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Encyclopedia > Arthur Conan Doyle
Sir Arthur Conan Doyle

Sir Arthur Conan Doyle
Born 22 May 1859(1859-05-22)
Edinburgh, Scotland
Died 7 July 1930 (aged 71)
Occupation Novelist, short story writer, poet, doctor
Genres Detective fiction, historical novels, non-fiction
Notable work(s) stories of Sherlock Holmes
The Lost World

Sir Arthur Ignatius Conan Doyle, DL (22 May 18597 July 1930) was a Scottish author most noted for his stories about the detective Sherlock Holmes, which are generally considered a major innovation in the field of crime fiction, and for the adventures of Professor Challenger. He was a prolific writer whose other works include science fiction stories, historical novels, plays and romances, poetry, and non-fiction. PD image from http://www. ... is the 142nd day of the year (143rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1859 (MDCCCLIX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Edinburgh viewed from Arthurs Seat. ... is the 188th day of the year (189th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1930 (MCMXXX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display 1930 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about work. ... A literary genre is one of the divisions of literature into genres according to particular criteria such as literary technique, tone, or content. ... Basil Rathbone as Sherlock Holmes Detective fiction is a branch of crime fiction that centers upon the investigation of a crime, usually murder, by a detective, either professional or amateur. ... A historical novel is a novel in which the story is set among historical events, or more generally, where the time the action takes place in predates the time of the first publication -- distinguish and contrast the genre of alternate history. ... For the book by Chuck Palahniuk titled Non-fiction, see Stranger Than Fiction: True Stories. ... Traditionally, the canon of Sherlock Holmes consists of the 56 short stories and 4 novels written by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. ... The Lost World is a 1912 novel by Arthur Conan Doyle concerning an expedition to a plateau (native name is Tepuyes) in South America (Venezuela) where prehistoric animals (dinosaurs and other extinct creatures) still survive. ... Edgar Allan Poe (January 19, 1809 – October 7, 1849) was an American poet, short story writer, playwright, editor, literary critic, essayist and one of the leaders of the American Romantic Movement. ... Agatha Mary Clarissa, Lady Mallowan, DBE (15 September 1890 – 12 January 1976), commonly known as Agatha Christie, was an English crime fiction writer. ... The Deputy Lieutenant is the deputy to the Lord Lieutenant of a county. ... is the 142nd day of the year (143rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1859 (MDCCCLIX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 188th day of the year (189th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1930 (MCMXXX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display 1930 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the Scottish as an ethnic group. ... For other uses, see Author (disambiguation). ... Basil Rathbone as Sherlock Holmes Detective fiction is a branch of crime fiction that centers upon the investigation of a crime, usually murder, by a detective, either professional or amateur. ... This article is about Arthur Conan Doyles fictional detective. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with mystery_fiction. ... Professor Challenger (sitting) as illustrated by Harry Rountree in Conan Arthur Doyles short story The Poison Belt in Strand Magazine. ... Science fiction is a form of speculative fiction principally dealing with the impact of imagined science and technology, or both, upon society and persons as individuals. ... A historical novel a novel in which the story is set among historical events, or more generally, in which the time of the action predates the lifetime of the author. ...

Contents

Life

Arthur Conan Doyle was born on 22 May 1859, in Edinburgh, Scotland, to an English father, Charles Altamont Doyle, and an Irish mother, née Mary Foley, who had married in 1855.[1] Although he is now referred to as "Conan Doyle", the origin of this compound surname is uncertain.[2] Conan Doyle's father was an artist, as were his paternal uncles (one of whom was Richard Doyle), and his paternal grandfather John Doyle. is the 142nd day of the year (143rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1859 (MDCCCLIX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... For other uses, see Edinburgh (disambiguation). ... This article is about the country. ... Charles Altamont Doyle, (1888) Charles Altamont Doyle (1832-1893) was a Victorian artist. ... A family name, or surname, is that part of a persons name that indicates to what family he or she belongs. ... Richard Dickie Doyle (September 1824 - December 11, 1883) was a notable Victorian illustrator. ... John Doyle (1797 Dublin - 1868-01-02) was an artist and notable[1][2] Victorian illustrator, producing political caricatures for The Times between 1829 and 1851. ...


Conan Doyle was sent to the Roman Catholic Jesuit preparatory school Hodder Place, Stonyhurst, at the age of eight. He then went on to Stonyhurst College, but by the time he left the school in 1875, he had rejected Christianity to become an agnostic. Catholic Church redirects here. ... The Society of Jesus (Latin: Societas Iesu), commonly known as the Jesuits, is a Roman Catholic religious order. ... A Jesuit School in Lancashire. ... Stonyhurst College is an independent, Roman Catholic school in the Jesuit tradition. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Relation to other religions Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Christianity Portal This box:      Christianity is a monotheistic[1] religion centered on the life and teachings of Jesus of Nazareth as presented in the New Testament. ... Agnosticism (Greek: α- a-, without + γνώσις gnōsis, knowledge; after Gnosticism) is the philosophical view that the truth value of certain claims — particularly metaphysical claims regarding theology, afterlife or the existence of God, gods, deities, or even ultimate reality — is unknown or, depending on the form of agnosticism, inherently unknowable due to...


