FACTOID # 16: In the 2000 Presidential Election, Texas gave Ralph Nader the 3rd highest popular vote count of any US state.
 
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Encyclopedia > As of May 2005

2005 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December- →
2005 is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and is the current year. ... 2005 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December- → Deaths in January • 29 Ephraim Kishon • 25 Philip Johnson • 23 Johnny Carson • 22 Parveen Babi • 20 Jan Nowak-Jeziorański • 17 Virginia Mayo • 17 Zhao Ziyang • 15 Ruth Warrick • 14 Rudolph Moshammer Recent deaths Ongoing events • Tsunami relief... 2005 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December- → Ongoing events • Iraqi legislative election • Bill C-38 (Canada gay marriage) • Tsunami relief Upcoming events • March 11: Red Nose Day 2005 in the UK. Deaths in February • 26 – Jef Raskin • 25 – Hugh Nibley • 25 – Peter Benenson • 21... 2005 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December- → Ongoing events • Iraqi legislative election • Bill C-38 (Canada gay marriage) • Tsunami relief • Cedar Revolution in Lebanon • Tulip Revolution in Kyrgyzstan • German Visa Affair 2005 • Expo 2005 in Nagoya, Japan • Terri Schiavo controversy • Pope John Paul II... 2005 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December- → Ongoing events • Iraqi legislative election • Bill C-38 (Canada gay marriage) • Tsunami relief • Cedar Revolution in Lebanon • Tulip Revolution in Kyrgyzstan • German Visa Affair 2005 • Expo 2005 in Nagoya, Japan • Terri Schiavo controversy • Pope John Paul II... Ongoing events • 2005 Kuomintang visits to Mainland • Bill C-38 (Canada gay marriage) • German Visa Affair 2005 • Expo 2005 in Aichi, Japan • Fuel prices • Election of OAS Secretary General • Stanislav Gross scandal in Czech republic Upcoming events Deaths in May May 3: Jagjit Singh Aurora May 3: Don Canham May... Ongoing events • 2005 Kuomintang visits to Mainland • Bill C-38 (Canada gay marriage) • German Visa Affair 2005 • Expo 2005 in Aichi, Japan • Fuel prices • Election of OAS Secretary General • Stanislav Gross scandal in Czech republic Upcoming events Deaths in May May 3: Jagjit Singh Aurora May 3: Don Canham May... Ongoing events • 2005 Kuomintang visits to Mainland • Bill C-38 (Canada gay marriage) • German Visa Affair 2005 • Expo 2005 in Aichi, Japan • Fuel prices • Election of OAS Secretary General • Stanislav Gross scandal in Czech republic Upcoming events Deaths in May May 3: Jagjit Singh Aurora May 3: Don Canham May... Ongoing events • 2005 Kuomintang visits to Mainland • Bill C-38 (Canada gay marriage) • German Visa Affair 2005 • Expo 2005 in Aichi, Japan • Fuel prices • Election of OAS Secretary General • Stanislav Gross scandal in Czech republic Upcoming events Deaths in May May 3: Jagjit Singh Aurora May 3: Don Canham May... Ongoing events • 2005 Kuomintang visits to Mainland • Bill C-38 (Canada gay marriage) • German Visa Affair 2005 • Expo 2005 in Aichi, Japan • Fuel prices • Election of OAS Secretary General • Stanislav Gross scandal in Czech republic Upcoming events Deaths in May May 3: Jagjit Singh Aurora May 3: Don Canham May... Ongoing events • 2005 Kuomintang visits to Mainland • Bill C-38 (Canada gay marriage) • German Visa Affair 2005 • Expo 2005 in Aichi, Japan • Fuel prices • Election of OAS Secretary General • Stanislav Gross scandal in Czech republic Upcoming events Deaths in May May 3: Jagjit Singh Aurora May 3: Don Canham May... Ongoing events • 2005 Kuomintang visits to Mainland • Bill C-38 (Canada gay marriage) • German Visa Affair 2005 • Expo 2005 in Aichi, Japan • Fuel prices • Election of OAS Secretary General • Stanislav Gross scandal in Czech republic Upcoming events Deaths in May May 3: Jagjit Singh Aurora May 3: Don Canham May...

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Deaths in May

May 26: Eddie Albert
May 25: Ismail Merchant
May 25: Sunil Dutt
May 25: Graham Kennedy
May 22: Thurl Ravenscroft
May 21: Howard Morris
May 21: Subodh Mukherjee
May 21: Stephen Elliott
May 20: Paul Ricoeur
May 19: Henry Corden
May 19: Richard Lewine
May 17: Frank Gorshin
May 17: Piero Dorazio
May 16: Albert "Smiler" Marshall
May 15: Les Bartley
May 13: George Dantzig
May 13: Michael Ross
May 12: Monica Zetterlund
May 7: Peter Wallace Rodino
May 6: Narayan Pokharel
May 4: David H. Hackworth
May 3: Jagjit Singh Aurora
May 3: Don Canham
May 2: Bob Hunter
2005 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December- → Ongoing events • Iraqi legislative election • Bill C-38 (Canada gay marriage) • Tsunami relief • Cedar Revolution in Lebanon • Tulip Revolution in Kyrgyzstan • German Visa Affair 2005 • Expo 2005 in Nagoya, Japan • Terri Schiavo controversy • Pope John Paul II... Ongoing events • 2005 Kuomintang visits to Mainland • Bill C-38 (Canada gay marriage) • German Visa Affair 2005 • Expo 2005 in Aichi, Japan • Fuel prices • Election of OAS Secretary General • Stanislav Gross scandal in Czech republic Upcoming events Deaths in May May 3: Jagjit Singh Aurora May 3: Don Canham May... Todays featured article • Tsunami Deaths in May • None entered Other recent deaths Ongoing events • None entered Upcoming events • None entered Related pages • 2005 in science • 2004 in science • 2003 in science • 2002 in science • 2001 in science Other Years in Sci Tech May 20, 2005 South Korean scientists led... 2005 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December- → Deaths in May Graham Kennedy (1934-2005) Events in April Bali Nine Douglas Wood - Schapelle Corby Vivian Solon Related pages About this page May 31, 2005 (Tuesday) In Botswana, Australian lecturer Kenneth Good loses his appeal against... May 26 is the 146th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (147th in leap years). ... Eddie Albert with Eva Gabor in Green Acres Eddie Albert (April 22, 1906 – May 26, 2005) was an American actor. ... May 25 is the 145th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (146th in leap years). ... Ismail Merchant (December 25, 1936 - May 25, 2005) was a Indian-born film producer, and his most famous collaboration was with James Ivory. ... May 25 is the 145th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (146th in leap years). ... Sunil Dutt (June 6, 1929 - May 25, 2005) was an Indian Bollywood actor and politician. ... May 25 is the 145th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (146th in leap years). ... Graham Kennedy Graham Cyril Kennedy (15 February 1934-25 May 2005) was an Australian radio, television and film performer. ... May 22 is the 142nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (143rd in leap years). ... Ravenscrofts 1970 gospel album Great Hymns in Story and Song Thurl Arthur Ravenscroft (February 6, 1914 – May 22, 2005) was an American voice actor and singer with a deep, booming voice. ... May 21 is the 141st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (142nd in leap years). ... Howard Howie Morris (September 4, 1919 – May 21, 2005) was a short, quicksilver comic of TVs Golden Age; he was heard more than seen in the last few decades, as he possessed one of the finest vocal instruments around for animation. ... May 21 is the 141st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (142nd in leap years). ... Subodh Mukherjee (d. ... May 21 is the 141st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (142nd in leap years). ... Stephen Elliott (November 27, 1918 - May 21, 2005) was an American actor and comedian from New York City. ... May 20 is the 140th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (141st in leap years). ... Paul Ricoeur (February 27, 1913, Valence - May 20, 2005, Chatenay Malabry) was a French philosopher best known for his attempt to combine phenomenological description with hermeneutic interpretation. ... May 19 is the 139th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (140th in leap years). ... {{Copyvio|url=Copyright © 2005 The Associated Press. ... May 19 is the 139th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (140th in leap years). ... May 17 is the 137th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (138th in leap years). ... Frank Gorshin as the Riddler, from the Batman TV series. ... May 17 is the 137th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (138th in leap years). ... May 16 is the 136th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (137th in leap years). ... Albert Elliot Smiler Marshall (March 15, 1897 in Elmstead Market, Essex - May 16, 2005 in Ashtead, Surrey) was a British veteran of World War I and the last surviving British cavalryman to have seen battle on the Western Front. ... May 15 is the 135th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (136th in leap years). ... Les Bartley (d. ... May 13 is the 133rd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (134th in leap years). ... George Bernard Dantzig (8 November 1914 in Portland, Oregon - 13 May 2005 in Palo Alto, California) was a mathematician who introduced the simplex algorithm and is considered the Father of linear programming. He was the recipient of many honors, including the National Medal of Science in 1975, the John von... May 13 is the 133rd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (134th in leap years). ... Michael Bruce Ross (July 26, 1959 – May 13, 2005) was an American serial killer. ... May 12 is the 132nd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (133rd in leap years). ... Monica Zetterlund (born Monica Nilsson on September 20, 1937 in Hagfors, Sweden, died May 12, 2005 in Stockholm, Sweden) was a Swedish singer and actress. ... May 7 is the 127th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (128th in leap years). ... Peter Wallace Rodino Jr. ... May 6 is the 126th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (127th in leap years). ... Narayan Prasad Pokharel, (1958-2005), was president of the Nepal branch of the World Hindu Federation. ... May 4 is the 124th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (125th in leap years). ... David H. Hackworth (November 11, 1930 – May 4, 2005) known affectionately as Hack, was a retired United States Army colonel and prominent military journalist. ... May 3 is the 123rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (124th in leap years). ... Lt-Gen Jagjit Singh Aurora (February 13, 1917, Jhelum, Pakistan - May 3, 2005, New Delhi, India) was a lieutenant general in the Indian Army. ... May 3 is the 123rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (124th in leap years). ... Don Canham (1918-May 3, 2005) served as athletic director at the University of Michigan from 1968 to 1988. ... May 2 is the 122nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (123rd in leap years). ... Greenpeace co-founder Bob Hunter Robert (Bob) Lorne Hunter October 13, 1941 – May 2, 2005) was a Canadian environmentalist, journalist, author and politician. ...

Events


May 31, 2005 (Tuesday)

May 31 is the 151st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (152nd in leap years), with 214 days remaining, as the last day of May. ... 2005 is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and is the current year. ... Central La Paz Panoramic sight of the city of La Paz La Paz is the administrative capital of Bolivia, as well as the departmental capital of La Paz Department. ... Nationalization is the act of taking assets into state ownership. ... Carlos Diego Mesa Gisbert (born August 12, 1953) is the current President of Bolivia, having held the office from October 17, 2003. ... Serbia and Montenegro  – Serbia    – Kosovo and Metohia        (UN administration)    – Vojvodina  – Montenegro Official language Serbian1 Capital Belgrade Area  – Total  – % water  88,361 km²  n/a Population  – Total (2002)     (without Kosovo)  – Density  7. ... Mirjana Marković is the wife of former Serbian president Slobodan Milošević. ... Slobodan Milošević. ... A session of the Security Council in progress The United Nations Security Council is the most powerful organ of the United Nations. ... Peacekeeping, as defined by the United Nations, is a way to help countries torn by conflict create conditions for sustainable peace. ... June 24 is the 175th day of the year (176th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 190 days remaining. ... Deportation is the expelling of someone from a country. ... Festus Gontebanye Mogae (born August 21, 1939) is the president of Botswana. ... Nelson Mandela Nelson Rolihlahla Mandela, OM, (born July 18, 1918) before becoming President of South Africa, was one of its chief anti-apartheid activists, and was also an anti-apartheid saboteur. ... Modern Naval Tactics It is tempting to regard modern naval combat as the purest expression of tactics. ... Karwar is the capital of Uttara Kannada district in Karnataka in India. ... Karnataka (ಕರ್ನಾಟಕ in Kannada) is one of the four southern states of India. ... Mikhail Khodorkovsky speaking at an Open Russia forum. ... This article contrasts tax evasion, tax avoidance, tax resistance and tax mitigation. ... Bangkok from the Chao Phraya River at sunset, July 2004 Bangkok, (in Thai กรุงเทพฯ, กรุงเทพมหานคร, or Krung Thep, Krung Thep Mahanakhon), population 8,538,610 (1990), is the capital and largest city of Thailand. ... Natalie Glebova dressing the Miss Universe sash and the tiara. ... The 2005 Miss Universe Pageant The Miss Universe beauty contest has been held since 1952 (not to be confused with the similar Miss World). ... Vanity Fair is a glossy American glamour magazine monthly that offers a mixture of articles on high-brow culture, jet-set and entertainment-business personalities, politics, and current affairs. ... The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) is a Federal police force which is the principal investigative arm of the United States Department of Justice (DOJ). ... W. Mark Felt (circa 2005) William Mark Felt, Sr. ... The Watergate Complex as depicted in Government Exhibit 1. ... W. Mark Felt, circa 2005 Deep Throat is the pseudonym that was given to a secret source who leaked information about the involvement of U.S. President Richard Nixons administration in the events that came to be known as the Watergate scandal. ... The Hamas emblem shows two crossed swords, the Dome of the Rock, and a map of the land they claim as Palestine (roughly, present-day Israel, the West Bank and the Gaza Strip). ... A boycott is a refusal to buy, sell, or otherwise trade with an individual or business who is generally believed by the participants in the boycott to be doing something morally wrong. ... Industrial espionage is espionage conducted for commercial purposes instead of the usual national security purposes. ... In the context of computer software, a Trojan horse is a malicious program that is disguised as legitimate software. ... In computer security technology, a virus is a self-replicating program that spreads by inserting copies of itself into other executable code or documents (for a complete definition: see below). ... Hack has a number of meanings, some related: Hack is a slang term in technology culture which has a number of meanings depending on context, including a joke, a progamming exploit, or a commercial software breakin. ... Beijing  listen? (Chinese: 北京; pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Pei-ching; Postal System Pinyin: Peking) is the capital city of the Peoples Republic of China (PRC). ... The East China Sea, showing surrounding countries. ... A prime minister may be either: the chief or leading member of the cabinet of the top-level government in a country having a parliamentary system of government; or the official, in countries with a semi-presidential system of government, appointed to manage the civil service and execute the directives... Jean-Pierre Raffarin Jean-Pierre Raffarin  listen (born August 3, 1948) is a French conservative politician. ... The Treaty establishing a Constitution for Europe, commonly referred to as the European Constitution, is an international treaty signed in 2004 and currently awaiting ratification, intended to create a constitution for the European Union. ... The President of France, known officially as the President of the Republic (Président de la République in French), is Frances elected Head of State. ... Jacques René Chirac (born November 29, 1932) is a French politician. ... The entrance to the Ministry in Place Beauvau is guarded by one gendarme (to the left) and one policewoman (to the right). ... Dominique de Villepin Photo: David Mendiboure Dominique Marie François René Galouzeau de Villepin (born November 14, 1953, in Rabat, Morocco), simply known as Dominique de Villepin  listen?, is a French diplomat and politician. ... The Three Gorges Dam (Chinese: 三峡大坝; pinyin: ) spans the Yangtze River (third longest in the world) at Sandouping, Yichang, Hubei province, China. ... A rebellion is, in the most general sense, a refusal to accept authority. ... This page is about protests. ... Categories: Politics stubs | Liberal related stubs | Senegalese people ... Vaccination is a term coined by Edward Jenner for the process of administering a weakened form of a disease to patients as a means of giving them immunity to a more serious form of the disease. ... Poliomyelitis (polio), or infantile paralysis, is a viral paralytic disease. ... Robert Frederick Xenon Bob Geldof, (born on October 5, 1951 in Dublin) is an Irish singer, songwriter and political activist. ... U2 at Live Aid (Wembley Stadium, London) Live Aid was a multi-venue rock music concert held on July 13, 1985. ... 1985 is a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... G8 work session; July 20-22, 2002. ... A summit is: A point higher than all the ground immediately surrounding it; see topographical summit. ... Edinburghs location in Scotland Edinburgh viewed from Arthurs Seat. ... The Live 8 poster Live 8 is a series of concerts planned for July, 2005 in the G8 nations. ... Hyde Park is one of the largest parks in central London, England, and one of the Royal Parks of London. ... The Eiffel Tower has become a symbol of Paris throughout the world. ... Rome - Wikipedia /**/ @import /w/skins-1. ...  Berlin (pronounced: , German ) is the capital of Germany and its largest city, with 3,426,000 inhabitants (as of January 2005); down from 4. ... Philadelphia is a village located in Jefferson County, New York. ... The UK campaign A white band bilingual in Welsh and English. ... Paul McCartney, as photographed by Richard Avedon for the 1968 LP The Beatles (aka The White Album). Sir James Paul McCartney,KBE, MBE (born June 18, 1942), better known as Paul McCartney, is a British musician, composer and producer. ... Album cover for Williams 2004 Greatest Hits Robert Peter Williams (born February 13, 1974 in Burslem, Stoke-on-Trent, Staffordshire) is a British pop singer. ... Madonna Ciccone Madonna Louise Ciccone (born in Bay City, Michigan, August 16, 1958), simply known by the stage name Madonna, also occasionally referred to as Madonna Ciccone Ritchie, is an American singer frequently referred to as the Queen of Pop music. ... This article is about the rock band. ... From left: Guy Berryman, Jon Buckland, Chris Martin, and Will Champion Coldplay is a post-Britpop/alternative rock band from London, United Kingdom well known for their rock melodies, introspective lyrics and ethical stance. ... U2 can mean: The communist rock group U2 The Lockheed U-2 spy plane The U-2 Spy Plane Crisis of 1960 Unterseeboot 2, German submarine The Polikarpov U-2 (Po-2) biplane The U2 electric guitar by Danelectro, a 1956 twenty-two fret single-cutaway with two single-coil... Victoria, Emma, Mel B, Geri, Mel C; The Spice Girls at the MTV Europe Video Awards 1997 The Spice Girls were a British vocal girl band. ... The Supreme Court Building, Washington, D.C. The Supreme Court Building, Washington, D.C., (large image) The Supreme Court of the United States, located in Washington, D.C., is the highest court (see supreme court) in the United States; that is, it has ultimate judicial authority within the United States... Arthur Andersen LLP, based in Chicago, Illinois, was the fifth largest of the Big Five accounting firms and performed auditing, tax services, and consulting. ... Enron Corporation Enron Corporation is an energy trading and communications company based in Houston, Texas that employed around 21,000 people in mid-2001 (before bankruptcy). ... This article is confusing for some readers, and needs to be edited for clarity. ...

May 30, 2005 (Monday)

May 30 is the 150th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (151st in leap years). ... 2005 is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and is the current year. ... Prague (Praha in Czech) is the capital and largest city of the Czech Republic. ... For other meanings, see Prince (disambiguation). ... 2001 is a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2004 is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Jerusalem (Hebrew: יְרוּשָׁלַיִם Yerushalayim; Arabic: القدس al-Quds; see also names of Jerusalem) is an ancient Middle Eastern city of key importance to the religions of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. ... Irenaios Skopeliti (formerly, Patriarch Irenaios, Erinaios the 1st, or Eirinaios the 1st) is the former Patriarch of Jerusalem, the primate of the Orthodox Church of Jerusalem (2001-2005). ... Metropolitan Cornelius of Petra is a senior bishop of the Orthodox Church of Jerusalem and is the current locum tenens of that church, pending the election of a new Orthodox Patriarch of Jerusalem. ... Locum tenens is a Latin phrase literally meaning holding place. ... The Orthodox Church of Jerusalem, properly called the Greek Orthodox Church of Jerusalem, is regarded by Orthodox Christians as the mother church of all of Christendom, because it was in Jerusalem that the Church was established on the day of Pentecost with the descent of the Holy Spirit on the... Baidoa is a city in south-central Somalia. ... Angela Merkel Angela Dorothea Merkel (born Angela Dorothea Kasner, July 17, 1954 in Hamburg) is a German politician and the oppositions candidate to become Chancellor of Germany in the upcoming German federal election, 2005. ... This article needs cleanup. ... The Christian Social Union in Bavaria (CSU – ) is a conservative Germany. ... The head of government in Germany has traditionally been called Kanzler (Chancellor). ... The German federal election, 2005 will be conducted in the fall of 2005, to elect members to the Bundestag (lower house) of Germany. ... Amnesty International (commonly known as Amnesty or AI) is an international non-governmental organization with the stated purpose of promoting all the human rights enshrined in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and other international standards. ... Human rights are rights which some hold to be inalienable and belonging to all humans. ... Map of Cuba with location of Guantanamo Bay indicated. ... His Holiness Pope Benedict XVI (Latin: ; born April 16, 1927 as Joseph Alois Ratzinger in Marktl am Inn, Bavaria) is the 265th and reigning pope, the head of the Roman Catholic Church and sovereign of Vatican City. ... Eastern Orthodoxy (also called Greek Orthodoxy and Russian Orthodoxy) is a Christian tradition which represents the majority of Eastern Christianity. ... Location within Italy Bari is the second largest continental city of Southern Italy, with a population of 326,201 (2001) along 116 sq. ... The 2005 Lebanese General Elections were the first elections in thirty years without a Syrian military or intelligence presence in Lebanon. ... Saadeddine Rafik Hariri (born April 1970) is the younger son of Rafik Hariri, the assassinated former prime minister of Lebanon. ... Rafiq Bahaa Edine Hariri (born November, 1944) is a Lebanese billionaire businessman, and was Prime Minister of Lebanon until his resignation on October 20, 2004. ... Central Beirut (2004) Beirut ( Arabic بيروت - the French name, Beyrouth, was also commonly used in English in the past) is the capital, largest city and chief seaport of Lebanon. ... A prime minister may be either: the chief or leading member of the cabinet of the top-level government in a country having a parliamentary system of government; or the official, in countries with a semi-presidential system of government, appointed to manage the civil service and execute the directives... Rafiq Bahaa Edine Hariri (born November, 1944) is a Lebanese billionaire businessman, and was Prime Minister of Lebanon until his resignation on October 20, 2004. ... See Election (movie) for the film directed by Alexander Payne. ... // Israel, the West Bank and Gaza Strip are at the center of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. ... Jabalia (Arabic: جباليا), with a registered population of 103,646 inhabitants (as of June 30 2002), is the largest Palestinian refugee camp in existence. ... The Palestinian flag, adopted in 1948, is a widely recognized modern symbol of the Palestinian people. ... A refugee camp is a camp built up by governments or NGOs (such as the ICRC) to receive refugees. ... IDF may refer to: the International Diabetes Federation the Israel Defense Forces the AIDC Ching-kuo Indigenous Defence Fighter of Taiwan. ... The California Institute of Technology (commonly known as Caltech) is a private, coeducational university located in Pasadena, California, in the United States. ... This image is a Galaxy Evolution Explorer observation of the large galaxy in Andromeda, Messier 31. ... The terms Red Cross and Red Crescent are often used as short names for the International Red Cross and Red Crescent Movement, or its two leading international organs, the ICRC and the IFRCS. This page is about the symbol itself, see respective articles for information about the organizations and movements. ... HIV (Human Immunodeficiency Virus) is a retrovirus that infects cells of the human immune system. ... In medicine (gastroenterology), hepatitis is any disease featuring inflammation of the liver. ...

