FACTOID # 21: 15% of Army recruits from South Dakota are Native American, which is roughly the same percentage for female Army recruits in the state.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > As You Like It
Walter Deverell,The Mock Marriage of Orlando and Rosalind, 1853
Walter Deverell,The Mock Marriage of Orlando and Rosalind, 1853

William Shakespeare's As You Like It is a pastoral comedy written in 1599 or early 1600. It is often classed as one of Shakespeare's mature comedies. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Deverells illustration of a scene from As You Like It Walter Howell Deverell (1827-1854) was a British artist, born in America, who was associated with the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... Titians The Pastoral Concert Pastoral refers to the lifestyle of shepherds and pastoralists, moving livestock around larger areas of land according to seasons and availability of water and feed. ... The word comedy has a classical meaning (comical theatre) and a popular one (the use of humor with an intent to provoke laughter in general). ... Year 1599 was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 10-day slower Julian calendar). ... 1600 was a leap year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Tuesday of the 10-day slower Julian calendar). ...

Contents

Date and text

The play was entered into the Register of the Stationers Company on August 4, 1600; but it was not printed till its inclusion in the First Folio in 1623. The Worshipful Company of Stationers and Newspaper Makers is one of the Livery Companies of the City of London. ... The title page of the First Folio with the famous engraved portrait of Shakespeare by Martin Droeshout The First Folio is the name given by modern scholars to the first published collection of William Shakespeares plays; its actual title is Mr. ...


Performance

There is no certain record of any performance before the Restoration. There is one possible performance, however, at Wilton House in Wiltshire, the country seat of the Earls of Pembroke. William Herbert, 3rd Earl of Pembroke hosted James I and his Court at Wilton House from October to December 1603, while London was suffering an epidemic of bubonic plague. The King's Men were paid £30 to come to Wilton House and perform for the King and Court on December 2, 1603. A Herbert family tradition holds that the play acted that night was As You Like It.[1] King Charles II, the first monarch to rule after the English Restoration. ... Wiltshire (abbreviated Wilts) is a large southern English county. ... For other persons named William Herbert, see William Herbert (disambiguation). ... James VI of Scotland and I of England (Charles James) (19 June 1566–27 March 1625) was a King who ruled over England, Scotland and Ireland, and was the first Sovereign to reign in the three realms simultaneously. ... The bubonic plague or bubonic fever is the best-known variant of the deadly infectious disease caused by the enterobacteria Yersinia pestis. ... It has been suggested that Lord Chamberlains Men be merged into this article or section. ...


In the Restoration era, the King's Company was assigned the play by royal warrant in 1669. It is known to have been acted at Drury Lane in 1723, in an adapted form called Love in a Forest; Colley Cibber played Jaques. Another Drury Lane production seventeen years later returned to the Shakespearean text (1740).[2] The Kings Company was one of two enterprises granted the rights to mount theatrical productions in London at the start of the English Restoration. ... Currently home to Lord Of The Rings, the musical. ... Colley Cibber, actor, playwright, Poet Laureate, first British actor-manager, and head Dunce of Alexander Popes Dunciad. ...