From 1876 to 1881 he studied medicine at the University of Edinburgh, including a period working in the town of Aston (now a district of Birmingham). While studying, he also began writing short stories; his first published story appeared in Chambers's Edinburgh Journal before he was 20.[3] Following his term at university, he served as a ship's doctor on a voyage to the West African coast. He completed his doctorate on the subject of tabes dorsalis in 1885.[4] For the chemical substances known as medicines, see medication. ... The University of Edinburgh (Scottish Gaelic: ), founded in 1582,[4] is a renowned centre for teaching and research in Edinburgh, Scotland. ... Aston is an area of the City of Birmingham, in the West Midlands of England. ... This article is about the British city. ... Robert Chambers (10 July 1802 – 17 March 1871), Scottish author and publisher, was born in Peebles. ...  Western Africa (UN subregion)  Maghreb[1] West Africa or Western Africa is the westernmost region of the African continent. ... // Tabes dorsalis is a slow degeneration of the nerve cells and nerve fibers that carry sensory information to the brain. ...


In 1882, he joined former classmate George Budd as his partner at a medical practice in Plymouth, but their relationship proved difficult, and Conan Doyle soon left to set up an independent practice.[5] Arriving in Portsmouth in June of that year with less than £10 to his name, he set up a medical practice at 1 Bush Villas in Elm Grove, Southsea.[6] The practice was initially not very successful; while waiting for patients, he again began writing stories. His first significant work was A Study in Scarlet, which appeared in Beeton's Christmas Annual for 1887 and featured the first appearance of Sherlock Holmes, who was partially modelled after his former university professor, Joseph Bell. Future short stories featuring Sherlock Holmes were published in the English Strand Magazine. Interestingly, Rudyard Kipling congratulated Conan Doyle on his success, asking "Could this be my old friend, Dr. Joe?" Sherlock Holmes, however, was even more closely modelled after the famous Edgar Allan Poe character, C. Auguste Dupin.[7] This article is about the city in England. ... For other places with the same name, see Portsmouth (disambiguation). ... Southsea is a seaside resort located in Portsmouth at the southern tip of Portsea Island in the county of Hampshire in England. ... A Study in Scarlet is a detective mystery story written by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle and published in 1887. ... Joseph Bell, JP, DL, FRCS Ed. ... The Strand Magazine was a monthly fiction magazine founded by George Newnes. ... This article is about the British author. ... Edgar Allan Poe (January 19, 1809 – October 7, 1849) was an American poet, short story writer, playwright, editor, literary critic, essayist and one of the leaders of the American Romantic Movement. ... C. Auguste Dupin is a fictional detective created by Edgar Allan Poe. ...


While living in Southsea he played Rugby for a proffessional side (that disbanded in 1703), Portsmouth Association Football Club, as a goal keeper. (This club had no connection with the Portsmouth F.C. of today, who were founded in 1898.) Conan Doyle was also a keen cricketer, and between 1900 and 1907 he played 10 first-class matches for the MCC. His highest score was 43 against London County in 1902. He was an occasional bowler who took just one first-class wicket. Southsea is a seaside resort located in Portsmouth at the southern tip of Portsea Island in the county of Hampshire in England. ... Portsmouth Football Club is an English football club based in the south coast island city of Portsmouth. ... A cricketer is a term used to refer to a person who plays cricket. ... First-class cricket matches are those between international teams or the highest standard of domestic teams in which teams have two innings each. ... Lords 2005 The Marylebone Cricket Club (MCC), founded in 1787, is a private members club and was the original governing body of cricket in England and across the world. ... WG Grace in the colours of London County, painted by Albert Chevallier Tayler. ...


In 1885, he married Louisa (or Louise) Hawkins, known as "Touie", who suffered from tuberculosis and died on 4 July 1906.[8] He married Jean Leckie in 1907, whom he had first met and fallen in love with in 1897 but had maintained a platonic relationship with her out of loyalty to his first wife. Conan Doyle had five children, two with his first wife (Mary Louise (born 1889) and Alleyne Kingsley (1892 – 1918)) and three with his second wife (Jean Lena Annette, Denis Percy Stewart (17 March 19099 March 1955), second husband in 1936 of Georgian Princess Nina Mdivani (circa 1910 – 19 February 1987) (former sister-in-law of Barbara Hutton), and Adrian Malcolm). Tuberculosis (abbreviated as TB for tubercle bacillus or Tuberculosis) is a common and deadly infectious disease caused by mycobacteria, mainly Mycobacterium tuberculosis. ... is the 185th day of the year (186th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1906 (MCMVI) was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Platonic love in its modern popular sense is an affectionate relationship into which the sexual element does not enter, especially in cases where one might easily assume otherwise. ... Dame Jean Lena Annette Billy Conan Doyle (aka Lady Bromet) (1912-1997) was the daughter of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. ... is the 76th day of the year (77th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1909 (MCMIX) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... is the 68th day of the year (69th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1955 (MCMLV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1955 Gregorian calendar). ... [[Media:Italic text]]{| style=float:right; |- | |- | |} is the 50th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1987 (MCMLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link displays 1987 Gregorian calendar). ... Barbara Hutton (November 14, 1912 – May 11, 1979) was an American socialite dubbed by the media as the Poor Little Rich Girl because of her troubled life. ... Adrian Conan Doyle (1910-1970) was the youngest son of Arthur Conan Doyle, and his fathers literary executor. ...

Portrait of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle by Sidney Paget, 1897.

In 1890, Conan Doyle studied the eye in Vienna; he moved to London in 1891 to set up a practice as an ophthalmologist. He wrote in his autobiography that not a single patient crossed his door. This gave him more time for writing, and in November 1891 he wrote to his mother: "I think of slaying Holmes... and winding him up for good and all. He takes my mind from better things." His mother responded, saying, "You may do what you deem fit, but the crowds will not take this lightheartedly." In December 1893, he did so in order to dedicate more of his time to more "important" works (his historical novels). Image File history File links PortraitOfACD.jpg‎ 1897-Portrait of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle by Sidney Paget, the illustrator of the original Adventures of Sherlock Holmes in The Strand Magazine. ... Image File history File links PortraitOfACD.jpg‎ 1897-Portrait of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle by Sidney Paget, the illustrator of the original Adventures of Sherlock Holmes in The Strand Magazine. ... A Paget illustration of Sherlock Holmes (right) and Dr. Watson. ... For other uses, see Eye (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Vienna (disambiguation). ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... Ophthalmology is the branch of medicine which deals with the diseases of the eye and their treatment. ... Cover of the first English edition of 1793 of Benjamin Franklins autobiography. ... A historical novel a novel in which the story is set among historical events, or more generally, in which the time of the action predates the lifetime of the author. ...