May 29, 2005 (Sunday)

May 29 is the 149th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (150th in leap years). ... 2005 is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and is the current year. ... The Clock Tower of the Palace of Westminster which contains Big Ben Tower Bridge at night A red double-decker bus crosses Piccadilly Circus. ... Merrill Lynch & Co. ... State nickname: Empire State Other U.S. States Capital Albany Largest city New York Governor George Pataki Official languages None Area 141,205 km² (27th)  - Land 122,409 km²  - Water 18,795 km² (13. ... In finance, a derivative security is a contract that specifies the rights and obligations between the issuer of the security and the holder to receive or deliver future cash flows (or exchange of other securities or assets) based on some future event. ... J.P. Morgan Chase & Co. ... In politics, an electorate is the group of entities entitled to vote in an election. ... On 29 May 2005 a referendum was held in France to decide whether the country should ratify the proposed Constitution of the European Union. ... The Treaty establishing a Constitution for Europe, commonly referred to as the European Constitution, is an international treaty signed in 2004 and currently awaiting ratification, intended to create a constitution for the European Union. ... The President of France, known officially as the President of the Republic (Président de la République in French), is Frances elected Head of State. ... Jacques René Chirac (born November 29, 1932) is a French politician. ... Family photo of European leaders at the signing of the constitutional treaty in Rome This article discusses the history of the Treaty establishing a Constitution for Europe, which was signed in 2004 and is currently awaiting ratification by European Union member states. ... Indianapolis 500, 1994 The Indianapolis 500 Mile Race, frequently shortened to Indianapolis 500 or Indy 500, is an American race for open-wheel automobiles held annually over the Memorial Day weekend at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway in Speedway, Indiana. ... Danica Patrick is the first woman driver to ever lead the field at the Indy 500 Danica Sue Patrick (born March 25, 1982) is a professional race car driver in the Indy Racing League. ... Gay Pride in San Francisco The gay pride or simply pride campaign of the gay rights movement has three main premises: that people should be proud of what they are, that sexual diversity is a gift, and that sexual orientation and gender identity are inherent and cannot be intentionally altered. ... Sao Paulo and São Paulo (city) redirect here. ... Underwater funeral in Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea A funeral is a ceremony marking a persons death. ... Gangsters are members of a professional crime organization, such as a gang or a mafia group. ... This page is a candidate for speedy deletion. ... Wikiquote has a collection of quotations by or about: United States Wikinews has news related to this article: United States United States government Official website of the United States government - Gateway to governmental sites White House - Official site of the US President Senate. ... In May 2005 unrest in Uzbekistan reached a head when Uzbek troops fired into a crowd of protesters in the eastern city of Andijan, killing an estimated 400 to 1000 people on 13 May. ... Paolo Savoldelli (born 27 may 1973) is the road racing cyclist for UCI Pro Tour team Discovery Channel and winner of 2002 and 2005 Giro dItalia. ... The 88th Giro dItalia was held in 2005 from May 7 to May 29, running for about 3500 kilometers. ...

May 28, 2005 (Saturday)

May 28 is the 148th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (149th in leap years). ... 2005 is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and is the current year. ... A clock tower is a tower built with a large clock face on one or more (often all four) of its sides so as to be visible to a large number of inhabitants of an area. ... The Palace of Westminster lies on the bank of the River Thames in the heart of London. ... The Clock Tower of the Palace of Westminster which contains Big Ben Tower Bridge at night A red double-decker bus crosses Piccadilly Circus. ... The Clock Tower, colloquially known as Big Ben Big Ben is the colloquial name of the Clock Tower of the Palace of Westminster in London, and an informal name for the Great Bell of Westminster, part of the Great Clock of Westminster. ... The Westminster Quarters is the most common name for a melody used by a set of clock bells to strike the hour. ... A minute is: a unit of time equal to 1/60th of an hour and to 60 seconds. ... Mushroom cloud from the nuclear explosion over Nagasaki rising 18 km (over 11 miles) into the air. ... Sexual slavery is a special case of slavery which includes various different practices: forced prostitution (which can include religious prostitution) single-owner sexual slavery slavery for primarily non-sexual purposes where sex is common or permissible In general, the nature of slavery means that the slave is de facto available... 1995 was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Comfort women is a euphemism for women forced to serve in military brothels in Japanese-occupied countries during World War II. Comfort women were from Korea, the Philippines, Thailand, Vietnam, Malaysia, China, Taiwan, Indonesia, and other Japanese-occupied countries/regions. ... State nickname: The Golden State Other U.S. States Capital Sacramento Largest city Los Angeles Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger Official languages English Area 410,000 km² (3rd)  - Land 404,298 km²  - Water 20,047 km² (4. ... A State Senator is a member of a state Senate, the upper legislative chamber in the government of a U.S. state. ... Santa Ana is the largest city and the county seat of Orange County, California. ... Leukemia (leukaemia in Commonwealth English) is a group of blood diseases characterized by malignancies (cancer) of the blood-forming tissues. ... Etymologically derived through Middle English from the Latin second-type conjugation verb stŭdērĕ, which means to direct ones zeal at; hence a student is one who directs zeal at a subject. ... The Ethiopian Peoples Revolutionary Democratic Front, or EPRDF, is the ruling political party of Ethiopia. ... Ethiopian Prime Minister Meles Zenawi Ato Legesse Meles Zenawi (b. ... June 8 is the 159th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (160th in leap years), with 206 days remaining. ...

May 27, 2005 (Friday)

  • The King of Saudi Arabia, Fahd Bin Abd-al-Aziz, has been taken to hospital, overtly for tests; however, the BBC quotes an unofficial source who claims the King has water in his lungs. (BBC)
  • Qur'an desecration by US military: Protests have occurred in Egypt, Pakistan, Jordan, Lebanon and Malaysia after the US military admitted that the Qur'an had been "mishandled" by soldiers. (BBC)
  • The Bundesrat of Germany ratifies the Treaty establishing a Constitution for Europe. (BBC)
  • Australian Schapelle Corby has been found guilty by a Bali court of importing a narcotic into Indonesia. She has appealed the AU$13,875 fine and the 20-year jail sentence. (ABC News) (Jakarta Post)
  • The Federal Court of Australia rejects an attempt from Humane Society International to sue a Japanese whaler because such an action might generate conflict with Japan. The organisation claims the whaling company is hunting unlawfully in Australian waters near Antarctica. The Humane Society is now considering appeal. (ABC News)
  • The 148 members of the World Trade Organization officially appoint the former European Union Trade Commissioner, Pascal Lamy, as its 5th Director-General. (VOA News), (WTO official website)
  • The majority of members of Basque parliament, Spain, condemn the ETA bomb attack in Madrid, though the communists abstain. A bomb explodes later in a Basque train station. (EITB) (Reuters AlertNet)
  • The planned 48 hour strike at the BBC in Britain is called off, unions announce, following talks. (BBC) (ThisIsLondon)
  • 14 people die as a bomb explodes near a shrine in Islamabad, Pakistan. (Al-Jazeera) (BBC) (Bloomberg)
  • Ethiopian general elections: European Union observers report that the National Elections Board of Ethiopia (NEBE) may be losing control of the vote counting for the recent May 15 election, potentially marring the most open election in Ethiopian history. Meanwhile the NEBE has postponed announcement of the election's provisional results until June 8, due to the volume of complaints of election irregularities. (CBC)
  • Popular singer Morrissey's official Website released the following statement: "Morrissey will regrettably not be appearing at the Isle Of Wight Festival on the 11th of June as scheduled. The pressure of preparing the new album and losing his drummer earlier this month has made it impossible to do the gig without massively compromising both the gig and the album. Apologies to all the fans, the organisers and the people of the Isle Of Wight."[1]

May 27 is the 147th day (148th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, with 218 days remaining. ... 2005 is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and is the current year. ... This is a list of kings of Saudi Arabia: King Abdul Aziz (Ibn Saud) (1902/1932-1953) King Saud, son of King Abdul Aziz (1953-1964) King Faisal, son of King Abdul Aziz (1964-1975) King Khalid, son of King Abdul Aziz (1975-1982) King Fahd, son of King Abdul... King Fahd bin Abdelaziz Al Saud King Fahd Bin Abdul Aziz Al-Saud (born in Riyadh, probably in 1923) is the king and prime minister of Saudi Arabia and leader of the House of Saud. ... A physician visiting the sick in a hospital. ... The British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC) was formed in 1927 by means of a royal charter. ... The heart and lungs (from an older edition of Grays Anatomy) The lung is an organ belonging to the respiratory system and interfacing to the circulatory system of air-breathing vertebrates. ... This article concerns allegations of Quran desecration by United States Armed Forces personnel at the Guantánamo Bay prison camp. ... The armed forces of the United States of America consist of the United States Army United States Navy United States Air Force United States Marine Corps United States Coast Guard Note: The United States Coast Guard has both military and law enforcement functions. ... The Quran (Arabic: al-qurān; its literal meaning is the recitation and is often called Al Qurān Al KarÄ«m: The Noble Quran or The Glorious Qurān, also transliterated as Quran, Koran, and less commonly Alcoran) is the holy book of Islam. ... The Bundesrat (federal council) is the representation of the 16 Federal States (Länder) of Germany at the federal level. ... The Treaty establishing a Constitution for Europe, commonly referred to as the European Constitution, is an international treaty signed in 2004 and currently awaiting ratification, intended to create a constitution for the European Union. ... Schapelle Leigh Corby (born July 10, 1977) is a former beauty student from Australia convicted by an Indonesian court of attempting to smuggle 4. ... Bali is an Indonesian island. ... The term narcotic, derived from the Greek word for stupor, originally referred to a variety of substances that induced sleep (such state is narcosis). ... Australian Dollar The Australian dollar, AUD or A$, is the official currency of the Commonwealth of Australia, including the Australian Antarctic Territory, Christmas Island, Cocos (Keeling) Islands, Heard Island and McDonald Islands and Norfolk Island, as well as the independent Pacific island states of Kiribati, Nauru and Tuvalu. ... The Federal Court of Australia is the Australian court in which most civil disputes and some summary criminal matters governed by federal law are decided. ... The crew of the oceanographic research vessel Princesse Alice, of Albert Grimaldi (later Prince Albert I of Monaco) pose while flensing a catch Whaling is the hunting and killing of whales. ... In international maritime law, an Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ) is a seazone extending from a states coast over which the state has special rights over the exploration and use of marine resources. ... The World Trade Organization (WTO) is an international organization which oversees a large number of agreements defining the rules of trade between its member states (WTO, 2004a). ... Pascal Lamy (born 8 April 1947) is a French politician and former European Commissioner. ... The Director-General of the World Trade Organization holds the highest permanent office of the World Trade Organization, and is responsible for supervising the administrative functions of the organization. ... This article is about the Basque people. ... ETA logo Euskadi Ta Askatasuna, or ETA (IPA: [ˈɛːta]), is an armed Basque terrorist organisation that seeks to create an independent socialist state for the Basque people, separate from Spain and France, the states that currently control the Basque country. ... Coat of arms Plaza de España (Spain square) Madrid, the capital of Spain, is located in the center of the country at 40°25′ N 3°45′ W. Population of the city of Madrid proper was 3,093,000 (Madrilenes, madrileños) as of 2003 estimates. ... Abstain means to keep oneself from some indulgence. ... This article is about the Basque people. ... This article is an overview article about the Crown chartered British Broadcasting Corporation formed in 1927. ... Faisal Mosque, located in Islamabad, the capital city of Pakistan, was built in 1986. ... Ethiopia held general elections on May 15, 2005, for seats in both its national and in four local parliaments. ... May 15 is the 135th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (136th in leap years). ... June 8 is the 159th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (160th in leap years), with 206 days remaining. ... Steven Morrissey Steven Patrick Morrissey, (born May 22, 1959 in Manchester in England) dropped his forenames to become Morrissey, the lead singer of the seminal UK indie band, The Smiths. ... The first Isle of Wight ‘Pop’ Festival took place in August 1968. ...

May 26, 2005 (Thursday)

May 26 is the 146th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (147th in leap years). ... 2005 is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and is the current year. ... Politics of Suriname Categories: Election related stubs | Elections in Suriname ... Dictator was the title of a magistrate in ancient Rome appointed by the Senate to rule the state in times of emergency. ... Désiré Delano Bouterse of Suriname (born 1945) has been a military sports instructor, coup leader, army leader and a politician in the Nationaal Democratische Partij (NDP). ... The Netherlands followed Spain and Portugual in establishing a colonial empire outside of continental Europe. ... This article deals with the post-invasion period in Iraq and its occupation. ... The Army is the branch of the United States armed forces which has primary responsibility for land-based military operations. ... A helicopter is an aircraft which is lifted and propelled by one or more large horizontal rotors (propellers). ... Baquba (بعقوبه; also transliterated as Baqubah and Baqouba) is the capital of Iraqs Diyala province. ... A street map of Baghdad Average temperature (red) and precipitations (blue) in Baghdad Baghdad (Arabic: ) is the capital of Iraq and the Baghdad Province. ... Seal of the Congress. ... Wikiquote has a collection of quotations by or about: United States Wikinews has news related to this article: United States United States government Official website of the United States government - Gateway to governmental sites White House - Official site of the US President Senate. ... Seal of the President of the United States The President of the United States is the head of state of the United States. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is a politician and the current (43rd) president of the United States. ... The impeachment trial of President Bill Clinton in 1999, Chief Justice William H. Rehnquist presiding. ... John C. Bonifaz is a American constiutional attorney and author. ... The Downing Street memo (occasionally DSM), sometimes described by critics of the 2003 Iraq War as the smoking gun memo, contains the minutes of a secret meeting, on July 23, 2002, among United Kingdom government, defence and intelligence figures, discussing the build-up to the war. ... The 2003 invasion of Iraq, also called the Iraq War or Operation Iraqi Freedom, began March 20, 2003, initiated by the United States, the United Kingdom and a loosely-defined coalition. ... The South African Geographical Names Council is the official government body of South Africa that advises the executive branch of the central government (in the form of the Minister of Arts and Culture) on new geographical names as well as the changing of existing geographical names. ... In politics a capital (also called capital city or political capital — although the latter phrase has an alternative meaning based on an alternative meaning of capital) is the principal city or town associated with its government. ... The central area of Pretoria. ... The City of Tshwane Metropolitan Municipality is (as of 5 December 2000) a metropolitan area mostly in Gauteng province, South Africa, that includes the city of Pretoria. ... Wikiquote has a collection of quotations by or about: United States Wikinews has news related to this article: United States United States government Official website of the United States government - Gateway to governmental sites White House - Official site of the US President Senate. ... Seal of the President of the United States The President of the United States is the head of state of the United States. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is a politician and the current (43rd) president of the United States. ... The President of the Palestinian Authority is the highest-ranking political position (equivalent to head of state) in the Palestinian National Authority (PNA). ... Mahmoud Abbas (Arabic: محمود عباس) (born March 26, 1935), commonly known as Abu Mazen (ابو مازن), was elected President (Raees) of the Palestinian National Authority (PNA) on January 9, 2005 and took office on January 15, 2005. ... The dollar is the name of the official currency in several countries, dependencies and other regions (see list below), including the US dollar, the worlds most widely circulated currency (see list below). ... The Association of University Teachers (AUT) is the trade union and professional association that represents academic (teaching and research) and academic-related (librarians, IT managers and senior administrators) at pre-1992 universities in the United Kingdom. ... A boycott is a refusal to buy, sell, or otherwise trade with an individual or business who is generally believed by the participants in the boycott to be doing something morally wrong. ... A university is an institution of higher education and of research, which grants academic degrees. ... The University of Haifa (אוניברסיטת חיפה) is a university in Haifa, Israel. ... Bar-Ilan University (BIU, אוניברסיטת בר-אילן) is a university in Ramat Gan, a suburb of Tel Aviv, Israel. ... The Liberal Democrats, often shortened to Lib Dems, are a social liberal political party based in the United Kingdom. ... Charles Kennedy, current leader of the UK Liberal Democrat Party The Right Honourable Charles Peter Kennedy (born 25 November 1959) is a Scottish politician, who has been leader of the Liberal Democrats (the third largest political party in the United Kingdom) since 1999. ... The Labour Party is a a centre-left political party in the United Kingdom (see British politics), and one of the United Kingdoms three main political parties. ... The Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs is a member of the British Government responsible for relations with foreign countries. ... Jack Straw off camera The Right Honourable John Whitaker Jack Straw (born August 3, 1946) is a British Labour Party politician. ... The mushroom cloud of the atomic bombing of Nagasaki, Japan, 1945, rose some 18 km (11 mi) above the epicenter. ... The general meaning of atomic is irreducible. That is, reduced to the smallest possible part. ... Geneva: the Mont Blanc bridge over the Rhône River and St Peters Cathedral Geneva (French: Genève) is the second-most populous city in Switzerland located where Lake Geneva (French: Lac Léman, but the Genevois are fond of calling it Lac de Genève) empties into the... Backpacking is traveling long distances with a backpack. ... 2004 is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... A flash flood (also a freshet, considered archaic) is a rapid flooding of low-lying areas, rivers and streams that is caused by the intense rainfall associated with a thunderstorm, or multiple training thunderstorms. ... Landmark buildings Edifício Italia (at left) and Copan (curved façade at center), in São Paulo Downtown. ... Pascal Lamy (born 8 April 1947) is a French politician and former European Commissioner. ... The World Trade Organization (WTO) is an international organization which oversees a large number of agreements defining the rules of trade between its member states (WTO, 2004a). ... The National Sorry Day is an Australian event held yearly on May 26. ... Stolen Generation is the term commonly used to mean the Australian Aboriginal children who were removed from their families by Australian government agencies and church missions between approximately 1900 and 1972. ... Australian Aborigines are the indigenous peoples of Australia. ... The Siachen Glacier is located in the East Karakoram/Himalaya, at approximately 35. ... State nickname: Empire State Other U.S. States Capital Albany Largest city New York Governor George Pataki Official languages None Area 141,205 km² (27th)  - Land 122,409 km²  - Water 18,795 km² (13. ... Insurance, in law and economics, is a form of risk management primarily used to hedge against the risk of potential financial loss. ... Aig may also refer to the abbreviation of the creationist organization Answers in Genesis American International Group, Inc. ... In accountancy, an account is a label for recording a quantity of almost anything. ... Arnaldo Otegi (b. ... Batasuna (Unity) is a Basque political party based mainly in Spain but with a French presence, which is presumed to be associated with the Basque separatist armed group ETA. Their relation is similar to that of Northern Irelands Sinn Féin and the IRA. History and outline The party was... This article is about the Basque people. ... ETA logo Euskadi Ta Askatasuna, or ETA (IPA: [ˈɛːta]), is an armed Basque terrorist organisation that seeks to create an independent socialist state for the Basque people, separate from Spain and France, the states that currently control the Basque country. ... Traditionally, bail is some form of property which is deposited or pledged to a court in order to persuade it to release a suspect from jail, on the understanding that the suspect will return for trial or forfeit the bail (skipping bail is also illegal). ... Chechen can mean: Chechen people, an ethnic group Chechen language Related to Chechnya This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Theo (or Theodore or Theodorus) van Gogh may refer to the following persons: Theodorus van Gogh, father of Vincent van Gogh. ... A referendum (plural: referendums or referenda) or plebiscite is a direct vote in which an entire electorate is asked to either accept or reject a particular proposal. ... The U.S. Senate Committee on the Judiciary (informally Senate Judiciary Committee) is a standing committee of the United States Senate, the upper house of the United States Congress. ... The United States Senate is the upper house of the U.S. Congress, smaller than the United States House of Representatives. ... The British Governments Health and Safety Executive (HSE) has promoted rigorous controls on asbestos handling, based on reports linking exposure to abestos dust or fibres with thousands of annual deaths from mesothelioma and asbestos-related lung cancer. ... House of Representatives is a name used for legislative bodies in many countries. ... State nickname: Volunteer State Other U.S. States Capital Nashville Largest city Memphis (largest metropolitan area is Nashville) Governor Phil Bredesen Official languages English Area 109,247 km² (36th)  - Land 106,846 km²  - Water 2,400 km² (2. ... State legislatures are the lawmaking bodies of the 50 states in the United States of America. ... In the United States, a federal crime or federal offence is a crime that is either made illegal by U.S. federal legislation or a crime that occurs on U.S. federal property. ... Bribery is the practice of offering a professional or an authority person money or other favours in order to circumvent ethics or other rules in a variety of situations. ... John Ford Operation Tennessee Waltz was a sting operation set up by federal and state law enforcement agents, including the FBI and TBI, that led to the arrest of seven Tennessee state lawmakers on the morning of May 26, 2005 on bribery charges. ...

