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Encyclopedia > Arsine
Arsine
Arsine
General
Systematic name Arsane
Other names arsenic trihydride
arseniuretted hydrogen
arsenous hydride
hydrogen arsenide
Molecular formula AsH3
Molar mass 77.95 g/mol
Appearance colourless gas
CAS number 7784-42-1
Properties
Density and phase 4.93 g/l, gas
1.640 g/mL (-64 °C)
Solubility in water 0.07 g/100 ml (25 °C)
Solubility in organic solvents soluble
Melting point -117 °C (157 K)
Boiling point -62.5 °C (210 K)
Basicity (pKb)  ?
Structure
Molecular shape trigonal pyramidal
Dipole moment 0.20 D
Thermodynamic data
Standard enthalpy
of formation
ΔfHogas
+66.4 kJ/mol
Standard molar entropy
Sogas
223 kJ.K−1.mol−1
Hazards
MSDS External MSDS
EU classification Very flammable
Highly toxic
Dangerous for
the environment
NFPA 704

Image File history File links Size of this preview: 541 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (1355 × 1502 pixel, file size: 17 KB, MIME type: image/png) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Arsine User:Benjah... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 436 pixel Image in higher resolution (1600 × 872 pixel, file size: 280 KB, MIME type: image/png) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Arsine User:Benjah... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 622 × 599 pixel Image in higher resolution (1100 × 1060 pixel, file size: 235 KB, MIME type: image/png) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Arsine User:Benjah... IUPAC nomenclature is a system of naming chemical compounds and of describing the science of chemistry in general. ... A chemical formula (also called molecular formula) is a concise way of expressing information about the atoms that constitute a particular chemical compound. ... Molar mass is the mass of one mole of a chemical element or chemical compound. ... CAS registry numbers are unique numerical identifiers for chemical compounds, polymers, biological sequences, mixtures and alloys. ... In physics, density is mass m per unit volume V. For the common case of a homogeneous substance, it is expressed as: where, in SI units: ρ (rho) is the density of the substance, measured in kg·m-3 m is the mass of the substance, measured in kg V is... In the physical sciences, a phase is a set of states of a macroscopic physical system that have relatively uniform chemical composition and physical properties (i. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Solution. ... This article describes water from a scientific and technical perspective. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Solution. ... A solvent is a liquid that dissolves a solid, liquid, or gaseous solute, resulting in a solution. ... The melting point of a crystalline solid is the temperature at which it changes state from solid to liquid. ... The boiling point of a substance is the temperature at which it can change its state from a liquid to a gas throughout the bulk of the liquid at a given pressure. ... The acid dissociation constant (Ka), also known as the acidity constant or the acid-ionization constant, is a specific equilibrium constant for the reaction of an acid with its conjugate base in aqueous solution [1]. // When an acid dissolves in water, it partly dissociates forming hydronium ions and its conjugate... four sp³ orbitals three sp² orbitals In chemistry, hybridisation or hybridization (see also spelling differences) is the concept of mixing atomic orbitals to form new hybrid orbitals suitable for the qualitative description of atomic bonding properties. ... The Earths magnetic field, which is approximately a dipole. ... The debye (symbol: D) is a non-SI and non-CGS unit of electrical dipole moment. ... The standard enthalpy of formation or standard heat of formation of a compound is the change of enthalpy that accompanies the formation of 1 mole of a substance in its standard state from its constituent elements in their standard states (the most stable form of the element at 1 atmosphere... In chemistry, the standard molar entropy is the entropy content of one mole of substance, under conditions of standard temperature and pressure. ... An example MSDS in a US format provides guidance for handling a hazardous substance and information on its composition and properties. ... This page provides supplementary chemical data on arsine. ... Council Directive 67/548/EEC of 27 June 1967 on the approximation of laws, regulations and administrative provisions relating to the classification, packaging and labelling of dangerous substances (as amended) is the main source of European Union law concerning chemical safety. ... NFPA 704 is a standard maintained by the U.S. National Fire Protection Association. ... Image File history File links NFPA_704. ...

