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Encyclopedia > Arthur, Prince of Wales
English Royalty
House of Tudor

Royal Coat of Arms
Henry VII
   Arthur, Prince of Wales
   Margaret, Queen of Scots
   Henry VIII
   Elizabeth Tudor
   Mary, Queen of France
   Edmund, Duke of Somerset

Arthur Tudor (19 September/20 September 14862 April 1502) was the first son of King Henry VII of England and Elizabeth of York, and therefore, heir to the throne of England and Wales. As he predeceased his father he never became king, and his place was taken by his brother, who became King Henry VIII. This article is about the monarchy of the United Kingdom, one of sixteen that share a common monarch; for information about this constitutional relationship, see Commonwealth realm; for information on the reigning monarch, see Elizabeth II. For information about other Commonwealth realm monarchies, as well as other relevant articles, see... For other uses, see Tudor (disambiguation). ... The Royal Arms as used in England, Wales and Northern Ireland The Royal Coat of Arms of the United Kingdom is the official coat of arms of the British monarch, currently Queen Elizabeth II. These arms are used by the Queen in her official capacity as monarch, and are officially... The Tudor Rose: a combination of the Red Rose of Lancaster and the White Rose of York Henry VII (January 28, 1457 – April 21, 1509), King of England, Lord of Ireland (August 22, 1485 – April 21, 1509), born Henry Tudor, was the first monarch of the Tudor dynasty. ... Margaret Tudor Margaret Tudor (29 November 1489 – October 1541) was the eldest of the two surviving daughters of Henry VII of England and Elizabeth of York, and the elder sister of Henry VIII. In 1503 she married James IV, king of Scotland, thus becoming the mother of James V and... Henry VIII redirects here. ... Elizabeth Tudor (July 2, 1492 – September 14, 1495) was the second daughter and fourth child of Henry VII of England and Elizabeth of York. ... Mary Tudor (March 18, 1496 – June 25, 1533) was the younger sister of Henry VIII of England and queen consort of France due to her marriage to Louis XII. After his death, she married Charles Brandon and became Duchess of Suffolk. ... Edmund Tudor, Duke of Somerset (February 21, 1499 – June 19, 1500). ... is the 262nd day of the year (263rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 263rd day of the year (264th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events Tízoc, Aztec ruler of Tenochtitlan dies. ... is the 92nd day of the year (93rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1502 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Tudor Rose: a combination of the Red Rose of Lancaster and the White Rose of York Henry VII (January 28, 1457 – April 21, 1509), King of England, Lord of Ireland (August 22, 1485 – April 21, 1509), born Henry Tudor, was the first monarch of the Tudor dynasty. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Henry VIII redirects here. ...

Contents

Early life

Birth

Henry VII, in order to strengthen his otherwise dubious claim to the throne (Henry came from bastard stock), set his personal genealogists to trace back his heritage to Cadwaladr and ancient British kings. Henry identified Winchester in Hampshire as Camelot, and it was there that the first Tudor Prince of Wales, Arthur, was born to Henry and his Queen, Elizabeth of York, the daughter of Edward IV. He was named after the legendary King Arthur of the Round Table. His christening took place at Winchester Cathedral, his godfathers being Thomas Stanley, 1st Earl of Derby and John de Vere, 13th Earl of Oxford who was late to the ceremony. Elizabeth Woodville, his maternal grandmother, was his godmother and carried him during the ceremony. He was made a Knight of the Bath at his christening. It is not known if Arthur was a robust child when born. In Arthur's Church History it says: ". . . [Arthur Tudor was] yet vital and vigorous" while Francis Bacon describes him as, "Born in the eighth month, as the physicians do prejudge," yet "strong and able". Some historians suggest that he had been weak his whole life long, and that was what led him to his death. Cadwaladr ap Cadwallon (c. ... Winchester is a historic city in southern England, with a population of around 40,000 within a 3 mile radius of its centre. ... This article is about the mythical castle. ... This article is about the title Prince of Wales. ... The text below is generated by a template, which has been proposed for deletion. ... For other uses, see King Arthur (disambiguation). ... In Japanese pop music, Round Table (officially ROUND TABLE) is a band that produces music mostly for Anime soundtracks. ... Winchester Cathedral as seen from the Cathedral Close View along the nave of Winchester Cathedral to the west door A plan published in 1911 View of Winchester Cathedral Winchester Cathedral at Winchester in Hampshire is one of the largest cathedrals in England, said to be the second longest, and with... Thomas Stanley, 1st Earl of Derby Thomas Stanley, 1st Earl of Derby, KG (1435 - July 29, 1504), an English nobleman, inherited his fathers titles, including that of king of the Isle of Man, in 1459. ... John de Vere, 13th Earl of Oxford (1443 – 10 March 1513) was one of the principal Lancastrian commanders during the English Wars of the Roses. ... Elizabeth Woodville or Wydville (c. ... Military Badge of the Order of the Bath The Most Honourable Order of the Bath is a British order of chivalry founded by George I on 18 May 1725. ...

