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Encyclopedia > Arundhati Roy
Arundhati Roy

Arundhati Roy speaking at the 2007 World Tribunal on Iraq.
Born November 24, 1961
Shillong, Meghalaya, India
Occupation Novelist, essayist
Nationality Flag of India India
Writing period 1997-present

Suzanna Arundhati Roy[1] (born November 24, 1961) is an Indian novelist, writer and activist. She won the Booker Prize in 1997 for her first novel, The God of Small Things and in 2002, the Lannan Cultural Freedom Prize. Roy has been severely criticized for her various personal conflicts with popular Indian celebrities and politicians and for supporting genocide against various communities. Image File history File linksMetadata Arundhati_roy_wti. ... The World Tribunal on Iraq (WTI) is a peoples court consisting of unelected intellectuals, human rights campaigners and non-governmental organizations. ... is the 328th day of the year (329th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1961 (MCMLXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... , Shillong (Khasi Shillong) is the capital of Meghalaya, one of the smaller states in India. ... , Meghalaya   is a small state in north-eastern India. ... This article is about work. ... In English usage, nationality is the legal relationship between a person and a country. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_India. ... is the 328th day of the year (329th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1961 (MCMLXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see Novel (disambiguation). ... Activism, in a general sense, can be described as intentional action or inaction to bring about social or political change. ... The Man Booker Prize for Fiction, also known as the Man Booker Prize, or simply the Man Booker, is one of the worlds most important literary prizes, and awarded each year for the best original novel written by a citizen of the Commonwealth or the Republic of Ireland in... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... The God of Small Things (1997) is a semi-autobiographical, politically charged novel by Indian author Arundhati Roy. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... The Lannan Literary Awards are a series of awards and literary fellowships given out in various fields. ...

Contents

Biography

Roy was born in Shillong, Meghalaya[2] to a Keralite Syrian Christian mother, the women's rights activist Mary Roy, and a Bengali father, a tea planter by profession. She spent her childhood in Ayemenem or Aymanam in Kerala, and went to school at Corpus Christi, Kottayam, followed by the Lawrence School, Lovedale in the Nilgiris, Tamil Nadu. She then studied architecture at the School of Planning and Architecture, New Delhi, where she met her first husband, architect Gerard DaCunha. , Shillong (Khasi Shillong) is the capital of Meghalaya, one of the smaller states in India. ... , Meghalaya   is a small state in north-eastern India. ... , Kerala ( ; Malayalam: കേരളം; ) is a state on the Malabar Coast of southwestern India. ... A Nasrani (also called as a Syrian - Malabar Christian) is a type of Christian from Kerala, South India who follows the earliest form of Christian-Jewish tradition of the early Christians. ... Mary Roy is an Indian educator and womens rights activist, who became famous after filing a lawsuit against the inheritance legislation of her Keralite Syrian Christian community in the federal court system. ... For other uses, see Bengal (disambiguation). ... Aymanam is a village in Kottayam District, Kerala, India made famous by Arundhati Roys novel The God of Small Things. Ay in Dravidic language means Five and Vanam in Sanskrit means Forests. ... , Kerala ( ; Malayalam: കേരളം; ) is a state on the Malabar Coast of southwestern India. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... , This article is about the town of Kottayam, See Kottayam district also. ... The Lawrence School, Lovedale (near Ootacamund ), Tamilnadu, is named after Sir Henry Montgomery Lawrence. ... Tamil Nadu (தமிழ் நாடு, Land of the Tamils) is a state at the southern tip of India. ... This article is about building architecture. ... School of Planning and Architecture (SPA) is one of the leading Planning and Architecture institutes in India. ... This article is about the capital city of India. ...


Roy met her second husband, filmmaker Pradip Krishen, in 1984, and became involved in film-making under his influence. She played a village girl in the award-winning movie Massey Sahib. Pradip Krishen directed some well-known films (Massey Sahib, In Which Annie Gives It Those Ones) before he became a naturalist and eco-botanist in 1995. ... This article is about the year. ...


Roy is a cousin of the prominent media personality Prannoy Roy[3] [4] and lives in New Delhi. Prannoy Roy anchoring a news program on NDTV Prannoy Roy (born on October 15, 1949) is an Indian media figure. ... This article is about the capital city of India. ...


