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Encyclopedia > Art Nouveau
Vitebsk Railway Station one of the finest examples of Art Nouveau architecture.
Vitebsk Railway Station one of the finest examples of Art Nouveau architecture.

Art Nouveau ([aʁ nu vo], anglicised /ˈɑːt nuːvəu/) (French for 'new art') is an international style of art, architecture and design that peaked in popularity at the beginning of the 20th century (1880-1914) and is characterized by highly-stylized, flowing, curvilinear designs often incorporating floral and other plant-inspired motifs. More localized terms for the phenomenon of self-consciously radical, somewhat mannered reformist chic that formed a prelude to 20th-century modernism include Jugendstil in Germany, Austria and many other countries or skønvirke in Denmark, named after the avant-garde periodical Jugend ('Youth'), Młoda Polska ('Young Poland' style) in Poland, and Sezessionsstil ('Secessionism') in Vienna, where forward-looking artists and designers seceded from the mainstream salon exhibitions to exhibit on their own work in more congenial surroundings. Further centers were in Belgium (especially Brussels) and Scotland (Glasgow). Image File history File linksMetadata Vitebsky_vokzal. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Vitebsky_vokzal. ... Vitebsk Railway Station in May 2005. ... This does not cite any references or sources. ... Look up style in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The Bath, a painting by Mary Cassatt (1844-1926). ... Architecture (from Latin, architectura and ultimately from Greek, a master builder, from αρχι- chiefs, leader , builder, carpenter)[1] is the art and science of designing buildings and structures. ... Example of a cup figuring a tortise. ... (19th century - 20th century - 21st century - more centuries) Decades: 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s As a means of recording the passage of time, the 20th century was that century which lasted from 1901–2000 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar (1900–1999... For Modernism in an American context, see American modernism. ... Jugendstil is defined as a style of architecture or decorative art similar to Art Nouveau, popular in German-speaking areas of Europe during the late 19th and early 20th centuries [1]. Jugendstil was also popular in the Nordic countries, where it became integrated with the National Romantic Style. ... Young Poland (Polish Młoda Polska) is a modernist period in Polish art, literature and music, covering roughly the years between 1890 and 1918. ... The secession building at Vienna, built in 1897 by Joseph Maria Olbrich for exhibitions of the secession group another view The Vienna Secession or (also known as Secessionsstil, or Sezessionsstil in Austria) was part of that highly varied movement that is now covered by the general term Art Nouveau. ... Vienna (German: , see also other names) is the capital of Austria, and also one of the nine States of Austria. ... A salon is a gathering of stimulating people of quality under the roof of an inspiring hostess or host, partly to amuse one another and partly to refine their taste and increase their knowledge through conversation and readings, often consciously following Horaces definition of the aims of poetry, to... Nickname: Map showing the location of Brussels in Belgium Coordinates: Country Belgium Region Brussels-Capital Region Founded 979 Founded (Region) June 18, 1989 Government  - Mayor (Municipality) Freddy Thielemans Area  - Region 162 km²  (62. ... Motto (Latin) No one provokes me with impunity Cha togar mfhearg gun dioladh (Scottish Gaelic) Wha daur meddle wi me?(Scots)1 Anthem (Multiple unofficial anthems) Scotlands location in Europe Capital Edinburgh Largest city Glasgow Official languages English, Gaelic and Scots1 Government Constitutional monarchy  -  Monarch Queen Elizabeth II... For other uses, see Glasgow (disambiguation) George Square and Glasgows City Chambers Glasgow is Scotlands largest city, located on the River Clyde in West Central Scotland. ...


In Russia, the movement revolved around the art magazine Mir iskusstva ('World of Art'), which spawned the revolutionary Ballets Russes. In Italy, Stile Liberty was named for the London shop, Liberty & Co, which distributed modern design emanating from the Arts and Crafts movement, a sign both of the Art Nouveau's commercial aspect and the 'imported' character that it always retained in Italy. Miriskusniki tended to idealize the 18th century as the quintessential Age of Art. ... Léon Bakst: Firebird, Ballerina, 1910 The Ballets Russes was a ballet company established in 1909 by the Russian impresario Serge Diaghilev and resident first in Théâtre Mogador, Paris; and then in Monte Carlo. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... Liberty is a well known department store in Regent Street in central London, England at the heart of the West End shopping district. ... Artichoke wallpaper, by John Henry Dearle for William Morris & Co. ...


In Spain, the movement was centred in Barcelona and was known as modernisme, with the architect Antoni Gaudí as the most noteworthy practitioner. Art Nouveau was also a force in Eastern Europe, with the influence of Alfons Mucha in Prague and Moravia (part of the modern Czech Republic) and Latvian Romanticism (Riga, the capital of Latvia, is home to over 800 Art Nouveau buildings). Location Coordinates : Time Zone : CET (GMT +1) - summer: CEST (GMT +2) General information Native name Barcelona (Catalan) Spanish name Barcelona Nickname Ciutat Comtal (Catalan) Postal code 08001–08080 Area code 34 (Spain) + 93 (Barcelona) Website http://www. ... Modernisme in Catalan, (not to be confused with modernism) is the Catalan variant of Art Nouveau. ... Antoni Gaudí i Cornet (25 June 1852 – 10 June 1926) – sometimes referred to by the Spanish translation of his name, Antonio Gaudí – was an architect from Catalonia, Spain who belonged to the Modernisme (Art Nouveau) movement and was famous for his unique style and highly individualistic designs. ... Map of Eastern Europe Pre-1989 division between the West (grey) and Eastern Bloc (orange) superimposed on current national boundaries: Russia (dark orange), other countries of the former USSR (medium orange),members of the Warsaw pact (light orange), and other former Communist regimes not aligned with Moscow (lightest orange). ... Alfons Mucha Alfons Maria Mucha (or Alphonse Maria Mucha)   (July 24, 1860–July 14, 1939) was a Czech painter and decorative artist. ... Nickname: Motto: Praga Caput Rei publicae Location within the Czech Republic Coordinates: , Country Czech Republic Region Capital City of Prague Founded 9th century Government  - Mayor Pavel Bém Area  - City 496 km²  (191. ... Flag of Moravia Moravia (Czech and Slovak: Morava; German: ; Hungarian: ; Polish: ) is a historical region in the east of the Czech RepublicCzechia. ... Coordinates: Founded 1201 Government  - Mayor Jānis Birks Area  - City 307. ...


