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Encyclopedia > Aromatic stacking interaction

Aromatic stacking interaction, sometimes called phenyl stacking, is a phenomenon in organic chemistry that affects aromatic compounds and functional groups. Because of especially strong Van der Waals bonding between the surfaces of flat aromatic rings, these groups in different molecules tend to arrange themselves like a stack of coins. This bonding behavior affects the properties of polymers as diverse as aramids, polystyrene, DNA, RNA, proteins, and peptides. The effect can be exploited in gas sensors to detect the presence of aromatic chemicals. Organic chemistry is the scientific study of the structure, properties, composition, reactions, and synthesis of organic compounds. ... In chemistry, an aromatic molecule is one in which electrons are free to cycle around circular arrangements of atoms, which are alternately singly and doubly bonded to one another. ... In ecology functional groups are collections of organisms based on morphological, physiological, behavioral, biochemical, or environmental responses or on trophic criteria. ... Van der Waals bonding, also known as London force, instantaneous dipole effect, and induced dipole interaction, is an intermolecular force or interatomic force that causes an attraction between between temporarily induced dipoles in nonpolar molecules and [atom]]s. ... A polymer is a generic term used to describe a substantially long molecule. ... Aramid fiber (1961) is a synthetic fiber, a fire-resistant polyamide, is a favorite for aerospace and military; bullet-proof protective armor fabric, as well as an asbestos substitute. ... Styrofoam redirects here. ... Space-filling model of a section of DNA molecule Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) or deoxyribose nucleic acid is a nucleic acid that contains the genetic instructions specifying the biological development of all cellular forms of life (and many viruses). ... Ribonucleic acid (RNA) is a nucleic acid consisting of a string of covalently-bound nucleotides. ... A representation of the 3D structure of myoglobin, showing coloured alpha helices. ... Peptides (from the Greek πεπτος, digestable), are the family of molecules formed from the linking, in a defined order, of various amino acids. ...


T-Stacking

A related effect called T-stacking is often seen in proteins where the partially positively charged hydrogen atom of one aromatic system points perpendicular to the center of the aromatic plane of the other aromatic system. Charge is a word with many different meanings. ... General Name, Symbol, Number hydrogen, H, 1 Chemical series nonmetals Group, Period, Block 1, 1, s Appearance colorless Atomic mass 1. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Van der Waals bonding - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (520 words)
Van der Waals bonding, also known as London force, instantaneous dipole effect, and induced dipole interaction, is an intermolecular force or interatomic force that causes an attraction between temporarily induced dipoles in nonpolar molecules and atoms because of assymetrical distribution of electrons due to their movement.
Van der Waals bonding is the sole process by which noble gases are attracted to each other, and the dominant form of interaction between electrically neutral species with all of their bonds saturated.
By contrast, benzene and related aromatic compounds form relatively strong van der Waals bonds between the flat surfaces of their rings (aromatic stacking interaction).
Stacking (chemistry) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (464 words)
Stacking in supramolecular chemistry refers to a stacked arrangement of aromatic molecules, which interact through aromatic interactions.
In supramolecular chemistry, an aromatic interaction (or π-π interaction) is a noncovalent interaction between organic compounds containing aromatic moieties.
Aromatic stacking interaction, sometimes called phenyl stacking, is a phenomenon in organic chemistry that affects aromatic compounds and functional groups.
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