Notable recent productions of As You Like It include the 1936 Old Vic Theatre production starring Edith Evans and the 1961 Shakespeare Memorial Theatre production starring Vanessa Redgrave. The longest running Broadway production starred Katharine Hepburn as Rosalind and Ernest Thesiger as Jacques and was directed by Michael Benthall. It ran for 145 performances in 1950. Another notable production was at the 2005 Stratford Festival in Stratford, Ontario, which was set in the 1960s and featured Shakespeare's lyrics set to music written by Barenaked Ladies. 1936 (MCMXXXVI) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ... The Old Vic is a theatre in the Waterloo area of London. ... Blue plaque at 109 Ebury Street, London Dame Edith Mary Evans DBE (8 February 1888–14 October 1976) was an Academy Award nominated and Golden Globe award winning actress. ... Year 1961 (MCMLXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Royal Shakespeare Theatre is a large theatre dedicated to British playwright William Shakespeare in his birthplace of Stratford-upon-Avon. ... Vanessa Redgrave, CBE (born 30 January 1937) is an Academy Award winning English actress and member of the Redgrave family, one of the enduring theatrical dynasties. ... The Lion King at the New Amsterdam Theatre, 2003 Broadway theatre[1] is the most prestigious form of professional theatre in the U.S., as well as the most well known to the general public and most lucrative for the performers, technicians and others involved in putting on the shows. ... Katharine Houghton Hepburn (May 12, 1907 – June 29, 2003) was an iconic American star of film, television and stage, widely recognized for her sharp wit, New England gentility and fierce independence. ... Ernest Thesiger, (January 15, 1879 - January 14, 1961), sometimes credited as Ernst Thesiger, was a British stage and film actor. ... Year 1950 (MCML) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Stratford Festival of Canada is a summer-long celebration of theatre. ... Stratford is a city on the Avon River in Perth County in southwestern Ontario, Canada with a population of 30,461 in 2006. ... The 1960s decade refers to the years from January 1, 1960 to December 31, 1969, inclusive. ... Barenaked Ladies (often abbreviated BNL or occasionally BnL) is a Canadian alternative rock band currently composed of Jim Creeggan, Kevin Hearn, Steven Page, Ed Robertson, Tyler Stewart, and formerly Andy Creeggan. ...


Characters

  • Duke Senior - in banishment and in the forest
  • Duke Frederick - Duke Senior's younger brother and usurper
  • Amiens - attending lord
  • Jaques - attending lord
  • Oliver - eldest son of Sir Rowland de Boys
  • Jaques de Boys - second son of Sir Rowland de Boys
  • Orlando - youngest son of Sir Rowland de Boys
  • Le Beau - a courtier attending on Duke Frederick
  • Charles - a wrestler at court
  • Adam - an old servant to Sir Rowland de Boys
  • Dennis - a servant to Oliver
  • Touchstone - a court fool
  • Sir Oliver Martext - a country curate
  • Corin & Silvius - shepherds
  • William - a country fellow
  • Hymen - god of marriage
  • Rosalind - daughter of Duke Senior
  • Celia - daughter of Duke Frederick
  • Phebe - a shepherdess
  • Audrey - a country wench

Touchstone is the name of the fool or jester character in Shakespeares play As You Like It. ...

Synopsis

Scene from As you like it, Francis Hayman, c. 1750.
Scene from As you like it, Francis Hayman, c. 1750.

The play is set in a duchy in France, but most of the action takes place in a location called the 'Forest of Arden', which is most likely a toponym for a forest close to Shakespeare's home town of Stratford-upon-Avon. The Oxford Shakespeare edition rationalizes this geographical discrepancy by assuming that 'Arden' is an anglicisation of the forested Ardennes region of Belgium, and alters the spelling to reflect this. Other editions keep Shakespeare's 'Arden' spelling, since it can be argued that the pastoral mode depicts a fantastical world in which geographical details are irrelevant. The Arden edition of Shakespeare makes the suggestion that the name 'Arden' comes from a combination of the classical region of Arcadia and the biblical garden of Eden, as there is a strong interplay of classical and Christian belief systems and philosophies within the play. Furthermore, Shakespeare's mother's name was Mary Arden, and the name of the forest may also be a pun on that. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2048x1170, 287 KB) Please see the file description page for further information. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2048x1170, 287 KB) Please see the file description page for further information. ... Francis Hayman (1708 - 2 February 1776) was an English painter and illustrator who became one of the founding members of the Royal Academy in 1768 and later its first librarian. ... A duchy is a territory, fief, or domain ruled by a duke or duchess. ... Arden is a district in Warwickshire, England, near Stratford-upon-Avon. ... Toponymy is the taxonomic study of toponyms (place-names), their origins and their meanings. ... Stratford-upon-Avon Stratford-upon-Avon is a town in Warwickshire, England. ... This does not cite any references or sources. ... The Ardennes (IPA pronunciation: ) (Dutch: Ardennen) is a volcanic region of extensive forests and rolling hill country, primarily in Belgium and Luxembourg, but stretching into France (lending its name to the Ardennes département and the Champagne-Ardenne région). ... Titians The Pastoral Concert Pastoral refers to the lifestyle of shepherds and pastoralists, moving livestock around larger areas of land according to seasons and availability of water and feed. ... Look up mode in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