4
4
2
 
R-phrases R12, R26, R48/20
R50/53
S-phrases (S1/2), S9, S16,
S28, S33, S36/37,
S45, S60, S61
Flash point flammable gas
Autoignition temperature  ? °C
Explosive limits 4.5–78
Supplementary data page
Structure and
properties
n, εr, etc.
Thermodynamic
data
Phase behaviour
Solid, liquid, gas
Spectral data UV, IR, NMR, MS
Related compounds
Related hydrides Ammonia
Phosphine
Stibine
Bismuthine
Except where noted otherwise, data are given for
materials in their standard state (at 25 °C, 100 kPa)
Infobox disclaimer and references

Arsine, the simplest compound of arsenic, is AsH3. It is a flammable, pyrophoric, and highly toxic molecular derivative of arsenic and hydrogen. The compound is of interest for its lethality, its applications in the semiconductor industry, and its use in the synthesis of organoarsenic species. [1] R-phrases are defined in Annex III of European Union Directive 67/548/EEC: Nature of special risks attributed to dangerous substances and preparations. ... S-phrases are defined in Annex IV of European Union Directive 67/548/EEC: Safety advice concerning dangerous substances and preparations. ... The flash point of a flammable liquid is the lowest temperature at which it can form an ignitable mixture with air. ... The autoignition temperature, or the ignition temperature of a substance is the lowest temperature at which a chemical will spontaneously ignite in a normal atmosphere, without an external source of ignition, such as a flame or spark. ... The explosive limit of a gas or a vapour, is the limiting concentration (in air) that is needed for the gas to ignite and explode. ... This page provides supplementary chemical data on arsine. ... This page provides supplementary chemical data on arsine. ... The refractive index (or index of refraction) of a medium is a measure for how much the speed of light (or other waves such as sound waves) is reduced inside the medium. ... The relative dielectric constant of a material under given conditions is a measure of the extent to which it concentrates electrostatic lines of flux. ... This page provides supplementary chemical data on arsine. ... This page provides supplementary chemical data on arsine. ... Ultraviolet-Visible Spectroscopy or Ultraviolet-Visible Spectrophotometry (UV/ VIS) involves the spectroscopy of photons (spectrophotometry). ... Infrared spectroscopy (IR Spectroscopy) is the subset of spectroscopy that deals with the IR region of the EM spectrum. ... It has been suggested that NMR Data Processing be merged into this article or section. ... Mass spectrometry (also known as mass spectroscopy (deprecated)[1] or in common speech mass-spec) is an analytical technique used to measure the mass-to-charge ratio of ions. ... A hydride is a compound of hydrogen with more electropositive elements. ... Ammonia is a compound with the formula NH3. ... Phosphine is the common name for phosphorus hydride (PH3), also known by the IUPAC name phosphane and, occasionally, phosphamine. ... Stibine is a colourless gas formed by the reaction of certain antimony compounds with water or reducing agents. ... Bimuthine is the highly unstable molecule BiH3. ... In chemistry, the standard state of a material is its state at 1 bar (100 kilopascals) and 25 degrees Celsius (298. ... A chemical compound is a chemical substance consisting of two or more different chemically bonded chemical elements, with a fixed ratio determining the composition. ... General Name, Symbol, Number arsenic, As, 33 Chemical series metalloids Group, Period, Block 15, 4, p Appearance metallic gray Atomic mass 74. ... General Name, Symbol, Number hydrogen, H, 1 Chemical series nonmetals Group, Period, Block 1, 1, s Appearance colorless Atomic mass 1. ... A pyrophoric substance is a substance that ignites spontaneously, that is, its autoignition temperature is below room temperature. ... General Name, Symbol, Number arsenic, As, 33 Chemical series metalloids Group, Period, Block 15, 4, p Appearance metallic gray Atomic mass 74. ... General Name, Symbol, Number hydrogen, H, 1 Chemical series nonmetals Group, Period, Block 1, 1, s Appearance colorless Atomic mass 1. ...


At its standard state, arsine appears in the form of a colorless, denser than air gas that is soluble in water (200 ml/l) and in many organic solvents as well. While arsine itself is odorless, owing to its oxidation by air it is possible to smell a slight, garlic-like scent when the compound is present at about 0.5 ppm. This compound is generally regarded as stable, since its decomposition into arsenic and hydrogen at room teperature takes place very slowly, unless a temperature of 230 °C is reached. Several factors, such as humidity, presence of light and certain catalysts (namely aluminium) facilitate the decomposition of arsine. [1] This article describes water from a scientific and technical perspective. ... A solvent is a liquid that dissolves a solid, liquid, or gaseous solute, resulting in a solution. ... Binomial name Allium sativum L. Allium sativum L., commonly known as garlic, is a species in the onion family Alliaceae. ... The parts-per notations are used to denote low concentrations of chemical elements. ... This article or section is not written in the formal tone expected of an encyclopedia article. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Catalysis. ... General Name, Symbol, Number aluminium, Al, 13 Chemical series poor metals Group, Period, Block 13, 3, p Appearance silvery Standard atomic weight 26. ...


