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Encyclopedia > Arrigo Boito

Arrigo Boito (February 24, 1842June 10, 1918) was an Italian poet, journalist, novelist and composer, best known today for his opera libretti and his own opera, Mefistofele. is the 55th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1842 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... is the 161st day of the year (162nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1918 (MCMXVIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar. ... The poor poet A poet is a person who writes poetry. ... For other uses, see Journalist (disambiguation). ... A novel is an extended work of written, narrative, prose fiction, usually in story form; the writer of a novel is a novelist. ... A composer is a person who writes music. ... This article is about Opera, the art form. ... Antonio Ghislanzoni, nineteenth century Italian librettist. ... Mefistofele is the only completed opera by the Italian composer Arrigo Boito. ...


Biography

Arrigo Boito.

Born in Padua, Boito studied music at the Milan Conservatoire. The premiere of his only finished opera, Mefistofele, based on Goethe's Faust, came on March 3, 1868, at La Scala, Milan. The premiere was badly received, provoking riots and duels over its supposed "Wagnerism", and it was closed by the police after two performances. Verdi commented, "He aspires to orginality but succeeds only at being strange." Boito withdrew the opera from further performances to rework it, and it had a more successful second premiere, in Bologna, April 10, 1875. Boito's revised and drastically cut version also changed Faust from a baritone to a tenor, and is still frequently performed and recorded today. Other than this work, Boito wrote very little music, completing but later destroying another opera, Ero e Leandro, and leaving incomplete a further opera, Nerone, which he had been working at, on and off, since 1877. Excluding the last act, for which he left only a few sketches, it was finished after his death by Arturo Toscanini and Vincenzo Tommasini and premiered at Il Teatro alla Scala, 1924. Mefistofele is the only work of his performed with any regularity today. The Prologue to the opera, set in Heaven, is a favorite concert piece. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 416 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (444 × 640 pixel, file size: 89 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg)Portrait of composer/librettist Arrigo Boito (February 24, 1842 – June 10, 1918) This image is in the public domain in the United States. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 416 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (444 × 640 pixel, file size: 89 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg)Portrait of composer/librettist Arrigo Boito (February 24, 1842 – June 10, 1918) This image is in the public domain in the United States. ... Padua, Italy, (Italian: IPA: , Latin: Patavium, Venetian: ) is a city in the Veneto, northern Italy, the economic and communications hub of the region. ... For other uses, see Music (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Milan (disambiguation). ... Mefistofele is the only completed opera by the Italian composer Arrigo Boito. ... “Goethe” redirects here. ... For other uses, see Faust (disambiguation). ... The Teatro alla Scala in Milan, by night. ... For other uses, see Milan (disambiguation). ... Arturo Toscanini (March 25, 1867 – January 16, 1957) was an Italian musician. ... Vincenzo Tommasini (17 September 1878–23 December 1950) was an Italian composer. ... The Teatro alla Scala in Milan, by night. ...


Boito's literary powers never dried up. As well as writing the libretti for his own operas, Boito wrote them for other composers. As "Tobia Gorrio" (an anagram of his name) he provided the libretto for Amilcare Ponchielli's La Gioconda. His rapprochement with Verdi, whom he had offended in a toast shortly after they had collaborated on Verdi's Inno delle Nazioni ("Hymn of the Nations", London, 1862), was effected by the music publisher Giulio Ricordi. Boito successfully revised the libretto for Verdi's unwieldy Simon Boccanegra, which premiered to great acclaim in 1881. With that, their mutual friendship and respect blossomed and, though Verdi's projection for an opera based on King Lear never came to anything, Boito provided subtle and resonant libretti for Verdi's last masterpieces, Otello (1887) and Falstaff (1893). When Verdi died, Boito was there at his bedside. For the game, see Anagrams. ... Amilcare Ponchielli (August 31, 1834 – January 17, 1886) was an Italian composer, largely of operas. ... La Gioconda can refer to: A famous painting by Leonardo da Vinci, better known as Mona Lisa; An opera by Amilcare Ponchielli. ... “Verdi” redirects here. ... Giulio Ricordi (Milan 1840-1912) was an Italian Editor, musician and composer. ... Simon Boccanegra is an opera with a prologue and three acts by Giuseppe Verdi to an Italian libretto by Francesco Maria Piave, based on the play Simón Bocanegra by Antonio García Gutiérrez. ... Year 1881 (MDCCCLXXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... King Lear and the Fool in the Storm by William Dyce (1806-1864) King Lear is a play by William Shakespeare, considered one of his greatest tragedies, based on the legend of King Lear of Britain. ... For the Rossini opera, see Otello (Rossini) or for the eurobeat artist see Gianni Coraini. ... For other uses, see Falstaff (disambiguation). ...


Boito was director of the Parma Conservatoire from 1889 to 1897. He died in Milan and was interred there in the Cimitero Monumentale. Parma is a city in the Italian region of Emilia-Romagna, famous for its architecture and the fine countryside around it. ... For other uses, see Milan (disambiguation). ... The Cimitero Monumentale in Milan, Italy is a very large cemetery located on the square given its name, Piazzale del Cimitero Monumentale. ...


A memorial concert was given in his honor at La Scala, in 1948. The orchestra was conducted by Arturo Toscanini. Recorded in very primitive sound, the concert has been issued on CD. The Teatro alla Scala in Milan, by night. ... Year 1948 (MCMXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display the 1948 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Arturo Toscanini (March 25, 1867 – January 16, 1957) was an Italian musician. ... CD may stand for: Compact Disc Canadian Forces Decoration Cash Dispenser (at least used in Japan) CD LPMud Driver Centrum-Demokraterne (Centre Democrats of Denmark) Certificate of Deposit České Dráhy (Czech Railways) Chad (NATO country code) Chalmers Datorförening (computer club of the Chalmers University of Technology) a 1960s...


References

  • Arrigo Boito at the Stanford University: OperaGlass Composer index
  • Mefistofele Creative Commons MP3 Recording
  • Costantino Maeder, Il real fu dolore e l'ideal sogno. Arrigo Boito e i limiti dell'arte, Cesati: Firenze, 2002.

  Results from FactBites:
 
Boito, Arrigo - Musical Biographies (1157 words)
Boito's text was based on both parts of Goethe's "Faust." Gounod, inspired by the same subject, had taken but one episode of the vast poem and made a five-act opera of it.
Boito achieves one of the most moving passages in the opera a passage to which Verdi might have been proud to sign his name by a melody of almost childlike simplicity.
Boito is too critical to risk the- production of a work inadequate to his ideals, a work which, moreover, would stand or fall by the last operas of Verdi.
Arrigo Boito - definition of Arrigo Boito in Encyclopedia (272 words)
Arrigo Boito (February 24, 1842 – June 10, 1918) was an Italian poet, novelist and composer, best known today for his opera libretti and his own opera, Mefistofele.
But Boito's revised and drastically cut version (which also changed Faust from a baritone to a tenor) was a great success, and it is still frequently performed and recorded today.
As well as writing the libretti for his own operas, Boito wrote them for other composers, the most notable examples being for Giuseppe Verdi's Falstaff and Otello, and (as "Tobia Gorrio") for Amilcare Ponchielli's La Gioconda.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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