The entrances to the Paris Métro designed by Hector Guimard in 1899 and 1900 are famous examples of Art Nouveau. Line 5s crossing of the Seine on the Austerlitz viaduct. ... Designed in 1899, the Porte Dauphine station exhibits Guimards only surviving enclosed edicule of the Paris Métro. ...

Contents

History of Art Nouveau

Bookcover of Arthur Mackmurdo, Wren's City Churches, 1883
Ingram Chairs by Charles Rennie Mackintosh, 1899

Art Nouveau climaxed in the years 1892 to 1902. One of the first Art nouveau paintings can be found at Roquetaillade castle (France). Viollet-le-Duc restored the castle in the 1850's, and even though his ideal was to create a Gothic revival, his fresque in the keep of the castle is a pure example of "pre" Art Nouveau style -- organic movement, colour and grace. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (481x607, 133 KB) Summary Arthur Mackmurdo, cover design of Wrens City Churches, published 1883 Licensing File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (481x607, 133 KB) Summary Arthur Mackmurdo, cover design of Wrens City Churches, published 1883 Licensing File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Ingram chairs by Charles Rennie Mackintosh. ... Image File history File links Ingram chairs by Charles Rennie Mackintosh. ... Roquetaillade castle Built in 1306 by Pope Clement Vth, with the permission of King Edward II, Roquetaillade is still lived in by the same family for over 700 years. ... Eugène Emmanuel Viollet-le-Duc (Paris, January 27, 1814 - Lausanne 1879) was a French architect, famous for his restorations of medieval buildings. ...


The first stirrings of an Art Nouveau "movement" can be recognized in the 1880s, in a handful of progressive designs such as the architect-designer Arthur Mackmurdo's book cover design for his essay on the city churches of Sir Christopher Wren, published in 1883. Some free-flowing wrought iron from the 1880s could also be adduced, or some flat floral textile designs, most of which owed some impetus to patterns of High Victorian design. This page may meet Wikipedias criteria for speedy deletion. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... It has been suggested that Ecclesia (Church) be merged into this article or section. ... Christopher Wren. ... A wrought iron railing in Troy, New York. ... “fabric” redirects here. ... Windsor Castle in Modern Times by Landseer depicts the Queen and the Prince Consort at home in the 1840s. ...


The name 'Art Nouveau' derived from the name of a shop[1] in Paris, Maison de l'Art Nouveau, at the time run by Siegfried Bing, that showcased objects that followed this approach to design. This article is about the capital of France. ... Siegfried (Samuel) Bing (1838 - 1905) was a German art dealer in Paris, who started his career by dealing in Japanese art and artworks. ...


A high point in the evolution of Art Nouveau was the Exposition Universelle of 1900 in Paris, in which the 'modern style' triumphed in every medium. It probably reached its apogee, however, at the Esposizione Internazionale d'Arte Decorativa Moderna of 1902 in Turin, Italy, where designers exhibited from almost every European country where Art Nouveau flourished. Art Nouveau made use of many technological innovations of the late 19th century, especially the broad use of exposed iron and large, irregularly shaped pieces of glass in architecture. By the start of the First World War, however, the highly stylized nature of Art Nouveau design — which itself was expensive to produce — began to be dropped in favor of more streamlined, rectilinear modernism that was cheaper and thought to be more faithful to the rough, plain, industrial aesthetic that became Art Deco. The Exposition Universelle of 1900 was a worlds fair held in Paris, France, to celebrate the achievements of the past century and to accelerate development into the next. ... “Torino” redirects here. ... By the mid 20th century humans had achieved a mastery of technology sufficient to leave the surface of the Earth for the first time and explore space. ... Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ... Glass can be made transparent and flat, or into other shapes and colors as shown in this sphere from the Verrerie of Brehat in Brittany. ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ... Dejeuner sur lHerbe by Pablo Picasso At the Moulin Rouge: Two Women Waltzing by Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec, 1892 The Scream by Edvard Munch, 1893 I and the Village by Marc Chagall, 1911 Fountain by Marcel Duchamp, 1917 Campbells Soup Cans 1962 Synthetic polymer paint on thirty-two... Asheville City Hall. ...


Character of Art Nouveau

St. Louis World's Fair, (1904). Entrance to the Creation exhibit.

Dynamic, undulating, and flowing, with curved 'whiplash' lines of syncopated rhythm, characterized much of Art Nouveau. Another feature is the use of hyperbolas and parabolas. Conventional mouldings seem to spring to life and 'grow' into plant-derived forms. 1904 St. ... 1904 St. ... Entrance to Creation Exhibit on the Pike Map of the St. ... In mathematics, a hyperbola (Greek literally overshooting or excess) is a type of conic section defined as the intersection between a right circular conical surface and a plane which cuts through both halves of the cone. ... A parabola A graph showing the reflective property, the directrix (light blue), and the lines connecting the focus and directrix to the parabola (blue) In mathematics, the parabola (from the Greek: παραβολή) (IPA pronunciation: ) is a conic section generated by the intersection of a right circular conical surface and a plane... Cavetto molding and resulting shadow pattern Ovolo molding and resulting shadow pattern Cyma molding and resulting shadow pattern Ogee molding and resulting shadow pattern Molding (USA) or moulding (AUS, UK) is a strip of material with various cross sections used to cover transitions between surfaces or for decoration. ...