AsH3 is a pyramidal molecule with H-As-H angles of 91.8° and three equivalent As-H bonds, each of 1.519 Å length. The term arsine is commonly used to describe a class of organoarsenic compounds of the formula AsH3-xRx, where R = aryl or alkyl. For example, As(C6H5)3, called triphenylarsine, is referred to as an arsine. An angstrom, angström, or Ã¥ngström (symbol Ã…) is a non-SI unit that is internationally recognized. ... In the context of organic molecules, aryl refers to any member of the set of functional groups or substituents that are derived from a simple aromatic ring. ... An alkyl is a univalent radical containing only carbon and hydrogen atoms arranged in a chain. ...

Contents

Discovery

AsH3 was discovered in 1775 by Carl Scheele from the reduction of arsenic(III) oxide with zinc and acid. This reaction is a prelude to the Marsh test, described briefly below. Year 1775 (MDCCLXXV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... Carl Wilhelm Scheele Scheeles house with his pharmacy in Köping. ... R-phrases , , , S-phrases , , , Supplementary data page Structure and properties n, εr, etc. ... The highly sensitive Marsh test is used to detect arsenic in food or stomach contents. ...


Synthesis

AsH3 is generally prepared by the reaction of As3+ sources with H equivalents. [2] [3]

4 AsCl3 + 3 NaBH4 → 4 AsH3 + 3 NaCl + 3 BCl3

Alternatively, sources of As3− react with protonic reagents to also produce this gas:

Zn3As2 + 6 H+ → 2 AsH3 + 3 Zn2+

Reactions

The chemical properties of AsH3 are reasonably well developed and could be anticipated based on an average of the behavior of PH3 and SbH3. Phosphine is the common name for phosphorus hydride (PH3), also known by the IUPAC name phosphane and, occasionally, phosphamine. ... Stibine is a colourless gas formed by the reaction of certain antimony compounds with water or reducing agents. ...


Thermal decomposition

Typical for a heavy hydride (e.g., SbH3, H2Te, SnH4), AsH3 is unstable with respect to its elements. In other words, AsH3 is stable kinetically but not thermodynamically. Stibine is a colourless gas formed by the reaction of certain antimony compounds with water or reducing agents. ...

2 AsH3 → 3 H2 + 2 As

This decomposition reaction is the basis of the Marsh Test described below, which detects the metallic As.


Oxidation

Continuing the analogy to SbH3, AsH3 is readily oxidized by O2 or even air: The most fundamental reactions in chemistry are the redox processes. ...

2 AsH3 + 3 O2 → As2O3 + 3 H2O

Arsine will react violently in presence of strong oxidizing agents, such as potassium permanganate, sodium hypochlorite or nitric acid. [1] Potassium permanganate is the chemical compound KMnO4. ... Sodium hypochlorite is a chemical compound with the formula NaClO. A solution of sodium hypochlorite is frequently used as a disinfectant and as a bleaching agent; indeed, often it is simply called bleach, though other chemicals are sometimes given that name as well. ... The chemical compound nitric acid (HNO3), also known as aqua fortis and spirit of nitre, is an aqueous solution of hydrogen nitrate (anhydrous nitric acid). ...


Precursor to metallic derivatives

AsH3 is used as a precursor to metal complexes of "naked" (or "nearly naked") As. Illustrative is the dimanganese species [(C5H5)Mn(CO)2]2AsH, wherein the Mn2AsH core is planar. [4]


Gutzeit test

A characteristic test for arsenic involves the reaction of AsH3 with Ag+, called the Gutzeit test for arsenic. [5] Although this test has become obsolete in analytical chemistry, the underlying reactions further illustrate the affinity of AsH3 for "soft" metal cations. In the Gutzeit test, AsH3 is generated by reduction of aqueous arsenic compounds, typically arsenites, with Zn in the presence of H2SO4. The evolved gaseous AsH3 is then exposed to AgNO3 either as powder or as a solution. With "solid" AgNO3, AsH3 reacts to produce yellow Ag4AsNO3, whereas AsH3 reacts with a "solution" of AgNO3 to give black Ag3As. Analytical chemistry is the analysis of material samples to gain an understanding of their chemical composition and structure. ... Arsenous acid, ,also known as arsenious acid, is the hydrolyzed form of arsenic trioxide and has the formula As(OH)3. ...


