow spiral staircase of 170 steps and is open to the public. The title Earl of Bridgewater has been created twice in the Peerage of England. ... The momument The Bridgewater Monument (Grid ref: SP 970 131) is a tower in the Chiltern Hills in England, built in 1832 in memory of Francis Egerton, 3rd Duke of Bridgewater, the father of inland navigation. It is 108 feet tall, with 170 steps inside, designed by Sir Jeffry Wyatville... Francis Egerton, 3rd Duke of Bridgewater (May 21, 1736–March 8, 1803) (also the 6th Earl of Bridgewater) was a British nobleman, the originator of British inland navigation, younger son of the 1st duke. ... The canal at Braunston The Grand Union Canal is a canal in England and part of the British canal system. ...


The abbey, which was of grand proportions and richly decorated, was pulled down in 1802 by the 7th Earl of Bridgewater, and was replaced by a large neo-Gothic house designed by James Wyatt and now a Grade 1 listed building. The then boundary between Hertfordshire and Buckinghamshire passed through the dining room, though the house is now entirely in Hertfordshire. The estate then passed to the Earls Brownlow, and then in 1921 was split, with the land passing to the National Trust, while the house and garden became the Ashridge (Bonar Law) College. Neo-gothic architecture is an American branch of the Gothic revival style that was imported from England in the 1830s. ... Fonthill Abbey. ... Year 1921 (MCMXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar). ... The standard of the National Trust The National Trust for Places of Historic Interest or Natural Beauty, usually known as The National Trust, is a British preservation organization. ... Andrew Bonar Law (16 September 1858 – 30 October 1923) was a British Conservative Party statesman and Prime Minister. ...


College of Citizenship

Ashridge's "College of Citizenship" was opened in 1929 to help the Conservative Party develop its intellectual forces in struggles with left-wing organisations such as the Fabian Society. It became a cross between a think-tank and a training centre and had Arthur Bryant as its educational adviser. During World War Two, Ashridge was used as a secondary site for Charing Cross Hospital. The Conservative Party (officially the Conservative and Unionist Party) is the second largest political party in the United Kingdom in terms of sitting Members of Parliament (MPs), the largest in terms of public membership, and the oldest political party in the United Kingdom. ... In politics, left-wing, political left, leftism, or simply the left, are terms which refer (with no particular precision) to the segment of the political spectrum typically associated with any of several strains of socialism, social democracy, or liberalism (especially in the American sense of the word), or with opposition... The Fabian Society is a British socialist intellectual movement, whose purpose is to advance the socialist cause by gradualist and reformist, rather than revolutionary means. ... A think tank (also called a policy institute) is an organization, institute, corporation, or group that conducts research and engages in advocacy in areas such as social policy, political strategy, science or technology issues, industrial or business policies, or military advice. ... Sir Arthur Bryant, CH, (18 February 1899 - 22 January 1985), was a widely popular British historian, and columnist for the Illustrated London News. ...


After the war, the College of Citizenship was briefly re-launched, then a finishing school for girls was added.


Ashridge Business School

In 1959 Ashridge was completely re-launched to provide management training, and is now Ashridge Business School. It has been suggested that Management system be merged into this article or section. ... Ashridge Business School is an international business school offering MBA and MSc degrees. ...


Trivia

Ashridge Common has been featured many times in film and television series due to its distinction as an area of natural beauty. It was the location for the film Danny, the Champion of the World based on the book by Roald Dahl. Some of the Ashridge Estate have been used for filming parts of the Harry Potter films, including The Goblet of Fire. The Ashridge House, which is now Ashridge Business School has been featured in films such as The Dirty Dozen. Danny, the Champion of the World is a 1975 childrens book by Roald Dahl. ... Roald Dahl (IPA: ) (13 September 1916 – 23 November 1990) was a Welsh novelist, short story author and screenwriter of Norwegian parentage, famous as a writer for both children and adults. ... This article is about the Harry Potter series of novels. ... Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire is a 2005 fantasy adventure film and the fourth in the popular Harry Potter films series. ... Ashridge Business School is an international business school offering MBA and MSc degrees. ... For the rap group, see D12. ...


Part of the estate became Ashridge Golf Club in 1932, and had Henry Cotton as its club professional in the late 1930s, including his most successful year 1937. Henry Cotton (Born Jan. ...


It should not be confused with Asheridge, which is a hamlet about five miles south-west, the other side of Berkhamsted. Asheridge is a small hamlet in the parish of Chesham, in Buckinghamshire, England. ...


References

  • Coult, Douglas (1980). A Prospect of Ashridge. Chichester: Phillimore. ISBN 0-85033-360-1. 

External links

  • Ashridge Estate information at the National Trust
  • Ashridge Business School
  • Ashridge Golf Club

Coordinates: 51°47′57″N, 0°33′35″W Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
House of Bonhommes: The college of Ashridge | British History Online (2596 words)
Citation: 'House of Bonhommes: The college of Ashridge', A History of the County of Buckingham: Volume 1 (1905), pp.
 In 1307 the rector and brethren of Ashridge received the custody of the hospital of St. Thomas of Acon in London (fn.
It is natural to suppose that the revision of the statutes at the new foundation in 1376 brought about a renewal of religious fervour, and a fresh desire for the careful observance of the rule.
Ashridge - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (617 words)
Ashridge is an estate and house in Hertfordshire, England; part of the land stretches into Buckinghamshire and it is close to the Bedfordshire border.
The estate then passed to the Earls Brownlow, and then in 1921 was split, with the land passing to the National Trust, while the house and garden became the Ashridge (Bonar Law) College.
Ashridge's "College of Citizenship" was opened in 1929 to help the Conservative Party develop its intellectual forces in struggles with left-wing organisations such as the Fabian Society.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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