May 25, 2005 (Wednesday)

May 25 is the 145th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (146th in leap years). ... 2005 is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and is the current year. ... Human rights are rights which some hold to be inalienable and belonging to all humans. ... Amnesty International (commonly known as Amnesty or AI) is an international non-governmental organization with the stated purpose of promoting all the human rights enshrined in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and other international standards. ... Human rights are rights which some hold to be inalienable and belonging to all humans. ... Human Rights Watch is an international NGO based in New York City, USA, that works with human rights issues. ... The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) is a Federal police force which is the principal investigative arm of the United States Department of Justice (DOJ). ... The Iron Maiden of Nuremberg was a famous torture device Torture is the infliction of severe physical or psychological pain as an expression of cruelty, a means of intimidation, deterrent or punishment, or as a tool for the extraction of information or confessions. ... Politics of Suriname Categories: Election related stubs | Elections in Suriname ... Dictator was the title of a magistrate in ancient Rome appointed by the Senate to rule the state in times of emergency. ... A drug is any substance that can be used to modify a chemical process or processes in the body, for example to treat an illness, relieve a symptom, enhance a performance or ability, or to alter states of mind. ... These lollipops, above, were found to contain heroin when inspected by the DEA. Smuggling is illegal transport, in particular across a border. ... Désiré Delano Bouterse of Suriname (born 1945) has been a military sports instructor, coup leader, army leader and a politician in the Nationaal Democratische Partij (NDP). ... The American Family Association (AFA) is a conservative, fundamentalist Christian non-profit organization founded in 1977 by Rev. ... The term Christian means belonging to Christ and is derived from the Greek noun Χριστός Khristós which means anointed one, which is itself a translation of the Hebrew word Moshiach (Hebrew: משיח, also written Messiah), (and in Arabic it is pronounced Maseeh مسيح). ... Alternate meanings: Disney (disambiguation) The Walt Disney Company (also known as Disney Enterprises, Inc. ... The current Kmart logo Kmart is a brand and retailing division of Sears Holdings Corporation. ... Abercrombie & Fitch is a clothing company which operates an extensive chain of retail outlets, marketing casual clothing to young adults. ... One of the Guys is an earnestly satirical and picaresque novel by Robert Clark Young, published in 1999, concerning the fantastical adventures of a man posing as a chaplain on a U.S. Navy ship which goes berserk and terrorizes a number of ports in the Far East before the... Robert Clark Young (born 1960) is an American author of novels, essays, and short stories. ... A NASA artists rendition of a Voyager spacecraft The Voyager 1 spacecraft is an 815-kilogram unmanned probe of the outer solar system and beyond, launched September 5, 1977, and currently operational. ... The heliosheath is the zone between the termination shock and the heliopause at the outer border of the solar system. ... Mosaic of Solar System planets except Pluto, including Earths Moon (not to scale). ... In astronomy, the interstellar medium (or ISM) is the matter and energy content that exists between the stars (or their immediate circumstellar environment) within a galaxy. ... The Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) is an international organization of those developed countries that accept the principles of representative democracy and a free market economy. ... A satellite composite image of Europe Europe is geologically and geographically a peninsula, forming the westernmost part of Eurasia. ... Upon completion, the Baku-Tbilisi-Ceyhan pipeline will transport crude oil from the offshore Azeri-Chirag-Guneshli oil field in the landlocked Caspian Seato the Mediterranean. ... An elevated section of the Alaska Pipeline Pipeline transport is a transportation of goods through a tube. ... Politics of Egypt Categories: Election related stubs | Elections in Egypt ... A referendum (plural: referendums or referenda) or plebiscite is a direct vote in which an entire electorate is asked to either accept or reject a particular proposal. ... This article is about the political process. ... A boycott is a refusal to buy, sell, or otherwise trade with an individual or business who is generally believed by the participants in the boycott to be doing something morally wrong. ... The National Democratic Party could refer to Mongolian National Democratic Party National Democratic Party (Barbados) National Democratic Party (Djibouti) National Democratic Party (Egypt) National Democratic Party (Georgia) National Democratic Party (Germany) National Democratic Party (Iraq) National Democratic Party (Poland) National Democratic Party (Suriname) National Democratic Party (UK) National Democratic Party... María Soledad Alvear Valenzuela is a Chilean politician and a pre-candidate to Chiles presidential election of 2005, representing the Christian Democratic Party, a faction of the ruling coalition Concertación. ... President is a title held by many leaders of organizations, companies, universities, and countries. ... Michelle Bachelet Michelle Bachelet Jeria (September 29, 1951-) is a Chilean socialist politician and the first woman to become Defense Minister of Chile. ... ETA logo Euskadi Ta Askatasuna, or ETA (IPA: [ˈɛːta]), is an armed Basque terrorist organisation that seeks to create an independent socialist state for the Basque people, separate from Spain and France, the states that currently control the Basque country. ... Coat of arms Plaza de España (Spain square) Madrid, the capital of Spain, is located in the center of the country at 40°25′ N 3°45′ W. Population of the city of Madrid proper was 3,093,000 (Madrilenes, madrileños) as of 2003 estimates. ... List of Heads of State of Guinea-Bissau (Dates in italics indicate de facto continuation of office) See also Guinea-Bissau Heads of Government of Guinea-Bissau Colonial Heads of Portuguese Guinea Colonial Heads of Bissau Colonial Heads of Cacheu lists of incumbents List of national leaders Categories: Lists of... Presidential Palace in Warsaw. ... Atatürk Olimpiyat Stadyumu The 2005 UEFA Champions League final between AC Milan and Liverpool Atatürk Olimpiyat Stadyumu (Ataturk Olympic Stadium) is located in Ä°kitelli, an outskirt of Ä°stanbul, and is the highest-capacity stadium of Turkey. ... This article is about the city. ... Liverpool Football Club are undoubtedly the most successful English football team since their creation to the present day, having won 5 European Cups and 18 Football League titles. ... AC Milan is an Italian football club. ... Ricardo scores a decisive penalty in the quarterfinals of EURO 2004 Kicks from the penalty mark (commonly referred to as a penalty shootout) are sometimes used to decide which team progresses to the next stage of a tournament following a tied result in a game of association football (soccer). ... Champions League Logo European Champion Clubs Cup The UEFA Champions League is an annual international inter-club football competition for Europes most successful clubs. ... 1984 is a leap year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... A power outage is the loss of the electricity supply to an area. ... Electricity is a property of certain subatomic particles (e. ... Saint Basils Cathedral Moscow (Russian/Cyrillic: Москва́, pronunciation: Moskvá) is the capital of Russia, located on the river Moskva, and encompassing 1097. ... Anatoly Chubais Anatoly Borisovich Chubais (Russian: Анато́лий Бори́сович Чуба́йс) was born on June 16, 1955 in the town of Barysau, Belarus. ... Viktor Khristenko Viktor Khristenko (Ви́ктор Бори́сович Христе́нко) (born August 28, 1957) was the acting prime minister of Russia from February 24, 2004, until March 5, 2004. ... Serial killers are individuals who have a history of multiple slayings of victims who were usually unknown to them beforehand. ... Robert William Willie Pickton (born 1950) is a pig farmer from the city of Port Coquitlam, British Columbia, Canada who has been charged with the first degree murders of 27 women, and is implicated, as of January 28, 2004 in the murders of up to 31 women, many of them... A pension (also known as superannuation) is a retirement plan intended to provide a person with a secure income for life. ... Martín Torrijos Martín Torrijos Espino (born 18 July 1963, in Panama City) is a Panamanian politician and the current President of Panama. ... A coup détat, or simply a coup, is the sudden overthrow of a government, usually done by a small group that just replaces the top power figures. ... The flag of NATO NATO 2002 Summit The North Atlantic Treaty Organisation (NATO), sometimes called North Atlantic Alliance, Atlantic Alliance or the Western Alliance, is an international organisation for defence collaboration established in 1949, in support of the North Atlantic Treaty signed in Washington, D.C., on April 4, 1949. ... . Radovan Karadžić Radovan Karadžić (born June 19, 1945) is a Bosnian Serb politician, poet, psychiatrist and accused war criminal. ... Look up Genocide in Wiktionary, the free dictionary Genocide has been defined as the deliberate killing of people based on their ethnicity, nationality, race, religion, or (sometimes) politics, as well as other deliberate action(s)leading to the physical elimination of any of the above categories. ... Yugoslavia (Jugoslavija in all south Slavic languages) is a term used for three separate but successive political entities that existed during most of the 20th century on the Balkan Peninsula in Europe. ... German soldiers at the Battle of Stalingrad World War II was the most extensive and costly armed conflict in the history of the world, involving the great majority of the worlds nations, being fought simultaneously in several major theatres, and costing tens of millions of lives. ... Yvon Neptune Yvon Neptune (born November 8, 1946) was the Prime Minister of Haiti from 2002 until 2004. ... A hunger strike is a method of non-violent resistance in which participants fast as an act of political protest or to achieve a goal such as a policy change. ...

May 24, 2005 (Tuesday)

May 24 is the 144th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (145th in leap years). ... 2005 is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and is the current year. ... This article deals with the post-invasion period in Iraq and its occupation. ... The Army is the branch of the United States armed forces which has primary responsibility for land-based military operations. ... Massive ordinance air-burst bomb. ... A mathematician is a person whose area of study and research is mathematics. ... Peter David Lax (born 1926) is a highly-respected mathematician working in the areas of pure and applied mathematics. ... The Abel Prize is awarded annually by the King of Norway to outstanding mathematicians. ... The United States dollar is the official currency of the United States. ... His Royal Highness, Crown Prince Haakon Magnus of Norway was born 20 July 1973 in Oslo. ... County Oslo NO-03 Landscape Viken Municipality NO-0301 Administrative centre Oslo Mayor (2004) Per Ditlev-Simonsen (H) Official language form Neutral Area  - Total  - Land  - Percentage Ranked 224 454 km² 426 km² 0. ... In mathematics, and in particular analysis, a partial differential equation (PDE) is an equation involving partial derivatives of an unknown function. ... The Palestinian flag, adopted in 1948, is a widely recognized modern symbol of the Palestinian people. ... A pipe bomb is a simple type of improvised explosive device favored by criminals, a piece of pipe filled with an explosive material. ... Al-Qaeda (Arabic: القاعدة, the foundation or the base) is the name given to a worldwide network of militant Islamist organizations under the leadership of Osama bin Laden. ... Abu Musab al-Zarqawi in one of eight photos from Rewards for Justice, all undated. ... John Howard John Winston Howard (born July 26, 1939), is an Australian politician and the 25th Prime Minister of Australia, coming to office on March 11, 1996 and winning re-election in 1998, 2001 and 2004. ... The current (25th) Prime Minister of Australia, John Howard (sitting, fifth from left), with his Cabinet, 1999 The office of Prime Minister is in practice the most powerful political office in the Commonwealth of Australia. ... Junichiro Koizumi Junichiro Koizumi (小泉 純一郎 Koizumi Junichirō, born January 8, 1942) is a Japanese politician and the 87th, and current, Prime Minister of Japan. ... The crew of the oceanographic research vessel Princesse Alice, of Albert Grimaldi (later Prince Albert I of Monaco) pose while flensing a catch Whaling is the hunting and killing of whales. ... The International Whaling Commission (IWC) was set up by the International Convention for the Regulation of Whaling on December 2, 1946 with a headquarters in Cambridge, England. ... Note that the geology in this article currently reflects views from the first decade of the 20th century. ... Military service is service in the armed forces of a nation or the military arm of a political organization. ... Sexual abuse is physical or psychological abuse or harm that involves sexual behavior. ... Auckland, in the North Island of New Zealand, is the largest urban area in New Zealand. ... Traditionally, bail is some form of property which is deposited or pledged to a court in order to persuade it to release a suspect from jail, on the understanding that the suspect will return for trial or forfeit the bail (skipping bail is also illegal). ... A privy council is a body that advises the head of state of a nation, especially in a monarchy. ... The Liberal Party of Canada (French: Parti libéral du Canada) is Canadas largest political party. ... Todd Russell is a Canadian politician and the Liberal member of Parliament for the riding of Labrador, Newfoundland and Labrador. ... A by-election or bye-election is a special election held to fill a political office when the incumbent has died or resigned. ... Labrador, previously known as Grand Falls—White Bay—Labrador and before that as Grand Falls—White Bay, is the name of a federal electoral district in Newfoundland and Labrador, covering all of Labrador. ... Richard M. Scrushy (born 1952 in Selma, Alabama, USA is the founder and former chairman and chief executive officer of the physical rehabilitation healthcare giant HealthSouth, based in Birmingham, Alabama. ... HealthSouth Corporation (NYSE: HRC), based in Birmingham, Alabama, is the nations largest healthcare services provider. ... 1996 is a leap year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International Year for the Eradication of Poverty. ... 2002 is a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

May 23, 2005 (Monday)

May 23 is the 143rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (144th in leap years). ... 2005 is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and is the current year. ... Channel 10 is an Israeli television station. ... The Israel Defense Forces (IDF) (Hebrew: צבא ההגנה לישראל Tsva Ha-Haganah Le-Yisrael ([Army] Force [for] the Defense of Israel), often abbreviated צהל Tsahal, alternative English spelling Tzahal, is the name of Israels armed forces (army, air force and navy). ... The Palestinian flag, adopted in 1948, is a widely recognized modern symbol of the Palestinian people. ... Human shield is a military term describing the use of civilians to deter an enemy from attacking certain targets—in particular military targets. ... The Israel Defense Forces (IDF) (Hebrew: צבא ההגנה לישראל Tsva Ha-Haganah Le-Yisrael ([Army] Force [for] the Defense of Israel), often abbreviated צהל Tsahal, alternative English spelling Tzahal, is the name of Israels armed forces (army, air force and navy). ... In a two-party system (such as in the United States), bipartisan refers to any bill, act, resolution, or any other action of a political body in which both of the major political parties are in agreement. ... In law a commission is a patent which allows a person to take possession of a state office and carry out official acts and duties. ... Seal of the Senate The Senate is one of the two houses of the Congress of the United States, the other being the House of Representatives. ... The nuclear option in American politics during 2005 is a code word that refers to a proposed change to the interpretation of the rules of the U.S. Senate for judicial confirmations. ... The judiciary, also referred to as the judicature, consists of justices, judges and magistrates among other types of adjudicators. ... A filibuster is a process, typically an extremely long speech, that is used primarily to stall the legislative process and thus derail a particular piece of legislation rather than to make a particular point in the content of the diversion per se. ... Two young girls A girl is a female human child, as contrasted to a male child, which is a boy. ... This article is about an abbey as a religious building. ... Navan (An Uaimh in Irish, meaning The Cave) is the administrative town of County Meath, Ireland. ... The Bus, established by Mayor Frank Fasi, is Honolulus only public transit system. ... A crash or Crash may mean: A car or other vehicular crash is a collision with something, including another vehicle. ... Meath (An Mhí in Irish) is a county in the Republic of Ireland, often informally called The Royal County. ... St. ... A three-point seat belt. ... The Palestinian flag, adopted in 1948, is a widely recognized modern symbol of the Palestinian people. ... The debating chamber or hemicycle of the European Parliament in Brussels. ... Fatah (Arabic: الفتح) al-fatah—an reverse acronym from arabic words Harakat alTahrir alwatani alFilastini (literally: the movement for liberation of the Palestinian homeland)—is a Palestinian faction founded in 1959 by Yasser Arafat who, until his death, was head of the Palestinian Authority. ... The Hamas emblem shows two crossed swords, the Dome of the Rock, and a map of the land they claim as Palestine (roughly, present-day Israel, the West Bank and the Gaza Strip). ... Legionellosis is an infection caused by species of the bacterium Legionella, most notably . ... Å·An epidemic is generally a widespread disease that affects many individuals in a population. ... Østfold is a county in southeastern Norway, bordering Akershus and southwestern Sweden (Västra Götaland County and Värmland), while Vestfold is on the other side of the bay. ... Fredrikstad (previously Frederiksstad) is a town and municipality in the county of Østfold, Norway. ... The town and municipality Sarpsborg in the county of Østfold, Norway. ... County Rogaland Landscape Jæren Municipality NO-1103 Administrative centre Stavanger Mayor (2004) Leif Johan Sevland (H) Official language form BokmÃ¥l Area  - Total  - Land  - Percentage Ranked 406 71 km² 68 km² 0. ... Note: in the broadest sense, air conditioning can refer to any form of heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning. ... This article is an overview article about the Crown chartered British Broadcasting Corporation formed in 1927. ... The post of Supreme Leader (ولی فقیه or رهبر in Persian) was created in the constitution of the Islamic Republic of Iran as the central political and religious authority in the nation. ... Ayatollah (Arabic: آية الله; Persian: آیت‌الله) is a high title given to major Shia clergymen. ... Ayatollah Ali Khamenei His Eminence Ayatollah Seyyed Ali Hosseini Khamenei (Persian: آیت‌الله سید علی حسینی خامنه‌ای; born July 15, 1939) is the Supreme Leader of Iran. ... The Guardian Council of the Constitution (شورای نگهبان قانون اساسی in Persian) is a high office within the constitution of the Islamic Republic of Iran which has the authority to interpret the constitution and to determine if the laws passed by the parliament are in line with the constitution of... Mostafa Moin, M.D. (مصطفی معین; born March 31, 1951 in Najaf Abad), is an Iranian politician, currently an Advisor to the President of Iran. ... The Islamic Iran Participation Front (جبهه مشارکت ایران اسلامی in Persian) is a reformist political party in Iran. ... Mohsen Mehralizadeh (in Persian: محسن مهرعلیزاده) is a Vice President of Iran and the head of the National Sports Organization of Iran under President Khatami. ... This article is about the political process. ... A boycott is a refusal to buy, sell, or otherwise trade with an individual or business who is generally believed by the participants in the boycott to be doing something morally wrong. ... The University of Tehran (دانشگاه تهران in Persian), also known as Tehran University, is the oldest and largest university of Iran. ... Avian influenza (also known as bird flu) is a type of influenza virulent in birds. ... Headquartered in Rome, Italy, the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) of the United Nations programs seek to raise levels of nutrition and standards of living; to improve the production, processing, marketing, and distribution of food and agricultural products; to promote rural development; and, by these means, to eliminate hunger. ... Qinghai (Chinese: 青海; pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Ching-hai; Postal System Pinyin: Tsinghai) is a province of the Peoples Republic of China, named after the enormous Qinghai Lake (Koko Nor). ... Avian influenza (also known as bird flu) is a type of influenza virulent in birds. ... Vaccination is a term coined by Edward Jenner for the process of administering a weakened form of a disease to patients as a means of giving them immunity to a more serious form of the disease. ...

May 22, 2005 (Sunday)

May 22 is the 142nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (143rd in leap years). ... 2005 is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and is the current year. ... Shenzhen (Chinese: 深圳; pinyin: ; Cantonese Jyutping: sam1 zan3, Yale: sām jan; Sham Chun [Shamchun] The hazy Shenzhen skyline in old or Hong Kong documents; lit. ... Ariel Sharon, the eleventh Prime Minister of Israel, spent many years in the Israel Defense Forces before being elected in March 2001. ... The Prime Minister of Israel is the elected head of the Israeli government. ... US,Us or us may stand for the United States of America us, the oblique case form of the English language pronoun we. ... First Lady Laura Bush Laura Lane Welch Bush (born November 4, 1946) is the wife of U.S. President George W. Bush and is the First Lady of the United States. ... Laura Bush, Current First Lady (2001-present) First Lady of the United States is the unofficial title of the hostess of the White House. ... The Palestinian flag, adopted in 1948, is a widely recognized modern symbol of the Palestinian people. ... Western Wall by night The Western Wall, known as the Kotel HaMaaravi (or simply Kotel)הכותל המערבי in Hebrew , also called the Wailing Wall (or Al-Buraq Wall, in a mix of English and Arabic) is a retaining wall from the time of the Second, q. ... Dome of the Rock in center of Temple Mount The Dome of the Rock (Arabic: قبة الصخرة Qubbat As-Sakhrah) is a famous Islamic shrine in Jerusalem. ... The 2003 invasion of Iraq, also called the Iraq War or Operation Iraqi Freedom, began March 20, 2003, initiated by the United States, the United Kingdom and a loosely-defined coalition. ... The Palestinian flag, adopted in 1948, is a widely recognized modern symbol of the Palestinian people. ... Nablus also spelled Nabulus (Arabic نابلس; Hebrew שכם, Shechem) is a major city (pop. ... A suicide bombing is a bomb attack on people or property, committed by a person who knows the explosion will cause his or her own death (see suicide, suicide weapons). ... The head of government in Germany has traditionally been called Kanzler (Chancellor). ... Gerhard Fritz Kurt Schröder [] (born April 7, 1944), a German politician, has been serving as Chancellor of Germany since 1998. ... The German federal election, 2005 will be conducted in the fall of 2005, to elect members to the Bundestag (lower house) of Germany. ... Autumn colours at Westonbirt Arboretum, Gloucestershire, England. ... This article needs cleanup. ... Categories: Politics stubs | Liberal related stubs | German political parties | Liberal parties ... The Social Democratic Party of Germany (SPD – Sozialdemokratische Partei Deutschlands) is the second oldest political party of Germany still in existence and also one of the oldest and largest in the world, celebrating its 140th anniversary in 2003. ... North Rhine-Westphalia (German: Nordrhein-Westfalen) is the largest in population (though only fourth in area) among Germanys 16 federal states. ... Politics of Mongolia Categories: Election related stubs | Elections in Mongolia ... The Prime Minister of Mongolia is the highest member of the Mongolian governments executive arm, and heads the Mongolian cabinet. ... Nambaryn Enkhbayar Nambaryn Enkhbayar (Mongolian language: Намбарын Энхбаяр) (born June 1, 1958, in Ulaanbaatar) is the President-elect of Mongolia. ... This article is about the political process. ... King Gyanendra King Gyanendra Bir Bikram Shah Dev of Nepal (born July 7, 1947) has been the king of Nepal since June 2001. ... The Muslim Brotherhood, also called Muslim Brethren (Arabic: جميعة الإخوان المسلمين jamiat al-Ikhwan al-muslimin, literally Society of Muslim Brothers; often only الإخوان المسلمون, Ikhwan ul Muslimoon (Muslim Brothers) or simply الإخوان Ikhwan (the Brothers) is an Islamic organization with a political approach to Islam. ... President Hugo Chávez Hugo Rafael Chávez Frías (born July 28, 1954) has been the President of Venezuela since 1999. ... Extradition is a formal process by which a criminal suspect held by one government is handed over to another government for trial or, if the suspect has already been tried and found guilty, to serve his or her sentence. ... Luis Posada Carriles (born February 15, 1928) is an anti-Castro Cuban émigré who is alleged to have been involved in numerous violent terrorist plots, including hotel bombings and the 1976 bombing of a Cuban jetliner in which seventy-three people killed. ...

May 21, 2005 (Saturday)

May 21 is the 141st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (142nd in leap years). ... 2005 is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and is the current year. ... Calvin College logo Calvin College is a comprehensive liberal arts college located in Grand Rapids, Michigan. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is a politician and the current (43rd) president of the United States. ... Helena Paparizou Helena Paparizou, sometimes spelled Elena Paparizou (Greek: Έλενα Παπαρίζου) (born January 31, 1982) is a Greek singer, born and raised in Sweden. ... Eurovision Song Contest 2005 logo. ... Motto: Oblast Municipality Municipal government City council (Київська Міська рада) Mayor Oleksandr Omelchenko Area 800 km² Population  - city  - urban  - density 2,642,486 100% 3,299/km² Founded City rights around 5th century 1487 Latitude Longitude 50°27′ N 30°30′ E Area code +044 Car plates  ? Twin towns Athenes... The European Broadcasting Union (EBU), known in French as LUnion Européenne de Radio-Télévision (UER), and unrelated to the European Union, was formed February 12, 1950 by 23 broadcasting organizations from Europe and the Mediterranean at a conference in the coastal resort of Torquay in Devon... The Suns most famous headline The Sun, a tabloid daily newspaper published in the United Kingdom, has the highest circulation of any daily English-language newspaper in the world, standing at around 3,200,000 copies daily in late-2004. ... A tabloid is a newspaper format particularly popular in the United Kingdom, which is roughly 231/2 by 143/4 inches (597 by 375 mm) per spread. ... Saddam Hussein Saddām Hussein ʻAbd al-Majīd al-Tikrīt, spelled Husayn or Hussain; Arabic صدام حسين عبد المجيد التكريتي; born April 28, 1937 1) was President of Iraq from 1979 until 2003. ... Ali Hassan al-Majid Ali Hassan al-Majid (born 1941), is an Iraqi official and commander. ... Categories: Most-wanted Iraqi playing cards | 1953 births | People stubs | Military stubs ... President Bush can refer to two different people who were President of the United States: George H.W. Bush, the 41st president of the United States. ...