Works

Roy first attracted attention when she criticised Shekhar Kapur's film Bandit Queen, based on the life of Phoolan Devi, charging Kapur with exploiting Devi and misrepresenting both her life and its meaning.[5] Shekhar Kapur, born 6 December 1945 is a renowned film director and producer from India. ... Bandit Queen is a 1994 film based upon the life of Phoolan Devi. ... Phoolan Devi (Phūlan Devī) August 10, 1963 – July 25, 2001), popularly known as The Bandit Queen, was an Indian dacoit, who later turned politician. ...

The God of Small Things, cover
The God of Small Things, cover

Roy began writing her first novel, The God of Small Things, in 1992, completing it in 1996. The book is semi-autobiographical and a major part captures her childhood experiences in Ayemenem or Aymanam[citation needed]. The book received the 1997 Man Booker Prize for Fiction and was listed as one of the New York Times Notable Books of the Year for 1997.[6] The book reached fourth position on the New York Times Bestsellers list for Independent Fiction.[7] She received half a million pounds as an advance, and rights to the book were sold in 21 countries. Image File history File links Thegodofsmallthings. ... Image File history File links Thegodofsmallthings. ... The God of Small Things (1997) is a semi-autobiographical, politically charged novel by Indian author Arundhati Roy. ... Year 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1992 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ... Aymanam is a village in Kottayam District, Kerala, India made famous by Arundhati Roys novel The God of Small Things. Ay in Dravidic language means Five and Vanam in Sanskrit means Forests. ... The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... The New York Times Best Seller List is a weekly chart in The New York Times newspaper that keeps track of the best-selling books of the week. ...


The God of Small Things received good reviews[8], including one from John Updike in The New Yorker.[9] However, Carmen Callil, chair of the Booker judges panel in 1996, called The God of Small Things "an execrable book" and said it should never have reached the shortlist.[10] John Hoyer Updike (born March 18, 1932 in Shillington, Pennsylvania) is an American novelist, poet, short story writer and literary critic. ... For other uses, see New Yorker. ... Carmen Callil (b. ...


Roy wrote the screenplays for In Which Annie Gives It Those Ones (1989) and Electric Moon (1992) and a television serial The Banyan Tree. She also wrote the documentary DAM/AGE: A Film with Arundhati Roy (2002). In Which Annie Gives it Those Ones is a 1989 Indian TV film. ...


In early 2007, Roy announced she would begin work on a second novel.[11]


Activism and advocacy

The God of Small Things is the only novel written by Roy. She has since devoted herself solely to nonfiction and politics, publishing two more collections of essays, as well as working for social causes. She is a spokesperson of the anti-globalization/alter-globalization movement and a vehement critic of neo-imperialism and of the global policies of the United States. She also criticizes India's nuclear weapons policies and the approach to industrialization and rapid development as currently being practiced in India, including the Narmada Dam project and the power company Enron's activities in India. Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Anti-globalization. ... Neo-imperialism is a politico-economic theory describing what is purported to be a modern form of imperialism. ... The Narmada Dam Project, known officially as the Sardar Sarovar Project (SSP), is a project involving the construction of a series of large hydroelectric dams on the Narmada River in India. ... Enron Creditors Recovery Corporation (formerly Enron Corporation) (former NYSE ticker symbol: ENE) was an American energy company based in Houston, Texas. ...


Sardar Sarovar Project

Roy has campaigned along with activist Medha Patkar against the Narmada dam project, saying that the dam will displace half a million people, with little or no compensation, and will not provide the projected irrigation, drinking water and other benefits.[12] Roy donated her Booker prize money as well as royalties from her books on the project to the Narmada Bachao Andolan.[13] Medha Patkar (Marathi:मेधा पाटकर) is a social activist from India. ... The Narmada Dam Project, known officially as the Sardar Sarovar Project (SSP), is a project involving the construction of a series of large hydroelectric dams on the Narmada River in India. ... Narmada Bachao Andolan (NBA) (Save Narmada Movement) is a non governmental organisation (NGO) that mobilised tribal people, adivasis, farmers, environmentalists and human rights activists against the Sardar Sarovar Dam being built across the Narmada river, Gujarat, India. ...


Arundhati Roy's opposition to the Narmada Dam project has been criticised as "anti-Gujarat" by Congress and BJP leaders in Gujarat.[14][15] Indian National Congress, Congress-I (also known as the Congress Party and abbreviated INC) is a major political party in India. ... The Bharatiya Janata Party [BJP] (Hindi: , translation: Indian Peoples Party), created in 1980, is a major right wing Indian political party. ...