Holmes and Moriarty apparently plunged to their deaths together down a waterfall in the story, "The Final Problem". Public outcry led him to bring the character back; Conan Doyle returned to the story in "The Adventure of the Empty House", with the explanation that only Moriarty had fallen but, since Holmes had other dangerous enemies, he had arranged to be temporarily "dead" also. Holmes ultimately appears in a total of 56 short stories and four Conan Doyle novels (he has since appeared in many novels and stories by other authors). Professor Moriarty, illustration by Sidney Paget which accompanied the original publication of The Final Problem. Professor James Moriarty is a fictional character who is the best known antagonist (and archenemy) of the detective Sherlock Holmes. ... The Adventure of the Final Problem is a short story by Arthur Conan Doyle, featuring his detective character Sherlock Holmes. ... This article is in need of attention. ... For other uses, see Novel (disambiguation). ...


Following the Boer War in South Africa at the turn of the 20th century and the condemnation from around the world over the United Kingdom's conduct, Conan Doyle wrote a short pamphlet titled, The War in South Africa: Its Cause and Conduct, which justified the UK's role in the Boer war, and was widely translated. Combatants British Empire Orange Free State South African Republic Commanders Sir Redvers Buller Lord Kitchener Lord Roberts Paul Kruger Louis Botha Koos de la Rey Martinus Steyn Christiaan de Wet Casualties 6,000 - 7,000 (A further ~14,000 from disease) 6,000 - 8,000 (Unknown number from disease) Civilians...


Conan Doyle believed that it was this pamphlet that resulted in 1902 in his being knighted and appointed Deputy-Lieutenant of Surrey. He also in 1900 wrote the longer book, The Great Boer War. During the early years of the 20th century, Sir Arthur twice ran for Parliament as a Liberal Unionist, once in Edinburgh and once in the Hawick Burghs, but although he received a respectable vote he was not elected. A statue of an armoured knight of the Middle Ages For the chess piece, see knight (chess). ... This article is about the English county. ... The Great Boer War is a non-fiction work on the Boer War by Arthur Conan Doyle and first published in 1900. ... For the Canadian party see Liberal-Unionist The Liberal Unionists were a British political party that split away from the Liberals in 1886, and had effectively merged with the Conservatives by the turn of the century. ... Hawick Burghs was a district of burghs constituency of the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom from 1868 until 1918. ...

Arthur Conan Doyle statue in Crowborough.
Arthur Conan Doyle statue in Crowborough.

Conan Doyle was involved in the campaign for the reform of the Congo Free State, led by the journalist E. D. Morel and the diplomat Roger Casement. He wrote The Crime of the Congo in 1909, a long pamphlet in which he denounced the horrors in that country. He became acquainted with Morel and Casement, taking inspiration from them for two of the main characters in the novel, The Lost World (1912). Download high resolution version (879x1905, 225 KB)Statue of Arthur Conan Doyle. ... Download high resolution version (879x1905, 225 KB)Statue of Arthur Conan Doyle. ... Capital Boma Government Monarchy Ruler and owner Leopold II of Belgium Historical era New Imperialism  - Established 1885  - Annexation by Belgium 15 November, 1908 The Congo Free State was a corporate state privately controlled by Leopold II, King of the Belgians through a dummy non-governmental organization, the Association Internationale Africaine. ... Picture of E.D. Morel frontpage of Red Rubber 1906 Picture of Roger Casement Emile Vandervelde Edmund Dene Morel, originally Georges Eduard Pierre Achille Morel de Ville (July 10, 1873 – November 12, 1924) was a British journalist, author and socialist politician. ... Roger David Casement (Irish: ;[1] 1 September 1864 – 3 August 1916), known as Sir Roger Casement, CMG between 1905 and July 1916, was an Irish patriot, poet, revolutionary and nationalist by inclination. ... The Lost World is a 1912 novel by Arthur Conan Doyle concerning an expedition to a plateau (native name is Tepuyes) in South America (Venezuela) where prehistoric animals (dinosaurs and other extinct creatures) still survive. ...


He broke with both when Morel became one of the leaders of the pacifist movement during the First World War, and when Casement committed treason against the UK during the Easter Rising out of conviction for his Irish nationalist views. Conan Doyle tried, unsuccessfully, to save Casement from the death penalty, arguing that he had been driven mad and was not responsible for his actions. Pacifist redirects here. ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ... For other uses, see Treason (disambiguation) or Traitor (disambiguation). ... Combatants Irish Volunteers, Irish Citizen Army, Irish Republican Brotherhood British Army Royal Irish Constabulary Commanders Patrick Pearse, James Connolly Brigadier-General Lowe General Sir John Maxwell Strength 1250 in Dublin, c. ... Irish nationalism refers to political movements that desire greater autonomy or the independence of Ireland from Great Britain. ... Death penalty, death sentence, and execution redirect here. ...


Conan Doyle was also a fervent advocate of justice, and personally investigated two closed cases, which led to two imprisoned men being released. The first case, in 1906, involved a shy half-British, half-Indian lawyer named George Edalji, who had allegedly penned threatening letters and mutilated animals. Police were set on Edalji's conviction, even though the mutilations continued after their suspect was jailed. George Edalji was the eldest son of three for Shapurji Edalji and Charlotte Stoneham. ...