Frederick has usurped the Duchy and exiled his older brother, Duke Senior. The Duke's daughter Rosalind has been permitted to remain at court because she is the closest friend and cousin of Frederick's only child, Celia. Orlando, a young gentleman of the kingdom who has fallen in love at first sight of Rosalind, is forced to flee his home after being persecuted by his older brother, Oliver. Frederick becomes angry and banishes Rosalind from court. Celia and Rosalind decide to flee together accompanied by the jester Touchstone, with Rosalind disguised as a young man.


Rosalind, now disguised as Ganymede ("Jove's own page"), and Celia, now disguised as Aliena (Latin for "stranger"), arrive in the Arcadian Forest of Arden, where the exiled Duke now lives with some supporters, including "the melancholy Jaques", who is introduced to us weeping over the slaughter of a deer. "Ganymede" and "Aliena" do not immediately encounter the Duke and his companions, as they meet up with Corin, an impoverished tenant, and offer to buy his master's rude cottage. The Rape of Ganymede, by Rubens In Greek mythology, Ganymede, or closer to the Greek Ganymede the great man that leads (in Greek — Γανυμήδης, GanumÄ“dÄ“s) was a divine hero whose homeland was the Troad. ... Jupiter et Thétis - by Jean Ingres, 1811. ... Latin was the language originally spoken in the region around Rome called Latium. ... This page is about the fictional land of Arcadia - for the real Greek region see Arcadia, or for other uses arcadia (disambiguation) Arcadia was a concept in Greek mythology or a land untouched by human civilisation, free of war and a place of outstanding natural beauty - in this way it... Arden is a district in Warwickshire, England, near Stratford-upon-Avon. ... Exile (band) may refer to: Exile - The American country music band Exile - The Japanese pop music band Category: ... Melancholia (Greek μελαγχολια) was described as a distinct disease as early as the fifth and fourth centuries BC in the Hippocratic writings. ... “Fawn” redirects here. ... A tenant (from the Latin tenere, to hold), in legal contexts, holds real property by some form of title from a landlord. ...


Orlando and his servant Adam (a role possibly played by Shakespeare himself, though this story may be apocryphal [3]), meanwhile, find the Duke and his men and are soon living with them and posting simplistic love poems for Rosalind on the trees. Rosalind, also in love with Orlando, meets him as Ganymede and pretends to counsel him to cure him of being in love. Ganymede says he will take Rosalind's place and he and Orlando can act out their relationship. Bust of Homer, one of the earliest European poets, in the British Museum Poetry (ancient Greek: ποιεω (poieo) = I create) is an art form in which human language is used for its aesthetic qualities in addition to, or instead of, its notional and semantic content. ... The coniferous Coast Redwood, the tallest tree species on earth. ...

Audrey by Philip Richard Morris
Audrey by Philip Richard Morris

Meanwhile, the shepherdess Phebe, with whom Silvius is in love, has fallen in love with Ganymede, though Ganymede continually shows that he is not interested in Phebe. The cynical Touchstone has also made an amorous advance on the dull-witted goatherd girl Audrey, and attempts to marry her before his plans are thwarted by the intrusive Jaques. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 394 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (505 × 768 pixel, file size: 139 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Faithful reproductions of two-dimensional original works cannot attract copyright in the U.S. according to the rule in Bridgeman Art Library v. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 394 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (505 × 768 pixel, file size: 139 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Faithful reproductions of two-dimensional original works cannot attract copyright in the U.S. according to the rule in Bridgeman Art Library v. ... “Spouse” redirects here. ...


Finally, Silvius, Phebe, Ganymede, and Orlando are brought together in an argument with each other over who will get whom. Ganymede says he will solve the problem, having Orlando promise to marry Rosalind, and Phebe promise to marry Silvius if she cannot marry Ganymede. The next day, Ganymede reveals himself as Rosalind, and since women are not allowed to marry women, Phebe ends up with Silvius.