In 2002, Roy responded to a contempt notice issued against her by the Indian Supreme Court with an affidavit saying the court's decision to initiate the contempt proceedings based on an unsubstantiated and flawed petition, while refusing to inquire into allegations of corruption in military contracting deals pleading an overload of cases, indicated a "disquieting inclination" by the court to silence criticism and dissent using the power of contempt.[16] The court found Roy's statement, which she refused to disavow or apologize for, constituted criminal contempt and sentenced her to a "symbolic" one day's imprisonment and fined Roy Rs. 2500.[17] Roy served the sentence and opted to pay the fine rather than serve an additional three months' imprisonment for default.[18] Also see: 2002 (number). ... Contempt of court is a court ruling which, in the context of a court trial or hearing, deems an individual as holding contempt for the court, its process, and its invested powers. ... The Supreme Court of India is the highest court of the land as established by Part V, Chapter IV of the Constitution of India. ... Tehelka is an Indian weekly newspaper under the editorship of Tarun Tejpal. ...


Environmental historian Ramachandra Guha has been critical of Roy's Narmada dam activism. While acknowledging her "courage and commitment" to the cause, Guha writes that her advocacy is hyperbolic and self-indulgent,[19] "Ms. Roy's tendency to exaggerate and simplify, her Manichean view of the world, and her shrill hectoring tone, have given a bad name to environmental analysis".[20] He faults Roy's criticism of Supreme Court judges who were hearing a petition brought by the Narmada Bachao Andolan as careless and irresponsible. Ramachandra Guha in Chennai Ramachandra Guha (1958 - ) is a well-respected Indian social, environmental and cricket historian, academician and biographer. ... Narmada Bachao Andolan (NBA) (Save Narmada Movement) is a non governmental organisation (NGO) that mobilised tribal people, adivasis, farmers, environmentalists and human rights activists against the Sardar Sarovar Dam being built across the Narmada river, Gujarat, India. ...


Roy counters that her writing is intentional in its passionate, hysterical tone - "I am hysterical. I'm screaming from the bloody rooftops. And he and his smug little club are going 'Shhhh... you'll wake the neighbours!' I want to wake the neighbours, that's my whole point. I want everybody to open their eyes".[13]


Gail Omvedt and Roy have had a fierce discussions, in open letters, on Roy's strategy for the Narmada Dam movement. Though the activists disagree on whether to demand stopping the dam building all together (Roy) or searching for intermediate alternatives (Omvedt), the exchange has mostly been, though critical, constructive. [21] Dr. Gail Omvedt is an American born Indian scholar, sociologist and human rights activist. ...


Many other analysts fault Roy for lying about the Gujarat governments compensation efforts, which have provided much more compensation than needed for rehabilitation. However, the governments of Madhya Pradesh, Maharashtra and Rajasthan have handed over very little of that money to the displaced. By solely blaming Gujarat, Roy has essentially lied to the people of India. Some consider Roy to be racist and that her activism is essentially a form of genocide against the people of Gujarat, which in desperate need of water.


United States foreign policy

Roy has strongly criticised the U.S. led invasion of Afghanistan in reaction to the September 11 attacks, decrying its undermining of international law and institutions. She disputes U.S. claims of being a peaceful and freedom-loving nation, listing the numerous armed conflicts the U.S. has been involved in since the second world war as well as its previous support for the Taliban movement and its support for the Northern Alliance (whose "track record is not very different from the Taliban's"). Noting the interests of arms and oil industries in formulating foreign policy, Roy doubts the U.S.'s stated goals of restoring democracy in Afghanistan and argues that its humanitarian efforts there are a cynical public relations exercise. While condemning the 9/11 attacks, she writes that its response has legitimised violence as a political instrument and aided governments around the world in suppressing freedom and civil rights.[22] It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Supermajor, Oil major and Seven Sisters (oil companies) (Discuss) Big Oil is a term used to describe the individual and collective economic power of the largest oil and gasoline manufacturers, and their perceived influence on politics, particularly in...


Her views were criticized by Ian Buruma, who wrote: "The snobbery of her tone alone betrays the lingering, if perhaps unconscious, influence in India of British lefties from the end of the Raj. It is the language of the Bloomsbury drawing room. You could well imagine Bertrand Russell taking this line."[23] This criticism, however, does not in any way address her actual arguments. Ian Buruma talks with an attendee at the Texas Book Festival. ... The Bloomsbury Group was an English collective of loving friends and relatives who lived in or near London during the first half of the twentieth century. ... Bertrand Arthur William Russell, 3rd Earl Russell, OM, FRS, (18 May 1872 – 2 February 1970), was a British philosopher, logician, mathematician, advocate for social reform, and pacifist. ...


