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Encyclopedia > Ascanius
Ascanius Hunting the Stag of Silvia, by Claude Lorrain (1682).

In Greek and Roman mythology, Ascanius was the son of Aeneas and Creusa. After the Trojan War, as the city burned, Aeneas escaped to Latium in Italy, taking his father Anchises and his child Ascanius with him, though Creusa died during the escape. Ascanius later fought in the Italian Wars. Virgil's Aeneid says he had a role in the founding of Rome as the first king of Alba Longa. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Claude Lorrain. ... A head of Minerva found in the ruins of the Roman baths in Bath Roman mythology, the mythological beliefs of the people of Ancient Rome, can be considered as having two parts. ... Aeneas flees burning Troy, Federico Barocci, 1598. ... In Greek mythology, four people had the name Creusa. ... The fall of Troy, by Johann Georg Trautmann (1713–1769). ... Latium (Lazio in Italian) is a region of central Italy, bordered by Tuscany, Umbria, Abruzzo, Marche, Molise, Campania and the Tyrrhenian Sea. ... Aeneas Bearing Anchises from Troy, by Carle van Loo, 1729 (Louvre) In Greek mythology, Anchises was a son of Capys and Themiste (daughter of Ilus, son of Tros) or Hieromneme, a naiad. ... Publius Vergilius Maro (October 15, 70 BC – September 21, 19 BC), later called Virgilius, and known in English as Virgil or Vergil, was a classical Roman poet, the author of the Eclogues, the Georgics and the substantially completed Aeneid, the last being an epic poem of twelve books that became... Aeneas flees burning Troy, Federico Barocci, 1598 Galleria Borghese, Rome The Aeneid (IPA English pronunciation: ; in Latin Aeneis, pronounced — the title is Greek in form: genitive case Aeneidos): is a Latin epic written by Virgil in the 1st century BCE (between 29 and 19 BCE) that tells the legendary story... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Alba Longa (in Italian sources occasionally written Albalonga) was an ancient city of Latium, in the Alban Hills founder and head of the Latin Confederation; it was destroyed by Rome around the middle of the 7th century BC. // Legendary history According to legend Alba Longa was founded by Ascanius or...


According to another legend mentioned by Livy, Ascanius may have been the son of Aeneas and Lavinia and thus born in Latium, not Troy. Thirty years after the founding of Lavinium, Ascanius founded Alba Longa. He had a son or grandson called Aeneas Silvius. In Roman mythology, Lavinia was the daughter of Latinus and Amata. ... Alba Longa (in Italian sources occasionally written Albalonga) was an ancient city of Latium, in the Alban Hills founder and head of the Latin Confederation; it was destroyed by Rome around the middle of the 7th century BC. // Legendary history According to legend Alba Longa was founded by Ascanius or... Aeneas Silvius was the third descndant of Aeneas and third king of Alba Longa, the site of Rome. ...


Ascanius was also called Iulus or Julus. The Gens Julia, or the Julians, the clan to which Julius Caesar belonged, claimed to have been descended from Ascanius/Iulus, his father Aeneas, and, ultimately, the goddess Venus, the mother of Aeneas in myth, his father being the mortal Anchises. Julius (fem. ... Look up Julian in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Gaius Julius Caesar [1] (Latin pronunciation ; English pronunciation ; July 12 or July 13, 100 BC or 102 BC – March 15, 44 BC), was a Roman military and political leader and one of the most influential men in world history. ... Adjectives: Venusian or (rarely) Cytherean Atmosphere Surface pressure: 9. ...


The name Iulus was popularised by Virgil in the Aeneid: replacing the Greek name Ascanius with Iulus linked the Julian family of Rome to earlier mythology. The emperor Augustus, who commissioned the work, was a great patron of the arts. As a member of the Julian family, he could claim to have three major Olympian gods in his family tree: (Venus; Jupiter; and Mars), so he encouraged his many poets to emphasize his supposed descent from Aeneas. Publius Vergilius Maro (October 15, 70 BC – September 21, 19 BC), later called Virgilius, and known in English as Virgil or Vergil, was a classical Roman poet, the author of the Eclogues, the Georgics and the substantially completed Aeneid, the last being an epic poem of twelve books that became... Aeneas flees burning Troy, Federico Barocci, 1598 Galleria Borghese, Rome The Aeneid (IPA English pronunciation: ; in Latin Aeneis, pronounced — the title is Greek in form: genitive case Aeneidos): is a Latin epic written by Virgil in the 1st century BCE (between 29 and 19 BCE) that tells the legendary story... For other uses, see Augustus (disambiguation). ... The Twelve Olympians, in Greek mythology, were the principal gods of the Greek pantheon, residing atop Mount Olympus. ... Marble Venus of the Capitoline Venus type, Roman (British Museum) Venus was a major Roman goddess principally associated with love and beauty, the rough equivalent of the Greek goddess Aphrodite. ... Jupiter et Thétis - by Jean Ingres, 1811. ... Mars was the Roman god of war, the son of Juno and either Jupiter or a magical flower. ...