The only original surviving portrait of Prince Arthur
The only original surviving portrait of Prince Arthur

His only original surviving portrait[1] shows a teenage boy growing into his skin, though some say he looks weak in it. He certainly differed from his athletic younger brother, the future Henry VIII. There is no evidence to show that Arthur did athletics, but he may have been fond of archery. In the portrait he has the red Tudor hair, small eyes, and a high-bridged nose. He bears a resemblance to both his father and brother. Download high resolution version (500x659, 71 KB) This image is in the public domain because its copyright has expired in the United States and those countries with a copyright term of life of the author plus 100 years. ... Download high resolution version (500x659, 71 KB) This image is in the public domain because its copyright has expired in the United States and those countries with a copyright term of life of the author plus 100 years. ... Henry VIII (28 June 1491 – 28 January 1547) was King of England and Lord of Ireland (later King of Ireland) from 22 April 1509 until his death. ... A womens 400 m hurdles race on a typical outdoor red rubber track in the Helsinki Olympic Stadium in Finland. ... Archery is the practice of using a bow to shoot arrows. ... Tudor usually relates to the Tudor period in English history, which refers to the period of time between 1485 and 1558/1603 when the Tudor dynasty held the English throne. ...


Betrothal and alliance

Arthur's father, Henry VII, was eager to strengthen his kingdom through an alliance with newly-united Spain, seeking the support of the Catholic Monarchs Isabella of Castile and Ferdinand of Aragon against French interests and possible aggression. When Arthur was two years old, a marriage with the Spanish princess, Catherine of Aragon (in Spain, Catalina de Aragón) was arranged for him as part of the Treaty of Medina del Campo. The auburn-haired Catherine was the youngest daughter of Isabella and Ferdinand. However, Ferdinand was more than ready to break the treaty if all of the pretenders to the throne of England did not vanish. Isabella and Ferdinand were in no hurry to have their daughter married, and, though a treaty had been made, they were still open. Therefore, in 1499, Edward Plantagenet, 17th Earl of Warwick was beheaded, and the pretender Perkin Warbeck, who some contemporaries asserted was Edward IV's illegitimate son, was hanged. Isabella I of Castile (April 22, 1451 – November 26, 1504) was Queen regnant of Castile and Leon. ... Ferdinand of Aragon can refer to two different kings of Aragon: Ferdinand I of Aragon, also known as Ferdinand of Antequera (r. ... Catherine of Aragon (16 December 1485 – 7 January 1536) (Castilian Infanta Catalina de Aragón y Castilla), was the Queen of England as the first wife of Henry VIII of England. ... The Treaty of Medina del Campo was an agreement reached March 26, 1489 between England and the nascent Spain. ... 1499 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... Contemporary painting of Warbeck Perkin Warbeck (c. ... The text below is generated by a template, which has been proposed for deletion. ...