It was partially as a result of this case that the Court of Criminal Appeal was established in 1907, so not only did Conan Doyle help George Edalji, his work helped establish a way to correct other miscarriages of justice. The story of Conan Doyle and Edalji is told in fictional form in Julian Barnes' 2005 novel, Arthur & George. The Court of Criminal Appeal was an English appellate court for criminal cases established by the Judicature Act 1873. ... A miscarriage of justice is primarily the conviction and punishment of a person for a crime that they did not commit. ... Barnes as Francophile and Francophone in Bernard Pivots Double je (France 2, March 2005) Julian Patrick Barnes (born January 19, 1946 in Leicester) is a contemporary English writer whose novels and short stories have been seen as examples of postmodernism in literature. ... For other uses, see Novel (disambiguation). ... Arthur & George is a novel by Julian Barnes. ...


The second case, that of Oscar Slater, a German Jew and gambling-den operator convicted of bludgeoning an 82-year-old woman in Glasgow in 1908, excited Conan Doyle's curiosity because of inconsistencies in the prosecution case and a general sense that Slater was framed. For other uses, see Glasgow (disambiguation). ...


After the death of his wife Louisa in 1906, and the deaths of his son Kingsley, his brother Innes, his two brothers-in-law, and his two nephews shortly after World War I, Conan Doyle sank into depression. He found solace supporting Spiritualism and its alleged scientific proof of existence beyond the grave. “The Great War ” redirects here. ... This article is about the religion. ...


According to the History Channel program Houdini: Unlocking the Mystery (which briefly explored the friendship between the two), Conan Doyle became involved with Spiritualism after the deaths of his son and his brother. Kingsley Doyle died from pneumonia on 28 October 1918, which he contracted during his convalescence after being seriously wounded during the 1916 Battle of the Somme. Brigadier-General Innes Doyle died in February 1919, also from pneumonia. Sir Arthur became involved with Spiritualism to the extent that he wrote a Professor Challenger novel on the subject, The Land of Mist. The History Channel is a cable television channel, dedicated to the presentation of historical events and persons, often with frequent observations and explanations by noted historians as well as reenactors and witnesses to events, if possible. ... is the 301st day of the year (302nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1918 (MCMXVIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar. ... For other battles known as Battle of the Somme, see Battle of the Somme (disambiguation). ... Professor Challenger (sitting) as illustrated by Harry Rountree in Conan Arthur Doyles short story The Poison Belt in Strand Magazine. ...


His book, The Coming of the Fairies (1921) shows he was apparently convinced of the veracity of the Cottingley Fairies photographs, which he reproduced in the book, together with theories about the nature and existence of fairies and spirits. Frances with the fairies, taken by Elsie in July 1917. ...


In his The History of Spiritualism (1926) Conan Doyle praised the psychic phenomena and spirit materialisations produced by Eusapia Palladino and Mina "Margery" Crandon.[9] Edgar Cayce (1877 – 1945) was one of the best-known American psychics of the 20th century and made many highly publicized predictions. ... Eusapia Palladino (1854-1918) was a medium and spiritualist from Naples. ... // Mina Margery Crandon (1888-1941) was the wife of a wealthy Boston surgeon and socialite, Dr. Le Roi Goddard Crandon. ...


His work on this topic was one of the reasons that one of his short story collections, The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes, was banned in the Soviet Union in 1929 for supposed occultism. This ban was later lifted. Russian actor Vasily Livanov later received an Order of the British Empire for his portrayal of Sherlock Holmes. The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes is a collection of twelve stories by Arthur Conan Doyle, featuring his famous detective and illustrated by Sidney Paget. ... For other uses, see Occult (disambiguation). ... The photograph of Livanov as Sherlock Holmes is said to be the largest of those gracing the walls of the Sherlock Holmes Museum in Baker Street. ... The Most Excellent Order of the British Empire is a British order of chivalry established on 4 June 1917 by King George V. The Order includes five classes in civil and military divisions; in decreasing order of seniority, these are Knight Grand Cross or Dame Grand Cross (GBE) Knight Commander... This article is about Arthur Conan Doyles fictional detective. ...


Conan Doyle was friends for a time with the American magician Harry Houdini, who himself became a prominent opponent of the Spiritualist movement in the 1920s following the death of his beloved mother. Although Houdini insisted that Spiritualist mediums employed trickery (and consistently attempted to expose them as frauds), Conan Doyle became convinced that Houdini himself possessed supernatural powers, a view expressed in Conan Doyle's The Edge of the Unknown. Houdini was apparently unable to convince Conan Doyle that his feats were simply magic tricks, leading to a bitter public falling out between the two.[9] Houdini redirects here. ...

Arthur Conan Doyle's house in South Norwood, London
Arthur Conan Doyle's house in South Norwood, London

Richard Milner, an American historian of science, has presented a case that Conan Doyle may have been the perpetrator of the Piltdown Man hoax of 1912, creating the counterfeit hominid fossil that fooled the scientific world for over 40 years. Milner says that Conan Doyle had a motive, namely revenge on the scientific establishment for debunking one of his favourite psychics, and that The Lost World contains several encrypted clues regarding his involvement in the hoax.[10] Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2816 × 2112 pixel, file size: 940 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2816 × 2112 pixel, file size: 940 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... South Norwood is a place in the London Borough of Croydon. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... The portrait painted by John Cooke in 1915. ... Genera The hominids are the members of the biological family Hominidae (the great apes), which includes humans, chimpanzees, gorillas, and orangutans. ... For other uses, see Fossil (disambiguation). ... The Lost World is a 1912 novel by Arthur Conan Doyle concerning an expedition to a plateau (native name is Tepuyes) in South America (Venezuela) where prehistoric animals (dinosaurs and other extinct creatures) still survive. ...