Ascanius, in the Aeneid, first used the phrase "annue coeptis," the root phrase of what later became the motto of the United States of America. This page includes English translations of several Latin phrases and abbreviations such as . ...


References

  • Livy, Ab Urbe Condita Book 1.

A portrait of Titus Livius made long after his death. ...

Family tree of the kings of Alba Longa

 
 
 
Anchises
 
Aphrodite/Venus
 
Latinus
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Creusa
 
Aeneas
 
 
Lavinia
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Ascanius, or Iulus
 
Silvius
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Silvius
 
 
Aeneas Silvius
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Brutus of Britain
 
 
Latinus Silvius
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Alba
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Atys
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Capys
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Capetus
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Tiberinus Silvius
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Agrippa
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Romulus Silvius
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Aventinus
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Procas
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Numitor
 
Amulius
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Rhea Silvia
 
Ares/Mars
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Hersilia
 
Romulus
 
Remus
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Kings of Rome

Aeneas Bearing Anchises from Troy, by Carle van Loo, 1729 (Louvre) In Greek mythology, Anchises was a son of Capys and Themiste (daughter of Ilus, son of Tros) or Hieromneme, a naiad. ... For other uses, see Aphrodite (disambiguation). ... Venus is the Roman goddess of love, equivalent to Greek Aphrodite and Etruscan Turan. ... Latinus or Latinos in Greek mythology, in Hesiods Theogony, was the son of Odysseus and Circe who ruled the Tyrsenoi, that is the Etruscans, with his brothers Agrius and Telegonus. ... In Greek mythology, four people had the name Creusa. ... Aeneas flees burning Troy, Federico Barocci, 1598. ... In Roman mythology, Lavinia was the daughter of Latinus and Amata. ... Silvius has several meanings: In Roman mythology, Silvius was the son of Aeneas and Lavinia. ... Aeneas Silvius was the third descndant of Aeneas and third king of Alba Longa, the site of Rome. ... Brutus of Troy, also of Britain (Welsh: Bryttys), was the legendary founding king of Britain and great grandson of Aeneas, according to Italy for the accidental killing of his natural father Silvius, Brutus liberated a group of Trojans living in slavery in Greece and led them forth, received a vision... Latinius Silvius was the fourth descendant of Aeneas and fourth king of Alba Longa (according to Livy). ... Alba in roman mythology is a son of Latinus Silvius and the fifth king of Alba Longa (Ovid, Metamorphoses, ХIV 612; Livy, І, 3). ... In Greek mythology, Capys was a son of Assaracus and Aigesta or Themiste or Clytodora (daughter of Laomedon) and father of Anchises and so grandfather of Aeneas. ... Capetus was a descendant of Aeneas. ... Tiberinus Silvius (the Tibers child born in the woods) was the ninth in the legendary king-list of the city Alba Longa in Lazio. ... Agrippa was a descendant of Aeneas and therefore a king of Alba Longa. ... Romulus Silvius was a descendant of Aeneas, and because of this a king of Alba Longa. ... Aventinus, one of the mythical kings of Alba Longa, who was buried on the Aventine Hill later named after him. ... In Roman mythology, King Procas of Alba Longa was the father of Amulius and Numitor. ... In Roman mythology, King Numitor of Alba Longa, son of Procas, was the father of Rhea Silvia. ... In Roman mythology, Amulius was the brother of Numitor and son of Procas. ... Rhea Silvia (also written as Rea Silvia), and also known as Ilia, was the mythical mother of the twins Romulus and Remus, who founded the city of Rome. ... In Greek mythology, Ares (Ancient Greek: , modern Greek Άρης [pron. ... Mars was the Roman god of war, the son of Juno and a magical flower (or Jupiter). ... In Roman mythology, Hersilia was the wife of Romulus. ... This page describes the ancient heroes who founded the city of Rome. ... This page describes the ancient heroes who founded the city of Rome. ... There were seven traditional Kings of Rome before the establishment of the Roman Republic. ...

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Ascanius

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Ascanius: Information from Answers.com (443 words)
Ascanius Hunting the Stag of Silvia, by Claude Lorrain (1682).
In Greek and Roman mythology, Ascanius was a son of Aeneas and Creusa.
Ascanius, in the Aeneid, first used the phrase "annue coeptis," the root phrase of what later became the motto of the United States of America.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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