Childhood

At the age of three, Arthur was made Prince of Wales and Earl of Chester, and when five he was made a Knight of the Garter. He, being the heir, was trained specially. Some historians maintain that he had some kind of bond with Thomas Howard, 2nd Duke of Norfolk who was also the Earl of Surrey, and who defended the border of England whenever the Kingdom of Scotland attacked. His tutors were John Rede and the blind poet Bernard André. When he was fourteen to fifteen years old Thomas Linacre (or Lynaker) began to teach him. His tutor, Bernard André, wrote an unfinished biography of Henry VII in which he inserted the information that Arthur was familiar with all the best Latin and Greek language authors. The Prince's governor and treasurer was Sir Henry Vernon. Arthur may have frequently lived with Henry Vernon at his house, Haddon Hall, in the peak of Derbyshire where there was an apartment called 'The Prince's Chamber', with Arthur's arms cut in several places. This article is about the title Prince of Wales. ... The Earldom of Chester is one of the few palatine earldoms in England. ... A garter is one of the Orders most recognisable insignia. ... Thomas Howard, 2nd Duke of Norfolk (c. ... Arms of the Warrens of Surrey The Earldom of Surrey was first created in 1088 for William de Warenne. ... Motto Latin: Nemo me impune lacessit (English: No one provokes me with impunity) (Scots: Wha daur meddle wi me) Capital Edinburgh¹ Language(s) Gaelic, Scots Government Monarchy King/Queen  - 843-860 Kenneth I  - 1587–1625 James VI  - 1702-1714 Anne Legislature Parliament of Scotland History  - United 843  - Union of the... Thomas Linacre (or Lynaker) (c. ... For other uses, see Latins and Latin (disambiguation). ... Greek ( IPA: or simply IPA: — Hellenic) has a documented history of 3,500 years, the longest of any single natural language in the Indo-European language family. ... Haddon Hall, Bakewell, Derbyshire, England (2002) For other uses, see Haddon Hall (disambiguation). ... Derbyshire is a county in the East Midlands of England. ...


Marriage

For two years, Arthur wrote numerous letters in Latin to his bride, and she would formally reply back. However, the letters were more polite than passionate, since the young couple barely knew each other. When Arthur was fourteen, the King of Aragon and Queen of Castile promised that they were going to send their daughter Catalina (later known as Catherine) over to England, but it was not until after her bridegroom turned fifteen that Catalina and her retinue finally started their journey. The Spanish Infanta (the Spanish title for princess) finally reached land in the autumn, and on November 4, 1501, the couple met at last at Dogsmersfield Palace in Hampshire. Little is known about their first impressions of each other, but Arthur did write to his father- and mother-in-law that he would be 'a true and loving husband' and he later told his parents that he was immensely happy to behold the face of his lovely bride. Ten days later, on November 14, 1501, they were married at St. Paul's Cathedral. At the end of the festive day came the Bedding Ceremony, in which most of the court put the young couple to bed, and thus began one of the most controversial wedding nights in history. For other uses, see Latins and Latin (disambiguation). ... In the Spanish and former Portuguese monarchies, Infante (masc. ... is the 308th day of the year (309th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1501 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see Hampshire (disambiguation). ... is the 318th day of the year (319th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1501 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... St Pauls Cathedral is a cathedral on Ludgate Hill, in the City of London in London, and the seat of the Bishop of London. ... A controversy is a contentious dispute, a disagreement over which parties are actively arguing. ...


Death and aftermath

Catherine as a young widow, by Henry VII's court painter, Michael Sittow, c.1502
Catherine as a young widow, by Henry VII's court painter, Michael Sittow, c.1502