May 20, 2005 (Friday)

May 20 is the 140th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (141st in leap years). ... 2005 is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and is the current year. ... Star Wars Episode III: Revenge of the Sith is the third episode of the Star Wars film series (but the sixth film to be produced), to be released on Thursday, May 19, 2005. ... The United States dollar is the official currency of the United States. ... Spider-Man 2 is the sequel to the popular 2002 film Spider-Man and was released in the U.S. on June 30, 2004. ... Shrek 2 is the 2004 sequel to the computer-animated 2001 DreamWorks Pictures movie Shrek that was released in the United States on May 19, 2004. ... The 32nd Daytime Emmy Awards were held on Friday May 20, 2005 to commemorate excellence in daytime programming from the previous year (2004). ... General Hospital is the longest-running daytime soap opera on the American ABC television network, and is also the longest-running soap opera produced in Hollywood (having been taped at the Prospect Avenue ABC Television Center West since its inception). ... Erika Slezak, in a still from the One Life to Live opening sequence. ... One Life to Live is a soap opera which has been broadcast on the American ABC television network since July 15, 1968. ... The Daytime Emmy Awards are awards presented by the New York- based National Academy of Television Arts and Sciences and the Los Angeles-based Academy of Television Arts and Sciences in recognition of excellence in American daytime television programming. ... Note that the geology in this article currently reflects views from the first decade of the 20th century. ... The degree Celsius (°C) is a unit of temperature named after the Swedish astronomer Anders Celsius (1701–1744), who first proposed a similar system in 1742. ... Fahrenheit is a temperature scale named after the German physicist Gabriel Fahrenheit (1686–1736), who proposed it in 1724. ... Etoumbi is a town in the Cuvette-Ouest province of northwestern Republic of the Congo. ... Species Ivory Coast ebolavirus Reston ebolavirus Sudan ebolavirus Zaire virus Ebola hemorrhagic fever (alternatively Ebola Haemorrhagic Fever, EHF, or just Ebola) is a very rare, but severe, often fatal infectious disease occurring in humans and other primates, caused by the Ebola virus. ... // Israel, the West Bank and Gaza Strip are at the center of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. ... The Palestinian flag, adopted in 1948, is a widely recognized modern symbol of the Palestinian people. ... The Hamas emblem shows two crossed swords, the Dome of the Rock, and a map of the land they claim as Palestine (roughly, present-day Israel, the West Bank and the Gaza Strip). ... The Popular Resistance Committees (PRC) are a Palestinian militant network which operates in the Gaza Strip. ... The Al-Aqsa Martyrs Brigades (كتائب شهداء الاقصى) are one of the militias of Palestinian leader Yasser Arafats al- Fatah faction. ... Soldier Firing the M224 60mm Mortar. ... An Anti-tank guided missile (ATGM) is a missile the primary purpose of which is to hit and destroy tanks. ... The 2005 Pacific hurricane season officially began May 15, 2005 in the eastern Pacific and June 1, 2005 in the central Pacific, and will last until November 30, 2005. ... Hurricane Adrian on May 19, 2005 at 17:15 UTC. Hurricane Adrian was a tropical cyclone that formed on May 17, 2005. ... This article is about the Salvadoran capital city. ... The United Nations, or UN, is an international organization established in 1945 and now made up of 191 states. ... Peacekeeping, as defined by the United Nations, is a way to help countries torn by conflict create conditions for sustainable peace. ... Politics of Papua New Guinea Categories: Election related stubs | Elections in Papua New Guinea ... This article is about the island; Bougainville is also the name of a commune in the Somme département of France. ... Autonomy is the condition of something that does not depend on anything else. ... Kylie Minogue in the music video for Slow (2003) Kylie Ann Minogue (pronounced: , to rhyme with vogue) (born May 28, 1968) is an Australian singer and actress. ... Breast cancer is cancer of breast tissue. ...

May 19, 2005 (Thursday)

May 19 is the 139th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (140th in leap years). ... 2005 is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and is the current year. ... The December 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami hits Thailand The 2004 Indian Ocean earthquake, known by the scientific community as the Sumatra-Andaman earthquake, was an undersea earthquake that occurred at 00:58:53 UTC (07:58:53 local time) on December 26, 2004. ... The House of Commons (French: Chambre des communes) is a component of the Parliament of Canada, which also includes the Sovereign (represented by the Governor General) and the Senate. ... The 2005 Canadian budget was the budget of the Government of Canada for the 2005-2006 fiscal year. ... The 2005 Canadian budget was the budget of the Government of Canada for the 2005-2006 fiscal year. ... In Canada the Speaker of the House of Commons is the presiding officer of the lower house and is elected by fellow MPs. ... A Motion of No Confidence, also called Motion of Non Confidence is a parliamentary motion traditionally put before a parliament by the opposition in the hope of defeating or embarrassing a government. ... The 2005 Pacific hurricane season officially began May 15, 2005 in the eastern Pacific and June 1, 2005 in the central Pacific, and will last until November 30, 2005. ... Star Wars Episode III: Revenge of the Sith is the third episode of the Star Wars film series (but the sixth film to be produced), to be released on Thursday, May 19, 2005. ... A workprint is a rough version of a motion picture, used by the film editor(s) during the editing process. ... DVD is an optical disc storage media format that can be used for storing data, including movies with high video and sound quality. ... File sharing is the activity of making files available to other users for download over the Internet, but also over smaller networks. ... In May 2005 unrest in Uzbekistan reached a head when Uzbek troops fired into a crowd of protesters in the eastern city of Andijan, killing an estimated 400 to 1000 people on 13 May. ... Korasuv is a village in eastern Uzbekistan, along the border with Kyrgyzstan, about 50 km from the district capital of Andijan. ... Islam Karimov Islam Abduganievich Karimov (in modern Uzbek: Islom Karimov) (born January 30, 1938) has been the President of Uzbekistan since 1991. ... The name Amazon may refer to several concepts: The legendary Amazons, women renowned in antiquity for their prowess in battle. ... Rainforest on Fatu-Hiva, Marquesas Islands A rainforest is a forested biome with high annual rainfall due to the Intertropical convergence zone. ... The United Nations, or UN, is an international organization established in 1945 and now made up of 191 states. ... The Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA), is a organisation under the United Nations which originated in December 1991 with the General Assembly Resolution 46/182. ... The World Food Programme (WFP) is an agency of the United Nations which distributes food commodities to support development projects, to long-term refugees and displaced persons and as emergency food assistance in situations of natural and man-made disasters. ... A drought is an extended period where water availability falls below the statistical requirements for a region. ... Desert locust Locust is the name given to the swarming phase of short-horned grasshoppers of the family Acrididae. ... This article is about swarms in biology. ... The United Nations, or UN, is an international organization established in 1945 and now made up of 191 states. ... A human rights abuse is abuse of people in a way that violates any fundamental human rights. ... 1999 is a common year starting on Friday of the Common Era, and was designated the International Year of Older Persons by the United Nations. ... Hutu is the name given to one of the three ethnic groups occupying Burundi and Rwanda. ... 1994 was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International year of the Family. ... The skulls of victims show gashes and signs of violence The Rwandan genocide was the organized murder of up to one million Rwandans in 1994. ... Niamey, population 665 918* is the capital of Niger and a capital of a department of Tilabery. ... A monument celebrating the emancipation of slaves in the British Empire in 1834, erected in Victoria Tower Gardens, Millbank, Westminster, London Look up Slavery in Wiktionary, the free dictionary Slavery is a condition of control over a person against their will, enforced by violence or other forms of coercion. ... See: University of Newcastle (NSW), a university in Newcastle, New South Wales, Australia University of Newcastle upon Tyne, a university in England. ... Cloning is the process of creating an identical copy of an original. ... Embryos (and one tadpole) of the wrinkled frog (Rana rugosa you beezie). ... Mouse embryonic stem cells. ... National motto: 널리 인간을 이롭게 하라 Translation: Bring benefit to all people Official language Korean Capital Seoul Largest city Seoul President Roh Moo-hyun Prime Minister Lee Hae-chan Area  - Total  - % water Ranked 107th 99,274 km² 0. ... Seoul National University is a major university whose main campus is located in Seoul, South Korea. ...

May 18, 2005 (Wednesday)

May 18 is the 138th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (139th in leap years). ... 2005 is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and is the current year. ... A fragmentation hand grenade A hand grenade is a hand-held bomb, made to be thrown by a soldier. ... For the pop band, see Presidents of the United States of America. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is a politician and the current (43rd) president of the United States. ... Image:12_country-of-wonders-tbilisi. ... Following are the successive heads of state of Poland. ... Term of office from December 23, 1995 until Incumbent Profession Journalist Political party SLD First Lady Jolanta Kwaśniewska Date of birth November 15, 1954 Place of birth Białogard, Poland Date of death Place of death Aleksander Kwaśniewski (pronounced: [alεksandεr kʋaɕɲefskʲi]) is a Polish politician and the current President of... A general election to the Sejm is not scheduled yet, but there are two options: in spring, probably June 19, 2005 (or other Sunday in June) as it was promised in electoral campaign by winning party SLD, now as the support for ruling party goes down they opt for the... September 25 is the 268th day of the year (269th in leap years). ... 2005 is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and is the current year. ... Presidential elections will be held in Poland on October 9, 2005. ... October 9 is the 282nd day of the year (283rd in Leap years). ... 2005 is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and is the current year. ... In May 2005 unrest in Uzbekistan reached a head when Uzbek troops fired into a crowd of protesters in the eastern city of Andijan, killing an estimated 400 to 1000 people on 13 May. ... Andijan is the capital of the Andijon province, which includes the Ferghana Valley Andijan (Andijon in Uzbek; also Andizhan, Andizan, Андижан) is the fourth-largest city in Uzbekistan, and the capital of the Andijan Province. ... A death toll is the number of dead as a result of war, violence, accident, natural disaster, extreme weather, or disease. ... Bakhtiyor Rakhimov with supporters in Korasuv. ... Korasuv is a village in eastern Uzbekistan, along the border with Kyrgyzstan, about 50 km from the district capital of Andijan. ... For other meanings of the acronym WHO, see WHO (disambiguation) WHO flag Headquartered in Geneva, Switzerland, the World Health Organization (WHO) is an agency of the United Nations, acting as a coordinating authority on international public health. ... Species Ivory Coast ebolavirus Reston ebolavirus Sudan ebolavirus Zaire virus Ebola hemorrhagic fever (alternatively Ebola Haemorrhagic Fever, EHF, or just Ebola) is a very rare, but severe, often fatal infectious disease occurring in humans and other primates, caused by the Ebola virus. ... The Marburg virus is the causative agent of Marburg hemorrhagic fever. ... Yevgeny Adamov (Yevgeney Adamov or Yevgeniy Adamov) is the head of the Russian atomic energy ministry, MinAtom. ... Wikiquote has a collection of quotations by or about: United States Wikinews has news related to this article: United States United States government Official website of the United States government - Gateway to governmental sites White House - Official site of the US President Senate. ...

May 17, 2005 (Tuesday)

  • Guantánamo Bay Qur'an desecration allegations: The Bush Adminstration suggests that to undo "damage" caused by the story, Newsweek explain the process by which their story alleging Qu'ran desecration, which sparked riots leading to 17 deaths, came into being. (NYTimes)
  • U.S. authorities detain Luis Posada Carriles, a CIA-linked anti-Castro militant, considered a terrorist by Cuba. (Financial Times)
  • George Galloway, British MP and anti-war campaigner, appears before the United States Senate to defend himself against charges that he profited from Saddam Hussein's regime, launching a tirade against the senators who had accused him and attacking the war in Iraq. (BBC) (Guardian Unlimited) (The Times Online)
  • Unrest in Uzbekistan: The Uzbek government says they will allow foreign diplomats to visit Andijan. Survivors from Andijan who have crossed the border to Kyrgyzstan say that government troops opened fire without warning and that they were shelled in the Kyrgyzstan border crossing. Opposition believes that as many as 745 may be dead. Official government death toll is 169. Government officials still deny that soldiers killed civilians (Moscow Times) (Reuters AlertNet) (Guardian Unlimited) (London Free Press) (Guardian Unlimited) (Interfax) (Reuters AlertNet) (IHT) (Telegraph)
  • 12,000 protesters march in the Brazilian capital of Brasília to protest the government's slowness in land reform. A 17-day march of the Landless Workers Movement ends with violence in the capital when the demonstrators clash with the riot police. Over 50 people are injured. (Bloomberg) (Reuters) (BBC)
  • In Guatemala, gunmen assassinate public prosecutor Erick Galvez in Chiquimula department. (BBC)
  • Australian pop singer Kylie Minogue announces she has been diagnosed with the early stages of breast cancer and is postponing her upcoming Australian tour. (SMH) (The Age) (BBC) (NineMSN)
  • Canadian Conservative MP Belinda Stronach crosses the floor of the House of Commons to sit with the Liberals, two days before a crucial budget vote that could determine whether the Liberal government falls or not. (CBC)
  • The Spanish parliament approves plan to begin negotiations with the Basque ETA. (IHT) (Guardian Unlimited) (Reuters AlertNet)
  • Judges at the International Criminal Court at The Hague send a case of Radovan Stanković back to new war crimes court in Bosnia. Stanković is accused of rape of Bosnian Muslim women in Foca in 1992. (BBC) (Reuters AlertNet)
  • A court in Paris sentences four men to 2-7 years in prison for complicity in the murder of Afghan resistance leader Ahmed Shah Masood in 2001. (BBC)
  • In Russia, the trial of Nur-Pashi Kulayev, the only survivor of the attackers in the Beslan school hostage crisis, begins. Relatives of the victims disrupt the proceedings. (Moscow Times) (Reuters AlertNet) (BBC)
  • In Malawi, education minister Yusuf Mwawa is arrested for using public funds to pay for his wedding. (Reuters) (BBC)
  • A Kenyan court drops the murder charge of Thomas Cholmondeley for insufficient evidence. (IOL) (Reuters SA) (BBC)
  • British Prime Minister Tony Blair's government unveils a controversial proposal for national identity cards and other counter-terrorism measures besides a bill on immigration. (Los Angeles Times) (Bloomberg)

May 17 is the 137th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (138th in leap years). ... 2005 is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and is the current year. ... The Quran desecration controversy of 2005 captured international attention in April 2005 when Newsweek published an article which appeared to confirm several previous allegations that U.S. personnel at the Guantánamo Bay prison camp had damaged a copy of the Quran by putting it in a toilet... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is a politician and the current (43rd) president of the United States. ... Newsweek Logo Newsweek is a weekly news magazine published in New York City and distributed throughout the United States and Canada. ... The Quran ( Arabic al-qurʾān أَلْقُرآن; its literal meaning is the recitation and is often called Al Quran Al Karim: The Noble Quran, also transliterated as Quran, Koran, and less commonly Alcoran) is the holy book of Islam. ... Wikiquote has a collection of quotations by or about: United States Wikinews has news related to this article: United States United States government Official website of the United States government - Gateway to governmental sites White House - Official site of the US President Senate. ... Luis Posada Carriles (born February 15, 1928) is an anti-Castro Cuban émigré who is alleged to have been involved in numerous violent terrorist plots, including hotel bombings and the 1976 bombing of a Cuban jetliner in which seventy-three people killed. ... The CIA Seal The Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) is one of the American foreign intelligence agencies, responsible for obtaining and analyzing information about foreign governments, corporations, and individuals, and reporting such information to the various branches of the U.S. Government. ... Fidel Castro Fidel Castro Ruz (born August 13, 1926), has led Cuba since 1959, when, leading the 26th of July Movement, he overthrew the dictatorship of Fulgencio Batista, and transformed Cuba into the first Communist-led state in the Western Hemisphere. ... Terrorism is a controversial term with multiple definitions. ... George Galloway featured on BBC Newsnight George Galloway (born 16 August 1954) is a British politician, and the Respect Member of Parliament for Bethnal Green and Bow in East London, England. ... A Member of Parliament, or MP, is a representative elected by the voters of an electoral district to a parliament; in the Westminster system, specifically to the lower house. ... Anti war protest in Melbourne, Australia, 2003 Anti_war is a name that is widely adopted by any social movement or person that seeks to end or oppose a future or current war. ... Thousands of small and large global protests against war in general, the U.S. plan to invade Iraq and the war itself were held from 2002 to 2005. ... Seal of the Senate The Senate is one of the two houses of the Congress of the United States, the other being the House of Representatives. ... Saddam Hussein Saddām Hussein ʻAbd al-Majīd al-Tikrīt, spelled Husayn or Hussain; Arabic صدام حسين عبد المجيد التكريتي; born April 28, 1937 1) was President of Iraq from 1979 until 2003. ... The 2003 invasion of Iraq, also called the Iraq War or Operation Iraqi Freedom, began March 20, 2003, initiated by the United States, the United Kingdom and a loosely-defined coalition. ... In May 2005 unrest in Uzbekistan reached a head when Uzbek troops fired into a crowd of protesters in the eastern city of Andijan, killing an estimated 400 to 1000 people on 13 May. ... Andijan is the capital of the Andijon province, which includes the Ferghana Valley Andijan (Andijon in Uzbek; also Andizhan, Andizan, Андижан) is the fourth-largest city in Uzbekistan, and the capital of the Andijan Province. ... Brasília from space, November 1990 Niemeyers Cathedral Brasília is the capital city of Brazil. ... Land reform (also agrarian reform) is the government-initiated or government-backed transfer of ownership of (or tenure in) agricultural land. ... MST logo. ... Jack Ruby murdered the assassin, Lee Harvey Oswald, in a very public manner. ... Chiquimula is a department in Guatemala. ... Kylie Minogue in the music video for Slow (2003) Kylie Ann Minogue (pronounced: , to rhyme with vogue) (born May 28, 1968) is an Australian singer and actress. ... Breast cancer is cancer of breast tissue. ... The Conservative Party of Canada (French: Parti conservateur du Canada) is a right wing political party in Canada, formed by the merger of the Canadian Alliance and the Progressive Conservative Party of Canada in December 2003. ... A Member of Parliament, or MP, is a representative elected by the voters of an electoral district to a parliament; in the Westminster system, specifically to the lower house. ... Belinda Stronach The Honourable Belinda Stronach, PC, MP, (born May 2, 1966 in Newmarket, Ontario) is a Canadian businessperson, politician and a Liberal Member of Parliament (MP) in the Canadian House of Commons. ... In politics, crossing the floor is to vote against party lines. ... The House of Commons (French: Chambre des communes) is a component of the Parliament of Canada, which also includes the Sovereign (represented by the Governor General) and the Senate. ... The Liberal Party of Canada (French: Parti libéral du Canada) is Canadas largest political party. ... This article is about the Basque people. ... ETA logo Euskadi Ta Askatasuna, or ETA (IPA: [ˈɛːta]), is an armed Basque terrorist organisation that seeks to create an independent socialist state for the Basque people, separate from Spain and France, the states that currently control the Basque country. ... The International Criminal Court (ICC) was established in 2002 as a permanent tribunal to prosecute individuals for genocide, crimes against humanity, and war crimes, as defined by several international agreements, most prominently the Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court. ... This article is about the city in the Netherlands; there is also a region known as (the) Hague in France. ... Bosnia and Herzegovina (officially Bosna i Hercegovina, shortened to BiH, also in English variously written Bosnia-Herzegovina, Bosnia and Hercegovina, Bosnia-Hercegovina) is a mountainous country in the western Balkans. ... A Muslim is a believer in or follower of Islam. ... Foča. ... 1992 is a leap year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Eiffel Tower has become a symbol of Paris throughout the world. ... Ahmed Shah Massoud (احمد شاه مسعود) (c. ... Aftermath of the gym in School Number One The Beslan school hostage crisis (also referred to by the media as the Beslan school siege) began when armed terrorists took hundreds of schoolchildren and adults hostage on September 1, 2004, at School Number One in the Russian town of Beslan in... A prime minister may be either: the chief or leading member of the cabinet of the top-level government in a country having a parliamentary system of government; or the official, in countries with a semi-presidential system of government, appointed to manage the civil service and execute the directives... The Right Honourable Anthony Charles Lynton Blair (born 6 May 1953 in Edinburgh, Scotland) is the current Prime Minister of the United Kingdom. ...