Orlando sees Oliver in the forest and rescues him from a lioness, causing Oliver to repent of mistreating Orlando. Oliver meets Aliena (Celia's false identity) and falls in love with her, and they agree to marry. Orlando and Rosalind, Oliver and Celia, Silvius and Phebe, and Touchstone and Audrey all are married in the final scene, after which they discover that Frederick has also repented his faults, deciding to restore his legitimate brother to the dukedom and adopt a religious life. Temperate rainforest on Northern Slopes of the Alborz mountain ranges, Iran A dense growth of softwoods (a conifer forest) in the Sierra Nevada Range of Northern California A deciduous broadleaf (Beech) forest in Slovenia. ... Binomial name Panthera leo (Linnaeus, 1758) The Lion (Panthera leo) is a mammal of the family Felidae. ... A scene is an episode in a story. ... The term duke is a title of nobility which refers to the sovereign male ruler of a Continental European duchy, to a nobleman of the highest grade of the British peerage, or to the highest rank of nobility in various other European countries, including Spain and France (in Italy, principe...


Critical response

Rosalind by Robert Walker Macbeth

Scholars have long disagreed about the merits of the play. Critics from Samuel Johnson to George Bernard Shaw have complained that As You Like It is lacking in the high artistry of which Shakespeare was capable. Shaw liked to think that Shakespeare wrote the play as a mere crowdpleaser, and signalled his own middling opinion of the work by calling it As You Like It — as if the playwright did not agree. Tolstoy objected to the immorality of the characters, and Touchstone's constant clowning. Other critics have found great literary value in the work. Harold Bloom has written that Rosalind is among Shakespeare's greatest and most fully realized female characters. Despite critical disputes, the play remains one of Shakespeare's most frequently performed comedies. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 478 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (613 × 768 pixel, file size: 150 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Faithful reproductions of two-dimensional original works cannot attract copyright in the U.S. according to the rule in Bridgeman Art Library v. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 478 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (613 × 768 pixel, file size: 150 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Faithful reproductions of two-dimensional original works cannot attract copyright in the U.S. according to the rule in Bridgeman Art Library v. ... For other persons named Samuel Johnson, see Samuel Johnson (disambiguation). ... George Bernard Shaw (26 July 1856–2 November 1950) was an Irish dramatist, literary critic, and socialist. ... Count Lev Nikolayevich Tolstoy(Lyof, Lyoff) (September 9 [O.S. August 28] 1828 – November 20 [O.S. November 7] 1910) (Russian: , IPA:  ), commonly referred to in English as Leo Tolstoy, was a Russian writer – novelist, essayist, dramatist and philosopher – as well as pacifist Christian anarchist and educational reformer. ... Morality is a complex of principles based on cultural, religious, and philosophical concepts and beliefs, by which an individual determines whether his or her actions are right or wrong. ...


The elaborate gender reversals in the story are of particular interest to modern critics interested in gender studies. Through four acts of the play, Rosalind — who in Shakespeare's day would have been played by a boy — finds it necessary to disguise herself as a boy, whereupon the rustic Phebe (also played by a boy), becomes infatuated with this "Ganymede", a name with homoerotic overtones. In fact, the epilogue, spoken by Rosalind to the audience, states rather explicitly that she (or at least the actor playing her) is not a woman. Gender studies is a theoretical work in the social sciences or humanities that focuses on issues of sex and gender in language and society, and often addresses related issues including racial and ethnic oppression, postcolonial societies, and globalization. ... The Rape of Ganymede, by Rubens In Greek mythology, Ganymede, or closer to the Greek Ganymede the great man that leads (in Greek — Γανυμήδης, GanumÄ“dÄ“s) was a divine hero whose homeland was the Troad. ... Homosexuality is a sexual orientation characterized by esthetic attraction, romantic love, or sexual desire exclusively for another of the same sex. ...


Themes

Language

Act II, Scene 7 features one of Shakespeare's most famous monologues, which states: All the worlds a stage is the phrase that begins a famous soliloquy from William Shakespeares As You Like It, spoken by the melancholy Jaques. ...