The couple soon travelled to Ludlow Castle on the Welsh border, where Arthur normally resided in his capacity as Prince of Wales and President of The Council of Wales and Marches. He then died suddenly at the young age of fifteen. The cause of his death is unknown but may have been consumption, diabetes, or the mysterious sweating sickness, which modern theorists tie to a hantavirus. Catherine was sick as well, but unlike her unfortunate husband, she survived. His brother, Henry, Duke of York, became heir upon Arthur's death and would come to the throne in 1509. For this he was unprepared -- it had originally been intended that he would enter the Church and perhaps become Archbishop of Canterbury -- and his lack of preparation was obvious as for some years he was heavily influenced by older statesmen, such as Cardinal Thomas Wolsey. Henry was not created Prince of Wales until it was certain that Catherine wasn't carrying Arthur's child. Catherine would marry Henry (who was six years her junior) eight years later, but in the interim, she lived in relative poverty. Image File history File links Young Catherine of Aragon, first wife of Henry VIII of England, by Michel Sittow. ... Image File history File links Young Catherine of Aragon, first wife of Henry VIII of England, by Michel Sittow. ... The Tudor Rose: a combination of the Red Rose of Lancaster and the White Rose of York Henry VII (January 28, 1457 – April 21, 1509), King of England, Lord of Ireland (August 22, 1485 – April 21, 1509), born Henry Tudor, was the first monarch of the Tudor dynasty. ... Diego de Guevara by Sittow, ca. ... Ludlow Castle Ludlow Castle is a large [1], now partly ruined, non-inhabited castle which dominates the town of Ludlow in Shropshire, England. ... This article is about the country. ... This article is about the title Prince of Wales. ... See also the Council of Wales for the advisory council established in 1948. ... Tuberculosis (abbreviated as TB for tubercle bacillus or Tuberculosis) is a common and deadly infectious disease caused by mycobacteria, mainly Mycobacterium tuberculosis. ... Sweating sickness, also known as the English sweate (Lat. ... Species Andes virus (ANDV) Bayou virus (BAYV) Black Creek Canal virus (BCCV) Cano Delgadito virus (CADV) Choclo virus (CHOV) Dobrava-Belgrade virus (DOBV) Hantaan virus (HTNV) Isla Vista virus (ISLAV) Khabarovsk virus (KHAV) Laguna Negra virus (LANV) Muleshoe virus (MULV) New York virus (NYV) Prospect Hill virus (PHV) Puumala virus... Henry VIII redirects here. ... 1509 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Archbishop of Canterbury is the spiritual leader and senior clergyman of the Church of England, recognized by convention as the head of the worldwide Anglican Communion. ... Cardinal Thomas Wolsey, (c. ... This article is about the title Prince of Wales. ...


Funeral

Arthur was buried in Worcester Cathedral where "Prince Arthur's Chantry" stands today. Sir Griffith Ryce, a member of Arthur's household, was an official mourner, and his tomb is located near Arthur's. Arthur's father, the King, did not attend the funeral. The reasons for his absence are unknown, though many conjecture that the journey was too long or that Henry VII was too distressed. Arthur's mother, Elizabeth of York did not attend the funeral either, and as was the custom, Catherine of Aragon also remained at home. A plan of Worcester Cathedral made in 1836. ... Sir Griffith Ryce (died 1523) was a member of Prince Arthurs household. ... The Tudor Rose: a combination of the Red Rose of Lancaster and the White Rose of York Henry VII (January 28, 1457 – April 21, 1509), King of England, Lord of Ireland (August 22, 1485 – April 21, 1509), born Henry Tudor, was the first monarch of the Tudor dynasty. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


Question of consummation

Immense controversy surrounds the question of whether or not Arthur and Catherine consummated their brief marriage, since the subsequent history of England and even of British Christianity was strongly influenced by the issue. Some believe that if a 15-year-old couple were to share a bed, the result would naturally be sexual intercourse. There is also the fact that Catherine and Arthur understood that they needed to begin producing heirs for England, something they would have regarded as a pressing and major duty. It was perfectly common then for a girl to marry and to be expected to consummate her marriage at a very young age; Margaret Beaufort was only 12 when she married Edmund Tudor. It has been suggested that Duration of sexual intercourse be merged into this article or section. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... Margaret Beaufort, Mother of Henry VII, at prayer, by an anonymous artist, about 1500 Margaret Beaufort (May 31, 1443 – June 29, 1509) was the daughter of John Beaufort, 1st Duke of Somerset, granddaughter of John Beaufort, 1st Earl of Somerset and great-granddaughter of John of Gaunt and his mistress... Edmund Tudor, 1st Earl of Richmond (~1430-November 1, 1456) was the father of King Henry VII of England. ...


Catherine's duenna Doña Elvira said that the marriage was not consummated, though some historians argue that Doña Elvira was never close to the girl, whom she would later betray. Arthur himself, before the wedding night, stated that he was feeling very 'lusty and amorous', and his friends claimed that the following day, he had proudly called for some water, saying that he had "been in Spain" and that being a husband was "thirsty work." There is no way to know whether Arthur made this joke to merely to cover up the fact that he had failed at his marital duty. For the biological meaning, see chaperone. ...


