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Encyclopedia > Arthur Capper
Cover of Time Magazine (January 18, 1926)

Arthur Capper (July 14, 1865 - December 19, 1951) was an American politician from Kansas. He was a Quaker and a member of the Republican Party. Image File history File links Cover of Time Magazine (January 18, 1926) w/ Artuhr Capper File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Cover of Time Magazine (January 18, 1926) w/ Artuhr Capper File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... July 14 is the 195th day of the year (196th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1865 (MDCCCLXV) is a common year starting on Sunday. ... December 19 is the 353rd day of the year (354th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1951 (MCMLI) was a common year starting on Monday; see its calendar. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... The Religious Society of Friends, commonly known as Quakers, or Friends, is a religious community founded in England in the 17th century. ... The Republican Party, often called the GOP (for Grand Old Party, although one early citation described it as the Gallant Old Party) [1], is one of the two major political parties in the United States. ...


Capper was born in Garnett, Kansas. He attended the public schools and learned the art of printing. He became a newspaper publisher, eventually owning several newspapers and two radio stations. The best known of his publications, Capper's Weekly, had an enormous readership among farm families and served as the base of his political support in Kansas. He also had a brief stint as the starting Quarterback (a position then known as the Runyon) for the Green Bay Packers. Garnett is a city located in Anderson County, Kansas. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... A publisher is a person or entity which engages in the act of publishing. ...


Capper first entered politics in 1912 when he became the Republican candidate for governor of Kansas. In addition to a reputation built from his newspapers, he was also the son-in-law of former governor Samuel J. Crawford. He was defeated by Democrat George Hartshorn Hodges. However, Capper was elected governor in the next election in 1914 and served as governor of Kansas from 1915 until 1919, winning re-election in 1916. The Politics series Politics Portal This box:      Politics is defined as a group of people who are influenced to change laws and other such things to make the world a better place the process by which groups of people make decisions. ... 1912 (MCMXII) was a leap year starting on Monday in the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Tuesday in the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... The Governor of Kansas holds the supreme executive power of the State as provided by the first article of the Kansas Constitution. ... Samuel James Crawford (April 10, 1835 - October 21, 1913) was an American general and the third Governor of the state of Kansas ((1865 – 1868)). He also served as one of the first members of the Kansas state legislature. ... The Democratic Party is one of two major political parties in the United States, the other being the Republican Party. ... For other uses, see Governor (disambiguation). ... Year 1914 (MCMXIV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... 1915 (MCMXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar). ... Year 1919 (MCMXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar). ... 1916 (MCMXVI) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar). ...


Having served two full terms as Governor, Capper was not permitted to run for a third term by the Kansas State Constitution. Instead, in 1918 he ran for election to the United States Senate and won. Capper became a long-serving senator, representing Kansas as one of its two senators for five 6-year terms. He was in the Senate from 1919 to 1949, and prominent among Republicans who supported the relief efforts and other policies of Franklin Delano Roosevelt's administration. He did not seek reelection in 1948. Drawn up at Wyandotte (now part of Kansas City) in July 1859, the Wyandotte Constitution was the 4th and final constitution voted on by the people of Kansas regarding the terms of Kansas admission to the union, particularly whether as a free state or slave state. ... 1918 (MCMXVIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Politics Portal      The United States Senate is one of the two chambers of the bicameral United States Congress, the... Year 1919 (MCMXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar). ... 1949 (MCMXLIX) was a common year starting on Saturday (the link is to a full 1949 calendar). ... 1948 (MCMXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Thursday (the link is to a full 1948 calendar). ...


Capper was particularly interested in issues relating to agriculture. Before his time as governor, he served as President of the board of regents of Kansas Agricultural College from 1910 to 1913. While in the Senate, he at times served as chairman of the Committee of Expenditures of the Department of Agriculture and the Committee on Agriculture and Forestry. He also at times served as chairman of the Committee on Claims and the Committee on the District of Columbia. He co-sponsored the Capper-Volstead Act. In 1923 Senator Capper brought forward an anti-miscegenation constitutional amendment outlawing mixed-race marriages, but was forced to retreat by the protest of African-American organizations.[1] 1910 (MCMX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Sunday of the 13-day slower Julian calendar. ... Year 1913 (MCMXIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar). ... The United States Senate Committee on Claims was among the first standing committees established in the Senate. ... The United States Senate Committee on the District of Columbia was one of the first standing committees created in the United States Senate, in 1816. ... Capper-Volstead Act was adopted on February 18, 1922. ... 1923 (MCMXXIII) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar). ... Miscegenation is an archaic term invented in 1863 to describe people of different human races (usually one European and one African) producing offspring; the use of this term is invariably restricted to those who believe that the category race is meaningful when applied to human beings. ... An amendment is a change to the constitution of a nation or a state. ... Othello and Desdemona from William Shakespeares Othello, a play concerning a biracial couple. ... Languages Predominantly American English Religions Protestantism (chiefly Baptist and Methodist); Roman Catholicism; Islam Related ethnic groups Sub-Saharan Africans and other African groups, some with Native American groups. ...


After retiring from the Senate, Capper returned to his home in Topeka, Kansas where he continued the newspaper publishing business until his death. He was buried in Topeka Cemetery in a plot adjacent to governor Crawford. This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ...

Preceded by
George Hartshorn Hodges
Governor of
Kansas

19151919
Succeeded by
Henry Justin Allen
Preceded by
William Howard Thompson
United States Senator (Class 2) from Kansas
1919–1949
Served alongside: Charles Curtis, Henry Justin Allen, George McGill, Clyde M. Reed
Succeeded by
Andrew Frank Schoeppel

This is a list of Governors of Kansas. ... 1915 (MCMXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar). ... Year 1919 (MCMXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar). ... Henry Justin Allen (September 11, 1868 - January 17, 1950) was Governor of Kansas (1919-1923), and U.S. Senator from Kansas (1929-31). ... William Howard Thompson (October 14, 1871 - February 9, 1928) was a United States Senator from Kansas. ... Kansas was admitted to the Union on January 29, 1861. ... This article is about the former Vice President of the United States. ... Henry Justin Allen (September 11, 1868 - January 17, 1950) was Governor of Kansas (1919-1923), and U.S. Senator from Kansas (1929-31). ... George S. Gloomy Gus McGill (February 12, 1879-May 14, 1963) was an American politician from Kansas. ... Clyde Martin Reed (October 19, 1871-November 8, 1949) was an American politician from Kansas. ... Andrew Frank Schoeppel (November 23, 1894-January 21, 1962) was the Governor of Kansas from 1943 to 1947 and a U.S. Senator from 1949 until his death. ...

Further reading

Arthur Capper: Publisher, Politician, and Philanthropist, by Homer E. Socolofsky (University of Kansas Press, Lawrence, KS 1962)


References

  1. ^ Miscegenation, Time Magazine, July 23, 1923

(Clockwise from upper left) Time magazine covers from May 7, 1945; July 25, 1969; December 31, 1999; September 14, 2001; and April 21, 2003. ...

External links

  • Capper speeches on State Library of Kansas web site

  Results from FactBites:
 
Arthur Capper (205 words)
Arthur Capper, a two-term governor of Kansas and a five term senator, demonstrated his interest in young people with the establishment of the Capper Foundation for Crippled Children.
Capper's influence was recognized with the passage of the Capper-Ketchum Act in 1928 that provided federal financial support through the agricultural extension network.
Capper's interest in children with disabilities began in 1920s and eventually led to the establishment of the Capper Foundation for Crippled Children.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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