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Encyclopedia > Arthur Waley

Arthur David Waley (August 19, 1889June 27, 1966) was a noted English Orientalist and Sinologist. August 19 is the 231st day of the year (232nd in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1889 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... June 27 is the 178th day of the year (179th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 187 days remaining. ... 1966 was a common year starting on Saturday (the link is to a full 1966 calendar). ... Orientalism is the study of Near and Far Eastern societies and cultures, by Westerners. ... Sinology is the study of China, which usually requires a foreign scholar to have command of the Chinese language. ...


Waley was born in Tunbridge Wells, Kent England, as Arthur David Schloss, son of the economist David Frederick Schloss. He changed his surname to his mother's maiden name, Waley, in 1914. Educated at Rugby School, he entered King's College, Cambridge in 1907, where he studied Classics, and was awarded a bachelor's degree in 1910. Tunbridge Wells (officially Royal Tunbridge Wells) is a Wealden town in west Kent in England, just north of the border with East Sussex. ... Kent is a county in England, south-east of London. ... Royal motto: Dieu et mon droit (French: God and my right) Englands location within the UK Official language English de facto Capital London de facto Largest city London Area  - Total Ranked 1st UK 130,395 km² Population  - Total (2001)  - Density Ranked 1st UK 49,138,831 377/km² Religion... An economist is someone who studies Economics. ... A family name, or surname, is that part of a persons name that indicates to what family he or she belongs. ... 1914 is a common year starting on Thursday. ... A view of Rugby School from the rear, including the playing field, where according to legend Rugby football was invented Rugby School, located in the town of Rugby in Warwickshire, is one of the oldest public schools in the United Kingdom and is perhaps the leading co-educational boarding school... There are a number of institutions known as Kings College: Kings College, Hong Kong, Kings College in Sai Ying Pun, Hong Kong Kings College, Uganda, Kings College in Wakiso district, Uganda Kings College, Cambridge, a constituent college of the University of Cambridge Kings College... The University of Cambridge is the second-oldest university in the English-speaking world. ... 1907 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Classics, particularly within the Western University tradition, when used as a singular noun, means the study of the language, literature, history, art, and other aspects of Greek and Roman culture during the time frame known as classical antiquity. ... A bachelors degree is usually an undergraduate academic degree awarded for a course or major that generally lasts three or four years. ... 1910 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ...

Contents

Early Life and Career

Waley was appointed Assistant Keeper of Oriental Prints and Manuscripts at the British Museum in 1913. During this time he taught himself Chinese and Japanese, partly to help catalogue the paintings in the Museum's collection. He quit in [1929]] to devote himself fully to his literary and cultural interests, though he continued to lecture in the School of Oriental and African Studies, London. In 1918, he met Beryl de Zoete, a dance critic and writer; they lived together until her death in 1962. In 1966, Arthur Waley married Alison Robinson, whom he had first met in 1929. The main entrance to the British Museum The British Museum is one of the worlds largest and most important museums of ancient history. ... 1913 is a common year starting on Wednesday. ... School of Oriental and African Studies The School of Oriental and African Studies (often abbreviated to SOAS) was founded in 1916 primarily as an institution to train British administrators for colonial postings, and has grown into one of the worlds foremost institutions for the study of Asia and Africa. ... The Clock Tower of the Palace of Westminster which contains Big Ben London is the capital city of the United Kingdom and of England. ... A contemporary dancer rehearsing in a dance studio Dance (from Old French dance, further history unknown) generally refers to human movement either used as a form of expression (see also body language) or presented in a social, spiritual or performance setting. ... A critic (derived from the ancient Greek word krites meaning a judge) is a person who offers a value judgement or an interpretation. ... The term writer can apply to anyone who creates a written work, but the word more usually designates those who write creatively or professionally, or those who have written in many different forms. ... 1962 was a common year starting on Monday (link will take you to calendar). ... 1966 was a common year starting on Saturday (the link is to a full 1966 calendar). ... 1929 was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). ...


Literary associations

Waley lived in Bloomsbury and had a number of friends among the Bloomsbury Group, many of whom he had met as an undergraduate. He was one of the earliest to recognize Ronald Firbank as an accomplished author, and together with Osbert Sitwell provided an introduction to Firbank's first collected edition. The Bloomsbury, a corner pub Bloomsbury is an area of central London, in the Borough of Camden, named after early landowner William de Blemund who acquired the land in 1201. ... The Bloomsbury group or Bloomsbury Set or just Bloomsbury as its adherents (members is probably too formal a designation) would generally refer to it, was an English group of artists and scholars that existed from around 1905 until around World War II. The group began as an informal social assembly... Arthur Annesley Ronald Firbank was a British novelist. ... Sir Francis Osbert Sacheverell Sitwell, fifth baronet, was an English writer. ...