Some historians assert that Arthur was frail, like Catherine's late brother, Juan, Prince of Asturias. Juan had been married to Archduchess Margaret of Austria and had died after six months of marriage. It was believed for a time that Margaret had ruined Juan's health through too much sexual activity. These historians maintain that Arthur and Catherine had a normal sexual relationship throughout their marriage and that this, as in the case of Catherine's brother, led Arthur to die of overexertion. Others suggest that the couple engaged in sexual activity but not to the extent of full and completed intercourse. Francisco Pradilla Ortizs painting Cortejo del bautizo del Príncipe Don Juan, hijo de los Reyes Católicos, por las calles de Sevilla (Retinue of the Baptism of Don Juan, son of the Catholic Monarchs, Along the Streets of Seville), 1910 Infante don Juan de Trastamare de Aragon y...


What most find hard to believe is that the fervently devout and Catholic Catherine, who insisted that her marriage to Arthur had never been consummated, would lie. Leviticus 20:21 states that it is unclean for a man to take his brother's wife and if a man did so, the union would be childless. (By the same token, other biblical passages enjoin a man to marry his brother's widow and to father children on her, so that the deceased man's line will officially continue. The inconsistency of the Bible on this point was a major issue during the divorce controversy.) The first time Catherine publicly claimed that her marriage to Arthur had not been consummated was when Henry sought the divorce; the subject had not been mentioned earlier, and some historians believe it makes sense that Catherine would have lied to protect her reputation, her marriage to Henry, and the rights of her only surviving child, her daughter Mary I. To say otherwise would have been an admission of fornication as well as a condemnation of Princess Mary to illegitimacy. Catherine claimed that she and Arthur had shared a bed for only seven days, but this is unconfirmed by any historical records. Mary I (18 February 1516 – 17 November 1558), also known as Mary Tudor, was Queen of England and Queen of Ireland from 6 July 1553 (de facto) or 19 July 1553 (de jure) until her death on 17 November 1558. ...


What Henry really wanted was a son, since he had historical reasons to believe that England would not accept a female monarch. During his marriage to her, Catherine's pregnancies had resulted in several living children, but only Mary had survived infancy. Henry had realized with the passing years that the aging Catherine was unlikely to produce a son and heir, and he was having a notorious love affair with sisters Mary and Anne Boleyn. His divorce from Catherine and his marriage to Anne were predicated on his claim that he and Catherine had produced no living son because he had disobeyed Scripture and married his brother's widow -- which Catherine would only have been, technically speaking, if she and Arthur had consummated their marriage. Mary Boleyn (c. ... Anne Boleyn, 1st Marchioness of Pembroke (1501/1507–19 May 1536) was a Queen Consort of England, the second wife of King Henry VIII and the mother of Queen Elizabeth I. Henrys marriage to Anne, and her subsequent execution, made her a key player in the political and religious...


This dispute, and Henry's inability to obtain papal dissolution of his marriage, would be the main reason for the English Reformation. Whatever the truth of the matter, whether Henry had found Catherine to be a virgin on their wedding night, has never been recorded. However, when he was trying to annul his marriage to Catherine, he ordered bloodstained bedsheets, supposedly from his brother's marriage night, to be paraded around his palace as proof of the consummation. How or why these sheets should have been preserved for so many years was not explained. This box:      King Henry VIII of England. ...