Samuel Rosenberg's 1974 book Naked is the Best Disguise purports to explain how Conan Doyle left, throughout his writings, open clues that related to hidden and suppressed aspects of his mentality. Samuel Rosenberg (1912—January 5,1996) was best known for his 1974 study of Sherlock Holmes entitled Naked is the Best Disguise (subtitled The Death and Resurrection of Sherlock Holmes). ... Title The title comes from lines in William Congreves The Double Dealer, 1694. ...

Death

Conan Doyle was found clutching his chest in the family garden on 7 July 1930. He soon died of his heart attack, aged 71, and is buried in the Church Yard at Minstead in the New Forest, Hampshire, England. His last words were directed toward his wife: "You are wonderful." The epitaph on his gravestone reads: is the 188th day of the year (189th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1930 (MCMXXX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display 1930 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Heart attack redirects here. ... Minstead is a small one-shop village in the New Forest, Hampshire, about 2 miles north of Lyndhurst. ... For other uses, see New Forest (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Hampshire (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ...

STEEL TRUE
BLADE STRAIGHT
ARTHUR CONAN DOYLE
KNIGHT
PATRIOT, PHYSICIAN & MAN OF LETTERS


Undershaw, the home Conan Doyle had built near Hindhead, south of London, and lived in for at least a decade, was a hotel and restaurant from 1924 until 2004. It was then bought by a developer, and has been empty since then while conservationists and Conan Doyle fans fight to preserve it.[8] Hindhead is a village on the A3 road in Surrey, about 10 miles south-west of Guildford. ...


A statue honours Conan Doyle at Crowborough Cross in Crowborough, East Sussex, England, where Sir Arthur lived for 23 years. There is also a statue of Sherlock Holmes in Picardy Place, Edinburgh, Scotland, close to the house where Conan Doyle was born. Crowborough is the largest inland town in East Sussex, United Kingdom. ... East Sussex is a county in South East England. ...


Bibliography

Grave of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle at Minstead, England
Grave of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle at Minstead, England

Image File history File links Size of this preview: 406 × 599 pixelsFull resolution‎ (598 × 882 pixels, file size: 216 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 406 × 599 pixelsFull resolution‎ (598 × 882 pixels, file size: 216 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ...

Holmes books

Traditionally, the canon of Sherlock Holmes consists of the 56 short stories and 4 novels written by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. ... A Study in Scarlet is a detective mystery story written by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle and published in 1887. ... The Sign of Four (1890) was the second novel featuring Sherlock Holmes written by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. ... The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes is a collection of twelve stories by Arthur Conan Doyle, featuring his famous detective and illustrated by Sidney Paget. ... The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes is a collection of Sherlock Holmes stories, originally published in 1894, by Arthur Conan Doyle. ... The Hound of the Baskervilles is a crime novel by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, originally serialized in the Strand Magazine in 1901 and 1902, which is set largely on Dartmoor in 1889. ... The Return of Sherlock Holmes is a collection of Sherlock Holmes stories, originally published in 1903-1904, by Arthur Conan Doyle. ... The Valley of Fear is a Sherlock Holmes novel by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. ... His Last Bow is a collection of Sherlock Holmes stories by Arthur Conan Doyle, as well as the title of one of the stories in that collection. ... The Case-Book of Sherlock Holmes is the final collection of Sherlock Holmes stories by Arthur Conan Doyle. ...

Challenger stories

The Lost World is a 1912 novel by Arthur Conan Doyle concerning an expedition to a plateau (native name is Tepuyes) in South America (Venezuela) where prehistoric animals (dinosaurs and other extinct creatures) still survive. ... The Poison Belt was the second novel Sir Arthur Conan Doyle wrote about Professor Challenger. ... The Land of Mist is a novel written by Arthur Conan Doyle in 1926. ... The Disintegration Machine is a very short story written by Arthur Conan Doyle in 1927. ... When the World Screamed was the last story written about Professor Challenger by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. ...

Historical novels

  • Micah Clarke (1888)
  • The White Company (1891)
  • The Great Shadow (1892)
  • The Refugees (publ. 1893, written 1892)
  • Rodney Stone (1896)
  • Uncle Bernac (1897)
  • Sir Nigel (1906)
  • The British Campaign in France and Flanders: 1914 (1916)

Micah Clarke by Arthur Conan Doyle is an historical adventure novel set during the Monmouth Rebellion of 1685 in England. ... The White Company by Arthur Conan Doyle is a historical adventure set during the Hundred Years War. ... Rodney Stone is a novel by English writer Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. ... Sir Nigel is a historical novel by the British author Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. ...