May 16, 2005 (Monday)

  • The National Assembly of Kuwait votes 35-23 in favor of women's suffrage, effective for the 2007 Parlimentary Election. Though the law mentions it should be subject to Islamic law, it is speculated this will only mean gender-segregated polling places. (Yahoo!)
  • Many French workers stay at home to protest over government's cancellation of Whit Monday holiday. Seven unions ask their workers to strike and many businesses stay closed. (BBC) (Bloomberg) (Reuters), (Wikinews)
  • Ethiopian prime minister Meles Zenawi bans demonstrations in the capital Addis Ababa for one month after Sunday's parliamentary elections. Opposition parties, especially Coalition for Unity and Democracy accuse government of electoral fraud and harassment of their election observers. No results have been published yet. (News24) (BBC) (Forbes) (Wikinews)
  • Unrest in Uzbekistan: Uzbek soldiers seal off the town of Korasuv after locals take over government buildings. The government denies giving an order to fire at protesters but they do not let journalists or the Red Cross visit the affected areas to evaluate the situation. Phone and internet access has been cut. There are varying reports of at least 700 people dead and continuing firefights in Andijan and other towns like Teshiktosh. Saidjahon Zaynabitdinov, head of the local human rights advocacy group Appeal, says that government troops had killed 200 in Pakhtabad and expects mass arrests. Opposition supporters and human rights campainers rally in the capital Tashkent. Hundreds of refugees have fled over the border of Kyrgyzstan; they believe that the death toll may be in thousands. (IHT) (CBC) (Reuters AlertNet) (Reuters) (CNN) (BBC) (Moscow Times) (Wikinews)
  • A jury in West Palm Beach, Florida, finds for Ronald Perelman in his lawsuit against the brokerage firm Morgan Stanley, on the grounds that Morgan Stanley helped appliance maker Sunbeam falsify its financial condition at the expense of investors like Perelman. He was awarded $ 604 million. (CNN)
  • An Indonesian court upholds the two-and-half year sentence of Abu Bakar Bashir. (Laksamana) (Reuters AlertNet)
  • The National Prosecuting Authority of South Africa intends to charge 64 men, including the 61 men released from Zimbabwe, under its anti-mercenary laws. (Reuters SA) (IOL)
  • Thousands of protesters rally in La Paz, Bolivia in support of legislation that would impose larger taxes on foreign energy companies. Some demand nationalization. (MercoPress) (Reuters AlertNet) (BBC)
  • The United Nations World Food Program states that North Korea is in dire need of food aid. (Chosun Ilbo) (BBC)
  • Ethiopia's ruling party EPRDF states it has won general elections when the opposition claims a victory. Voter turnout was over 90%. (Reuters SA) (News24) (News24) (BBC)
  • In Nigeria, former education minister Fabian Osuji, former Senate leader Adolphus Wabara and 5 others go on trial for corruption. Osuji claims he is just a "scapegoat". (BBC)
  • Belgravia Gallery in London removes works with the signature of Nelson Mandela. Mandela has filed a lawsuit forbidding sale of any items using his name. (All Headline News) (BBC)
  • Six African countries begin a two-day summit in Tripoli, Libya, to assess situation in Darfur. None of the local rebel groups have sent representatives. (LJBC, Libya) (Reuters AlertNet) (BBC)
  • Indian police arrest a man connected to the attack on social worker Shakuntala Verma in Uttar Pradesh. (Times of India) (WebIndia123) (NDTV)
  • Indian troops rescue more than 300 tourists who were stranded at the Himalayan pass of Natu La for two days after an avalanche (BBC)
  • In Sri Lanka, Buddhist monk Bellana Pannaloka Thero tries to commit suicide after he was jailed for child sexual abuse (BBC)

May 16 is the 136th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (137th in leap years). ... 2005 is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and is the current year. ... The National Assembly of Kuwait, known as the Majlis Al-Umma, is the parliament of Kuwait. ... The international movement for womens suffrage, led by suffragists (commonly called suffragettes), was a social, economic and political reform movement aimed at extending the suffrage (that is, the right to vote) to women, advocating equal suffrage (abolition of graded votes) rather than universal suffrage (abolition of discrimination due to... Sharia (Arabic شريعة also Sharia, Shariah or Syariah) is traditional Islamic law. ... A polling station is where voters attend to cast their ballot in an election as part of the voting process in a democracy. ... Whit Monday or Pentecost Monday is the Christian holiday celebrated the next day after Pentecost, a movable feast in the Christian calendar, being dependent upon the date of Easter. ... A union (labor union in American English; trade union, sometimes trades union, in British English; either labour union or trade union in Canadian English) is a legal entity consisting of employees or workers having a common interest, such as all the assembly workers for one employer, or all the workers... Ethiopian Prime Minister Meles Zenawi Ato Legesse Meles Zenawi (b. ... This page is about protests. ... average temperature and precipitations per month Addis Ababa (Amharic አዲስ አበባ, new flower) is the capital of Ethiopia. ... Politics of Ethiopia Categories: Election related stubs | Elections in Ethiopia ... The Coalition for Unity and Democracy (or CDU) is a coalition of four existing political parties of Ethiopia which combined to compete for seats in the Ethiopian General Elections held on May 15, 2005. ... Electoral fraud is the deliberate interference with the process of an election. ... In May 2005 unrest in Uzbekistan reached a head when Uzbek troops fired into a crowd of protesters in the eastern city of Andijan, killing an estimated 400 to 1000 people on 13 May. ... Korasuv is a village in eastern Uzbekistan, along the border with Kyrgyzstan, about 50 km from the district capital of Andijan. ... The terms Red Cross and Red Crescent are often used as short names for the International Red Cross and Red Crescent Movement, or its two leading international organs, the ICRC and the IFRCS. This page is about the symbol itself, see respective articles for information about the organizations and movements. ... Andijan is the capital of the Andijon province, which includes the Ferghana Valley Andijan (Andijon in Uzbek; also Andizhan, Andizan, Андижан) is the fourth-largest city in Uzbekistan, and the capital of the Andijan Province. ... Tashkent Tashkent (Toshkent or Тошкент in Uzbek, Ташке́нт in Russian; its name is Turkoman language for Stone City It is the current capital of Uzbekistan, has in the past been called Chach, Shash and Binkent. ... West Palm Beach is a city located in Palm Beach County, Florida. ... State nickname: Sunshine State, Everglade State Other U.S. States Capital Tallahassee Largest city Jacksonville Governor Jeb Bush Official languages English Area 170,451 km² (22nd)  - Land 137,374 km²  - Water 30,486 km² (17. ... Ronald O. Perelman (born 1943) is a wealthy investor and businessman, who appears 126th on the Forbes 2004 list of billionaires. ... Morgan Stanley (NYSE: MWD) is an investment bank and retail broker founded in New York on September 5, 1935, from the investment bank of J. P. Morgan & Co. ... A sunbeam is: a ray of sunlight. ... The United States dollar is the official currency of the United States. ... Abu Bakar Bashir Abu Bakar Bashir (also Abubakar Baasyir) alias Abdus Somad (born August 1938) is an Indonesian Muslim cleric who is the alleged spiritual head of Jemaah Islamiyah (JI), a militant Islamic separatist group. ... A mercenary is a soldier who fights, or engages in warfare primarily for money, usually with little regard for ideological, national or political considerations. ... Central La Paz Panoramic sight of the city of La Paz La Paz is the administrative capital of Bolivia, as well as the departmental capital of La Paz Department. ... A tax is an involuntary fee paid by individuals or businesses to a government. ... Nationalization is the act of taking assets into state ownership. ... The United Nations, or UN, is an international organization established in 1945 and now made up of 191 states. ... The World Food Programme (WFP) is an agency of the United Nations which distributes food commodities to support development projects, to long-term refugees and displaced persons and as emergency food assistance in situations of natural and man-made disasters. ... The World Food Programme (WFP) is an agency of the United Nations which distributes food commodities to support development projects, to long-term refugees and displaced persons and as emergency food assistance in situations of natural and man-made disasters. ... The Ethiopian Peoples Revolutionary Democratic Front, or EPRDF, is the ruling political party of Ethiopia. ... The Clock Tower of the Palace of Westminster which contains Big Ben Tower Bridge at night A red double-decker bus crosses Piccadilly Circus. ... Nelson Mandela Nelson Rolihlahla Mandela, OM, (born July 18, 1918) before becoming President of South Africa, was one of its chief anti-apartheid activists, and was also an anti-apartheid saboteur. ... Africa is the worlds second-largest continent in both area and population, after Asia. ... Tripoli (population 1. ... Darfur (Arabic دار فور, meaning home of the Fur) is a region of far western Sudan, bordering the Central African Republic, Libya, and Chad. ... Uttar Pradesh (Hindi: उत्तर प्रदेश, Urdu: اتر پردیش) is the fifth largest and the most populous state in India. ... The Himalaya is a mountain range in Asia, separating the Indian subcontinent from the Tibetan Plateau. ... Nathula Pass (also spelt Ntula, Natu La, Nathu la, Natula) is a pass on the Indo-Tibet border in the state of Sikkim. ... A Himalayan avalanche. ... Statues of Buddha such as this, the Tian Tan Buddha statue in Hong Kong, remind followers to practice right living. ... Suicide (from Latin sui caedere, to kill oneself) is the act of intentionally ending ones own life; it is sometimes a noun for one who has committed, or attempted the act. ...

May 15, 2005 (Sunday)

May 15 is the 135th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (136th in leap years). ... 2005 is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and is the current year. ... // Israel, the West Bank and Gaza Strip are at the center of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. ... Shabak emblem Defender who shall not be seen The Shin Bet (in Hebrew, שבכ SHABAK an acronym of Sherut Bitahon Klali שירות ביטחון כללי), is the Internal General Security Service of Israel. ... Etymologically derived through Middle English from the Latin second-type conjugation verb stŭdērĕ, which means to direct ones zeal at; hence a student is one who directs zeal at a subject. ... Israels unilateral disengagement plan (also known as the disengagement plan, Gaza Pull-Out plan תוכנית ההינתקות and Gaza Expulsion plan by its opponents. ... In May 2005 unrest in Uzbekistan reached a head when Uzbek troops fired into a crowd of protesters in the eastern city of Andijan, killing an estimated 400 to 1000 people on 13 May. ... Andijan is the capital of the Andijon province, which includes the Ferghana Valley Andijan (Andijon in Uzbek; also Andizhan, Andizan, Андижан) is the fourth-largest city in Uzbekistan, and the capital of the Andijan Province. ... The Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs is a member of the British Government responsible for relations with foreign countries. ... Jack Straw was/is the name of two famous individuals: John Whitaker Straw (born August 3, 1946), commonly known as Jack Straw, is a British Labour Party politician. ... The Seal of the United States Secretary of State The United States Secretary of State is the head of the United States Department of State, concerned with foreign affairs. ... Condoleezza Condi Rice (born November 14, 1954), is the second United States Secretary of State in the administration of President George W. Bush. ... A street map of Baghdad Average temperature (red) and precipitations (blue) in Baghdad Baghdad (Arabic: ) is the capital of Iraq and the Baghdad Province. ... Iskandariya (إسكندرية, also given as Iskandariyah, Iskanderiyah, Iskanderiya, Iskanderiyeh or Sikandariyeh) is an ancient town in central Iraq, one of a number of towns in the Near East named after Alexander the Great (Iskander in Arabic). ... Ramădī (الرمادي) is a city in central Iraq, about 100 kilometers west of Baghdad. ... Tuberculous lungs show up on an X-ray image Tuberculosis is an infection with the bacterium Mycobacterium tuberculosis, which most commonly affects the lungs (pulmonary TB) but can also affect the central nervous system (meningitis), lymphatic system, circulatory system (miliary TB), genitourinary system, bones and joints. ... Côte dIvoire (often called Ivory Coast in English; see below about the name) is a country in West Africa. ... June 27 is the 178th day of the year (179th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 187 days remaining. ... Domitien Ndayizeye (b. ... Dar es Salaam (دار السلام), formerly Mzizima, is the largest city (pop. ...

May 14, 2005 (Saturday)

May 14 is the 134th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (135th in leap years). ... 2005 is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and is the current year. ... A helicopter is an aircraft which is lifted and propelled by one or more large horizontal rotors (propellers). ... Everest is the highest mountain on Earth (as measured from sea level). ... The Eurocopter Group is a global helicopter manufacturing and support company formed in 1992 from the merger of the helicopter divisions of French Aérospatiale and German DaimlerChrysler Aerospace AG (DASA). ... Test Pilots work on developing, evaluating and proving experimental aircraft. ... Time zones are areas of the Earth that have adopted the same standard time, usually referred to as the local time. ... Coordinated Universal Time or UTC, also sometimes referred to as Zulu time, is an atomic realization of Universal Time or Greenwich mean time, the astronomical basis for civil time. ... Lukla is a town in the Khumbu region of eastern Nepal where most people visiting the Himalayas near Mount Everest start their journey. ... North Korea occupies the northern portion of a mountainous peninsula projecting southeast from China, between the Sea of Japan and the Yellow Sea. ... North Korea claims to possess nuclear weapons, and is widely believed to have a substantial arsenal of chemical weapons, deliverable by artillery against South Korea. ... The Richter magnitude test scale (or more correctly local magnitude ML scale) assigns a single number to quantify the size of an earthquake. ... Global earthquake epicenters, 1963–1998 An earthquake is a trembling or a shaking movement of the Earths surface. ... Sumatra (also spelled Sumatara and Sumatera) is the sixth largest island of the world (approximately 470,000 km²) and is the largest part of Indonesia. ... In May 2005 unrest in Uzbekistan reached a head when Uzbek troops fired into a crowd of protesters in the eastern city of Andijan, killing an estimated 400 to 1000 people on 13 May. ... Andijan is the capital of the Andijon province, which includes the Ferghana Valley Andijan (Andijon in Uzbek; also Andizhan, Andizan, Андижан) is the fourth-largest city in Uzbekistan, and the capital of the Andijan Province. ... Islam Karimov Islam Abduganievich Karimov (in modern Uzbek: Islom Karimov) (born January 30, 1938) has been the President of Uzbekistan since 1991. ... The Pan-Green Coalition, or Pan-Green Force (Chinese: 泛綠軍; pinyin: f nlǜjūn), is an informal political alliance in early 21st century Taiwan, consisting of the Democratic Progressive Party (DPP), Taiwan Solidarity Union (TSU), and the Taiwan Independence Party (TAIP). ... An election for the National Assembly will be held in the Republic of China on Taiwan on Saturday 2005-05-14, from 07:30 to 16:00 local time. ... The National Assembly (Chinese: 國民大會, pinyin: Gúomín Dàhùi) was the Constitutional Convention (and formerly an electoral college) of the Republic of China on Taiwan. ... Peter Gloystein was the Economy Minister of Bremen, a state in Germany until May 2005. ... Bremen lies in North Germany 50km South of the North Sea. ... Mexico City (Spanish: Ciudad de México) is the federal capital of, and largest city in, Mexico. ... Extradition is a formal process by which a criminal suspect held by one government is handed over to another government for trial or, if the suspect has already been tried and found guilty, to serve his or her sentence. ... A coup détat, or simply a coup, is the sudden overthrow of a government, usually done by a small group that just replaces the top power figures. ...

May 13, 2005 (Friday)

  • Heavy exchanges of fire in the Israeli-Lebanese border. Hezbollah fired at least 9 mortar shells or Katyusha rockets on outposts in the disputed Shebaa Farms. The IDF retaliated by artillery fire and IAF aircrafts bombed 3 Hezbollah positions. Israel maintains that Lebanon bears full responsibility for the border attacks, committed by Hezbollah and local Palestinian groups, while Hezbollah maintain that they are acting in retaliation for Israeli attacks on Lebanese territory including a hit on civilian houses in the village of Kfar Shouba. (Haaretz), (BBC)
  • Guantánamo Bay Qur'an desecration allegations: United States Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice promises "prompt action" if investigations prove that the Quran was desecrated by U.S. soldiers in Guantánamo Bay, Cuba. The Saudi Arabian government voices its "deep indignation" and has demanded a quick investigation and punishment for the perpetrators if found to be true. Seven people have died in Afghanistan following Anti-American protests in the wake of the allegations. There have also been protests in Pakistan and Indonesia. (BBC) (BBC) (The Jakarta Post)
  • The Vatican announced that the late Pope, John Paul II, is to be beatified. This is the first step to becoming a saint. (BBC)
  • Unrest In Uzbekistan:
    • Thousands of Uzbeks take over a high security jail in Andijan, freeing thousands of prisoners in protest against the jail sentence of 23 businessmen who were accused of being Islamic extremists. (CBC)
    • Violence breaks out in Andijan and in the capital Tashkent. There are reports of firefights in the streets and snipers firing into the crowd. A political rally in Andijan demands the resignation of the government, which claims that the situation is under control. (BBC) (Interfax) (CNN)
    • At least twenty protesters – some reports say as many as 500 – are shot dead in Uzbekistan. Thirty soldiers have been taken hostage as a result. (Yahoo!) (BBC) (The Guardian)
    • A man is fatally shot outside Israel's embassy in Tashkent. The man, who has a history of mental illness, was carrying wooden objects, and guards suspected him of being a suicide bomber. He walked through to the building, despite warning shots in the air and a bullet to the leg, and was eventually shot dead. The American embassy reported he was a suicide bomber and one Uzbek police officer said the man was carrying only a harmless package. However, it was later reported that the man was carrying a mock explosive belt. (Haaretz), (Ynet)
  • Michael Ross becomes the first person executed in the U.S. state of Connecticut since 1960. He was convicted in 1987 of the murder of four girls and young women. He confessed to having committed four more killings. (CNN)

May 13 is the 133rd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (134th in leap years). ... 2005 is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and is the current year. ... Hezbollah (Arabic ‮حزب الله‬, meaning Party of God) is a political and military organization in Lebanon founded in 1982 to fight Israel in southern Lebanon. ... Soldier Firing the M224 60mm Mortar. ... The 82mm BM-8 and 132mm BM-13 Katyusha rocket launchers were built and fielded by the Soviet Union in World War II. These launchers acquired this name, unofficial but immediately recognized in the Red Army, from the title of a popular Russian wartime song, Katyusha. ... Shebaa Farms is a disputed area consisting of 14 farms located south of Shebaa, a Lebanese village on the western slopes of Mount Hermon, at the corner where Syria, Lebanon and Israel meet. ... The Israel Defense Forces (IDF) (Hebrew: צבא ההגנה לישראל Tsva Ha-Haganah Le-Yisrael ([Army] Force [for] the Defense of Israel), often abbreviated צהל Tsahal, alternative English spelling Tzahal, is the name of Israels armed forces (army, air force and navy). ... Historically, artillery refers to any engine used for the discharge of projectiles during war. ... The Israeli Air Force (IAF) (Hebrew: חיל האוויר Heyl haAvir) is the air force of the Israel Defense Forces. ... Hezbollah (Arabic ‮حزب الله‬, meaning Party of God) is a political and military organization in Lebanon founded in 1982 to fight Israel in southern Lebanon. ... The Palestinian flag, adopted in 1948, is a widely recognized modern symbol of the Palestinian people. ... The Quran desecration controversy of 2005 captured international attention in April 2005 when Newsweek published an article which appeared to confirm several previous allegations that U.S. personnel at the Guantánamo Bay prison camp had damaged a copy of the Quran by putting it in a toilet... The United States Secretary of State is the head of the United States Department of State, concerned with foreign affairs. ... Condoleezza Condi Rice (born November 14, 1954), is the second United States Secretary of State in the administration of President George W. Bush. ... The Quran (Arabic al-qurʾān أَلْقُرآن; also transliterated as Quran, Koran, and less commonly Alcoran) is the holy book of Islam. ... The Army is the branch of the United States armed forces which has primary responsibility for land-based military operations. ... Map of Cuba with location of Guantanamo Bay indicated. ... The Kingdom of Saudi Arabia is a country on the Arabian Peninsula. ... Anti-American sentiment is a hostility towards or disapproval of the government, culture, history, and/or people of the United States of America. ... The Pope is the Catholic Bishop and patriarch of Rome, and head of the Roman Catholic Church and the Eastern Catholic Churches. ... The Servant of God Pope John Paul II (Latin: ), born Karol Józef Wojtyła [1] (May 18, 1920–April 2, 2005), reigned as pope of the Roman Catholic Church and sovereign of Vatican City for almost 27 years, from 16 October 1978 until his death in 2005. ... In Catholicism, beatification (from Latin beatus, blessed, via Greek μακαριος, makarios) is a recognition accorded by the church of a dead persons accession to Heaven and capacity to intercede on behalf of individuals who pray in their name (intercession of saints). ... General definition of saint In general, the term Saint refers to someone who is exceptionally virtuous and holy. ... In May 2005 unrest in Uzbekistan reached a head when Uzbek troops fired into a crowd of protesters in the eastern city of Andijan, killing an estimated 400 to 1000 people on 13 May. ... Andijan is the capital of the Andijon province, which includes the Ferghana Valley Andijan (Andijon in Uzbek; also Andizhan, Andizan, Андижан) is the fourth-largest city in Uzbekistan, and the capital of the Andijan Province. ... Islamism is a set of political ideologies derived from conservative religious views of Muslim fundamentalism which hold that Islam is not only a religion, but also a political system that governs the legal, economic and social imperatives of the state. ... Extremism is the act of taking a belief, political view or ideology to its most literal extreme. ... Tashkent Tashkent (Toshkent or Тошкент in Uzbek, Ташке́нт in Russian; its name is Turkoman language for Stone City It is the current capital of Uzbekistan, has in the past been called Chach, Shash and Binkent. ... The traditional definition of a sniper is an infantry soldier especially skilled in field craft and marksmanship who kills selected enemies from concealment with a rifle at large distances. ... A diplomatic mission is a group of people from one nation state present in another nation state to represent the sending state in the receiving State. ... Tashkent Tashkent (Toshkent or Тошкент in Uzbek, Ташке́нт in Russian; its name is Turkoman language for Stone City It is the current capital of Uzbekistan, has in the past been called Chach, Shash and Binkent. ... A suicide bombing is a bomb attack on people or property, committed by a person who knows the explosion will cause his or her own death (see suicide, suicide weapons). ... An explosive belt (also called suicide belt) is a vest packed with explosives (sometimes with nails, screws, bolts and other objects to maximize the number of casualties) and a detonator that is worn by suicide bombers. ... Michael Bruce Ross (July 26, 1959 – May 13, 2005) was an American serial killer. ... A U.S. state is any one of the 50 states (four of which officially favor the term commonwealth) which, together with the District of Columbia, form the United States of America. ... State nickname: The Constitution State Other U.S. States Capital Hartford Largest city Bridgeport Governor M. Jodi Rell Official languages English Area 14,371 km² (48th)  - Land 12,559 km²  - Water 1,809 km² (12. ... 1960 was a leap year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... 1987 is a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

May 12, 2005 (Thursday)

May 12 is the 132nd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (133rd in leap years). ... 2005 is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and is the current year. ... Malcolm Glazer Malcolm Irving Glazer (born 1928) is an American businessman and sports-team owner. ... Football is a ball game played between two teams of eleven players, each attempting to win by scoring more goals than their opponent. ... Manchester United is an English football club based at Old Trafford in Greater Manchester. ... The Air Accidents Investigation Branch investigates air accidents in the United Kingdom. ... An aviation accident (as per the U.S. National Transportation Safety Board definition) is an occurrence associated with the operation of an aircraft which takes place between the time any person boards the aircraft with the intention of flight and all such persons have disembarked, and in which any person... Paul Louis Halley (1934 – December 6, 2003) was a French billionaire who was killed in a light plane crash in 2003. ... 2003 is a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... A coup détat, or simply a coup, is the sudden overthrow of a government, usually done by a small group that just replaces the top power figures. ... Seal of the Senate The Senate is one of the two houses of the Congress of the United States, the other being the House of Representatives. ... A politician is an individual involved in politics. ... Saddam Hussein Saddām Hussein ʻAbd al-Majīd al-Tikrīt, spelled Husayn or Hussain; Arabic صدام حسين عبد المجيد التكريتي; born April 28, 1937 1) was President of Iraq from 1979 until 2003. ... George Galloway featured on BBC Newsnight George Galloway (born 16 August 1954) is a British politician, and the Respect Member of Parliament for Bethnal Green and Bow in East London, England. ... Leukemia (leukaemia in Commonwealth English) is a group of blood diseases characterized by malignancies (cancer) of the blood-forming tissues. ... The ECHR should not be mistaken for the European Court of Justice, an institution of the European Union for the resolution of disputes under EU law. ... 1999 is a common year starting on Friday of the Common Era, and was designated the International Year of Older Persons by the United Nations. ... Kurds are one of the Iranian peoples and speak Kurdish, a north-Western Iranian language related to Persian. ... Abdullah Öcalan Abdullah Öcalan escorted to Turkey by at least two intelligence agents. ... Obasanjo met with U.S. President Bush in France on June 1, 2003. ... Blood transfusion is the taking of blood or blood-based products from one individual and inserting them into the circulatory system of another. ... The Red Ribbon symbol is used internationally to represent the fight against AIDS. AIDS (Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome or Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome, rarely written Aids) is a disease characterized by the destruction of the human immune system. ... Chernobyl area. ... Nuclear power station at Leibstadt, Switzerland. ... Colombian politician born in Bucaramanga to Mario Galán and Cecilia Sarmiento (1943-1989). ... 1989 is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Location in the state of Texas City nickname: Space City Incorporated 1837 State Texas Counties Harris County Fort Bend County Montgomery County Mayor Bill White Area  â€” Total  â€” Water 1,558. ... Enron Corporation Enron Corporation is an energy trading and communications company based in Houston, Texas that employed around 21,000 people in mid-2001 (before bankruptcy). ... Dan Boyle could be Dan Boyle the hockey player Dan Boyle the Irish politician This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Merrill Lynch & Co. ... La Cumbre is volcano on Ferdinanda Island in the Galapagos Islands. ... NASA Satellite photo of the Galápagos archipelago. ...