Noted American poet Ezra Pound was instrumental in getting Waley's first translations into print in The Little Review. His view of Waley's early work was mixed, however. As he wrote to Margaret Anderson, the Review's editor, in a letter of July 2, 1917: "Have at last got hold of Waley's translations from Po chu I. Some of the poems are magnificent. Nearly all the translations marred by his bungling English and defective rhythm... I shall try to buy the best ones, and to get him to remove some of the botched places. (He is stubborn as a jackass, or a scholar.)" Ezra Pound in 1913. ... Margaret Caroline Anderson (November 24, 1886 - October 18, 1973) was founder and editor of the celebrated literary magazine The Little Review, which published an extraordinary collection of modern American and English writers between 1914 and 1929. ...


Later Life

Waley was elected an honorary fellow of King's College, Cambridge in 1945, received the Commander of the Order of the British Empire (CBE) honor in 1952, the Queen's Medal for Poetry in 1953, and the Order of the Companions of Honour (CH) in 1956. He died in London and is buried in the renowned Highgate Cemetery. 1945 was a common year starting on Monday (link will take you to calendar). ... Commanders Badge of the Order of the British Empire The Most Excellent Order of the British Empire is an order of chivalry established on 4 June 1917 by George V. The Order includes five classes in civil and military divisions, in order of seniority: Knight or Dame Grand Cross... 1952 was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). ... 1953 is a common year starting on Thursday. ... The Order of the Companions of Honour is a British and Commonwealth Order (decoration). ... 1956 was a leap year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Circle of Lebanon, West Cemetery Entrance to the Egyptian Avenue, West Cemetery Highgate Cemetery is a famous cemetery located in Highgate, London, England. ...


Translations

Amongst his many translations include A Hundred and Seventy Chinese Poems (1918), Japanese Poetry: The Uta (1919), The No Plays of Japan (1921), The Tale of Genji (published in 6 volumes from 1921-33), The Pillow Book of Sei Shonagon (1928), Monkey (1942, an abridged version of Journey to the West), The Poetry and Career of Li Po (1959) and The Secret History of the Mongols and Other Pieces (1964). Waley received the James Tait Black Memorial Prize for his translation of Monkey, and his translations of the classics, the Analects of Confucius and The Way and its Power (Tao Te Ching), are still regarded highly by his peers. Ilustration of ch. ... The Pillow Book (枕草子, makura no sōshi) was a book of observations and musings recorded by Sei Shonagon during her time as court lady to Empress Sadako during the 990s in Heian Japan. ... Sei Shōnagon (清少納言, ~965-10??) was a Japanese author and a court lady who served the Empress Teishi some years around 1000, known as the author of The Pillow Book (Makura no sōshi). ... Monkey: A Folk-Tale of China (1942), usually known as simply Monkey, is a abridged translation by Arthur Waley of the Chinese classic text Journey to the West by Wu Chengen. ... 18th century Chinese illustration of a scene from Journey to the West The four heros of the story, left to right: Sun Wukong, Xuanzang, Zhu Wuneng, and Sha Wujing. ... Li Po (701-762) was a Chinese poet, considered the greatest romantic poet of the Tang dynasty. ... Founded in 1919, the James Tait Black Memorial Prizes are among the oldest and most prestigious book awards in Britain. ... Engraving of Confucius. ... The Tao Te Ching (道德經, Pinyin: Dào Dé Jīng, thus sometimes rendered in recent works as Dao De Jing; archaic pre-Wade-Giles rendering: Tao Teh Ching; roughly translated as The Book of the Way and its Virtue (see dedicated chapter below on translating the title)) is an ancient Chinese... The Tao Te Ching (道德經, Pinyin: D Jīng, thus sometimes rendered in recent works as Dao De Jing; archaic pre-Wade-Giles rendering: Tao Teh Ching; roughly translated as The Book of the Way and its Virtue (see dedicated chapter below on translating the title)) is an ancient Chinese scripture...