Acid-base reactions

The acidic properties of the As-H bond are often exploited. Thus, AsH3 can be deprotonated:

AsH3 + NaNH2 → NaAsH2 + NH3

Upon reaction with the aluminium trialkyls, AsH3 gives the trimeric [R2AlAsH2]3, where R = (CH3)3C. [6] This reaction is relevant to the mechanism by which GaAs forms from AsH3 (see below).


AsH3 is generally considered non-basic, but it can be protonated by "super acids" to give isolable salts of the tetrahedral species [AsH4]+. [7]


Reaction with halogen compounds

Reactions of arsine with the halogens (fluorine and chlorine) or some of their compounds, such as nitrogen trichloride, are extremely dangerous and can result in explosions. [1] The halogens or halogen elements are a series of nonmetal elements from Group 17 (old-style: VII or VIIA; Group 7 IUPAC Style) of the periodic table, comprising fluorine, F, chlorine, Cl, bromine, Br, iodine, I, and astatine, At. ... General Name, Symbol, Number fluorine, F, 9 Chemical series halogens Group, Period, Block 17, 2, p Appearance Yellowish brown gas Atomic mass 18. ... General Name, Symbol, Number chlorine, Cl, 17 Chemical series halogens Group, Period, Block 17, 3, p Appearance yellowish green Standard atomic weight 35. ... Nitrogen trichloride, also known as trichloramine, is the chemical compound with the formula NCl3. ...


Catenation

In contrast to the behavior of PH3, AsH3 does not form stable chains, although H2As-AsH2 and even H2As-As(H)-AsH2 have been detected. The diarsine is unstable above -100 °C.


Microelectronics applications

AsH3 is used in the synthesis of semiconducting materials related to microelectronics and solid-state lasers. Related to P, As is an n-dopant for silicon and germanium. [1] More importantly, AsH3 is used to make the semiconductor GaAs by CVD at 700-900 °C: General Name, Symbol, Number phosphorus, P, 15 Chemical series nonmetals Group, Period, Block 15, 3, p Appearance waxy white/ red/ black/ colorless Standard atomic weight 30. ... In semiconductor production, doping refers to the process of intentionally introducing impurities into an intrinsic semiconductor in order to change its electrical properties. ... A semiconductor is a solid whose electrical conductivity can be controlled over a wide range, either permanently or dynamically. ... Gallium arsenide (GaAs) is a chemical compound composed of gallium and arsenic. ... DC plasma (violet) enhances the growth of carbon nanotubes in this laboratory-scale PECVD apparatus. ...

Ga(CH3)3 + AsH3 → GaAs + 3 CH4

Chemical warfare applications

Since before WWII AsH3 was proposed as a possible chemical warfare weapon. The gas is colorless, almost odourless, and 2.5 times more dense than air, as required for a blanketing effect sought in chemical warfare. It is also lethal in concentrations far lower than those required to smell its garlic-like scent. In spite of these characteristics, arsine was never officially used as a weapon, because of its high flammability and its lower efficacy when compared to the non-flammable alternative phosgene. On the other hand, several organic compounds based on arsine, such as lewisite (β-chlorovinyldichloroarsine), adamsite (diphenylaminearsine), Clark I (diphenylchlorarsine) and Clark II, (diphenylcyanoarsine) have been effectively developed for use in chemical warfare. [8] Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... Chemical warfare is warfare (and associated military operations) using the toxic properties of chemical substances to kill, injure or incapacitate an enemy. ... Binomial name Allium sativum L. Allium sativum L., commonly known as garlic, is a species in the onion family Alliaceae. ... Phosgene (also known as carbonyl chloride, COCl2) is a highly toxic gas or refrigerated liquid that was used as a chemical weapon in World War I. It has no color, but is detectable in air by its odor, which resembles moldy hay. ... Benzene is the simplest of the arenes, a family of organic compounds An organic compound is any member of a large class of chemical compounds whose molecules contain carbon and hydrogen; therefore, carbides, carbonates, carbon oxides and elementary carbon are not organic (see below for more on the definition controversy... Chemical structure of Lewisite Lewisite is a chemical compound from a chemical family called arsines. ... Adamsite is an organic compound; technically, an arsenical diphenylaminechlorarsine. ...