May 11, 2005 (Wednesday)

May 11 is the 131st day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (132nd in leap years). ... 2005 is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and is the current year. ... The Quran desecration controversy of 2005 captured international attention in April 2005 when Newsweek published an article which appeared to confirm several previous allegations that U.S. personnel at the Guantánamo Bay prison camp had damaged a copy of the Quran by putting it in a toilet... Newsweek Logo Newsweek is a weekly news magazine published in New York City and distributed throughout the United States and Canada. ... Jalalabad (Persian: Jalālābād) is the capital of Nangarhar province in Afghanistan, 150 km east of Kabul near the Khyber Pass. ... Boxes of ammunition clog a warehouse in Baghdad Ammunition is a generic military term meaning (the assembly of) a projectile and its propellant. ... Anti-American sentiment is a hostility towards or disapproval of the government, culture, history, and/or people of the United States of America. ... The Quran (Arabic al-qurʾān أَلْقُرآن; also transliterated as Quran, Koran, and less commonly Alcoran) is the holy book of Islam. ... The 82mm BM-8 and 132mm BM-13 Katyusha rocket launchers were built and fielded by the Soviet Union in World War II. These launchers acquired this name, unofficial but immediately recognized in the Red Army, from the title of a popular Russian wartime song, Katyusha. ... A Redstone rocket, part of the Mercury program A rocket is a vehicle, missile or aircraft which obtains thrust by the reaction to the ejection of fast moving exhaust gas from within a rocket engine. ... Shlomi is a development town in northern Israel. ... Yom Haatzmaut (יום העצמאות yom hā-‘aṣmā’ūṯ), Israeli Independence Day, commemorates the declaration of independence of Israel in 1948. ... The United Nations, or UN, is an international organization established in 1945 and now made up of 191 states. ... A war crime is a punishable offense, under international law, for violations of the law of war by any person or persons, military or civilian. ... Sharif Basyouni is a United Nations war crimes expert. ... Saddam Hussein Saddām Hussein ʻAbd al-Majīd al-Tikrīt, spelled Husayn or Hussain; Arabic صدام حسين عبد المجيد التكريتي; born April 28, 1937 1) was President of Iraq from 1979 until 2003. ... 1990 is a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar. ... C Company, 1st Battalion, The Staffordshire Regiment, 1st UK Armoured Division The 1991 Persian Gulf War was a conflict between Iraq and a coalition force of 34 nations mandated by the United Nations and led by the United States. ... The N3 road is a National Primary Route in the Republic of Ireland, running from Dublin to Cavan Town and the border area of Ireland. ... The Hill of Tara (aerial view) Today, the Hill of Tara (Irish Teamhair), located near the River Boyne, is a mound in County Meath, Leinster, Ireland, on which the grass veils the countrys rich heritage. ... The southern side of the White House The White House is the official residence and principal workplace of the President of the United States. ... United States Capitol The Capitol when first occupied by Congress, 1800. ... Aerial photo (looking NW) of the Washington Monument and the White House in Washington, D.C. Washington, D.C., officially the District of Columbia (also known as D.C.; Washington; the Nations Capital; the District; and, historically, the Federal City) is the capital city and administrative district of the... The United States Secret Service is a United States federal government law enforcement agency that is part of the United States Department of Homeland Security (prior to the founding of that department in 2002, it was under the United States Department of the Treasury). ... The Prime Minister of Canada, the head of the Canadian government, is usually the leader of the political party with the most seats in the Canadian House of Commons. ... The Right Honourable Paul Edgar Philippe Martin, PC, MP, (born August 28, 1938 in Windsor, Ontario) is the Prime Minister of Canada. ... May 19 is the 139th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (140th in leap years). ... The House of Commons (French: Chambre des communes) is a component of the Parliament of Canada, which also includes the Sovereign (represented by the Governor General) and the Senate. ... The Treaty establishing a Constitution for Europe, commonly referred to as the European Constitution, is an international treaty signed in 2004 and currently awaiting ratification, intended to create a constitution for the European Union. ... This article deals with the post-invasion period in Iraq and its occupation. ... Madhya Pradesh (मध्‍य प्रदेश) is a state in central India. ... Child marriage is a practice in which the parents of a small child (even infants) arrange a future marriage with another childs parents. ... Poliomyelitis (polio), or infantile paralysis, is a viral paralytic disease. ... Javier Adelmar Pupi Zanetti (born August 10, 1973 in Buenos Aires) is an Argentine football player, the current captain of Inter Milan. ... Football Club Internazionale Milano (commonly, but incorrectly, known as Inter Milan) is an Italian football club, playing in the Serie A (first division). ... The striker (wearing red jersey) has run past the defender (in white jersey) and is about to take a shot at the goal, while the goalkeeper positions himself to stop the ball. ... The Zapatista Army of National Liberation (Ejército Zapatista de Liberación Nacional, EZLN) is an armed revolutionary group based in Chiapas, one of the poorest states of Mexico. ... Bakassi is the peninsular extension of the African territory of Calabar into the Atlantic Ocean. ... The Red Ribbon symbol is used internationally to represent the fight against AIDS. AIDS (Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome or Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome, rarely written Aids) is a disease characterized by the destruction of the human immune system. ... Matthias Rath, M.D. (born 1955 in Stuttgart, Germany) is a controversial German physician. ... The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... The International Herald Tribune (or IHT) is fully owned by the New York Times, which along with its own staff journalists and news agencies supplies it with news and features. ... Look up Genocide in Wiktionary, the free dictionary Genocide has been defined as the deliberate killing of people based on their ethnicity, nationality, race, religion, or (sometimes) politics, as well as other deliberate action(s)leading to the physical elimination of any of the above categories. ... Retail selling Street selling is the bottom of the chain and can be accomplished through purchasing from prostitutes, through cloaked retail stores or refuse houses for users in the act located in red-light districts which often also deal in paraphernalia, dealers marketing merriment at night clubs and other events... The term antiretroviral drugs is used to describe drugs used against HIV infection (HIV is an RNA retrovirus). ... Vitamins are organic chemicals that a given living organism requires in trace quantities for good health, but which the organism cannot synthesize, and therefore must obtain from its diet. ... Harvard University is a private university in Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA, and a member of the Ivy League. ...

May 10, 2005 (Tuesday)

  • Leaders in Indonesia visit Suharto, the nation's former president, who is hospitalized with what has been diagnosed as intestinal bleeding. (Yahoo)
  • A Haitian court overturns convictions of 38 military officers who were charged with killings in the town of Raboteau during the 1991 coup against Jean-Bertrand Aristide. The Ecumenical Center for Human Rights states that the trial was annulled on technicality. (Jamaica Observer) (ABC) (BBC)
  • Human Rights Watch states that elections in the Oromia region of Ethiopia will be a "hollow exercise." (Human Rights Watch) (AllAfrica) (News24)
  • Canadian House of Commons opposition members of parliament pass a motion to instruct a house committee to call for the resignation of the government. The 153 votes of the Conservatives and Bloc Québécois defeat the 150 votes of the Liberals and NDP due to three absences. Although the motion is classified as a procedural instruction to a committee and not a no confidence motion, the Tories and BQ call on the government to resign. (CBC)
  • Germany unveils a Holocaust memorial. (Deutsche Welle) (Ha'aretz) (ABC) (Reuters AlertNet)
  • G8 countries urge Ukraine to cover the Chernobyl nuclear plant. (Reuters AlertNet)
  • Former South African president Nelson Mandela sues his former associate Ismail Ayob and businessman Ross Calder for selling forged works of art that depict his prison years in the Robben Island. (SABC) (News24) (ABC) (Reuters SA)
  • The Maldives government releases dissident Fathimath Nisreen. Two others, Mohamed Zaki and Ahmad Didi, remain in custody. (Reporters Without Borders) (Minivan News, Maldives) (BBC)
  • The Egyptian parliament approves a constitutional amendment that would allow presidential elections to be contested. (Arab News) (IHT) (BBC)

May 10 is the 130th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (131st in leap years). ... 2005 is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and is the current year. ... General Soeharto (commonly known as Suharto in the English-speaking world) (born June 8, 1921) was an Indonesian leader and military strongman. ... Raboteau is a town in Haiti, in in north-west Gonaives by the sea. ... Jean-Bertrand Aristide Jean-Bertrand Aristide (born July 15, 1953) is a Haitian politician and former Roman Catholic priest who was President of Haiti in 1991, from 1994 to 1996, and again from 2001 to 2004. ... Human Rights Watch is an international NGO based in New York City, USA, that works with human rights issues. ... Politics of Ethiopia Categories: Election related stubs | Elections in Ethiopia ... Categories: Africa geography stubs ... The House of Commons (French: Chambre des communes) is a component of the Parliament of Canada, which also includes the Sovereign (represented by the Governor General) and the Senate. ... The Parliamentary Opposition is a form of political opposition to a designated government, particularly in a Westminster-based parliamentary system. ... The Conservative Party of Canada (French: Parti conservateur du Canada) is a right wing political party in Canada, formed by the merger of the Canadian Alliance and the Progressive Conservative Party of Canada in December 2003. ... The Bloc Québécois is a left-wing federal political party in Canada that is devoted to the promotion of sovereignty for Quebec. ... The Liberal Party of Canada (French: Parti libéral du Canada) is Canadas largest political party. ... The New Democratic Party (French: Nouveau Parti démocratique) is a social democratic political party in Canada. ... A Motion of No Confidence, also called Motion of Non Confidence is a parliamentary motion traditionally put before a parliament by the opposition in the hope of defeating or embarrassing a government. ... Concentration camp inmates during the Holocaust The Holocaust was Nazi Germanys systematic genocide (ethnic cleansing) of various ethnic, religious, national, and secular groups during World War II, starting in 1941 and continuing through 1945. ... G8 work session; July 20-22, 2002. ... Chernobyl area. ... Nuclear power station at Leibstadt, Switzerland. ... Nelson Mandela Nelson Rolihlahla Mandela, OM, (born July 18, 1918) before becoming President of South Africa, was one of its chief anti-apartheid activists, and was also an anti-apartheid saboteur. ... Art forgery means creating and especially selling works of art that are falsely attributed to be work of other, usually more famous artists. ... Prison Buildings on Robben Island Robben Island (Dutch for seal island) is an island 12 km off the coast of Cape Town, South Africa. ... A constitutional amendment is an alteration to the constitution of a nation or a state. ... This article is about the political process. ...

May 9, 2005 (Monday)

May 9 is the 129th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (130th in leap years). ... 2005 is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and is the current year. ... The word ton or tonne is derived from the Old English tunne, and ultimately from the Old French tonne, and referred originally to a large cask with a capacity of 252 wine gallons, which holds approximately 2100 pounds of water. ... General Name, Symbol, Number Uranium, U, 92 Chemical series Actinides Period, Block 7, f Density, Hardness 19050 kg/m3, 6 Appearance silvery-white metal Atomic properties Atomic weight 238. ... Seal of the Congress. ... John Conyers John Conyers, Jr. ... The southern side of the White House The White House is the official residence and principal workplace of the President of the United States. ... ... 2002 is a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Sellafield is a village near the coast of the Irish Sea in Cumbria, England, close to the village and railway station of Seascale. ... Nuclear power station at Leibstadt, Switzerland. ... Cumbria is a administrative county located in the northwest area of England. ... Royal motto: Dieu et mon droit (French: God and my right) Englands location within the UK Official language English de facto Capital London de facto Largest city London Area  - Total Ranked 1st UK 130,395 km² Population  - Total (2001)  - Density Ranked 1st UK 49,138,831 377/km² Religion... A tonne (also called metric ton) is a non-SI unit of mass, accepted for use with SI, defined as: 1 tonne = 103 kg (= 106 g). ... Water (from the Old English word wæter) is a colorless, tasteless, and odorless substance that is essential to all known forms of life and is known also as the most universal solvent. ... Radioactive decay is the set of various processes by which unstable atomic nuclei (nuclides) emit subatomic particles. ... General Name, Symbol, Number Uranium, U, 92 Chemical series Actinides Period, Block 7, f Density, Hardness 19050 kg/m3, 6 Appearance silvery-white metal Atomic properties Atomic weight 238. ... General Name, Symbol, Number Plutonium, Pu, 94 Chemical series Actinides Period, Block 7, f Density, Hardness 19816 kg/m3, no data Appearance silvery white metal Atomic properties Atomic weight 244. ... Though a term originally coined for Republican presidents, a head of state or chief of state is now universally known as the chief public representative of a nation-state, federation or commonwealth, whose role generally includes personifying the continuity and legitimacy of the state and exercising the political powers, functions... Term of office: December 31, 1999 – Preceded by: Boris Yeltsin Succeeded by: Date of birth: October 7, 1952 Place of birth: Leningrad, U.S.S.R. First Lady: Liudmila Putina Political party: None Vladimir Vladimirovich Putin (Russian: Владимир Владимирович Путин  pronunciation; born October 7, 1952) is a Russian politician and... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is a politician and the current (43rd) president of the United States. ... The head of government in Germany has traditionally been called Kanzler (Chancellor). ... Gerhard Fritz Kurt Schröder [] (born April 7, 1944), a German politician, has been serving as Chancellor of Germany since 1998. ... Mushroom cloud from the nuclear explosion over Nagasaki rising 18 km (over 11 miles) into the air. ... Saint Basils Cathedral Moscow (Russian/Cyrillic: Москва́, pronunciation: Moskvá) is the capital of Russia, located on the river Moskva, and encompassing 1097. ... Nazi Germany, or the Third Reich, commonly refers to Germany in the years 1933–1945, when it was under the firm control of the totalitarian and fascist ideology of the Nazi Party, with the Führer Adolf Hitler as dictator. ... Computer generated image of Global Surveyor spacecraft (NASA) The launch of the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) spacecraft in November 1996 by NASA and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory began Americas return to Mars after a 20-year absence. ... Conceptual drawing The Mars Polar Lander was part of the Mars Surveyor 98 program, which consisted of two spacecraft launched separately, the Mars Climate Orbiter (formerly the Mars Surveyor 98 Orbiter) and the Mars Polar Lander (formerly the Mars Surveyor 98 Lander). ... Artists Concept of Rover on Mars NASAs Mars Exploration Rover (MER) Mission (since 2003) is a unmanned Mars exploration mission that includes sending two Rovers (robots) to explore the Martian surface and geology. ... Malin Space Science Systems is a San Diego, California company that designs, develops, and operates instruments to fly on unmanned spacecraft. ... The Apollo 15 capsule landed safely despite a parachute failure. ... Peter Friederich (born 1942 in St Gallen) is a former Swiss ambassador to Luxembourg, who in July 2002 was arrested for assisting drug smugglers, embezzlement and fraud. ... Money laundering is the practice of engaging in financial transactions in order to conceal the identity, source and destination of the money in question. ... General Soeharto (commonly known as Suharto in the English-speaking world) (born June 8, 1921) was an Indonesian leader and military strongman. ... A death toll is the number of dead as a result of war, violence, accident, natural disaster, extreme weather, or disease. ... A flood (in Old English flod, a word common to Teutonic languages; compare German Flut, Dutch vloed from the same root as is seen in flow, float) is an overflow of water, an expanse of water submerging land, a deluge. ... Somali is the eastern-most of the nine ethnic divisions (kililoch) of Ethiopia. ... 2005 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December- → Ongoing events • Iraqi legislative election • Bill C-38 (Canada gay marriage) • Tsunami relief • Cedar Revolution in Lebanon • Tulip Revolution in Kyrgyzstan • German Visa Affair 2005 • Expo 2005 in Nagoya, Japan • Terri Schiavo controversy • Pope John Paul II... The Shabele River (Shabeelle in Somalia) begins in the highlands of Ethiopia, and then flows southeast into Somalia towards Mogadishu. ... The bed of this stream is made up of rocks, some very rounded (having had a longer life in the stream) and some not. ... May 5 is the 125th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (126th in leap years). ... South America South America is a continent crossed by the equator, with most of its area in the Southern Hemisphere. ... The Arabs (Arabic: عرب Ê»arab) are an originally Arabian ethnicity widespread in the Middle East and North Africa. ... Gustavo Noboa Bejarano (born 21 August 1937) was the President of Ecuador (22 January 2000 to 15 January 2003) and was notable for being accused of mishandling the countrys foreign debt [1] by former president, León Febres Cordero. ... In justice and law, house arrest is the situation where a person is confined (by the authorities) to his or her house, possibly with travel allowed but restricted. ... Vatican Radio is broadcasting service of Vatican. ... Electromagnetic radiation or EM radiation is a combination (cross product) of oscillating electric and magnetic fields perpendicular to each other, moving through space as a wave, effectively transporting energy and momentum. ... Cancer is a class of diseases characterized by uncontrolled cell division and the ability of these cells to invade other tissues, either by direct growth into adjacent tissue (invasion) or by migration of cells to distant sites (metastasis). ... Hans Blix Hans Blix  listen? (born June 28, 1928 in Uppsala in Sweden) is a Swedish politician. ... The United Nations, or UN, is an international organization established in 1945 and now made up of 191 states. ... Enriched uranium is uranium whose uranium-235 content has been increased through the process of isotope separation. ... A map showing countries commonly considered to be part of the Middle East The Middle East is a region comprising the lands around the southern and eastern parts of the Mediterranean Sea, a territory that extends from the eastern Mediterranean Sea to the Persian Gulf. ... Languages Igbo, English Capital Enugu Head of State Philip Effiong National anthem Land of the Rising Sun Currency Biafran Pound (BIAP) Population;- Total 13,500,000 (1967) Created May 30, 1967 Dissolved January 15, 1970 Demonym Biafran The Republic of Biafra was a short-lived secessionist state in southeastern Nigeria. ... In law, treason is the crime of disloyalty to ones nation. ... Rome - Wikipedia /**/ @import /w/skins-1. ... Pier Paolo Pasolini (March 5, 1922 – November 2, 1975) was an Italian poet, film director, and writer, who, in his films about the socially outcast and rebellious, frequently used amateur actors. ... Andrés Manuel López Obrador Andrés Manuel López Obrador (b. ... Mexico City (Spanish: Ciudad de México) is the federal capital of, and largest city in, Mexico. ... July 31 is the 212th day (213th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 153 days remaining, as the final day of July. ... Joseph Kabila Joseph Kabila Kabange (born 1970) became president of the Democratic Republic of the Congo after the assassination of his father Laurent-Désiré Kabila in January 2001. ... Katanga is the southern province of the Democratic Republic of the Congo, regional capital Lubumbashi (formerly Elizabethville). ...

May 8, 2005 (Sunday)