As an art movement it has affinities with the Pre-Raphaelites and the Symbolism (arts) movement, and artists like Aubrey Beardsley, Alphonse Mucha, Edward Burne-Jones, Gustav Klimt, and Jan Toorop could be classed in more than one of these styles. Unlike Symbolist painting, however, Art Nouveau has a distinctive visual look; and unlike the backward-looking Arts and Crafts Movement (although they weren't backward at all), Art Nouveau artists quickly used new materials, machined surfaces, and abstraction in the service of pure design. Persephone, by Dante Gabriel Rossetti. ... La mort du fossoyeur (The death of the gravedigger) by Carlos Schwabe is a visual compendium of Symbolist motifs. ... Aubrey Beardsley Aubrey Vincent Beardsley (August 21, 1872 – March 16, 1898) was an influential English illustrator, and author, best known for his erotic illustrations. ... Alfons Mucha (July 24, 1860 - July 14, 1939) was a Czech painter and decorative artist. ... Love Among the Ruins, by Edward Burne-Jones. ... Gustav Klimt, 1902 Gustav Klimt (July 14, 1862 – February 6, 1918) was an Austrian Symbolist painter and one of the most prominent members of the Vienna Art Nouveau (Vienna Secession) movement. ... O Grave, Where Is Thy Victory? (1892) Jan Toorop (1858-1928) was a Dutch painter whose works straddle the space between the Symbolist painters and Art Nouveau. ... abstraction in general. ...

Vase by Daum (c. 1900).
Vase by Daum (c. 1900).

Art Nouveau in architecture and interior design eschewed the eclectic revival styles of the Victorian era. Though Art Nouveau designers selected and 'modernized' some of the more abstract elements of Rococo style, such as flame and shell textures, they also advocated the use of highly stylized organic forms as a source of inspiration, expanding the 'natural' repertoire to embrace seaweed, grasses, and insects. Title : Grand vase aux grillons designed by Daum, Nancy circa 1900. ... Title : Grand vase aux grillons designed by Daum, Nancy circa 1900. ... Vase, circa 1900 Daum is a crystal studio based in Nancy, France, founded in 1875 by Jean Daum (1825-1885). ... Image File history File linksMetadata Mexico_bellas_artes_palace. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Mexico_bellas_artes_palace. ... Palacio de Bellas Artes The Palacio de Bellas Artes (Palace of Fine Arts) is the premier opera house of Mexico City. ... Nickname: Location of Mexico City in central Mexico Coordinates: , Country Mexico Federal entity Federal District Boroughs The 16 delegaciones Founded (as Tenochtitlan) c. ... Interior design is the process of shaping the experience of interior space, through the manipulation of spatial volume as well as surface treatment. ... Queen Victoria (shown here on the morning of her accession to the Throne, 20 June 1837) gave her name to the historic era The Victorian era of the United Kingdom marked the height of the British Industrial Revolution and the apex of the British Empire. ... North side of the Catherine Palace in Tsarskoye Selo - carriage courtyard: all the stucco details sparkled with gold until 1773, when Catherine II had gilding replaced with olive drab paint. ... Flame generated by the burning of a candle. ... Various seashells Danielle A shell is the hard, rigid outer covering, or integument, allanimals. ... Ascophyllum nodosum exposed to the sun in Nova Scotia, Canada Dead Mans Fingers (Codium fragile) off Massachusetts coast For the band, see; Seaweed (band) For the rock musician, see; Seaweed (musician) Seaweeds are any of a large number of marine benthic algae. ... Natural vegetation dominated by grasses Grass is a common word that generally describes a monocotyledonous green plant in the family Poaceae. ... Insects (Class Insecta) are a major group of arthropods and the most diverse group of animals on the Earth, with over a million described species—more than all other animal groups combined. ...


Japanese wood-block prints, with their curved lines, patterned surfaces, contrasting voids, and flatness of visual plane, also inspired Art Nouveau. Some line and curve patterns became graphic clichés that were later found in works of artists from all parts of the world. View of Mount Fuji from Numazu, part of the Fifty-three Stations of the Tōkaidō series by Hiroshige, published 1850 Ukiyo-e ), pictures of the floating world, is a genre of Japanese woodblock prints (or woodcuts) and paintings produced between the 17th and the 20th centuries, featuring motifs of... A pattern is a form, template, or model (or, more abstractly, a set of rules) which can be used to make or to generate things or parts of a thing, especially if the things that are generated have enough in common for the underlying pattern to be inferred or discerned... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ...


Art Nouveau did not negate the machine as the Arts and Crafts Movement did, but used it to its advantage. For sculpture, the principal materials employed were glass and wrought iron, leading to sculptural qualities even in architecture. Wind turbines The scientific definition of a machine is any device that transmits or modifies energy. ... Artichoke wallpaper, by John Henry Dearle for William Morris & Co. ... A sculpture is a three-dimensional object, which for the purposes of this article is man-made and selected for special recognition as art. ...


Art Nouveau is considered a 'total' style, meaning that it encompasses a hierarchy of scales in design — architecture; interior design; decorative arts including jewelery, furniture, textiles, household silver and other utensils, and lighting; and the range of visual arts. (See Hierarchy of genres.) A hierarchy (in Greek: , it is derived from -hieros, sacred, and -arkho, rule) is a system of ranking and organizing things or people, where each element of the system (except for the top element) is subordinate to a single other element. ... Architecture (from Latin, architectura and ultimately from Greek, a master builder, from αρχι- chiefs, leader , builder, carpenter)[1] is the art and science of designing buildings and structures. ... Interior design is the process of shaping the experience of interior space, through the manipulation of spatial volume as well as surface treatment. ... The decorative arts are traditionally defined as ornamental and functional works in ceramic, wood, glass, metal, or textile. ... Jewellery (spelled jewelry in American English) consists of ornamental devices worn by persons, typically made with gems and precious metals. ... Look up furniture in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... “fabric” redirects here. ... A chandelier light fixture A light fixture or luminaire is an electrical device used to create artificial light or illumination in architecture. ... The Mona Lisa is one of the most recognizable artistic paintings in the Western world. ... A hierarchy of genres is any formalization which ranks different types of genres in an art-form in terms of their value. ...


Art Nouveau media

The Peacock Skirt, by Aubrey Beardsley, (1892).
The Peacock Skirt, by Aubrey Beardsley, (1892).

Two-dimensional Art Nouveau pieces were painted, drawn, and printed in popular forms such as advertisements, posters, labels, magazines, and the like. The Peacock Skirt, by Aubrey Beardsley (1892) This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... The Peacock Skirt, by Aubrey Beardsley (1892) This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... Aubrey Beardsley Aubrey Vincent Beardsley (August 21, 1872 – March 16, 1898) was an influential English illustrator, and author, best known for his erotic illustrations. ... Commercialism redirects here. ... Poster from the Spanish Revolution A poster is any large piece of printed paper which hangs from a wall or other such surface. ... well you dont know what you are looking 4 so go 2 bed A label is any kind of tag attached with adhesive to something so as to identify the object or its contents. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...