Other works

  • "J. Habakuk Jephson's Statement" (1884), a story based on the fate of the ship Mary Celeste
  • The Mystery of Cloomber (1889)
  • The Firm of Girdlestone (1890)
  • The Captain of the Polestar, and other tales (1890)
  • The Great Keinplatz Experiment (1890)[11]
  • The Doings of Raffles Haw (1891)[11]
  • Beyond the City (1892)
  • Jane Annie, or the Good Conduct Prize (1893)
  • My Friend the Murderer and Other Mysteries and Adventures (1893)[11]
  • Round The Red Lamp (1894)[11]
  • The Parasite (1894)[11]
  • The Stark Munro Letters (1895)
  • Songs of Action (1898)
  • The Tragedy of The Korosko (1898)
  • A Duet (1899)
  • The Great Boer War (1900)
  • The Exploits of Brigadier Gerard (1903)
  • Through the Magic Door (1907)
  • Round the Fire Stories (1908)[11]
  • The Crime of the Congo (1909)
  • The Lost Gallery (1911)[11]
  • The Terror of Blue John Gap (1912)
  • Danger! and Other Stories (1918)[11]
  • The New Revelation (1918)
  • The Horror of the Heights (1918)
  • The Vital Message (1919)
  • Tales of Terror & Mystery (1923)
  • The Black Doctor and Other Tales of Terror and Mystery (1925)[11]
  • The Dealings of Captain Sharkey (1925)[11]
  • The Man from Archangel and Other Tales of Adventure (1925)[11]
  • The History of Spiritualism (1926)
  • The Maracot Deep (1929)[11]

J. Habakuk Jephsons Statement is an 1884 story by a then-young Arthur Conan Doyle, loosly based on the real mystery of the abandonment of the Mary Celeste, published anonymously in the respected Cornhill Magazine. ... An 1861 painting of the Amazon (later renamed Mary Celeste) by an unknown artist (perhaps Honoré Pellegrin) The Mary Celeste was a brigantine discovered in the Atlantic Ocean unmanned and under full sail heading towards the Strait of Gibraltar in 1872. ... The Mystery of Cloomber is a novel by English author Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. ... The Firm of Girdlestone is a novel by English author Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. ... The Doings Of Raffles Haw is a novel by English author Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. ... Arthur Conan Doyle Sir Arthur Ignatius Conan Doyle (May 22, 1859 – July 7, 1930) is the British author most famously known for his stories about the detective Sherlock Holmes, which are generally considered a major innovation in the field of crime fiction. ... Programme, 1893 Jane Annie, or The Good Conduct Prize is an opera written in 1893 by J.M.Barrie and Arthur Conan Doyle, with music by Ernest Ford, a fine conductor and occasional composer. ... Categories: Possible copyright violations ... The Tragedy of The Korosko is a novel by English author Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. ... The Great Boer War is a non-fiction work on the Boer War by Arthur Conan Doyle and first published in 1900. ... Brigadier Gerard is the hero of a series of comic short stories by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. ... This article or section contains a plot summary that is overly long. ... The Maracot Deep is a 1929 novel by Arthur Conan Doyle about the discovery of a sunken city of Atlantis by a team of explorers led by Professor Maracot. ...

See also

Logo of the Toronto Public Library Toronto Reference Library The Toronto Public Library is the largest public library system in Canada and the second busiest (by number of visits) in the world after the Hong Kong Public Library. ... William Gillette as Sherlock Holmes William Hooker Gillette ( July 24, 1853, Hartford, Connecticut; April 29, 1937, Hartford, Connecticut) was an American actor, playwright and stage-manager; recognized as one of the greatest actors in the history of the United States. ... Christopher Golden is an American award-winning, bestselling author of such novels as Wildwood Road, The Boys Are Back in Town, The Ferryman, Strangewood, Of Saints and Shadows, and the Body of Evidence series of teen thrillers. ... Promotional photograph of Sniegoski and his dog. ... The Menagerie: The Nimble Man by Christopher Golden and Thomas E. Sniegoski Move over, X-Men and the League of Extraordinary Gentlemen, here comes the Menagerie! - The Barnes & Noble Review Were not the Justice League. ...

Notes and references

  1. ^ Lellenberg, Jon; Daniel Stashower and Charles Foley (2007). Arthur Conan Doyle: A Life in Letters. HarperPress, pp. 8 – 9. ISBN 978-0-00-724759-2.  Stashower, Daniel (2000). Teller of Tales: The Life of Arthur Conan Doyle. Penguin Books, pp. 20 – 21. ISBN 0-8050-5074-4. 
  2. ^ Stashower says that the name originated from his great-uncle Michael Conan, a distinguished journalist, from whom Arthur and his elder sister, Annette, received the compound surname of "Conan Doyle" (Stashower 20 – 21). The same source points out that in 1885 he was describing himself on the brass nameplate outside his house, and on his doctoral thesis, as "A. Conan Doyle". However, other sources (such as the 1901 census) indicate that Conan Doyle's surname was "Doyle", and that the form "Conan Doyle" was only used as a surname in his later years.[citation needed]
  3. ^ Stashower 30 – 31.
  4. ^ Available at the Edinburgh Research Archive.
  5. ^ Stashower 52 – 59.
  6. ^ Stashower 55, 58 – 59.
  7. ^ Sova, Dawn B. Edgar Allan Poe: A to Z. New York: Checkmark Books, 2001. pp. 162-163. ISBN 081604161X
  8. ^ a b Leeman, Sue, "Sherlock Holmes fans hope to save Conan Doyle's house from developers", Associated Press, 28 July 2006.
  9. ^ a b Kalush, William, and Larry Sloman, The Secret Life of Houdini: The Making of America's First Superhero, Atria Books, 2006. ISBN 0743272072.
  10. ^ Highfield, Roger, "The mysterious case of Conan Doyle and Piltdown Man.", The Daily Telegraph, Thursday 20 March 1997.
  11. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o Bibliographic information from: Bleiler, Everett (1948). The Checklist of Fantastic Literature. Chicago: Shasta Publishers, 102. 