May 8 is the 128th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (129th in leap years). ... 2005 is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and is the current year. ... Point guard is one of the standard positions in a regulation basketball game. ... Steve Nash Stephen John Nash (born February 7, 1974 in Johannesburg, South Africa) is a star Canadian basketball player. ... The National Basketball Association of the United States and Canada, commonly known as the NBA, is the premier professional basketball league in North America. ... The Phoenix Suns are a National Basketball Association team based in Phoenix, Arizona. ... In American sports, a Most Valuable Player (MVP) award is an honor typically bestowed upon the best performing player or players on a specific team, in an entire league, or for a particular contest or series of contests. ... MBA Shaquille Rashaun ONeal (born March 6, 1972 in Newark, New Jersey), nicknamed Shaq, is known as one of the National Basketball Associations most dominant basketball players. ... The Miami Heat are a National Basketball Association team based in Miami, Florida, USA. Founded: 1988 Formerly known as: Home Arena: American Airlines Arena Uniform colors: Red, Black, Flame orange and Yellow Logo design: A flaming basketball going through a hoop Mascot: Burnie NBA Championships: None 2004-05 Record: 0... Victory in Europe Day (V-E Day or VE Day) was May 8, 1945, the date when the Allies during the Second World War formally celebrated the defeat of Nazi Germany and the end of Adolf Hitlers Third Reich. ... Mushroom cloud from the nuclear explosion over Nagasaki rising 18 km (over 11 miles) into the air. ... A satellite composite image of Europe Europe is geologically and geographically a peninsula, forming the westernmost part of Eurasia. ... Grand Admiral Karl Dönitz. ... An atrocity (from the Latin atrox, atrocious, from Latin ater = matte black (as distinct from niger = shiny black)) is a term used to describe crimes ranging from an act committed against a single person to one committed against a population or ethnic group. ... The Nazi swastika symbol The National Socialist German Workers Party (German: Nationalsozialistische Deutsche Arbeiterpartei), better known as the NSDAP or the Nazi Party was a political party that was led to power in Germany by Adolf Hitler in 1933. ... Events and trends The 1930s were spent struggling for a solution to the global depression. ... Events and trends The 1940s were dominated by World War II, the most destructive armed conflict in history. ... Seal of the President of the United States The President of the United States is the head of state of the United States. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is a politician and the current (43rd) president of the United States. ... Baltic states and the Baltic Sea The Baltic states or the Baltic countries is a term which refers to three small countries in the Northern Europe: Estonia Latvia Lithuania Prior to World War II, Finland was sometimes considered a fourth Baltic state. ... Mushroom cloud from the nuclear explosion over Nagasaki rising 18 km (over 11 miles) into the air. ... Graves at Green-Wood Cemetery, Brooklyn, New York A cemetery or graveyard is a place (usually an enclosed area of land) in which dead bodies are buried. ... Margraten is a municipality and a town in the southeastern Netherlands. ... A vigil (from the Latin vigilia, wakefulness) is a period of sleeplessness, an occasion for devotional watching or observance. ...  Berlin (pronounced: , German ) is the capital of Germany and its largest city, with 3,426,000 inhabitants (as of January 2005); down from 4. ... The terms Neo-Nazism and Neo-Fascism refer to any social or political movement to revive Nazism or Fascism, respectively, and postdates the Second World War. ... Spandau is the westernmost borough (Bezirk) of Berlin, situated at the confluence of the Havel and Spree rivers and along the western bank of the Havel. ... The Brandenburg Gate The Brandenburg Gate The Brandenburg Gate (German: Brandenburger Tor) is a triumphal arch, the symbol of Berlin, Germany. ... 2003 GMO USDA protest Protest expresses relatively overt reaction to events or situations: sometimes in favour, more often opposed. ... Categories: French government | Stub ... This article chronicles the end of the European Theatre of World War II. On April 25, 1945 United States and Soviet troops linked-up, cutting Germany in two (see Elbe Day). ... Location within France Reims (English traditionally Rheims) (pronounced in French) is a city of northern France, 144 km (89 miles) east-northeast of Paris. ... Colonel-General Alfred Jodl Alfred Jodl (May 10, 1890 - October 16, 1946) was a Wehrmacht officer. ... Unconditional Surrender refers to a surrender without conditions, except for those provided by International Law conditional surrender. ... May 7 is the 127th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (128th in leap years). ... 1945 was a common year starting on Monday (link will take you to calendar). ... Abu Faraj al-Libbi has been alleged to be a leader of the al-Qaeda organization. ... This is a list of people accused of being Al-Qaida members. ... May 2 is the 122nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (123rd in leap years). ... Al-Qaeda (Arabic: القاعدة, the foundation or the base) is the name given to a worldwide network of militant Islamist organizations under the leadership of Osama bin Laden. ... Exile is a form of punishment. ... The term Christian means belonging to Christ and is derived from the Greek noun Χριστός Khristós which means anointed one, which is itself a translation of the Hebrew word Moshiach (Hebrew: משיח, also written Messiah), (and in Arabic it is pronounced Maseeh مسيح). ... General Michel Aoun Michel Aoun (born in 1935 in Beirut) is a Lebanese military commander and politician. ... The Free Patriotic Movement (Tayyar Al-Watani Al-Horr), also known as the Aounist Current (Tayyar Al-Aouni), is a Lebanese political party (although it is not yet officially registered as such) led by General Michel Aoun, the former commander of the Lebanese army who served as Prime Minister of... The skulls of victims show gashes and signs of violence The Rwandan genocide was the organized murder of up to one million Rwandans in 1994. ... This article is about the political process. ... François Bozizé Yangouvonda (born October 14, 1946) is the current President of the Central African Republic. ... Abdelaziz Bouteflika (عبجد العزيز بوتفليقة) (born March 2, 1937) is the president of Algeria (since 1999). ... Map of Algeria showing Setif province The Setif massacre was an attack on Algerian protesters by colonial French soldiers on May 8, 1945, the same day that Germany surrendered in World War II. Anti-French sentiment had been building across Algeria for months, leading to thousand-person protests in such... May 8 is the 128th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (129th in leap years). ... 1945 was a common year starting on Monday (link will take you to calendar). ... Nazi Germany, or the Third Reich, commonly refers to Germany in the years 1933–1945, when it was under the firm control of the totalitarian and fascist ideology of the Nazi Party, with the Führer Adolf Hitler as dictator. ... The Nazi party used a right-facing swastika as their symbol and the red and black colors were said to represent Blut und Boden (blood and soil). ... National Democratic Party of Germany can refer to: National Democratic Party of Germany (NPD) - a far-right political party in Germany National Democratic Party of Germany (East Germany) (NDPD)- a former political party in East Germany This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might...  Berlin (pronounced: , German ) is the capital of Germany and its largest city, with 3,426,000 inhabitants (as of January 2005); down from 4. ... HRH The Princess of Asturias Her Royal Highness The Princess of Asturias, (Letizia Ortiz Rocasolano), born September 15, 1972), is the wife of Felipe, Prince of Asturias, the heir apparent to the Spanish throne. ... King Gyanendra King Gyanendra Bir Bikram Shah Dev of Nepal (born July 7, 1947) has been the king of Nepal since June 2001. ...

May 7, 2005 (Saturday)

May 7 is the 127th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (128th in leap years). ... 2005 is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and is the current year. ... Northern Ireland is one of four constituent parts of the United Kingdom. ... The Ulster Unionist Party (UUP, sometimes referred to as the Official Unionist Party or OUP) is a political party in Northern Ireland representing the unionist community, and was the party of government in Northern Ireland between 1921 and 1972. ... The Right Honourable David Trimble (born October 15, 1944) is a Northern Ireland politician, leader of the Ulster Unionist Party (UUP), former First Minister of Northern Ireland, MP and MLA. He shared the 1998 Nobel Peace Prize with John Hume of the Social Democratic and Labour Party. ... Nobel Peace Prize (where Nobel is pronounced with the stress on the second syllable) is one of five Nobel Prizes requested by the Swedish industrialist and inventor Alfred Nobel. ... The Belfast Agreement (also known as the Good Friday Agreement and, more rarely, as the Stormont Agreement) was a major step in the Northern Ireland peace process. ... Barring a change in the law, the next general election in the United Kingdom must be held some time before June 30, 2006. ... George Peter (Pete) Nanos was the former director of the Los Alamos National Laboratory from January 2003 to May 2005. ... Los Alamos National Laboratory, aerial view from 1995. ... Citing the U.S. National Transportation Safety Board, an aviation accident is defined as an occurrence associated with the operation of an aircraft which takes place between the time any person boards the aircraft with the intention of flight and all such persons have disembarked, and in which any person... Motto: Audax at Fidelis (Bold but Faithful) Nickname: Sunshine State/Smart State Other Australian states and territories Capital Brisbane Government Governor Premier Const. ...

May 6, 2005 (Friday)

May 6 is the 126th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (127th in leap years). ... 2005 is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and is the current year. ... The United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit, known informally as the D.C. Circuit, is the federal appellate court for the U.S. district court in Washington, DC. Appeals from the D.C. Circuit, as with all the U.S. Courts of Appeals, are heard... The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) is an independent United States government agency, created, directed, and empowered by Congressional statute. ... A broadcast flag is a set of status bits (or flags) sent in the data stream of a digital television program that indicates whether or not it can be recorded, or if there are any restrictions on recorded content. ... Fatah (Arabic: الفتح) al-fatah—an reverse acronym from arabic words Harakat alTahrir alwatani alFilastini (literally: the movement for liberation of the Palestinian homeland)—is a Palestinian faction founded in 1959 by Yasser Arafat who, until his death, was head of the Palestinian Authority. ... The city of Gaza is the principal city in the Gaza Strip. ... The Hamas emblem shows two crossed swords, the Dome of the Rock, and a map of the land they claim as Palestine (roughly, present-day Israel, the West Bank and the Gaza Strip). ... Beit Lahia (Arabic: بيت لاهية) is a Palestinian village of about 40,000 people in the northern Gaza Strip. ... Tulkarm (Arabic طولكرم Ṭūlkarm; Standard Hebrew טולכרם) is an Arab city in the West Bank. ... Qalqīlyah (Arabic قلقيلية; Standard Hebrew קלקיליה Qalqilya) is an Arab city in the West Bank. ... The United Kingdom general election of 2005 was held on Thursday, 5 May 2005 and won by the Labour Party, led by Tony Blair. ... British Summer Time (BST), known in Ireland as Irish Summer Time (IST), is the daylight saving time in effect in the United Kingdom and Republic of Ireland between the last Sunday in March and the last Sunday in October each year. ... The Labour Party is a a centre-left political party in the United Kingdom (see British politics), and one of the United Kingdoms three main political parties. ... A simple majority is the most common requirement in voting for a measure to pass, especially in deliberative bodies and small organizations. ... The Right Honourable Anthony Charles Lynton Blair (born 6 May 1953 in Edinburgh, Scotland) is the current Prime Minister of the United Kingdom. ... In the United Kingdom, the Prime Minister is the head of government, exercising many of the executive functions nominally vested in the Sovereign, who is head of state. ... Northern Ireland is one of four constituent parts of the United Kingdom. ... The Ulster Unionist Party (UUP, sometimes referred to as the Official Unionist Party or OUP) is a political party in Northern Ireland representing the unionist community, and was the party of government in Northern Ireland between 1921 and 1972. ... The Right Honourable David Trimble (born October 15, 1944) is a Northern Ireland politician, leader of the Ulster Unionist Party (UUP), former First Minister of Northern Ireland, MP and MLA. He shared the 1998 Nobel Peace Prize with John Hume of the Social Democratic and Labour Party. ... Lady Sylvia Hermon (born 11 August 1955) is a Northern Ireland unionist politician. ... Foyle is a Parliamentary Constituency in the House of Commons and also an Assembly constituency in the Northern Ireland Assembly. ... The Social Democratic and Labour Party (SDLP — Irish: Páirtí Sóisialta Daonlathach an Lucht Oibre) is the smaller of the two major nationalist parties in Northern Ireland. ... Mark Durkan (born 1960) is a politician in Northern Ireland and the leader of the Social Democratic and Labour Party, since November 2001, succeeding John Hume. ... The name Sinn Féin (pronounced in English, in Irish), which means ourselves or we ourselves (not as sometimes incorrectly translated, ourselves alone or we alone) has been applied to a series of political movements since 1905 in Ireland, each of which claim or claimed sole descent from the original... The Conservative Party is the largest political party on the centre-right in the United Kingdom. ... Michael Howard The Right Honourable Michael Howard, QC, PC (born Michael Hecht, July 7, 1941) is a British politician, the Leader of the Opposition Conservative Party (although stepping down soon). ... Inferior view of a brain with meningitis caused by Haemophilus influenzae. ... Delhi (दिल्ली or Dillī in Hindi and Bengali and دیلی in Urdu) is a term that refers to either the State of Delhi or the National Capital Territory (NCT) of the Republic of India. ... A suicide bombing is a bomb attack on people or property, committed by a person who knows the explosion will cause his or her own death (see suicide, suicide weapons). ... The Israel Defense Forces (IDF) (Hebrew: צבא ההגנה לישראל Tsva Ha-Haganah Le-Yisrael ([Army] Force [for] the Defense of Israel), often abbreviated צהל Tsahal, alternative English spelling Tzahal, is the name of Israels armed forces (army, air force and navy). ... Military police (MPs) are the police of a military organization, generally concerning themselves with law enforcement and security. ... The Nazi party used a right-facing swastika as their symbol and the red and black colors were said to represent Blut und Boden (blood and soil). ... The term Blacks is often used in the West to denote race for persons whose progenitors, usually in predominant part, were indigenous to Africa. ... Detainee is neutral term used to indicate people held by a government, such as those it does not classify and treat as either prisoners of war or suspects in criminal cases. ... The Iron Maiden of Nuremberg was a famous torture device Torture is the infliction of severe physical or psychological pain as an expression of cruelty, a means of intimidation, deterrent or punishment, or as a tool for the extraction of information or confessions. ...

May 5, 2005 (Thursday)

May 5 is the 125th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (126th in leap years). ... 2005 is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and is the current year. ... Greek Orthodox Church can refer to: the Orthodox Church of Constantinople, headed by the Patriarch of Constantinople, who is also the first among equals of the Eastern Orthodox Communion. ... The Orthodox Patriarch of Jerusalem ranks fourth of nine patriarchs in the Eastern Orthodox Church. ... Patriarch Irenaios (also Erinaios the 1st, born Emmanuel Skopeliti in April of 1939) was elected Patriarch of Jerusalem on August 13, 2001 in the Church of the Holy Sepulchre. ... The word Jew (Hebrew: יהודי) is used in a wide number of ways, but generally refers to a follower of the Jewish faith, a child of a Jewish mother, or someone of Jewish descent with a connection to Jewish culture or ethnicity and often a combination of these attributes. ... Jerusalem (Hebrew: יְרוּשָׁלַיִם Yerushalayim; Arabic: القدس al-Quds; see also names of Jerusalem) is an ancient Middle Eastern city of key importance to the religions of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. ... // Israel, the West Bank and Gaza Strip are at the center of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. ... Commander is a military rank used in many navies but not generally in armies or air forces. ... Ramallah (Arabic: رام الله) is a West Bank city of approximately 57,000 residents, which is currently under Palestinian Authority control. ... May 4 is the 124th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (125th in leap years). ... The United Kingdom general election of 2005 was held on Thursday, 5 May 2005 and won by the Labour Party, led by Tony Blair. ... The House of Commons is the lower house of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... The Right Honourable Anthony Charles Lynton Blair (born 6 May 1953 in Edinburgh, Scotland) is the current Prime Minister of the United Kingdom. ... The name Labour Party or Labor Party is used by several political parties around the world. ... Michael Howard The Right Honourable Michael Howard, QC, PC (born Michael Hecht, July 7, 1941) is a British politician, the Leader of the Opposition Conservative Party (although stepping down soon). ... The Conservative Party is the largest political party on the centre-right in the United Kingdom. ... Charles Kennedy, current leader of the UK Liberal Democrat Party The Right Honourable Charles Peter Kennedy (born 25 November 1959) is a Scottish politician, who has been leader of the Liberal Democrats (the third largest political party in the United Kingdom) since 1999. ... The Liberal Democrats, often shortened to Lib Dems, are a social liberal political party based in the United Kingdom. ... A consulate (or consular office) is a form of diplomatic mission in charge of issues related to individual people and businesses, in other words issues outside inter-governmental diplomacy. ... Midtown Manhattan, looking north from the Empire State Building, 2005 New York City (officially named the City of New York) is the most populous city in the United States, and is at the center of international finance, politics, communications, music, fashion, and culture. ... For alternate meanings of GMT, see GMT (disambiguation). ... The Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) is Indias national space agency. ... CARTOSAT I is a stereoscopic Earth observation satellite built, launched and maintained by the Indian Space agency ISRO. Weighing around 1560 kgs at launch, Its applications will mainly be towards cartography in India. ... HAMSAT is a micro-satellite weighing 42. ... Earth orbit is an orbit around the planet Earth. ... Falun emblem Falun Gong (Traditional Chinese: 法輪功; Simplified Chinese: 法轮功; pinyin: ; literally Practice of the Wheel of Law) or Falun Dafa (Traditional Chinese: 法輪大法; Simplified Chinese: 法轮大法; pinyin: ; lit. ... A referendum (plural: referendums or referenda) or plebiscite is a direct vote in which an entire electorate is asked to either accept or reject a particular proposal. ... A boycott is a refusal to buy, sell, or otherwise trade with an individual or business who is generally believed by the participants in the boycott to be doing something morally wrong. ... Museveni was viewed as part of a new generation of African leaders in the 1990s. ... A monument celebrating the emancipation of slaves in the British Empire in 1834, erected in Victoria Tower Gardens, Millbank, Westminster, London Look up Slavery in Wiktionary, the free dictionary Slavery is a condition of control over a person against their will, enforced by violence or other forms of coercion. ... The Kansas Evolution Hearings are an ongoing courtroom-style debate held in Topeka, Kansas, by the Kansas State Board of Education and its State Board Science Hearing Committee to determine how the origin of life will be taught in the states public schools in the future. ... Pre-Cambrian stromatolites in the Siyeh Formation, Glacier National Park. ... Location in the state of Kansas Founded County Shawnee County Mayor Bill Bunten Area  - Total  - Water 147. ...

May 4, 2005 (Wednesday)

May 4 is the 124th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (125th in leap years). ... 2005 is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and is the current year. ... // Israel, the West Bank and Gaza Strip are at the center of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. ... The Palestinian flag, adopted in 1948, is a widely recognized modern symbol of the Palestinian people. ... The West Bank The Palestinian National Authority (PNA or PA) is a semi-autonomous state institution nominally governing the bulk of the West Bank and the Gaza Strip (which it calls the Palestinian Territories). It was established as a part of Oslo accords between the PLO and Israel. ... The Prime Minister of Israel is the elected head of the Israeli government. ... Ariel Sharon, the eleventh Prime Minister of Israel, spent many years in the Israel Defense Forces before being elected in March 2001. ... Tulkarm or Tulkarem (Arabic طولكرم Ṭūlkarm; Standard Hebrew טולכרם) is an Arab city in the West Bank. ... Jericho (Arabic أريحا ʾArīḥā; Hebrew יְרִיחוֹ, Standard Hebrew Yəriḥo, Tiberian Hebrew Yərîḫô, Yərîḥô) is a town in the West Bank, near the west bank of the Jordan River. ... The barrier route as of February 2005 The Israeli West Bank barrier (also called the West Bank security fence, or West Bank wall by its opponents) is a physical barrier consisting of a network of fences, walls, and trenches, constructed by Israel in the occupied West Bank. ... The war on terrorism or war on terror (abbreviated in U.S. policy circles as GWOT for Global War on Terror) is an effort by the governments of the United States and its principal allies to destroy groups deemed to be terrorist (primarily radical Islamist organizations such as al-Qaeda... Abu Faraj al-Libbi has been alleged to be a leader of the al-Qaeda organization. ... Al-Qaeda (Arabic: القاعدة, the foundation or the base) is the name given to a worldwide network of militant Islamist organizations under the leadership of Osama bin Laden. ... The CIA Seal The Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) is one of the American foreign intelligence agencies, responsible for obtaining and analyzing information about foreign governments, corporations, and individuals, and reporting such information to the various branches of the U.S. Government. ... The CIA Seal The Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) is one of the American foreign intelligence agencies, responsible for obtaining and analyzing information about foreign governments, corporations, and individuals, and reporting such information to the various branches of the U.S. Government. ... The September 11, 2001 attacks were a series of coordinated Islamist terrorist attacks carried out in the United States on Tuesday, September 11, 2001. ... Osama bin Laden Usāmah bin Muhammad bin `Awad bin Lādin (born July 30 or March 10, 1957) (Arabic: ), commonly known as Osama bin Laden (Arabic: ), is the figurehead of al-Qaeda, an Islamist movement that has been involved in attacks against civilians and military targets around the world. ... Al-Qaeda (Arabic: القاعدة, the foundation or the base) is the name given to a worldwide network of militant Islamist organizations under the leadership of Osama bin Laden. ... This article deals with the post-invasion period in Iraq and its occupation. ... A suicide bombing is a bomb attack on people or property, committed by a person who knows the explosion will cause his or her own death (see suicide, suicide weapons). ... This article is about the province of Iraq. ... Kurdish may refer to: The Kurdish people The Kurdish language This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... This article is about the domestic group. ... The President of Iraq is Iraqs head of state and chief of government. ... Saddam Hussein Saddām Hussein ʻAbd al-Majīd al-Tikrīt, spelled Husayn or Hussain; Arabic صدام حسين عبد المجيد التكريتي; born April 28, 1937 1) was President of Iraq from 1979 until 2003. ... Hon Alexander Downer Alexander John Gosse Downer (born September 9, 1951), Australian politician, became Foreign Minister of Australia in March 1996. ... R. G. Casey House, the headquarters of the Australian Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade This is a list of Australian Foreign Ministers: Note: Prior to 1970, the office was known as the Minister for External Affairs. ... Al Jazeera logo Al Jazeera (Arabic: ), meaning The Island or The (Arabian) Peninsula is an Arabic television channel based in Qatar. ... Initial image of Douglas Wood after capture by Iraqi militants. ... A hostage is an entity which is held by a captor in order to compel another party to act or refrain from acting in a particular way. ... An insurgency is an armed rebellion against a constituted authority, by any irregular armed force that rises up against an enforced or established authority, government, or administration. ... John Howard John Winston Howard (born July 26, 1939), is an Australian politician and the 25th Prime Minister of Australia, coming to office on March 11, 1996 and winning re-election in 1998, 2001 and 2004. ... The current (25th) Prime Minister of Australia, John Howard (sitting, fifth from left), with his Cabinet, 1999 The office of Prime Minister is in practice the most powerful political office in the Commonwealth of Australia. ... A monk walking in front of the Royal palace in Phnom Penh Phnom Penh (Khmer: ភ្នុំពេញ) is the capital and largest city of Cambodia. ... Memorial stupa at Choeung Ek Closer view, showing skulls within Choeung Ek, the site of a former orchard about 17km south of Phnom Penh, Cambodia, is the best-known of the sites known as The Killing Fields, where the Khmer Rouge regime executed about 17,000 people between 1975 and... See also: The Killing Fields. ... Alejandro Celestino Toledo Manrique (born 28 March 1946) is the current President of Peru. ... Electoral fraud is the deliberate interference with the process of an election. ... Free trade is an economic concept referring to the selling of products between countries without tariffs or other trade barriers. ... 1995 was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Life imprisonment is a term used for a particular kind of sentence of imprisonment. ... 1969 was a common year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1969 calendar). ... Location within Italy Piazza della Scala Milan (Italian: Milano; Milanese dialect: Milán) is the main city in northern Italy, and is located in the plains of Lombardy, the most populated and developed of Italian regions. ... Wikiquote has a collection of quotations by or about: United States Wikinews has news related to this article: United States United States government Official website of the United States government - Gateway to governmental sites White House - Official site of the US President Senate. ... Firefighter in full turn out gear with an axe A firefighter is a person who is trained and equipped to put out fires, rescue people, and in some areas provide emergency medical services. ... Brain damage or brain injury is the destruction or degeneration of brain cells. ... 1995 was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

May 3, 2005 (Tuesday)

May 3 is the 123rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (124th in leap years). ... 2005 is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and is the current year. ... United States Marine Corps Emblem The United States Marine Corps (USMC) is a branch of the U.S. military. ... April 2003: Two United States Navy F/A-18 Hornets prepare to launch from the flight deck of the aircraft carrier USS Harry S Truman. ... Monsanto Company (NYSE: MON) is a multinational agricultural biotechnology corporation. ... An iconic image of genetic engineering; this 1986 autoluminograph of a glowing transgenic tobacco plant bearing the luciferase gene of fireflys strikingly demonstrates the power and potential of genetic manipulation. ... A journalist is a person who practices journalism, the gathering and dissemination of information about current events, trends, issues and people. ... 2003 GMO USDA protest Protest expresses relatively overt reaction to events or situations: sometimes in favour, more often opposed. ... Freedom of the press (or press freedom) is the guarantee by a government of free public speech often through a state constitution for its citizens, and associations of individuals extended to members of news gathering organizations, and their published reporting. ... World Press Freedom Day honors sacrifices around the world made for free press and puts pressure on nations that deny their citizenry of this basic human right. ... The United Nations, or UN, is an international organization established in 1945 and now made up of 191 states. ... David Crane is a successful video game designer and programmer. ... Charles Taylor announces his resignation on Liberian TV, 2003 Charles Ghankay Taylor (born January 28, 1948) was the President of Liberia from 1997 to 2003. ... Lansana Conté Lansana Conté (born 1934) has been the President of Guinea since 1984. ... Faure Gnassingbé Faure Essozimna Gnassingbé (born June 6, 1966), also known as Faure Eyadéma, has been the President of Togo since May 4, 2005; he was previously president for twenty days from February 5 to February 25, 2005. ... Poliomyelitis (polio), or infantile paralysis, is a viral paralytic disease. ... Mogadishu A Mogadishu boy straddles the remains of a US Black Hawk helicopter during the 1992-1995 UN peacekeeping operation Mogadishu (Somali: Muqdisho) is a city in eastern Africa, on the Indian Ocean. ... Ali Mohammed Ghedi is Somalias new prime minister as of January 2005, Ali Mohamed Ghedi, is no career politician, but as an intellectual it is hoped he will command the respect of the countrys many warlords. ... The word grenade can mean:- The well-known hand grenade commonly used by soldiers. ... Advance fee fraud, often also known as the Nigerian money transfer fraud, Nigerian scam or 419 scam after the relevant section of the Nigerian Criminal Code [1] that it violates, is a fraudulent scheme to extract money from investors living in rich countries in Europe, Australia, or North America. ...