Glass making was an area in which the style found tremendous expression — for example, the works of Louis Comfort Tiffany in New York, Charles Rennie Mackintosh in Glasgow and Émile Gallé and the Daum brothers in Nancy, France. This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Louis Comfort Tiffany (1848-1933) circa 1908 Louis Comfort Tiffany (February 18, 1848 – January 17, 1933) was an American artist and designer who worked in the decorative arts and is best known for his work in stained glass and is the American artist most associated with the Art Nouveau and... NY redirects here. ... Hill House, Helensburgh. ... For other uses, see Glasgow (disambiguation) George Square and Glasgows City Chambers Glasgow is Scotlands largest city, located on the River Clyde in West Central Scotland. ... Émile Gallé in 1889 Émile Gallé (Nancy, 8 May 1846 – Nancy, September 23, 1904) was a French artist who worked in glass, and is considered to be one of the major forces in the French Art Nouveau movement. ... Vase, circa 1900 Daum is a crystal studio based in Nancy, France, founded in 1875 by Jean Daum (1825-1885). ... Nancy (IPA pronounciation ; archaic German: ; Luxembourgish: Nanzeg) is a city and commune in the Lorraine région of northeastern France. ...


Jewelery of the Art Nouveau period revitalized the jeweler's art, with nature as the principal source of inspiration, complemented by new levels of virtuosity in enameling and the introduction of new materials, such as opals and semi-precious stones. The widespread interest in Japanese art, and the more specialized enthusiasm for Japanese metalworking skills, fostered new themes and approaches to ornament. Jewellery (spelled jewelry in American English) consists of ornamental devices worn by persons, typically made with gems and precious metals. ... In a discussion of art technology, enamel (or vitreous enamel, or porcelain enamel in American English) is the colorful result of fusion of powdered glass to a substrate through the process of firing, usually between 750 and 850 degrees Celsius. ... For other articles with similar names, see Opal (disambiguation). ... Bronze statue of Amida Buddha at Kotokuin in Kamakura (1252 CE) Japanese art covers a wide range of art styles and media, including ancient pottery, sculpture in wood and bronze, ink painting on silk and paper, and a myriad of other types of works of art. ...


For the previous two centuries, the emphasis in fine jewelery had been on gemstones, particularly on the diamond, and the jeweler or goldsmith had been principally concerned with providing settings for their advantage. With Art Nouveau, a different type of jewelery emerged, motivated by the artist-designer rather than the jeweler as setter of precious stones. A selection of gemstone pebbles made by tumbling rough rock with abrasive grit, in a rotating drum. ... This article is about the gemstone. ... A goldsmith creating a new ring A goldsmith is a metalworker who specializes in working with precious metals, usually to make jewelry. ...

Mikhail Vrubel. Demon Seated in a Garden, 1890

The jewelers of Paris and Brussels defined Art Nouveau in jewelery, and in these cities it achieved the most renown. Contemporary French critics were united in acknowledging that jewelery was undergoing a radical transformation, and that the French designer-jeweler-glassmaker René Lalique was at its heart. Lalique glorified nature in jewelery, extending the repertoire to include new aspects of nature — dragonflies or grasses — inspired by his encounter with Japanese art. Demon Seated in a Garden (1890). ... Demon Seated in a Garden (1890). ... Self-portrait, 1885 Mikhail Aleksandrovich Vrubel (Russian: Михаил Александрович Врубель;March 17, 1856 - April 14, 1910, all n. ... Nickname: Map showing the location of Brussels in Belgium Coordinates: Country Belgium Region Brussels-Capital Region Founded 979 Founded (Region) June 18, 1989 Government  - Mayor (Municipality) Freddy Thielemans Area  - Region 162 km²  (62. ... Illuminated automobile hood ornament in the form of a rooster by René Jules Lalique René Jules Lalique was born in Ay, Marne, France on April 6, 1860, and died May 5, 1945. ... Families Aeshnidae Austropetaliidae Cordulegastridae Corduliidae Gomphidae Libellulidae Macromiidae Neopetaliidae Petaluridae A dragonfly is any insect belonging to the order Odonata, the suborder Epiprocta or, in the strict sense, the infraorder Anisoptera. ...


The jewelers were keen to establish the new style in a noble tradition, and for this they looked back to the Renaissance, with its jewels of sculpted and enameled gold, and its acceptance of jewelers as artists rather than craftsmen. In most of the enameled work of the period precious stones receded. Diamonds were usually given subsidiary roles, used alongside less familiar materials such as moulded glass, horn and ivory. The Renaissance (French for rebirth, or Rinascimento in Italian), was a cultural movement in Italy (and in Europe in general) that began in the late Middle Ages, and spanned roughly the 14th through the 17th century. ... Highland cow, a very old long-horned breed from Scotland. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


Geographical scope of Art Nouveau

Interior of a dome in the Grand Palais, Paris
Interior of a dome in the Grand Palais, Paris
Hungarian Art Nouveau in Kecskemét
Hungarian Art Nouveau in Kecskemét

Centers of the style are: Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (2530x1732, 1356 KB) Description France Paris Grand Palais intérieur Photographie prise par GIRAUD Patrick Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Art Nouveau ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (2530x1732, 1356 KB) Description France Paris Grand Palais intérieur Photographie prise par GIRAUD Patrick Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Art Nouveau ... This article includes a list of works cited or a list of external links, but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ... Grand Palais in 2004 The Grand Palais (Grand Palace) is a large glass exhibition hall that was built for the Paris Exhibition of 1900. ... This article is about the capital of France. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 391 × 600 pixels Full resolution (898 × 1377 pixel, file size: 239 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Art Nouveau Kecskemét ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 391 × 600 pixels Full resolution (898 × 1377 pixel, file size: 239 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Art Nouveau Kecskemét ... Kecskemét (IPA: ), (approximate pronounciation, Kech-kem-it), is a city in the central part of Hungary. ...