Forensic science and the Marsh test

AsH3 is also well known in forensic science because it is a chemical intermediate in the detection of arsenic poisoning. The old (but extremely sensitive) Marsh test generates AsH3 in the presence of arsenic. [3] This procedure, developed around 1836 by James Marsh, is based upon treating a As-containing sample of a victim's body (typically the stomach) with As-free zinc and dilute sulphuric acid: if the sample contains arsenic, gaseous arsine will form. The gas is swept into a glass tube and decomposed by means of heating around 250-300 °C. The presence of As is indicated by formation of a deposit in the heated part of the equipment. The formation of a black mirror deposit in the cool part of the equipment indicates the presence of Sb. Crime Scene, done by the United States Army Criminal Investigation Command Forensic science (often shortened to forensics) is the application of a broad spectrum of sciences to answer questions of interest to the legal system. ... The highly sensitive Marsh test is used to detect arsenic in food or stomach contents. ... Year 1836 (MDCCCXXXVI) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... James Marsh (September 2, 1794- June 21, 1846) was a chemist who invented the Marsh test for detecting arsenic. ... General Name, Symbol, Number zinc, Zn, 30 Chemical series transition metals Group, Period, Block 12, 4, d Appearance bluish pale gray Atomic mass 65. ... Sulfuric acid (British English: sulphuric acid), H2SO4, is a strong mineral acid. ...


The Marsh test was widely used by the end of the 19th century and the start of the 20th; nowadays more sophisticated techniques such as neutron activation analysis are employed in the forensic field. Neutron activation is the process by which neutron radiation induces radioactivity in materials. ...


Toxicology

For the toxicology of other arsenic compounds, see Arsenic, Arsenic trioxide and Arsenicosis. [7]

The toxicity of arsine is distinct from that of other arsenic compounds. The main route of exposure is by inhalation, although poisoning after skin contact has also been described. Arsine binds to the haemoglobin of red blood cells, causing them to be destroyed by the body. General Name, Symbol, Number arsenic, As, 33 Chemical series metalloids Group, Period, Block 15, 4, p Appearance metallic gray Atomic mass 74. ... R-phrases , , , S-phrases , , , Supplementary data page Structure and properties n, εr, etc. ... Arsenicosis is a chronic illness resulting from drinking water with high levels of arsenic over a long period of time. ... 3-dimensional structure of hemoglobin Hemoglobin or haemoglobin is the iron-containing oxygen-transport metalloprotein in the red cells of the blood in mammals and other animals. ... Human red blood cells Red blood cells are the most common type of blood cell and the vertebrate bodys principal means of delivering oxygen from the lungs or gills to body tissues via the blood. ...


The first signs of exposure, which can take several hours to become apparent, are headaches, vertigo and nausea, followed by the symptoms of haemolytic anaemia (high levels of unconjugated bilirubin), haemoglobinuria and nephropathy. In severe cases, the damage to the kidneys can be long-lasting. A headache is a condition of pain in the head; sometimes neck or upper back pain may also be interpreted as a headache. ... Vertigo, sometimes called a headrush, is a major symptom of a balance disorder. ... For the Beck song, see Nausea (song). ... Hemolysis (alternative spelling haemolysis) is the excessive breakdown of red blood cells. ... Bilirubin is a yellow breakdown product of heme catabolism. ... In medicine, haemoglobinuria is a condition in which the oxygen transport protein haemoglobin is found in abnormally high concentrations in the urine. ... Nephropathy refers to damage to or disease of the kidney. ... It has been suggested that Renal anomalies and Renal plasma threshold be merged into this article or section. ...


Exposure to arsine concentrations of 250 ppm is rapidly fatal: concentrations of 25–30 ppm are fatal for 30 min exposure, and concentrations of 10 ppm can be fatal at longer exposure times. Symptoms of poisoning appear after exposure to concentrations of 0.5 ppm. There is little information on the chronic toxicity of arsine, although it is reasonable to assume that, in common with other arsenic compounds, a long-term exposure could lead to arsenicosis. Arsenicosis is a chronic illness resulting from drinking water with high levels of arsenic over a long period of time. ...


See also

General Name, Symbol, Number arsenic, As, 33 Chemical series metalloids Group, Period, Block 15, 4, p Appearance metallic gray Atomic mass 74. ... Cacodylic acid (also called dimethylarsinic acid) has the chemical formula (CH3)2AsO2H. Derivates of cacodylic acid, cacodylates, were frequently used as herbicides. ... Cacodyl oxide, is a chemical compound of the chemical formula C4H12As2O or (CH3)2As-O-As(CH3)2. ...