May 2, 2005 (Monday)

  • Data withheld from an annual report on terrorism by the U.S. State Department show a sharp increase in attacks in 2004. (BBC)
  • Israeli-Palestinian conflict:
    • Following an Israeli raid on the Palestinian city of Tulkarm, one Israeli soldier and one Islamic Jihad leader are killed. The soldier was killed in a gunfight with 3 members of Palestinian Islamic Jihad. The three were suspected to have been part of a the cell which was involved in Tel Aviv "Stage" club bombing in February 2005. Shafiq Abdul Rani, the leader of the Jihad cell in Tulkarm was killed and another militant was arrested. (Haaretz)
    • Palestinian militants fired 3 Qassam rockets on the Israeli town of Sderot. There were no casualties. (Haaretz)
    • Israeli Minister of Jerusalem and Diaspora Affairs Natan Sharansky resigned from the government as a protest against Ariel Sharon's unilateral disengagement plan. (Haaretz), (BBC)
  • Dozens of people reportedly die after a large explosion in a munitions dump in Pagja, Afghanistan 50 miles north of Kabul. (Seattle Times)
  • Guardsman Anthony John Wakefield, from Newcastle upon Tyne, has been killed in Iraq after being injured in hostile action in the southern town of Al Amarah, bringing the total of UK servicemen killed in the Iraq conflict to 87. (BBC)
  • Europe's largest sporting goods maker Adidas-Salomon sold its Salomon division for 485 million euros to Finnish company Amer Sports (which owns Wilson Sporting Goods). CNN News
  • The government of Nepal ends the house arrest of two parliamentarian communist leaders, Madhav Kumar Nepal and Amrit Bohara. (BBC)
  • In Togo, opposition party Union of Forces for Change refuses to join a new government, accusing Faure Gnassingbé of electoral fraud. About 12,000 people have fled the violence to Ghana and Benin. ECOWAS tries to mediate. (BBC) (Reuters AlertNet) (GhanaWeb) (ABC)
  • Foreign ministers gather in New York to review the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty. (Wired) (BBC) (Reuters AlertNet)
  • Cairo terrorism: Following Saturday's terrorist incidents in Cairo, some 200 people are brought in for questioning by Egyptian police. Ten people were injured in the attacks, and three militants were killed. (BBC)
  • In Germany, prosecutors demand 8-year sentence to neo-nazi leader Martin Weise and three others. (Reuters AlertNet)
  • Former Haitian prime minister Yvon Neptune demands that the current government drops its claim that he organized a massacre in February 2004. Neptune has been on a hunger strike for 15 days and refuses treatment. (Haiti Action Committee) (BBC) (Reuters AlertNet)
  • A gas cylinder explosion in Lahore, Pakistan causes collapse of three buildings - at least 16 people dead. (BBC) (Reuters)
  • British rocket Skylark makes its last launch. (Independent) (BBC)
  • United Nations chief prosecutor of Sierra Leone's war crimes court David Crane (prosecutor) claims that Charles Taylor, former president of Liberia, is still plotting to kill Guinean leader Lansana Conté. Conté has been in a hospital since he survived an assassination attempt in January. (Reuters AlertNet) (UN Regional Information) (World Peace Herald) (BBC)

May 2 is the 122nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (123rd in leap years). ... 2005 is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and is the current year. ... Terrorism is a controversial and subjective term with multiple definitions. ... The United States Department of State, often referred to as the State Department, is the Cabinet-level foreign affairs agency of the United States government, equivalent to foreign ministries in other countries. ... // Israel, the West Bank and Gaza Strip are at the center of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. ... The Palestinian flag, adopted in 1948, is a widely recognized modern symbol of the Palestinian people. ... Tulkarm or Tulkarem (Arabic طولكرم Ṭūlkarm; Standard Hebrew טולכרם) is an Arab city in the West Bank. ... The emblem of the Palestinian Islamic Jihad shows a map of the land they claim as Palestine (roughly, present-day Israel, the West Bank and the Gaza Strip) superimposed on the images of the Dome of the Rock, two fists and two rifles. ... Tel Aviv at night Dizengof Center Allenby Street Tel Aviv-Yafo (Hebrew תל אביב-יפו; Arabic تل ابيب-يافا Tal Abīb-Yāfā) is an Israeli city on the coast of the Mediterranean sea. ... Tulkarm or Tulkarem (Arabic طولكرم Ṭūlkarm; Standard Hebrew טולכרם) is an Arab city in the West Bank. ... The Qassam rocket is a simple steel rocket filled with explosives, developed by the Palestinian organization Hamas. ... Sederot (שדרות; unofficially also spelled Sderot) is a city in the Southern District of Israel in Israel. ... Natan Sharansky (Hebrew: נתן שרנסקי, Russian: Натан Щаранский, born January 20, 1948) is a notable former Soviet anticommunist, Zionist, Israeli politician and writer. ... Ariel Sharon, the eleventh Prime Minister of Israel, spent many years in the Israel Defense Forces before being elected in March 2001. ... Kabul (Kâbl, in Persian کابل) is the capital and largest city of Afghanistan with a population variously estimated at 2 to 4 million. ... This article is about a city in the United Kingdom. ... adidas Stabil and a box adidas is a German sports apparel corporation. ... A Wilson football. ... In justice and law, house arrest is the situation where a person is confined (by the authorities) to his or her house, possibly with travel allowed but restricted. ... Faure Gnassingbé Faure Essozimna Gnassingbé (born June 6, 1966), also known as Faure Eyadéma, has been the President of Togo since May 4, 2005; he was previously president for twenty days from February 5 to February 25, 2005. ... Electoral fraud is the deliberate interference with the process of an election. ... The Economic Community of West African States is a regional group of fifteen countries, founded on May 28, 1975 when 15 West African countries signed the Treaty of Lagos. ... State nickname: Empire State Other U.S. States Capital Albany Largest city New York Governor George Pataki Official languages None Area 141,205 km² (27th)  - Land 122,409 km²  - Water 18,795 km² (13. ... Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty Opened for signature July 1, 1968 at New York Entered into force March 5, 1970 Conditions for entry into force Ratification by the United Kingdom, the Soviet Union, the United States, and 40 other signatory states. ... Cairo, capital of Egypt and largest city in both Africa and the Middle East was hit by three terrorist attacks during April 2005. ... Terrorism is a controversial and subjective term with multiple definitions. ... View of the modern citys skyline. ... The terms Neo-Nazism and Neo-Fascism refer to any social or political movement to revive Nazism or Fascism, respectively, and postdates the Second World War. ... Yvon Neptune Yvon Neptune (born November 8, 1946) was the Prime Minister of Haiti from 2002 until 2004. ... A hunger strike is a method of non-violent resistance in which participants fast as an act of political protest or to achieve a goal such as a policy change. ... Lahore (لاةور) is a major city in Pakistan and is the capital of the province of Punjab. ... Skylark is the name of a British elevator research sounding rocket. ... The United Nations, or UN, is an international organization established in 1945 and now made up of 191 states. ... Charles Taylor announces his resignation on Liberian TV, 2003 Charles Ghankay Taylor (born January 28, 1948) was the President of Liberia from 1997 to 2003. ... Lansana Conté Lansana Conté (born 1934) has been the President of Guinea since 1984. ...

May 1, 2005 (Sunday)

  • Lenovo Group, the largest Chinese computer company acquires the personal computer business of IBM for US$ 1.25 billion in cash, and Lenovo assumes $500 million of IBM's debt. (Reuters)
  • More than thirty Iraqis are killed and more than fifty are wounded as a bomb goes off at a funeral. (CBC)
  • The United States informs Japan that North Korea may have launched another test missile towards the Sea of Japan. The report is now said to be confirmed. (ABC News) (Forbes)
  • Astronomers have directly confirmed the existence of an extrasolar planet orbiting the brown dwarf numbered 2M1207a. The team says that this is the first-ever infrared view of an exoplanet. (Seattle Times) (ESO) (CP)
  • Taiwanese president Chen Shui-bian requests that the Chinese government meet directly with his government after China meets with Taiwan's opposition leader, Lien Chan. Taiwan and China are in conflict over Taiwan's increased calls for independence from the mainlaind. (CBC) (ABC)
  • Iraqi and American militaries hold several suspects for questioning in the Margaret Hassan kidnapping case. Hassan, director of CARE's Iraq division, was kidnapped by insurgents in late October 2004 and subsequently believed to be killed. (CBC) (Reuters)
  • In Nepal, 10,000 protesters march in Kathmandu against the policies of king Gyanendra and demand return of democracy. (Reuters AlertNet) (ABC)
  • Italy intends to publish its own view of the killing of Nicola Calipari. Italian media has released classified details about a report the United States made. (BBC) (Reuters AlertNet) (ABC)
  • Riot police clash with masked left-wing anarchists in Berlin and Leipzig, Germany. 100 people are arrested. (Deutsche Welle) (Reuters AlertNet)
  • Honduran president Ricardo Maduro, and his daughter survive with minor injuries when their plane crashes into the sea near Tela. (CNN) (Guardian Unlimited) (BBC)

May 1 is the 121st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (122nd in leap years). ... 2005 is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and is the current year. ... Lenovo Group Limited (联想集团有限公司), formerly known as Legend Group Limited, is the largest personal computer manufacturer in the Peoples Republic of China, and as of 2004 is the eighth largest in the world. ... International Business Machines Corporation (IBM, or colloquially, Big Blue) (NYSE: IBM) (incorporated June 15, 1911, in operation since 1888) is headquartered in Armonk, New York, USA. The company manufactures and sells computer hardware, software, and services. ... The United States dollar is the official currency of the United States. ... Massive ordinance air-burst bomb. ... Polish missile wz. ... The Sea of Japan or Japan Sea in most countries and the United Nations and in academic fields, known as the East Sea in South Korea, the East Sea of Korea in North Korea, and the Japan Sea in China, is a marginal sea of the western Pacific Ocean, bound... Astronomy is one of the few sciences where amateurs can still play an active role, especially in the discovery and monitoring of transient phenomena. ... 2M1207b is an extrasolar planet orbiting brown dwarf 2M1207A. It is five times the size of Jupiter. ... A planet (from the Greek πλανήτης, planētēs which means wanderer or more forcefully vagrant, tramp) is an object in orbit around a star that is not a star in its own right. ... Brown dwarfs are sub-stellar objects (~5 to 90 Jupiter masses) that do not fuse hydrogen into helium in their cores, as do stars on the main sequence, but have fully convective surfaces and interiors, with no chemical differentiation by depth. ... 2M1207, 2M1207A or 2MASSWJ 1207334-393254 is a brown dwarf star located at right ascension 12 hrs, 7 minutes, 33. ... Infrared Image of a possible extrasolar planet (lower left) in the Constellation Taurus, taken by the Hubble Space Telescope. ... Map of Taiwan Taiwan is mostly mountainous in the east, but gradually transitions to gently sloping plains in the west (satellite photo by NASA). ... Chen Shui-bian, President of the Republic of China Chen Shui-bian (ch. ... Lien Chan (連戰, in pinyin: Lián Zhàn) (born August 27, 1936, in Xian) is a Taiwanese politician, active in late 20th and early 21st centuries. ... Margaret Hassan Margaret Hassan (also Madam Margaret) (April 18, 1945–November 14, 2004?) was an aid worker who worked in Iraq for many years and was kidnapped and killed there, apparently by members of the Iraqi resistance, in late 2004. ... Cooperative for Assistance and Relief Everywhere (CARE) is one of the largest private international humanitarian organizations in the world, with programmes in over 72 countries. ... October is the tenth month of the year in the Gregorian Calendar and one of seven Gregorian months with the length of 31 days. ... 2004 is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2003 GMO USDA protest Protest expresses relatively overt reaction to events or situations: sometimes in favour, more often opposed. ... This article is about the city. ... King Gyanendra King Gyanendra Bir Bikram Shah Dev of Nepal (born July 7, 1947) has been the king of Nepal since June 2001. ... Nicola Calipari Nicola Calipari (June 23, 1953, Reggio Calabria - March 4, 2005, Iraq) was an Italian military intelligence officer (with the rank of Major). ... Riot control are the measures to control a riot or to break up an unwanted demonstration (usually of protestors). ...  Berlin (pronounced: , German ) is the capital of Germany and its largest city, with 3,426,000 inhabitants (as of January 2005); down from 4. ... Map of Germany showing Leipzig Leipzig [ˈlaiptsɪç] (Polish; Sorbian/Lusatian: Lipsk) is the largest city in the federal state (Bundesland) of Saxony in Germany. ... Categories: Stub | 1946 births | Presidents of Honduras ... Tela is a town on the northern Caribbean coast of the Atlántida department of Honduras. ...

Past events by month

2005: January February March April
2004: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2003: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2002: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2001: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2000: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2005 is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and is the current year. ... 2005 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December- → Deaths in January • 29 Ephraim Kishon • 25 Philip Johnson • 23 Johnny Carson • 22 Parveen Babi • 20 Jan Nowak-Jeziorański • 17 Virginia Mayo • 17 Zhao Ziyang • 15 Ruth Warrick • 14 Rudolph Moshammer Recent deaths Ongoing events • Tsunami relief... 2005 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December- → Ongoing events • Iraqi legislative election • Bill C-38 (Canada gay marriage) • Tsunami relief Upcoming events • March 11: Red Nose Day 2005 in the UK. Deaths in February • 26 – Jef Raskin • 25 – Hugh Nibley • 25 – Peter Benenson • 21... 2005 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December- → Ongoing events • Iraqi legislative election • Bill C-38 (Canada gay marriage) • Tsunami relief • Cedar Revolution in Lebanon • Tulip Revolution in Kyrgyzstan • German Visa Affair 2005 • Expo 2005 in Nagoya, Japan • Terri Schiavo controversy • Pope John Paul II... 2005 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December- → Ongoing events • Iraqi legislative election • Bill C-38 (Canada gay marriage) • Tsunami relief • Cedar Revolution in Lebanon • Tulip Revolution in Kyrgyzstan • German Visa Affair 2005 • Expo 2005 in Nagoya, Japan • Terri Schiavo controversy • Pope John Paul II... 2004 is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2004 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December- → January 31, 2004 The United States defence budget is set to exceed US$400 billion next year—an almost 7% increase—according to budget proposals inadvertently posted on the Pentagons website. ... 2004 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December- → February 29, 2004 Jean-Bertrand Aristide resigns as president of Haiti and flees the country for the Central African Republic. ... 2004 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December Deaths • 08 Abu Abbas • 20 Queen Juliana • 28 Peter Ustinov • 30 Alistair Cooke More March 2004 deaths Ongoing events EU Enlargement Exploration of Mars: Rovers Haiti Rebellion Israeli-Palestinian conflict Occupation of Iraq Same-sex marriage in... 2004 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December Deaths in April • 18 Ratu Sir Kamisese Mara • 19 Norris McWhirter • 22 Pat Tillman • 24 Estée Lauder Other recent deaths Ongoing events EU Enlargement Exploration of Mars: Rovers Haiti Rebellion Reconstruction of Iraq – Occupation & Resistance Israeli-Palestinian... 2004 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December Deaths in May • 28 Gerald Anthony • 27 Umberto Agnelli • 22 Richard Biggs • 20 Len Murray • 17 Tony Randall • 17 Ezzedine Salim • 9 Alan King • 9 Akhmad Kadyrov • 8(?) Nick Berg • 7 Waldemar Milewicz Other recent deaths Ongoing... 2004 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December See also: June 2004 in sports Deaths in June • 28 Anthony Buckeridge • 26 Naomi Shemer • 26 Yash Johar • 22 Bob Bemer • 22 Thomas Gold • 22 Francisco Ortiz Franco • 16 Thanom Kittikachorn • 10 Ray Charles • 5 Ronald Reagan... 2004 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December See also: July 2004 in sports Deaths in July • 31 David B. Haight • 29 Francis Crick • 29 Nafisa Joseph • 23 Joe Cahill • 23 Mehmood • 23 Illinois Jacquet • 23 Carlos Paredes • 22 Sacha Distel • 21 Jerry Goldsmith • 21... 2004 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December See also: August 2004 in sports Deaths in August 2004 • 30 Fred Whipple • 26 Laura Branigan • 24 Elisabeth Kübler-Ross • 18 Elmer Bernstein • 15 Amarsinh Chaudhary • 14 Czesław Miłosz • 13 Julia Child • 8 Robert Bootzin • 8 Fay... -1... 2004 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December See also: October 2004 in sports Deaths in October • 29 HRH Princess Alice • 25 John Peel • 24 James Cardinal Hickey • 23 Robert Merrill • 19 Paul Nitze • 18 K. M. Veerappan • 16 Pierre Salinger • 10 Christopher Reeve • 9... 2004 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December See also: November 2004 in sports November 2004 in science Deaths in November • 30 Pierre Berton • 29 John Drew Barrymore • 26 Bill Alley • 24 Arthur Hailey • 23 Rafael Eitan • 18 Bobby Frank Cherry • 16 John Morgan • 13... 2004 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December- → Deaths in December • 30 Artie Shaw • 29 Julius Axelrod • 28 Jacques Dupuis • 28 Jerry Orbach • 28 Susan Sontag • 26 Reggie White • 26 Sir Angus Ogilvy • 23 P. V. Narasimha Rao • 23 Doug Ault • 19 Renata Tebaldi • 16... 2003 is a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2003: January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for January, 2003. ... 2003 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for February, 2003. ... 2003 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December - → A timeline of events in the news for March, 2003. ... 2003 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December - → A timeline of events in the news for April 2003. ... 2003 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December - → A timeline of events in the news for May, 2003. ... 2003 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for June, 2003. ... 2003 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for July, 2003. ... 2003 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for August, 2003. ... 2003 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for September, 2003. ... 2003 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for October, 2003. ... 2003 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for November, 2003. ... 2003: January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December - → A timeline of events in the news for December, 2003. ... 2002 is a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2002 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for January, 2002. ... 2002 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December February 27, 2002 Alicia Keys wins five Grammys. ... 2002 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for March, 2002. ... 2002 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for April, 2002. ... 2002 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for May, 2002. ... 2002 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for June, 2002. ... 2002 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for July, 2002. ... 2002 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for August, 2002. ... 2002 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for September, 2002. ... 2002 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for October, 2002. ... 2002 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for November, 2002. ... 2002 : January _ February _ March _ April _ May _ June _ July _ August _ September _ October _ November _ December _ → A timeline of events in the news for December, 2002. ... 2001 is a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2001 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December This is a month starting on Monday with 31 days. ... 2001 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December Events: February - Iraq disarmament crisis: British and U.S. forces carry out bombing raids attempting to disable Iraqs air defense network. ... 2001 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December Events: March 3 - A U.S. Air Force Materials Command C-23 Sherpa transport crashes during stormy weather in the U.S. state of Georgia, killing 21. ... 2001 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December Events: April 1: An EP-3E United States Navy plane collides with a Chinese Peoples Liberation Army fighter jet. ... 2001 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December Events: May 1 - Chandra Levy disapears while jogging. ... 2001 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December Events: June 5-June 9 - Houston, Texas is devastated by flooding when Tropical Storm Allison dumps 36 inches of rain on the city. ... 2001 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December Deaths: July 3 - Mordecai Richler July 23 - Eudora Welty July 31 - Poul Anderson Films: July 4 - Cats and Dogs July 6 - Kiss of the Dragon starring Jet Li July 18 - Jurassic Park III July 27 - Planet of... 2001 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December Deaths: August 25 - Aaliyah Films: August 10 - Osmosis Jones played by Chris Rock, starring Bill Murray August 24 - Bubble Boy Categories: 2001 by month ... 2001 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December Events: September 11 - September 11, 2001 Terrorist Attack occurs in United States; more than 3,000 killed in New York City and The Pentagon in Washington, D.C. as a result. ... 2001 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December Films: October 5 - Joy Ride October 19 - From Hell See also 2001#October. ... 2001 is a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar, and also: The International Year of the Volunteer The United Nations Year of Dialogue Among Civilizations Events January January 1 - A black monolith measuring approximately nine feet tall appears in Seattles Magnuson Park, placed by an anonymous... 2001 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December Events: December 2 - Enron files for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection five days after Dynegy canceled a US$8. ... 2000 is a leap year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2000 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December Events: January 1- Millennium celebrations take place throughout the world. ... 2000 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December This is a timeline for events in February, 2000. ... 2000 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December This is a timeline for events in March, 2000. ... 2000 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December This is a timeline for events in April, 2000. ... 2000 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December This is a timeline for events in May, 2000. ... 2000 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December This is a timeline for events in June, 2000. ... 2000 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December This is a timeline for events in July, 2000. ... 2000 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December This is a timeline for events in August, 2000. ... 2000 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December This is a timeline for events in September, 2000. ... 2000 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December This is a timeline for events in October, 2000. ... 2000 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December This is a timeline for events in November, 2000. ... 2000 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December This is a timeline for events in December, 2000. ...


News collections and sources

  • Wikipedia:News collections and sources.
  • Wikipedia:News sources - This has much of the same material organized in a hierarchical manner to help encourage NPOV in our news reporting.

  Results from FactBites:
 
May 2005 - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (4738 words)
Reports emerge that the United States may be sending detainees to Uzbekistan, a regime notorious for torture.
Abu Faraj al-Libbi, the al-Qaeda suspect captured in Pakistan on May 2 and thought to be third-in-command in al-Qaeda, turns out to be a mid-level member in the organization.
In April 2005, heavy rains generated widespread flooding and caused the Shabele River to burst its banks.
May 2005 Letter of Acceptances and Returns (9693 words)
Identifiable elements may be rendered unidentifiable by significant reduction in size, marginal contrast, excessive counterchanging, voiding, or fimbriation, or by being obscured by other elements of the design." In this case, the heart, a charge not usually seen voided, loses its identifiability when voided and interlaced with the triquetra.
Identifiable elements may be rendered unidentifiable by significant reduction in size, marginal contrast, excessive counterchanging, voiding, or fimbriation, or by being obscured by other elements of the design." In this case, the odd placement of the overall quill pens obscures the identity of the underlying crescent.
Although the two devices may be technically clear, the voiding of Christoff's mullet and the eclipsing of Cynedd's sun, together with the shared tincture of half the field, create an overwhelming visual similarity between the two pieces of armory under RfS X.5.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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