Further research

Christopher Guy, the archaeologist of Worcester Cathedral, said he found it odd that, if Arthur had been unhealthy, he was sent to the cold remoteness of Ludlow Castle. Peter Vaughan, of the Worcester Prince Arthur Committee, finds this strange as well. He remarks: "He wasn't a strong character, unlike his younger brother. Could it be that his father was strong enough to see that the best interests of the Tudors were to be served by Henry Duke of York, rather than Arthur?" However, historians such as David Starkey and Julian Litten have dismissed theories of neglect or murder. "There is nothing fishy about his demise", said Litten. "He was in Ludlow as an ambassador for a King setting up a new dynasty." Litten believes that the real mystery in Arthur's death is the disease that killed him. If not consumption or the historical English sweating sickness, it could have been a genetic condition that might have been passed on to his nephews, Edward VI and Henry Fitzroy.[2] Archaeology or sometimes in American English archeology (from the Greek words αρχαίος = ancient and λόγος = word/speech) is the study of human cultures through the recovery, documentation and analysis of material remains, including architecture, artefacts, biofacts, human remains, and landscapes. ... A plan of Worcester Cathedral made in 1836. ... Ludlow Castle Ludlow Castle is a large [1], now partly ruined, non-inhabited castle which dominates the town of Ludlow in Shropshire, England. ... David Robert Starkey (born January 3, 1945) is one of Englands best-known historians, and a specialist in the Tudor period. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with consumption (economics). ... Sweating sickness, also known as the English sweate (Lat. ... Edward VI King of England and Ireland Edward VI (12 October 1537–6 July 1553) was King of England and King of Ireland from 28 January 1547 until his death. ... Henry Fitzroy, 1st Duke of Richmond and Somerset (June 15, 1519 – June 18, 1536) was the son of Henry VIII and his teenaged mistress, Elizabeth Blount, the only bastard that Henry acknowledged. ...


Arthur in fiction

Arthur has appeared in several novels about Catherine of Aragon. Norah Lofts wrote The King's Pleasure in the late 1960s. Katharine, The Virgin Widow by Jean Plaidy has Arthur in it as well. Vanity Fair magazine declared the book "Outstanding".[citation needed] The Constant Princess, by Philippa Gregory, tells the story of how Catherine and Arthur fell in love, consummated their marriage, and how he suddenly died. In it, Katherine promises Arthur she will become Queen of England by marrying his brother in order to fulfill their vision for the future of the kingdom. Norah Lofts (27 August 1904—10 September 1983) was a 20th century best-selling British author. ... Jean Plaidy was a pen name of British author Eleanor Hibbert, also known as Philippa Carr and Victoria Holt. ... Vanity Fair is a glossy American glamour magazine monthly that offers a mixture of articles on high-brow culture, jet-set and entertainment-business personalities, politics, and current affairs. ... The Constant Princess is a historical novel by Philippa Gregory, published in 2005. ... Philippa Gregory (born 9 January 1954) is a British novelist, mainly associated with the historical fiction genre. ...


Kingsley Amis wrote "The Alteration" (1976), an alternative history novel about the effects of a contested "War of the English Succession" (c 1509 CE), where the birth and reign of Prince Arthur Tudor and Katherine of Aragon's son, "Stephen II", leads Henry VIII to attempt to usurp his nephew's throne. Sir Kingsley William Amis (April 16, 1922 – October 22, 1995) was an English novelist, poet, critic, and teacher. ... The Alteration is the title of a 1976 alternate history novel by Kingsley Amis, set in an alternative present in which the Reformation did not take place. ... Alternative history or alternate history develops out of historiography to identify historical points of view that have been ignored, overlooked, or unseeable. ... 1509 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The recently-widowed young Catherine of Aragon, by Henry VIIs court painter, Michael Sittow, c. ... Henry VIII (28 June 1491 – 28 January 1547) was King of England and Lord of Ireland (later King of Ireland) from 22 April 1509 until his death. ...