Roy has presented evidence for her position. In an opinion piece in the Manchester Guardian (10/23/01), Roy wrote, "Here is a list of the countries that America has been at war with - and bombed - since the second world war:" Updated, it reads China (1945-46, 1950-53), Korea (1950-53), Guatemala (1954, 1967-69), Indonesia (1958), Cuba (1959-60), Vietnam (1961-73), the Belgian Congo (1964), Laos (1964-73), Peru (1965), Cambodia (1969-70), Nicaragua (the 1980s), El Salvador (the 1980s), Grenada (1983), Libya (1986), Panama (1989), Iraq (1991-99, 2003-08), Bosnia (1995), Sudan (1998), Yugoslavia (1999), and Afghanistan (2001-08).[24] From this, the years 1947-49, 1955-57, 1974-79, 1990 and 2000 were the only peaceful ones. 73% of the years, from World War II's end until 1989, the U.S. was militarily intervening somewhere. After the Berlin Wall fell in 1989 (not counting conflicts like Colombia where governing elites request help against rebellious subpopulations) the U.S. was actively militarily intervening in a foreign country at least 89% of the years into 2008. From this, the Soviet Union's existence only deterred US military interventions. The Guardian was also the name of a U.S. television series. ... This article is about the Korean civilization. ... Motto: Travail et Progres (Work and Progress) The Belgian Congo Capital Léopoldville/Leopoldstad Political structure Colony Governor  - 1908-1910 Baron Wahis  - 1946-1951 Eugène Jacques Pierre Louis Jungers  - 1958-1960 Henri Arthur Adolf Marie Christopher Cornelis History  - Established 15 November, 1908  - Congolese independence 30 June, 1960 The Belgian... This article is about the country of Bosnia and Herzegovina. ... Yugoslavia (Jugoslavija in the Latin alphabet, Југославија in Cyrillic; English: South Slavia, or literary The Land of South Slavs) describes three political entities that existed one at a time on the Balkan Peninsula in Europe, during most of the 20th century. ... View in 1986 from the west side of graffiti art on the walls infamous death strip Walls poster in memory of the fall. ...


In May 2003 she delivered a speech entitled "Instant-Mix Imperial Democracy" at the Riverside Church in New York City. In it she described the United States as a global empire that reserves the right to bomb any of its subjects at any time, deriving its legitimacy directly from God. The speech was an indictment of the U.S. actions relating to the Iraq War.[25] In June 2005 she took part in the World Tribunal on Iraq. In March 2006, Roy criticized US President George W. Bush's visit to India.[26] Riverside Church as seen from West 121st Street The Riverside Church in the City of New York is an interdenominational (American Baptist and United Church of Christ), interracial, international church in New York City, famous not only for its elaborate Gothic architecture — which includes the worlds largest carillon — but... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... For other uses, see Iraq war (disambiguation). ... The World Tribunal on Iraq (WTI) is a peoples court consisting of unelected intellectuals, human rights campaigners and non-governmental organizations. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the forty-third and current President of the United States of America, originally inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ...


India's nuclear weaponisation

In response to India's testing of nuclear weapons in Pokhran, Rajasthan, Roy wrote The End of Imagination (1998), a critique of the Indian government's nuclear policies. It was published in her collection The Cost of Living (1999), in which she also crusaded against India's massive hydroelectric dam projects in the central and western states of Maharashtra, Madhya Pradesh and Gujarat. Pokhran (also spelt Pokaran) is a city and a municipality in Jaisalmer district in the Indian state of Rajasthan. ... , Rājasthān (DevanāgarÄ«: राजस्थान, IPA: )   is the largest state of the Republic of India in terms of area. ... The Titan II ICBM carried a 9 Mt W53 warhead, making it one of the most powerful nuclear weapons fielded by the United States during the Cold War. ... , Maharashtra (Marathi: महाराष्ट्र , IPA  , translation: Great Nation) is Indias third largest state in area and second largest in population after Uttar Pradesh. ... , Madhya Pradesh (abbreviated as MP)   (HindÄ«: मध्य प्रदेश, English: , IPA: ), often called the Heart of India, is a state in central India. ... This article is for the Indian state. ...