Bibliography

  1. ^ a b c d e Institut National de Recherche et de Sécurité (2000). "Fiche toxicologique nº 53: Trihydrure d'arsenic" (PDF). Retrieved on 2006-09-06.
  2. ^ Bellama, J. M.; MacDiarmid, A. G. "Synthesis of the Hydrides of Germanium, Phosphorus, Arsenic, and Antimony by the Solid-Phase Reaction of the Corresponding Oxide with Lithium Aluminum Hydride" Inorganic Chemistry, 1968, vol. 7, page 2070-2
  3. ^ a b Holleman, A. F.; Wiberg, E. "Inorganic Chemistry" Academic Press: San Diego, 2001
  4. ^ Herrmann, W. A.; Koumbouris, B.; Schaefer, A.; Zahn, T.; Ziegler, M. L. "Generation and Complex Stabilization of Arsinidene and Diarsine Fragments by Metal-Induced Degradation of Monoarsine" Chemische Berichte (1985), vol. 118, pages 2472-88
  5. ^ King, E. J. "Qualitative Analysis and Electrolytic Solutions" Harcourt, Brace, and World; New York (1959)
  6. ^ Atwood, D. A.; Cowley, A. H.; Harris, P. R.; Jones, R. A.; Koschmieder, S. U.; Nunn, C. M.; Atwood, J. L.; Bott, S. G. "Cyclic Trimeric Hydroxy, Amido, Phosphido, and Arsenido Derivatives of aluminum and gallium. X-ray Structures of [tert-Bu2Ga(m-OH)]3 and [tert-Bu2Ga(m-NH2)]3" Organometallics (1993), vol. 12, pages 24-29
  7. ^ a b R. Minkwitz, R.; Kornath, A.; Sawodny, W.; Härtner, H. "Über die Darstellung der Pnikogenoniumsalze AsH4+SbF6-, AsH4+AsF6-, SbH4+SbF6-" Zeitschrift für anorganische und allgemeine Chemie Vol. 620, pages 753 - 756.
  8. ^ Suchard, Jeffrey R. (March 2006). "CBRNE - Arsenicals, Arsine" (HTML). eMedicine. Retrieved on 2006-09-05. 
  • Hatlelid K. M. (1996). "Reactions of Arsine with Hemoglobine". Journal of Toxicology and Environmental Health Part A 47 (2): 145 - 157. DOI:10.1080/009841096161852. 
  • Nielsen H. H. (1952). "The Molecular Structure of Arsine". The Journal of Chemical Physics 20 (12): 1955-1956. DOI:10.1063/1.1700347. 
  • Fowler B. A., Weissberg J. B. (1974). "Arsine poisoning". New England Journal of Medicine 300: 1171–1174. 

PDF is an abbreviation with several meanings: Portable Document Format Post-doctoral fellowship Probability density function There also is an electronic design automation company named PDF Solutions. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 6 is the 249th day of the year (250th in leap years). ... HTML, short for HyperText Markup Language, is the predominant markup language for the creation of web pages. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 5 is the 248th day of the year (249th in leap years). ... A digital object identifier (or DOI) is a standard for persistently identifying a piece of intellectual property on a digital network and associating it with related data, the metadata, in a structured extensible way. ... A digital object identifier (or DOI) is a standard for persistently identifying a piece of intellectual property on a digital network and associating it with related data, the metadata, in a structured extensible way. ...

External links

  • International Chemical Safety Card 0222
  • IARC Monograph "Arsenic and Arsenic Compunds"
  • NIOSH Pocket Guide to Chemical Hazards
  • Institut national de recherche et de sécurité (2000). "Trihydrure d'arsenic." Fiche toxicologique n° 53. Paris:INRS. (PDF file, in French)
  • Data on arsine from Air Liquide
  • Links to external chemical sources

  Results from FactBites:
 
Arsine (CASRN 7784-42-1) | IRIS | US EPA (5208 words)
Although the reactive form of arsine and the specific sequence of events that precede hemolysis are not fully known, the general mechanism of RBC damage caused by arsine is understood.
The greater susceptibility of rats to the hematologic effects of arsine may be due to the fact that mice may have a greater capability for erythrocyte regeneration because of a superior capacity for splenic extramedullary hematopoiesis (Blair et al., 1990a).
Arsine: Absence of developmental toxicity in rats and mice.
Arsine - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1031 words)
Arsine, the simplest compound of arsenic, is AsH
In spite of these characteristics, arsine was never officially used as a weapon, because of its high flammability and its lower efficacy when compared to phosgene.
Arsine binds to the haemaglobin of red blood cells, causing them to be destroyed by the body.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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