Ancestors

This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... Edmund Tudor, 1st Earl of Richmond (~1430-November 1, 1456) was the father of King Henry VII of England. ... Charles VI Charles VI the Well-Beloved, later known as the Mad (French: Charles VI le Bien-Aimé, later known as le Fol) (December 3, 1368 – October 21, 1422) was a King of France (1380 – 1422) and a member of the Valois Dynasty. ... Catherine of Valois (27 October 1401 – 3 January 1437) was the Queen consort of England from 1420 until 1422. ... Isabeau de Bavière (also Isabella of Bavaria-Ingolstadt; ca. ... The Tudor Rose: a combination of the Red Rose of Lancaster and the White Rose of York Henry VII (January 28, 1457 – April 21, 1509), King of England, Lord of Ireland (August 22, 1485 – April 21, 1509), born Henry Tudor, was the first monarch of the Tudor dynasty. ... John Beaufort, 1st Earl of Somerset (c. ... John Beaufort, 1st Duke of Somerset (baptised March 25, 1404 – May 27, 1444), was an English noble and military commander. ... Margaret Holland (1385 - 30 Dec 1429) was the daughter of Thomas Holland, 2nd Earl of Kent, who was the son of Joan the Fair Maid of Kent, (wife of Edward the Black Prince and mother of Richard II of England) and grandson of Edward I of England. ... Margaret Beaufort, Mother of Henry VII, at prayer, by an anonymous artist, about 1500 Margaret Beaufort (May 31, 1443 – June 29, 1509) was the daughter of John Beaufort, 1st Duke of Somerset, granddaughter of John Beaufort, 1st Earl of Somerset and great-granddaughter of John of Gaunt and his mistress... Margaret Beauchamp of Bletso (d. ... Richard of Conisburgh, 3rd Earl of Cambridge (c. ... Richard, Duke of York (21 September 1411 – 30 December 1460) was a member of the English royal family, who served in senior positions in France at the end of the Hundred Years War, and in England during Henry VIs madness. ... Anne Mortimer (December 27, 1390 - September, 1411) was the daughter of Roger Mortimer, 4th Earl of March (1373-1398) and Eleanor de Holland. ... Edward IV (April 28, 1442 – April 9, 1483) was King of England from March 4, 1461 to April 9, 1483, with a break of a few months in the period 1470–1471. ... Ralph de Neville, 1st Earl of Westmorland (c. ... Cecily Neville (3 May 1415 – 31 May 1495), Duchess of York, was called the Rose of Raby (because she was born at Raby Castle in Durham, England) and Proud Cis (because of her pride and a temper that went with it). ... Beaufort coat of arms Joan Bearfort and mother, Katherine Swynfords tomb 1640 drawing of the tombs of Joan Bearfort and mother, Katherine Swynford in Lincoln Cathedral before the tombs were despoiled in 1644 by the Roundheads. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Richard Woodville (or Wydeville), 1st Earl Rivers (1405 - August 12, 1469), was an English nobleman, best remembered as the father of Elizabeth Woodville, wife of Edward IV. Born at Maidstone, Kent, he was the son of another Sir Richard Wydevill, chamberlain to the Duke of Bedford. ... Elizabeth Woodville or Wydville (c. ... Jacquetta de Luxembourg (1415/1416 - May 30, 1472) was daughter of Pierre de Luxembourg, Comte de Saint Pol, Conversano et Brienne and his wife Margaret de Baux (Margherita del Balzo of Andria). ...

Notes

  1. ^ Philip Mould (1995) devotes a chapter to the rediscovery of this portrait and its validation through historical research.
  2. ^ David Derbyshire, Science Correspondent in the Telegraph.

Additional reading

  • Fraser, Antonia, The Six Wives of Henry VIII, ISBN 0-7493-1409-5
  • "Royal Tutors in the Reign of Henry VII", David Carlson, Sixteenth Century Journal Vol. 22, No. 2 (Summer, 1991), pp. 253-279
  • Mould, Philip. (1995) Sleepers. London: Fourth Estate. ISBN 1857022181
  • Weir, Alison The Six Wives of Henry VIII
  • Weir, Alison The Princes in the Tower

Lady Antonia Fraser, née Pakenham, (born August 27, 1932) is a British author of history and novels, best known for writing biographies. ... Alison Weir (born 1951) is a British writer of history books for the general public, mostly in the form of biographies about British kings and queens. ... Alison Weir (born 1951) is a British writer of history books for the general public, mostly in the form of biographies about British kings and queens. ...

External links

Arthur, Prince of Wales
Born: 19 September 1486 Died: 2 April 1502
English royalty
Preceded by
John de la Pole, 1st Earl of Lincoln
Heir to the English Throne
as heir apparent

19 September 1486 - 2 April 1502
Succeeded by
Henry, Prince of Wales
Peerage of England
Preceded by
Edward of Middleham,
Prince of Wales
Prince of Wales
14861502
Succeeded by
Henry, Duke of York
later became
King Henry VIII
Image File history File links Flag_of_the_Duke_of_Cornwall. ...

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