"All the world's a stage And all the men and women merely players; They have their exits and their entrances, And one man in his time plays many parts, His acts being seven ages."


This famous monologue is spoken by the melancholy Jaques. A monologue, pronounced monolog, is a speech made by one person speaking his or her thoughts aloud or directly addressing a reader, audience, or character. ...


As You Like It also features much humorous and clever wordplay(e.g, Jacques attribution of "ducdame"), occasioned by chance encounters in the forest, and several entangled love affairs, all in a serene pastoral setting which makes it often especially effective staged outdoors in a park or similar site. Ducdame is a nonsense word from a song sung by Jaques in Shakespeares As You Like It, Act 2, Scene 5. ...


Pastoral mode

This section may contain original research or unverified claims.
Please help Wikipedia by adding references. See the talk page for details.

The theme of pastoral comedy is love in all its guises in a rustic setting, the genuine love embodied by Rosalind contrasted with the sentimentalized affectations of Orlando, and the improbable happenings that set the urban courtiers wandering to find exile, solace or freedom in a woodland setting are no more unrealistic than the string of chance encounters in the forest, provoking witty banter, which require no subtleties of plotting and character development. The main action of the first act is no more than a wrestling match, and the action throughout is often interrupted by a song. At the end, Hymen himself arrives to bless the wedding festivities. Image File history File links Circle-question-red. ... In Greek mythology, Hymenaeus (also Hymenaeus, Hymenaues, or Hymen; Ancient Greek: Ὑμέναιος) was a god of marriage ceremonies, inspiring feasts and songs (like wedding hymns, or epithalamia). ...


The stock characters in conventional situations were familiar material for Shakespeare and his audience; it is the light repartee and the breadth of the subjects that provide texts for wit that put a fresh stamp on the proceedings. At the centre the optimism of Rosalind is contrasted with the misogynistic melancholy of Jaques. Shakespeare would take up some of the themes more seriously later: the usurper Duke and the Duke in exile provide themes for Measure for Measure and The Tempest. Look up Wit in Wiktionary, the free dictionary Wit is a form of intellectual humor, based on manipulation of concepts; a wit is someone who excels in witty remarks, typically in conversation and spontaneously, since wit carries the connotation of speed of thought. ... // Optimists see the world as a positive place. ... Misogyny (IPA: ) is hatred or strong prejudice against women; an antonym of philogyny. ... Claudio and Isabella (1850) by William Holman Hunt Measure for Measure is a play by William Shakespeare, written in 1603. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ...


Adaptations and cultural references

Radio

According to the history of radio station WCAL in the U.S. state of Minnesota, As You Like It may have been the first play ever broadcast. It went over the air in 1922. A radio station is an audio (sound) broadcasting service, traditionally broadcast through the air as radio waves (a form of electromagnetic radiation) from a transmitter to an antenna and a thus to a receiving device. ... KCMP (89. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      A U.S. state is any one of the fifty subnational entities of the... Capital Saint Paul Largest city Minneapolis Area  Ranked 12th  - Total 87,014 sq mi (225,365 km²)  - Width 250 miles (400 km)  - Length 400 miles (645 km)  - % water 8. ... Year 1922 (MCMXXII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar). ...


Film

See also As You Like It, on screen.

As You Like It was Laurence Olivier's first Shakespeare film, though he only acted in it, rather than producing and directing. Made in the UK and released in 1936, the film also starred director Paul Czinner's wife Elizabeth Bergner, who played Rosalind with a thick German accent. Although it is much less "Hollywoody" than the 1930's versions of A Midsummer Night's Dream and Romeo and Juliet, and although its cast was made up entirely of Shakespearean actors, it was not considered a success by either Olivier or the critics. It has been suggested that this article be split into multiple articles. ... As You Like It is a 1936 film, directed by Paul Czinner and starring Laurence Olivier as Orlando and Elisabeth Bergner as Rosalind. ... Laurence Kerr Olivier, Baron Olivier, OM (22 May 1907 – 11 July 1989) was an Academy Award, Golden Globe, BAFTA and four-time Emmy winning English actor, director, and producer. ... 1936 (MCMXXXVI) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ... Paul Czinner, born May 30, 1890 in Budapest, Hungary, died June 22, 1972 in London, was a writer, film director and producer. ... Elisabeth Bergner, 1935 Elisabeth Bergner was born Elisabeth Ettel on August 22, 1897, in Drohobycz, Austro-Hungarian Empire (now Drogobych, Ukraine). ...