Criticism of Israel

In August 2006, Roy signed a letter written by Professor Steve Trevillion calling Israel's attacks on Lebanon a "war crime" and accused Israel of "state terror".[27] In 2007, Roy was one of more than 100 artists and writers who signed an open letter initiated by Queers Undermining Israeli Terrorism and the South West Asian, North African Bay Area Queers (SWANABAQ) and calling on the San Francisco International LGBT Film Festival "to honor calls for an international boycott of Israeli political and cultural institutions, by discontinuing Israeli consulate sponsorship of the LGBT film festival and not cosponsoring events with the Israeli consulate."[3][4] QUIT activists outside Macys San Francisco store on Valentines Day, 2004. ... The San Francisco International Lesbian and Gay Film Festival is the oldest film festival devoted to Lesbian and Gay programming currently in existence. ... Boycotts of Israel are a series of economic and political campaigns against the State of Israel in the course of the Arab-Israeli conflict and the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. ... The State of Israel (Hebrew: מְדִינַת יִשְׂרָאֵל, transliteration: ; Arabic: دَوْلَةْ اِسْرَائِيل, transliteration: ) is a country in the Middle East on the eastern edge of the Mediterranean Sea. ...


2001 Indian Parliament attack

Roy has raised questions about the investigation into the 2001 Indian Parliament attack and the trial of the accused. She has called for the death sentence of Mohammad Afzal to be stayed while a parliamentary enquiry into these questions are conducted and denounced press coverage of the trial.[28] The BJP has criticised Roy for what it alleges is defence of a terrorist that does not lie in the national interest.[29][30] The 2001 Indian Parliament attack was a high-profile attack by Pakistan based Kashmiri terrorists against the building housing the Parliament of India in New Delhi. ... Mohammad Afzal is an Indian from Kashmir accused and convicted of conspiracy in the December 2001 attack on the Indian Parliament. ... BJP could mean one of Indias largest political parties, the Bharatiya Janata Party British Journal of Photography British Journal of Psychiatry British Journal of Pharmocology This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ...


The Muthanga 'Incident'

In 2003, the Adivasi Gothra Maha Sabha, a social movement for adivasi land rights in Kerala, organized a major land occupation of a piece of land of a former Eucalyptus plantation in the Muthanga Wildlife Reserve on the border of Kerala and Karnataka. After 48 days, a massive police force was sent into the area to smash the huts that had been built up and brutally evict the people--one participant of the movement and a policeman were killed. The leaders of the movement moreover were badly beaten and arrested. Arundhati Roy immediately travelled to the area, visited the movement's leaders in jail and wrote an open letter to the Chief Minister saying "You have blood on your hands." [31]


Awards

Arundhati Roy was awarded the 1997 Booker Prize for her fiction The God of Small Things. The award carried a prize of about US $30,000[32] and a citation that noted: 'The book keeps all the promises that it makes.' [33] The Man Booker Prize for Fiction, also known as the Man Booker Prize, or simply the Man Booker, is one of the worlds most important literary prizes, and awarded each year for the best original novel written by a citizen of the Commonwealth or the Republic of Ireland in... The God of Small Things (1997) is a semi-autobiographical, politically charged novel by Indian author Arundhati Roy. ...


In 2002, she won the Lannan Foundation's Cultural Freedom Award for her work "about civil societies that are adversely affected by the world’s most powerful governments and corporations" and "to celebrate her life and her ongoing work in the struggle for freedom, justice and cultural diversity."[34] The Lannan Literary Awards are a series of awards and literary fellowships given out in various fields. ...


Roy was awarded the Sydney Peace Prize in May 2004 for her work in social campaigns and her advocacy of non-violence. The Sydney Peace Prize is awarded by the Sydney Peace Foundation, a not-for-profit organisation associated with the University of Sydney. ... Nonviolence (or non-violence), whether held as a moral philosophy or only employed as an action strategy, rejects the use of physical violence in efforts to attain social, economic or political change. ...


In January 2006 she was awarded the Sahitya Akademi award for her collection of essays on contemporary issues, The Algebra of Infinite Justice, but she declined to accept it[35]. The Sahitya Akademi is an Indian organisation dedicated to the promotion of literature in the languages of India. ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ...