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External links

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Real life cases

Works

Persondata
NAME Conan Doyle, Sir Arthur Ignatius
ALTERNATIVE NAMES Conan Doyle, Sir Arthur; Conan Doyle, Arthur
SHORT DESCRIPTION British author of Sherlock Holmes
DATE OF BIRTH May 22, 1859
PLACE OF BIRTH Edinburgh, Scotland
DATE OF DEATH July 7, 1930
PLACE OF DEATH
Project Gutenberg, abbreviated as PG, is a volunteer effort to digitize, archive and distribute cultural works. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 83rd day of the year (84th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 53rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about Arthur Conan Doyles fictional detective. ... A Study in Scarlet is a detective mystery story written by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle and published in 1887. ... The Sign of Four (1890) was the second novel featuring Sherlock Holmes written by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. ... The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes is a collection of twelve stories by Arthur Conan Doyle, featuring his famous detective and illustrated by Sidney Paget. ... The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes is a collection of Sherlock Holmes stories, originally published in 1894, by Arthur Conan Doyle. ... The Hound of the Baskervilles is a crime novel by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, originally serialized in the Strand Magazine in 1901 and 1902, which is set largely on Dartmoor in 1889. ... The Return of Sherlock Holmes is a collection of Sherlock Holmes stories, originally published in 1903-1904, by Arthur Conan Doyle. ... The Valley of Fear is a Sherlock Holmes novel by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. ... His Last Bow is a collection of Sherlock Holmes stories by Arthur Conan Doyle, as well as the title of one of the stories in that collection. ... The Case-Book of Sherlock Holmes is the final collection of Sherlock Holmes stories by Arthur Conan Doyle. ... PD image from http://www. ... Professor Challenger (sitting) as illustrated by Harry Rountree in Conan Arthur Doyles short story The Poison Belt in Strand Magazine. ... The Lost World is the name of: the Lost World (genre) literary genre. ... The Poison Belt was the second novel Sir Arthur Conan Doyle wrote about Professor Challenger. ... The Land of Mist is a novel written by Arthur Conan Doyle in 1926. ... The Disintegration Machine is a very short story written by Arthur Conan Doyle in 1927. ... When the World Screamed was the last story written about Professor Challenger by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. ... Micah Clarke by Arthur Conan Doyle is an historical adventure novel set during the Monmouth Rebellion of 1685 in England. ... The White Company by Arthur Conan Doyle is a historical adventure set during the Hundred Years War. ... Sir Nigel is a historical novel by the British author Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. ... J. Habakuk Jephsons Statement is an 1884 story by a then-young Arthur Conan Doyle, loosly based on the real mystery of the abandonment of the Mary Celeste, published anonymously in the respected Cornhill Magazine. ... The Mystery of Cloomber is a novel by English author Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. ... The Firm of Girdlestone is a novel by English author Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. ... Categories: Possible copyright violations ... Brigadier Gerard is the hero of a series of comic short stories by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. ... The Maracot Deep is a 1929 novel by Arthur Conan Doyle about the discovery of a sunken city of Atlantis by a team of explorers led by Professor Maracot. ... Charles Altamont Doyle, (1888) Charles Altamont Doyle (1832-1893) was a Victorian artist. ... Richard Dickie Doyle (September 1824 - December 11, 1883) was a notable Victorian illustrator. ... John Doyle (1797 Dublin - 1868-01-02) was an artist and notable[1][2] Victorian illustrator, producing political caricatures for The Times between 1829 and 1851. ... Great Wyrley is a parish and village in the county of Staffordshire, England. ... This article is about the religion. ... This article is about Arthur Conan Doyles fictional detective. ... A Study in Scarlet is a detective mystery story written by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle and published in 1887. ... The Sign of Four (1890) was the second novel featuring Sherlock Holmes written by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. ... The Hound of the Baskervilles is a crime novel by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, originally serialized in the Strand Magazine in 1901 and 1902, which is set largely on Dartmoor in 1889. ... The Valley of Fear is a Sherlock Holmes novel by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. ... Image File history File links Paget_holmes. ... The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes is a collection of twelve stories by Arthur Conan Doyle, featuring his famous detective and illustrated by Sidney Paget. ... The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes is a collection of Sherlock Holmes stories, originally published in 1894, by Arthur Conan Doyle. ... The Return of Sherlock Holmes is a collection of Sherlock Holmes stories, originally published in 1903-1904, by Arthur Conan Doyle. ... His Last Bow is a collection of Sherlock Holmes stories by Arthur Conan Doyle, as well as the title of one of the stories in that collection. ... The Case-Book of Sherlock Holmes is the final collection of Sherlock Holmes stories by Arthur Conan Doyle. ... Irene Adler is a fictional character featured in the Sherlock Holmes story A Scandal in Bohemia by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, published in July, 1891. ... Inspector Bradstreet is a fictional Scotland Yard detective from Sir Arthur Conan Doyles Sherlock Holmes series. ... Tobias Gregson, a Scotland Yard inspector, is a fictional character who has appeared in a number of the Sherlock Holmes novels and short stories by Arthur Conan Doyle. ... Mycroft Holmes as depicted by Sidney Edward Paget in Strand Magazine Mycroft Holmes is a fictional character in the stories written by Arthur Conan Doyle. ... This article is about Arthur Conan Doyles fictional detective. ... Inspector Stanley Hopkins is a Scotland Yard detective in the Sherlock Holmes stories by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. ... Mrs. ... Inspector Lestrade arresting a suspect, by Sidney Paget Inspector Lestrade in the Granada television series Inspector Lestrade is a Scotland Yard detective appearing in several of the Sherlock Holmes stories by Arthur Conan Doyle. ... Colonel Sebastian Moran is the villain of the Sherlock Holmes short story The Adventure of the Empty House. ... Professor Moriarty, illustration by Sidney Paget which accompanied the original publication of The Final Problem. Professor James Moriarty is a fictional character who is the best known antagonist (and archenemy) of the detective Sherlock Holmes. ... beware pie man beware pie man beware pie man beware pie man beware pie man beware pie man beware pie man beware pie man beware pie man beware pie man beware pie man beware pie man beware pie man beware pie man beware pie man beware pie man beware pie... Dr Watson (left) and Sherlock Holmes, by Sidney Paget. ... Traditionally, the canon of Sherlock Holmes consists of the 56 short stories and 4 novels written by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. ... 