Experiences and Expertise

Despite translating many Chinese and Japanese classical texts into English, including much poetry and philosophical works, Waley never ventured into the Far East during his lifetime. In his preface to The Secret History of the Mongols, Waley writes that he was not a master of many languages, but claims to have known Chinese and Japanese fairly well, a good deal of Ainu and Mongolian, and some Hebrew and Syriac. Japanese literature spans a period of almost two millennia of writing. ... Far East is a term often used for East Asia and Southeast Asia combined, sometimes including also the easternmost territories of Russia, i. ... For the language spoken in Central Asia, see Aini language The Ainu language (アイヌ イタㇰ, Aynu Itak; Japanese: アイヌ語) is spoken by the Ainu ethnic group on the northern Japanese island of Hokkaido. ... The Modern Hebrew language is a Semitic language of the Afro-Asiatic language family. ... Syriac is an Eastern Aramaic language that was once spoken across much of the Fertile Crescent. ...


Anecdote

Edith Sitwell records the following anecdote of Waley. Having found in her brother Sacheverell's library a book of unknown alphabet, she placed it next to Waley's bed when he stayed as a house guest. "Next morning, Mr. Waley looked a little pale; his manner was languid, but as he placed the book on the breakfast table he announced in a faint voice: 'Turkish. 18th century.' The pages were few; and after an interval of respect we enquired: 'What is it about?' Mr. Waley, with sudden animation: 'The Cat and the Bat. The Cat sat on the Mat. The Cat ate the Rat.' 'Oh, it is a child's book.' 'One would imagine so. One would hope so!" Edith Sitwell (September 7, 1887 - December 9, 1964) was a British poet and critic. ...


Selected works

  • A Hundred and Seventy Chinese Poems, 1918
  • More Translations from the Chinese, 1919
  • Japanese Poetry: The Uta, 1919
  • The Nō Plays of Japan, 1921
  • The Tale of Genji, by Lady Murasaki, 1921-1933
    • The Tale of Genji
    • The Sacred Tree
    • The Wreath of Cloud
    • Blue Trousers
    • The Lady of the Boat
    • The Bridge of Dreams
  • The Temple and Other Poems, 1923
  • Introduction to the Study of Chinese Painting, 1923
  • The Pillow Book of Sei Shōnagon, 1928
  • The Way and its Power: A Study of the Tao Te Ching and its Place in Chinese Thought, 1934
  • The Book of Songs [Shih Ching], 1937
  • The Analects of Confucius, 1938
  • Three Ways of Thought in Ancient China, 1939
  • Translations from the Chinese, a compilation, 1941
  • Monkey, 1942
  • Chinese Poems, 1946
  • The Life and Times of Po Chü-I, 1949
  • The Real Tripitaka and Other Pieces, 1952
  • The Nine Songs: A Study of Shamanism in Ancient China, 1955
  • Yuan Mei: Eighteenth Century Chinese Poet, 1956
  • The Opium War through Chinese Eyes, 1958
  • The Poetry and Career of Li Po, 1959
  • Ballads and Stories from Tun-Huang, 1960
  • The Secret History of the Mongols, 1963

References

  • Alison Waley, A Half of Two Lives, (London, 1982)
  • John Walter de Gruchy, Orienting Arthur Waley: Japonism, Orientalism, and the Creation of Japanese Literature in English, Honolulu: University of Hawai'i Press, 2003. ISBN 0-8248-2567-5.

External link

  • Waley's translation of The Way and its Power (http://afpc.asso.fr/wengu/wg/wengu.php?l=Daodejing)

  Results from FactBites:
 
Arthur Waley - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (750 words)
Waley was born in Tunbridge Wells, Kent England, as Arthur David Schloss, son of the economist David Frederick Schloss.
Waley was elected an honorary fellow of King's College, Cambridge in 1945, received the Commander of the Order of the British Empire (CBE) honor in 1952, the Queen's Medal for Poetry in 1953, and the Order of the Companions of Honour (CH) in 1956.
Waley received the James Tait Black Memorial Prize for his translation of Monkey, and his translations of the classics, the Analects of Confucius and The Way and its Power (Tao Te Ching), are still regarded highly by his peers.
Arthur Waley - definition of Arthur Waley in Encyclopedia (209 words)
Arthur David Waley (August 19, 1889 – June 27, 1966) was an English orientalist and sinologist.
Born Arthur David Schloss, son of the economist David Frederick Schloss, he changed his surname to his mother's maiden name, Waley, in 1914.
After his graduation, Waley was appointed Assistant Keeper of Oriental Prints and Manuscripts at the British Museum in 1913.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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