County Møre og Romsdal District Sunnmøre Municipality NO-1504 Administrative centre Ã…lesund Mayor (2003) Arve Tonning (H) Official language form Neutral Area  - Total  - Land  - Percentage Ranked 388 98 km² 93 km² 0. ... Nickname: Motto: Heldhaftig, Vastberaden, Barmhartig (Valiant, Determined, Compassionate) Location of Amsterdam Coordinates: Country Netherlands Province North Holland Government  - Mayor Job Cohen (PvdA)  - Aldermen Lodewijk Asscher Hennah Buyne Carolien Gehrels Tjeerd Herrema Maarten van Poelgeest Marijke Vos  - Secretary Erik Gerritsen Area [1][2]  - City 219 km²  (84. ... Bad Nauheim is a town in the Wetteraukreis district of Hesse state of Germany. ... Location Coordinates : Time Zone : CET (GMT +1) - summer: CEST (GMT +2) General information Native name Barcelona (Catalan) Spanish name Barcelona Nickname Ciutat Comtal (Catalan) Postal code 08001–08080 Area code 34 (Spain) + 93 (Barcelona) Website http://www. ... Location of Berlin within Germany / EU Coordinates Time zone CET/CEST (UTC+1/+2) Administration Country NUTS Region DE3 City subdivisions 12 boroughs Governing Mayor Klaus Wowereit (SPD) Governing parties SPD / Left. ... Nickname: Map showing the location of Brussels in Belgium Coordinates: Country Belgium Region Brussels-Capital Region Founded 979 Founded (Region) June 18, 1989 Government  - Mayor (Municipality) Freddy Thielemans Area  - Region 162 km²  (62. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... For other uses, see Buenos Aires (disambiguation). ... Nickname: Motto: Urbs In Horto (Latin: City in a Garden), I Will Location in the Chicago metro area and Illinois Coordinates: , Country United States State Illinois County Cook & DuPage Settled 1770s Incorporated March 4, 1837 Government  - Mayor Richard M. Daley (D) Area  - City  234. ... Darmstadt is a city in the Bundesland (federal state) of Hesse in Germany. ... Nickname: Coordinates: Country Mexico State Jalisco Foundation 1542 Government  - Mayor Alfonso Petersen Farah ( PAN) Area  - City 187. ... Hagen is the 37th largest city in Germany, located in the federal state of North Rhine-Westphalia. ... Harbin on a map of China For other meanings of Harbin, see Harbin (disambiguation). ... Nickname: (Spanish) City of Columns Position of Havana in the Americas Coordinates: , Country Cuba Province Ciudad de La Habana Municipalities 15 Founded 1515a Government  - Mayor Juan Contino Aslán Area  - City 721. ... Nickname: Location of Helsinki in Northern Europe Coordinates: Country Finland Province Southern Finland Region Uusimaa Sub-region Helsinki Charter 1550 Capital city 1812 Government  - Lord Mayor Jussi Pajunen  - Mayor Pekka Korpinen  - Mayor Ilkka-Christian Björklund  - Mayor Pekka Sauri  - Mayor Paula Kokkonen Area  - City 187. ... “Glaswegian” redirects here. ... Kecskemét (IPA: ), (approximate pronounciation, Kech-kem-it), is a city in the central part of Hungary. ... Map of Ukraine with Kiev highlighted Coordinates: Country Ukraine Oblast Kiev City Municipality Raion Municipality Government  - Mayor Leonid Chernovetskyi Elevation 179 m (587. ... Wawel Hill, Old Town, Kraków. ... This does not cite any references or sources. ... Łódź ( ) is Polands second largest city (population 776,297 in 2004). ... Motto: Semper fidelis Location Map of Ukraine with Lviv. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... Mannheim is a city in Germany. ... This article is about the city in Italy. ... Position of Moscow in Europe Coordinates: , Country District Subdivision Russia Central Federal District Federal City Government  - Mayor Yuriy Luzhkov Area  - City 1,081 km²  (417. ... Munich (German: , pronounced  ; Austro-Bavarian: Minga [2]) is the capital of the German Federal State of Bavaria. ... Nancy (IPA pronounciation ; archaic German: ; Luxembourgish: Nanzeg) is a city and commune in the Lorraine région of northeastern France. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... Nizhny Novgorod (Russian: ), colloquially shortened as Nizhny, is the fourth largest city in Russia, ranking after Moscow, St. ... Reus, Joan Prims Monument Reus is the capital of the comarca of Baix Camp, in the province of Tarragona, Catalonia, located at 117 metres above sea level. ... Coordinates: Founded 1201 Government  - Mayor Jānis Birks Area  - City 307. ... Osijek (pronounced: []) is the fourth largest city in Croatia with a population of 114,616 in 2001. ... County Bihor County Status County capital Mayor Petru Filip, Democratic Party, since 2000 Area 111. ... Oradea (Hungarian: Nagyvárad, German: Großwardein) is a city located in Romania, in the county of Bihor (BH), in Transylvania. ... This article is about the capital of France. ... 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Noted Art Nouveau practitioners