221B Baker Street is the fictional London residence of the detective Sherlock Holmes, created by author Arthur Conan Doyle. ... The stories of Sherlock Holmes were very popular as adaptations for the stage, and later film, and still later television. ... Sherlockiana compasses: Memorabilia, such as statuettes, drawings, and movie posters, that concern the fictional character Sherlock Holmes, his associates such as Dr. Watson and Inspector Lestrade, and his dwellings at 221B Baker Street; Non-canonical fiction, not written by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, that relates to these characters and their... This article is about the religion. ... This article is about Kardecist spiritism. ... Theism is the belief in the existence of one or more divinities or deities. ... This article is about the belief in life after death. ... Mediumship is a form of relationship to spirits practiced in many religions, including Spiritualism, Spiritism, Espiritismo, Candomblé, Voodoo, Kardecism, and Umbanda. ... Look up séance in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... This article is being considered for deletion in accordance with Wikipedias deletion policy. ... This article is about the theological concept. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Relation to other religions Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Christianity Portal This box:      Christianity is a monotheistic[1] religion centered on the life and teachings of Jesus of Nazareth as presented in the New Testament. ... New Age describes a broad movement characterized by alternative approaches to traditional Western culture. ... Emanuel Swedenborg, 75, holding the manuscript of Apocalypsis Revelata (1766). ... Franz Anton Mesmer His Grave Franz Anton Mesmer (May 23, 1734 – March 5, 1815) discovered what he called animal magnetism and others often called mesmerism. ... The Fox Sisters Sisters Catherine (1838–92), Leah (1814–90) and Margaretta (1836–93) Fox played an important role in the creation of Spiritualism. ... Andrew Jackson Davis (11 August 1826 - 1910), American spiritualist, was born at Blooming Grove, New York. ... Cora Lodencia Veronica Scott (1840–1923) was one of the best-known mediums of the Spiritualist movement of the last half of the 19th century. ... Achsa W. Sprague was one of the best-known Spiritualists during the 1850s in the United States. ... Paschal Beverly Randolph (October 8, 1825 - July 29, 1875) was born according to conflicting sources in New York or Virginia, a free man of mixed-race ancestry. ... Allan Kardec was a pseudonym of the French teacher and educator Hippolyte Léon Denizard Rivail (Lyon, October 3, 1804 — Paris, March 31, 1869), who is known today as the systematizer of Spiritism. ... Camille Flammarion Camille Flammarion (February 26, 1842 – June 3, 1925) was a French astronomer and author. ... The Reverend William Stainton Moses (born Donnington, near Lincoln, England, in 1839, died 1892), was an English clergyman and spiritualist. ... For other uses, see Robert Owen (disambiguation). ... Francisco Cândido Xavier Chico Xavier was a popular medium in Brazil´s spiritism movement. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Doris Stokes Doris Fisher Stokes (January 6, 1920 - May 8, 1987) was a British psychic medium. ... Colin Fry (1962 - 25th April 2007) was an English tele-medium. ... Danielle Egnew is a prolific singer/songwriter/composer (ASCAP) with over 300 songs to her original catalogue in the areas of pop, rock, alternative rock, country, industrial, and folk, as well as composing numerous ambient tracks and film scores. ... Derek Acorah (also known as The Big Daddy) is the stage name of Derek Johnson (born January 27, 1950). ... // Mina Margery Crandon (1888-1941) was the wife of a wealthy Boston surgeon and socialite, Dr. Le Roi Goddard Crandon. ... Houdini redirects here. ... Spiritism was founded by Allan Kardec in France in the middle of the XIX century, influenced by Franz Mesmer, the Fox sisters and the popularity of table-turning séances in his time. ... The introduction to this article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject matter. ... The Spiritualist Church arose from the Spiritualist movement which began in the 1840s in America. ... SNU logo The Spiritualists National Union (SNU) is a Spiritualist organisation, founded in the United Kingdom in 1901, and is one of the largest spiritualist groups in the world. ... Established in 1872 the Association moved to Belgrave Square in London in the 1940s where it is still located serving the principles of the Spiritualist movement. ... This is a list of fictional stories in which Spiritualism features as an important plot element. ... This article is about Arthur Conan Doyles fictional detective. ... For other uses, see Edinburgh (disambiguation). ... This article is about the country. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Arthur Conan Doyle - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1608 words)
Arthur Conan Doyle was born in 1859 in Edinburgh to Charles Altamont Doyle and Mary Doyle.
Conan Doyle was involved in the campaign for the reform of the Congo Free State, led by the journalist E.
Sir Arthur Conan Doyle died of a heart attack in 1930, aged 71, and is buried in the Church Yard at Minstead in the New Forest, Hampshire, England.
Arthur Conan Doyle - definition of Arthur Conan Doyle in Encyclopedia (1017 words)
Sir Arthur Ignatius Conan Doyle (May 22, 1859 - July 7, 1930) is the British author most famously known for his stories about the detective Sherlock Holmes, which are generally considered a major innovation in the field of crime fiction.
He was born in 1859 (Edinburgh) and sent to the Jesuit preparatory school Stonyhurst at the age of nine, and by the time he left the school in 1875, he had firmly rejected Catholicism and probably Christianity in general, to become an agnostic.
Arthur Conan Doyle is buried in the Church Yard at Minstead in the New Forest, Hampshire, England.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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