Criticisms and controversies

Economist and prominent free trade advocate Jagdish Bhagwati, on being asked if he'd like his book being reviewed by Roy, said "her conclusions are far more obvious than her arguments and that makes it impossible to function. You don’t know where to begin or where to end." [36] Free trade is an economic concept referring to the selling of products between countries without tariffs or other trade barriers. ... Jagdish Bhagwati (born 1934) is a prominent economist noted for his defense of free trade against the critics of globalization. ...


BJP Member of Parliament Balbir Punj criticised Roy's article, titled Democracy: Who's she when she's at home?, on the 2002 Gujarat Violence, pointing out a factual error in it and calling the article "dishonest" and a "hate charter against India and the Sangh parivar".[37] Roy acknowledged the factual error and apologised to the family referred to in the erroneous statement but said that such errors do not alter the substance of her own as well as others' accounts of the violence.[38] BJP could mean one of Indias largest political parties, the Bharatiya Janata Party British Journal of Photography British Journal of Psychiatry British Journal of Pharmocology This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Balbir Punj (1949-) is a journalist and columnist from India. ... The skyline of Ahmedabad filled with smoke as buildings and shops are set on fire by rioting mobs. ...


In 2003, Arundhati Roy and her husband were found building their house in a protected tribal forest area, in violation of forest law, which bars buying and selling of notified forest land.[39] Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


List of writings

Books

  • Roy, Arundhati; (1997). The God of Small Things. Flamingo. ISBN 0-00-655068-1. 
  • Roy, Arundhati; (1999). The Cost of Living. Flamingo. ISBN 0375756140. . It contains the essays The Greater Common Good and The End of Imagination, which are now included in the book The Algebra of Infinite Justice
  • Roy, Arundhati; (2002). The Algebra of Infinite Justice. Flamingo. ISBN 0-00-714949-2.  (a collection of essays: The End of Imagination, The Greater Common Good, Power Politics [also a book], The Ladies Have Feelings, So..., The Algebra of Infinite Justice, War is Peace, Democracy, War Talk [also a book] and Come September.)
  • Foreword to For Reasons of State (2003) ISBN 1-56584-794-6 by Noam Chomsky
  • Roy, Arundhati; (2002). Power Politics. South End Press. ISBN 0-89608-668-2. 
  • Roy, Arundhati; (2003). War Talk. South End Press. ISBN 0-89608-724-7. 
  • Roy, Arundhati; (2004). An Ordinary Person's Guide To Empire, Consortium Book Sales and Dist, September 15, 2004, hardcover, ISBN 0-89608-728-X; trade paperback, Consortium, September 15, 2004, ISBN 0-89608-727-1
  • Roy, Arundhati; (2004). Public Power in the Age of Empire. Seven Stories Press. ISBN 1-58322-682-6. 
  • Roy, Arundhati; (2004). The Checkbook and the Cruise Missile: Conversations with Arundhati Roy. South End Press. ISBN 0-89608-710-7. 

The God of Small Things (1997) is a semi-autobiographical, politically charged novel by Indian author Arundhati Roy. ... Suzanna Arundhati Roy[1] (born November 24, 1961) is an Indian novelist, writer and activist. ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... Avram Noam Chomsky (born December 7, 1928) is an American linguist, philosopher, political activist, author, and lecturer. ... is the 258th day of the year (259th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 258th day of the year (259th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Essays, Speeches and Articles

is the 293rd day of the year (294th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... 1 July 2002 Cover Page Outlook is an Indian weekly English newsmagazine in publication since October 1995. ... is the 302nd day of the year (303rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 133rd day of the year (134th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