Architecture

François-Émile André (Nancy, 1871 - Nancy, 1933), was a French architect, artist, and furniture designer. ... Gavriil Vasilyevich Baranovsky (Russian:Гавриил Васильевич Барановский, also spelled as Baranovskii, March 23, 1860 - ?? 1920) was a Russian architect, civil engineer, art historian and publisher, who worked primarily in Saint Petersburg for the Eliseyev family, but also practiced in Moscow and produced the first town plan for Murmansk (then Romanov-na-Murmane). ... Raimondo Tommaso D’Aronco (1857-1932) was an Italian architect renowned for his building designs in the style of Art Nouveau. ... Mikhail Eisenstein, (1867 - 1921), was a Latvian architect and civil engineer of German Jewish descent. ... August Endel (born 1871, Berlin, died 1925) was an Art Nouveau architect. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1536x2048, 748 KB)Picture taken June 2004 by Peter Clericuzio, using a Fuji FinePix S5000 digital camera. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1536x2048, 748 KB)Picture taken June 2004 by Peter Clericuzio, using a Fuji FinePix S5000 digital camera. ... List of stations of the Paris Métro Porte Dauphine (Maréchal de Lattre de Tassigny) is a station of the Paris Métro. ... Designed in 1899, the Porte Dauphine station exhibits Guimards only surviving enclosed edicule of the Paris Métro. ... Line 5s crossing of the Seine on the Austerlitz viaduct. ... Antoni Gaud i Cornet (more widely known in the English speaking world under the Spanish version of his first name, as Antonio Gaud , or, just simply, Gaudi), (25 June 1852–10 June 1926) was a Catalan architect famous for his unique designs expressing sculptural and individualistic qualities. ... Vladislav Gorodetsky Vladislav Gorodetsky or full name Vladislav Leshek Dezidery (Ukrainian: ; May 1863 in Sholudky, Podillia — 1930 in Iran) was an architect and big-game hunter, best known for his Art Nouveau-style buildings, namely the House with Chimaeras, the St. ... Designed in 1899, the Porte Dauphine station exhibits Guimards only surviving enclosed edicule of the Paris Métro. ... Josef Hoffmann (December 15, 1870 - May 7, 1956) was an Austrian architect and designer of consumer goods. ... Maison and Atelier Horta, designed in 1898, now houses the Horta Museum, dedicated to his work. ... Ödön Lechner (Pest, August 27, 1845 – Budapest, June 10, 1914) was a Hungarian architect, nicknamed the Hungarian Gaudí. Lechner was one of the early representatives of the Hungarian National Romanticism movement, related to Art Nouveau and Jugendstil in the rest of Europe, called szecesszió in Hungarian. ... Lev Nikolayevich Kekushev (Russian: Лев Николаевич Кекушев) was a Russian architect, notable for his Art Nouveau buildings in Moscow, built in the 1890s and early 1900s in the original, Franco-Belgian variety of this style. ... Hill House, Helensburgh. ... A poststamp representing the headquarters of the Constitutional Court of Russia. ... Fyodor Osipovich Schechtel (Russian: , August 7, 1859 - July 7, 1926) was a Russian architect, graphic artist and stage designer, the most influential and prodigious master of Russian Art Nouveau and late Russian Revival. ... Louis Sullivan Louis Henry (Henri) Sullivan (September 3, 1856–April 14, 1924) was an American architect, called the father of modernism. He is considered by many as the creator of the modern skyscraper, was an influential architect and critic of the Chicago School, and was a mentor to Frank Lloyd... Eugène Vallin (Herbéviller, 1856 - Nancy, 1922) was a French furniture designer and manufacturer, as well as an architect. ... Henry Van de Velde (3 April 1863 - 15 October 1957) was a Belgian painter, architect and interior designer. ... William Walcot (March 10, 1874 - May 21, 1943) was an British architect and graphic artist, notable as practicioner of refined Art Nouveau (Style Moderne) in Moscow, Russia (as Вильям Францевич Валькот). His trademark Ladys Head keystone ornament became the easily recognizable symbol of Russian Style Moderne. ... Otto Wagner Otto Koloman Wagner (13 July 1841–11 April 1918) was an Austrian architect. ... Lucien Weissenburger (Nancy, 2 May 1860 – Nancy, 24 February 1929), was a French architect. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 449 × 599 pixels Full resolution (614 × 819 pixel, file size: 380 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Budapest: Halle im Kunstgewerbemuseum (5. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 449 × 599 pixels Full resolution (614 × 819 pixel, file size: 380 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Budapest: Halle im Kunstgewerbemuseum (5. ... The Museum of Applied Arts is a museum in Budapest, Hungary. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...

Art, drawing, and graphics

Self-portrait Léon Nikolayevich Bakst (May 10, 1866 - December 28, 1924) was a Russian painter and scene- and costume- designer who revolutionized the arts he worked in. ... Aubrey Beardsley Aubrey Vincent Beardsley (August 21, 1872 – March 16, 1898) was an influential English illustrator, and author, best known for his erotic illustrations. ... Ivan Ya. ... The Dining Room in the Country Pierre Bonnard (October 3, 1867 – January 23, 1947) was a French painter and printmaker. ... Gustav Klimt, 1902 Gustav Klimt (July 14, 1862 – February 6, 1918) was an Austrian Symbolist painter and one of the most prominent members of the Vienna Art Nouveau (Vienna Secession) movement. ... Self-portrait, 1885 Mikhail Aleksandrovich Vrubel (Russian: Михаил Александрович Врубель;March 17, 1856 - April 14, 1910, all n. ... Alfons Mucha Alfons Maria Mucha (or Alphonse Maria Mucha)   (July 24, 1860–July 14, 1939) was a Czech painter and decorative artist. ... Self-portrait, 1880ies Valentin Alexandrovich Serov (Russian: Валентин Александрович Серов) (1865 - 1911) was a Russian painter. ... Self-portrait of StanisÅ‚aw WyspiaÅ„ski An old Polish banknote StanisÅ‚aw WyspiaÅ„ski (January 15, 1869, Kraków – November 28, 1907, Kraków) was a Polish dramatist, poet, painter, architect. ... Dziwny ogrod (Strange Garden) by Józef Mehoffer Józef Mehoffer (1869-1946) was a Polish painter and decorative artist, one of the leading artists of the Young Poland movement and one of the most revered Polish artists of his time. ... Konstantin Andreyevich Somov (1869-1939) was a Russian artist associated with the Mir iskusstva. ... Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec [äNrÄ“ du tOOlOOz lōtrek] (November 24, 1864 – September 9, 1901) was a French painter, printmaker, draftsman, and illustrator, whose immersion in the decadent and theatrical life of fin de siècle Paris yielded an oeuvre of provocative images of modern life. ... Image:Vaszary. ... Walter Crane (August 15, 1845 - March 14, 1915) was a significant English artist. ...

Murals and mosaics

Antoni Gaud i Cornet (more widely known in the English speaking world under the Spanish version of his first name, as Antonio Gaud , or, just simply, Gaudi), (25 June 1852–10 June 1926) was a Catalan architect famous for his unique designs expressing sculptural and individualistic qualities. ... Gustav Klimt, 1902 Gustav Klimt (July 14, 1862 – February 6, 1918) was an Austrian Symbolist painter and one of the most prominent members of the Vienna Art Nouveau (Vienna Secession) movement. ... Alfons Mucha Alfons Maria Mucha (or Alphonse Maria Mucha)   (July 24, 1860–July 14, 1939) was a Czech painter and decorative artist. ... Self-portrait, 1885 Mikhail Aleksandrovich Vrubel (Russian: Михаил Александрович Врубель;March 17, 1856 - April 14, 1910, all n. ...