In 1992 Christine Edzard made another film adaptation of the play. It features James Fox, Cyril Cusack, Griff Rhys Jones and Ewen Bremner. The action is transposed to a modern and bleak urban world.


A third version of As You Like It was released in 2007, directed by Kenneth Branagh. As You Like It is a film due for release in 2006, directed by Kenneth Branagh. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... Kenneth Charles Branagh (born December 10, 1960) is an Emmy Award-winning, Academy Award-nominated Northern Irish-born actor and film director. ...


Musical Theatre

David Aquisito and Sammy Buck adapted this play into an 80's themed musical entitled "Like You Like It."


References

  1. ^ F. E. Halliday, A Shakespeare Companion 1564-1964, Baltimore, Penguin, 1964; p. 531.
  2. ^ Halliday, Shakespeare Companion, p. 40.
  3. ^ Dolan, Frances E. "Introduction" in Shakespeare, As You Like It. New York: Penguin Books, 2000.

External links

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
As You Like It
Wikisource has original text related to this article:
As You Like It
Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
  • As You Like It - searchable e-text
  • As You Like it - HTML version of this title.

As you like it is also at the Oregon Shakespeare festival in Ashland, Oregon Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Wikiquote is a sister project of Wikipedia, using the same MediaWiki software. ... Image File history File links Wikisource-logo. ... The original Wikisource logo. ... Image File history File links Commons-logo. ...

Part of a series on William Shakespeare and his works
General information Biography | Style | influence | Reputation | Religion | Sexuality | Shakespearean Authorship Question
Tragedies Antony and Cleopatra | Coriolanus | Hamlet | Julius Caesar | King Lear | Macbeth | Othello | Romeo and Juliet | Timon of Athens | Titus Andronicus | Troilus and Cressida
Comedies All's Well That Ends Well | As You Like It | The Comedy of Errors | Cymbeline | Love's Labour's Lost | Measure for Measure | The Merchant of Venice | The Merry Wives of Windsor | A Midsummer Night's Dream | Much Ado About Nothing | Pericles, Prince of Tyre | The Taming of the Shrew | The Tempest | Twelfth Night, or What You Will | The Two Gentlemen of Verona | The Two Noble Kinsmen | The Winter's Tale
Histories King John | Richard II | Henry IV, Part 1 | Henry IV, Part 2 | Henry V | Henry VI, part 1 | Henry VI, part 2 | Henry VI, part 3 | Richard III | Henry VIII
Poems Sonnets | Venus and Adonis | The Rape of Lucrece | The Passionate Pilgrim | The Phoenix and the Turtle | A Lover's Complaint
Apocrypha and Lost Plays Edward III | Sir Thomas More | Cardenio (lost) | Love's Labour's Won (lost) | The Birth of Merlin | Locrine | The London Prodigal | The Puritan | The Second Maiden's Tragedy | Richard II, Part I: Thomas of Woodstock | Sir John Oldcastle | Thomas Lord Cromwell | A Yorkshire Tragedy | Fair Em | Mucedorus | The Merry Devil of Edmonton | Arden of Faversham | Edmund Ironside | Vortigern and Rowena
Other play information Shakespeare's plays | Shakespeare in performance | Chronology of Shakespeare plays | Oxfordian chronology | Shakespeare on screen | Titles based on Shakespeare | List of characters | Problem Plays | List of historical characters | Ghost characters

  Results from FactBites:
 
Talk Like A Pirate Day - September 19 (421 words)
Subscribe to The Poopdeck to learn what the Pirate Guys are up to the rest of the year
Perhaps you're one of the millions of people from South Africa to Australia, from New York to the Pacific Northwest, who party like pirates every September 19th (and sometimes for days afterward.
Talk Like A Pirate Day is an original concept created in a moment of temporary insanity by John Baur and Mark Summers.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m