References

  1. ^ Anthony Cardinale. "Create beauty in order to keep fighting, writer-activist Roy says", The Buffalo News, September 9, 2004. 
  2. ^ Arundhati Roy - English Writer: The South Asian Literary Recordings Project (Library of Congress New Delhi Office)
  3. ^ Re: eigenvalue calculators and Arundhati Roy
  4. ^ Rediff On The NeT: Mary Roy celebrates her daughter's victory
  5. ^ "Arundhati Roy: A 'small hero'", BBC News Online, 6 March, 2002. 
  6. ^ Notable Books of the Year 1997. New York Times (December 7, 1997). Retrieved on 2007-03-21.
  7. ^ Best Sellers Plus. New York Times (January 25, 1998). Retrieved on 2007-03-21.
  8. ^ TRUAX, ALICE (May 25, 1997), "A Silver Thimble in Her Fist", New York Times, <http://www.nytimes.com/books/97/05/25/reviews/970525.25truaxt.html> 
  9. ^ [1]
  10. ^ "Arundhati Roy: A 'small hero'", BBC News Online, 6 March 2002. Retrieved on 2006-12-08. (English) 
  11. ^ Randeep Ramesh (Friday, March 10, 2007). An activist returns to the novel (English). Sydney Morning Herald. Retrieved on 2007-03-13.
  12. ^ Roy, Arundhati (May 22 - June 04, 1999), "The Greater Common Good", Frontline (magazine) 16 (11), <http://www.hinduonnet.com/fline/fl1611/16110040.htm> 
  13. ^ a b SCIMITARS IN THE SUN, Frontline, Volume 18 - Issue 01, Jan. 06 - 19, 2001
  14. ^ "Youth Congress workers burn Arundhati's book", Times of India, 23 July 1999. Retrieved on 2006-12-08. 
  15. ^ The Telegraph - Calcutta : Nation
  16. ^ "Arundhati’s contempt: Supreme Court writes her a prison sentence", Indian Express, March 07, 2002. V. Venkatesan and Sukumar Muralidharan. "Of contempt and legitimate dissent", Frontline, Aug. 18 - 31, 2001. 
  17. ^ In re: Arundhati Roy.... Contemner, JUDIS (Supreme Court of India bench, Justices G.B. Pattanaik & R.P. Sethi March 6, 2002).
  18. ^ Roy, Arundhati (March 7, 2002). Statement by Arundhati Roy. Friends of River Narmada. Retrieved on 2007-03-21.
  19. ^ Ramachandra Guha, The Arun Shourie of the left, The Hindu, November 26, 2000
  20. ^ Ramachandra Guha, Perils of extremism, The Hindu, December 17, 2000
  21. ^ Gail Omvedt'S Open Letter To Arundhati Roy
  22. ^ Arundhati Roy, "'Brutality smeared in peanut butter' Why America must stop the war now." Guardian Unlimited 10/23/01.
  23. ^ The Anti-American by Ian Buruma, The New Republic (Archived link)
  24. ^ Arundhati Roy, "'Brutality smeared in peanut butter' Why America must stop the war now." Guardian Unlimited 10/23/01.
  25. ^ Instant-Mix Imperial Democracy (Buy One, Get One Free), speech by Arundhati Roy at The Riverside Church, May 13, 2003. Audio and video
  26. ^ Roy, Arundhati. "George Bush go home", The Hindu, February 28, 2006. Retrieved on 2007-03-21. (en) 
  27. ^ War crimes and Lebanon (Thursday August 3, 2006).
  28. ^ Arundhati Roy, 'And His Life Should Become Extinct', Outlook, Oct 30, 2006
  29. ^ [2]
  30. ^ BJP flays Arundhati for 'defending' Afzal, The Hindu, October 28, 2006
  31. ^ http://www.hinduonnet.com/fline/fl2006/stories/20030328002104500.htm)
  32. ^ Arundhati Roy interviewed by David Barsamian. The South Asian (September 2001).
  33. ^ Previous winners - 1997. Booker Prize Foundation. Retrieved on 2007-03-21.
  34. ^ 2002 Lannan Cultural Freedom Prize awarded to Arundhati Roy. Lannan Foundation. Retrieved on 2007-03-21.
  35. ^ Sahitya Akademi Award: Arundhati Roy Rejects Honor
  36. ^ "Reforms have made a big impact on poverty...there is no evidence that they lack a human face’", WALK THE TALK, Financial Express, November 30, 2004. Retrieved on 2007-03-21. (en) 
  37. ^ outlookindia.com
  38. ^ Roy, Arundhati (May 27, 2002), "To the Jaffri Family, An Apology", Outlook (magazine), <http://www.outlookindia.com/rants.asp?type=single&id=20020527133759>. Retrieved on 21 March 2007 
  39. ^ KIDWAI, RASHEED. "Bungalow blow to Arundhati - Allotment on notified forest land cancelled in Panchmarhi", The Telegraph (Calcutta), May 07, 2003. Retrieved on 2007-03-21. (en) 

Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 80th day of the year (81st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 80th day of the year (81st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 65th day of the year (66th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 342nd day of the year (343rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 72nd day of the year (73rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 204th day of the year (205th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events of 2008: (EMILY) Me Lesley and MIley are going to China! This article is about the year. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 342nd day of the year (343rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 80th day of the year (81st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For followers of Hinduism, see Hindu. ... For followers of Hinduism, see Hindu. ... Ian Buruma talks with an attendee at the Texas Book Festival. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 80th day of the year (81st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 80th day of the year (81st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 80th day of the year (81st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 80th day of the year (81st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 80th day of the year (81st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

See also

Anti-WEF grafiti in Lausanne. ... Narmada Bachao Andolan (NBA) (Save Narmada Movement) is a non governmental organisation (NGO) that mobilised tribal people, adivasis, farmers, environmentalists and human rights activists against the Sardar Sarovar Dam being built across the Narmada river, Gujarat, India. ... Indian English Literature (IEL) refers to the body of work by writers in India who write in the English language and whose native or co-native language could be one of the numerous languages of India. ... For other uses, see American Empire (disambiguation). ...