Furniture

Antoni Gaud i Cornet (more widely known in the English speaking world under the Spanish version of his first name, as Antonio Gaud , or, just simply, Gaudi), (25 June 1852–10 June 1926) was a Catalan architect famous for his unique designs expressing sculptural and individualistic qualities. ... Hill House, Helensburgh. ... no ... Henry Van de Velde (3 April 1863 - 15 October 1957) was a Belgian painter, architect and interior designer. ...

Glassware and stained glass

Vase, circa 1900 Daum is a crystal studio based in Nancy, France, founded in 1875 by Jean Daum (1825-1885). ... Émile Gallé in 1889 Émile Gallé (Nancy, 8 May 1846 – Nancy, September 23, 1904) was a French artist who worked in glass, and is considered to be one of the major forces in the French Art Nouveau movement. ... Illuminated automobile hood ornament in the form of a rooster by René Jules Lalique René Jules Lalique was born in Ay, Marne, France on April 6, 1860, and died May 5, 1945. ... Hill House, Helensburgh. ... Louis Comfort Tiffany (1848-1933) circa 1908 Louis Comfort Tiffany (February 18, 1848 – January 17, 1933) was an American artist and designer who worked in the decorative arts and is best known for his work in stained glass and is the American artist most associated with the Art Nouveau and... Self-portrait of StanisÅ‚aw WyspiaÅ„ski An old Polish banknote StanisÅ‚aw WyspiaÅ„ski (January 15, 1869, Kraków – November 28, 1907, Kraków) was a Polish dramatist, poet, painter, architect. ...

Other decorative arts

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Charles Robert Ashbee ( London, May 17, 1863–Sevenoaks, Kent, May 23, 1942 ) was a designer and entrepreneur who was a prime mover of the English Arts and Crafts movement that took its craft ethic from the works of John Ruskin and its co-operative structure from the socialism of William... William H. Bradley (10 July, 1868 to 1962), illustrator and artist, was born in Boston, Massachusetts, United States. ... Georges de Feure, painter, theatrical designer, and industrial art designer in the Art Nouveau style, born in Paris 6th Sept. ... Hermann Obrist (*May 23 1863 at Kilchberg (near Zurich), Switzerland died February 26 1927, Munich, Germany) was a German sculptor of the Jugendstil movement. ... Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... The Wikimedia Commons (also called Wikicommons) is a repository of free content images, sound and other multimedia files. ... Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... The Wikimedia Commons (also called Wikicommons) is a repository of free content images, sound and other multimedia files. ...

See also

Arthur Lasenby Liberty (August 13, 1843 _ May 11, 1917) was born in Chesham, Buckinghamshire, England. ...

Notes

  1. ^ A modern equivalent might be called "an interior design gallery", implying that the arts of design are equivalent in importance to the "fine arts", an Art Nouveau axiom.

Fine art is a term used to refer to fields traditionally considered to be artistic. ...

External links

Western art movements
Renaissance · Mannerism · Baroque · Rococo · Neoclassicism · Romanticism · Realism · Pre-Raphaelite · Academic · Impressionism · Post-Impressionism
20th century
Modernism · Cubism · Expressionism · Abstract expressionism · Abstract · Neue Künstlervereinigung München · Der Blaue Reiter · Die Brücke · Dada · Fauvism · Art Nouveau · Bauhaus · De Stijl · Art Deco · Pop art · Futurism · Suprematism · Surrealism · Color Field · Minimalism · Lyrical Abstraction · Post-Modernism · Conceptual art

Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... The Renaissance (French for rebirth, or Rinascimento in Italian), was a cultural movement in Italy (and in Europe in general) that began in the late Middle Ages, and spanned roughly the 14th through the 17th century. ... In Parmigianinos Madonna with the Long Neck (1534-40), Mannerism makes itself known by elongated proportions, affected poses, and unclear perspective. ... Adoration, by Peter Paul Rubens. ... North side of the Catherine Palace in Tsarskoye Selo - carriage courtyard: all the stucco details sparkled with gold until 1773, when Catherine II had gilding replaced with olive drab paint. ... Neoclassicism (sometimes rendered as Neo-Classicism or Neo-classicism) is the name given to quite distinct movements in the decorative and visual arts, literature, theatre, music, and architecture. ... Wanderer above the sea of fog by Caspar David Friedrich Romanticism is an artistic, literary and intellectual movement that originated in 18th century Western Europe during the Industrial Revolution. ... Realism in the visual arts and literature is the depiction of subjects as they appear in everyday life, without embellishment or interpretation. ... Persephone, by Dante Gabriel Rossetti. ... Birth of Venus, Alexandre Cabanel, 1863 Academic art is a style of painting and sculpture produced under the influence of European academies or universities. ... Impressionism was a 19th century art movement that began as a loose association of Paris-based artists, who began exhibiting their art publicly in the 1860s. ... Self-Portrait with sister, by Victor Borisov-Musatov 1898 Post-Impressionism is the term coined by the British artist and art critic Roger Fry in 1914, to describe the development of European art since Monet (Impressionism). ... Dejeuner sur lHerbe by Pablo Picasso At the Moulin Rouge: Two Women Waltzing by Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec, 1892 The Scream by Edvard Munch, 1893 I and the Village by Marc Chagall, 1911 Fountain by Marcel Duchamp, 1917 Campbells Soup Cans 1962 Synthetic polymer paint on thirty-two... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... The Scream by Edvard Munch (1893) which inspired 20th century Expressionists Portrait of Eduard Kosmack by Egon Schiele Rehe im Walde by Franz Marc Elbe Bridge I by Rolf Nesch On White II by Wassily Kandinsky, 1923. ... Jackson Pollock, No. ... Black square by Kazimir Malevich Abstract art is now generally understood to mean art that does not depict objects in the natural world, but instead uses colour and form in a non-representational way. ... The Neue Künstlervereinigung München, abbreviated NKVM, (German:Munich New Artists Association) formed in 1909 in Munich. ... Cover of Der Blaue Reiter almanac. ... Die Brücke (The Bridge) was a group of German expressionist artists formed in Dresden in 1905. ... Cover of the first edition of the publication, Dada. ... The Dessert: Harmony in Red (1908) by Henri Matisse Les Fauves (French for The Wild Beasts) were a short-lived and loose grouping of early Modern artists whose works emphasized painterly qualities, and the use of deep color over the representational values retained by Impressionism. ... Typography by Herbert Bayer above the entrance to the workshop block of the Bauhaus, Dessau, 2005. ... De Stijl redirects here. ... Asheville City Hall. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Futurism was a 20th century art movement. ... This term is not to be confused with supremacism. ... Yves Tanguy Indefinite Divisibility 1942 Surrealism[1] is a cultural movement that began in the mid-1920s, and is best known for the visual artworks and writings of the group members. ... Color Field painting was an abstract style that emerged in the 1950s after Abstract Expressionism and is largely characterized by abstract canvases painted primarily with large areas of solid color. ... Minimalism describes movements in various forms of art and design, especially visual art and music, where the work is stripped down to its most fundamental features and core self expression. ... Lyrical Abstraction is an important American abstract art movement that emerged in New York City, Los Angeles, Washington DC and then Toronto and London during the 1960s - 1970s. ... Postmodern art (sometimes called po-mo) is a term used to describe art which is thought to be after or in contradiction to some aspect of modernism. ... Joseph Kosuth, One and Three Chairs (1965) Conceptual art is art in which the concept(s) or idea(s) involved in the work take precedence over traditional aesthetic and material concerns. ... Le Corbusiers Villa Savoye, a well known example of modern architecture Modern architecture,not to be confused with contemporary architecture, is a term given to a number of building styles with similar characteristics, primarily the simplification of form and the elimination of ornament, that first arose around 1900. ... Asheville City Hall. ... Future Systems blobitecture design for the 2003 Selfridges department store, is intended to make a statement and rejuvenate Birmingham city centre. ... Unité dHabitation, Marseille (Le Corbusier 1952) Brutalism is an architectural style that spawned from the modernist architectural movement and which flourished from the 1950s to the 1970s. ... Constructivist architecture was a form of modern architecture that flourished in the Soviet Union in the 1920s and early 1930s. ... The Sydney Opera House - designed to evoke the sails of yatchs in Sydney harbour Critical regionalism is an approach to architecture that strives to counter the placelessness and lack of meaning in Modern Architecture by using contextual forces to give a sense of place and meaning. ... De Stijl redirects here. ... Libeskinds Imperial War Museum North in Manchester comprises three apparently intersecting curved volumes. ... Expressionist architecture occurs in architecture when an architect distorts a building or design for an emotional effect. ... Functionalism, in architecture, is the principle that architects should design a building based on the purpose of that building. ... Perspective drawing from La Citta Nuova, 1914, by Antonia SantElia. ... The Space Needle, built for Seattles 1962 Worlds Fair GoogIe (with a capital i) redirects here. ... An architecture style developed in the 1970s, High Tech Architecture got its name from High Tech: The Industrial Style and Source Book for The Home, a book published in 1978 by Joan Kron and Suzanne Slesin. ... The Weissenhof Estate in Stuttgart, Germany (1927) The Weissenhof Estate in Stuttgart, Germany (1930) The International style was a major architectural trend of the 1920s and 1930s. ... Jugendstil is defined as a style of architecture or decorative art similar to Art Nouveau, popular in German-speaking areas of Europe during the late 19th and early 20th centuries [1]. Jugendstil was also popular in the Nordic countries, where it became integrated with the National Romantic Style. ... Modernisme in Catalan, (not to be confused with modernism) is the Catalan variant of Art Nouveau. ... Walter Gropius Bauhaus, Dessau For the literary and artistic aspects of this movement, see New Objectivity. ... Fallingwater by Frank Lloyd Wright Organic architecture is a philosophy of architecture which promotes harmony between human habitation and the natural world through design approaches so sympathetic and well integrated with its site that buildings, furnishings, and surroundings become part of a unified, interrelated composition. ... It has been suggested that Prairie Houses be merged into this article or section. ... 1000 de La Gauchetière, with ornamented and strongly defined top, middle and bottom. ... Bathers building, now a Maritime Museum at San Franciscos Aquatic Park, 1937, evokes a streamlined double–ended ferryboat Judges tower at San Franciscos Aquatic Park The Bauhaus style, also kown as Art Moderne, the International Style or Streamline Moderne succeeded the closely related Art Deco style... Sustainable architecture is building design that takes into account all aspects of the building that will affect and be affected by the environment. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Art Nouveau Jewelry and Art Nouveau Reproductions, Gifts and typical Souvenirs from Brussels, Fashion Accessories at ... (1090 words)
Art Nouveau Jewelry and Art Nouveau Reproductions, Haute Couture Fashion accessories, costume Jewellery in glass beads handmade in Venice, exclusive and stilish Art Nouveau Gifts, Vases in crystal, pewter, blown-glass or porcelain and Home Collections: Brussels "1900", Klimt, Mucha, Horta Style, typical and original Belgian Art Nouveau Souvenirs from Brussels and Belgium.
Exclusive exhibition on the Viennese Art Nouveau movement, Wiener Secession, wich influenced, by its innovative and more geometrical art nouveau style, notorious Belgian artists and architects from the end of the 19th century throughout modernity.
In the heart of the Sablon district, Senses Art Nouveau boutique was created in 1998 in order to offer enthousiasts of this movement, the capital of which is Brussels, a choice of affordable reproductions of Art Nouveau objects and fashion accessories.
Art Nouveau - Art Nouveau Art (931 words)
Art Nouveau was known in France as style Guimard, after French designer Hector Guimard; in Italy as the stile Floreale (floral style); stile Liberty, after British Art Nouveau designer Arthur Lasenby Liberty; in Spain as Modernisme; in Austria as Sezessionstil (Vienna Secession); and in Germany as Jugendstil.
Art Nouveau had its deepest influence on a variety of art and design movements that continued to explore integrated design, including De Stijl, a Dutch design movement in the 1920s, and the German Bauhaus school in the 1920s and 1930s.
French for "The New Art." An art movement and style of decoration and architecture of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, characterized particularly by the curvilinear depiction of leaves and flowers, often in the form of vines...
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