External links

Biographical material

Ch'ien, Evelyn Nien-Ming. "The Politics of Design." In Weird English. Cambridge, Ma: Harvard UP, 2004.


Works, speeches

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
  • 'We' The Unauthorised Arundhati Roy Musical Documentary (watch & download free or order DVD by donation)
    • Australian release without extras - resist.com.au
    • American release with extras - weroy.org
  • Come September Transcript of speech on 18 September 2002 and conversation with Howard Zinn
  • Archive of Arundhati Roy on Democracy Now!
  • `We have to become the global resistance' (Abriged version of speech given at the World Social Forum in Mumbai, 16. January 2004)
  • Tide? or Ivory Snow? Public Power in the Age of Empire (August 16, 2004 speech in San Francisco)
  • ABC Radio National transcript of Sydney Peace Prize Lecture (with audio) or download the speech here
  • The Most Cowardly War in History (Article dated 24 June 2005)
  • Complete Collection of Her Essays and Speeches (in-progress)
  • Podcast of Arundhati Roy and Pankaj Mishra discussing “India in the World ” at the Shanghai International Literary Festival

Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Wikiquote is one of a family of wiki-based projects run by the Wikimedia Foundation, running on MediaWiki software. ... is the 261st day of the year (262nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... Howard Zinn (born August 24, 1922) is an American historian, political scientist, social critic, activist and playwright, best known as author of the bestseller[5] , A Peoples History of the United States. ... The Australian Broadcasting Corporation or ABC is Australias national non-profit public broadcaster. ... ABC Radio National is an Australia-wide radio network with many various programs, involving news and current affairs, arts, music, society, science, drama and comedy. ... is the 175th day of the year (176th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Other

  • We, a political documentary about Roy's words
  • The Algebra of Arundhati’s Injudiciousness by Farzana Versey
  • Arundhati Roy denounces Indian democracy by Atul Cowshish
  • Carreira,Shirley de S. G.A representação da mulher em Shame, de Salman Rushdie, e O deus das pequenas coisas, de Arundathi Roy. In: MONTEIRO, Conceição & LIMA, Tereza M. de O. ed. Rio de JAneiro: Caetés, 2005
  • "In the Valley of the Tigers" an interview with ascent magazine.
Persondata
NAME Roy, Arundhati
ALTERNATIVE NAMES Roy, Suzanna Arundhati
SHORT DESCRIPTION Indian novelist, essayist
DATE OF BIRTH November 24, 1961
PLACE OF BIRTH Shillong, Meghalaya
DATE OF DEATH
PLACE OF DEATH
is the 328th day of the year (329th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1961 (MCMLXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Arundhati Roy - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1107 words)
In 2002, Roy was convicted of contempt of court by the Supreme Court in New Delhi for accusing the court of attempting to silence protests against the Narmada Dam Project.
Roy was awarded the Sydney Peace Prize in May 2004 for her work in social campaigns and advocacy of non-violence.
The Checkbook and the Cruise Missile: Conversations with Arundhati Roy.
Arundhati Roy (3164 words)
Roy's passionate expose of patriarchy has generated a number of predictable knee-jerk responses including that of being 'anti-men', (a woman friend buying the book at a Delhi bookstall recently was told by the bookseller, 'I hope you don't share her views about Indian men!'), and that of being 'pornographic'.
In terms of Roy's approach to the left, the fact that the novel focusses in on individual acts of resistance does not automatically imply, as Ahmed suggests, that the author is espousing a fully-fledged 'subaltern' theory in which wider organised forms of resistance are rejected.
Interestingly, Roy's critics have chosen to pass over her most coherent, though bitter, critique of Communist rule in Kerala which makes it quite clear that it is not Marxism, but the practices of the CPI(M) in that particular state, which she is at odds with.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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